Summary of “I spent 2 years cleaning houses. What I saw makes me never want to be rich.”

I worked for a company cleaning houses for two years.
I found the houses on little winding roads, the hidden keys tucked under gnomes or rugs.
I had 20 clients and two or three houses a day to get to, anyway.
If I cleaned houses quicker than the girl who’d replace me, clients would want to continue paying the lower rate.
The owner spent a lot of time in the hospital, and so his house stayed clean, except for dust that settled on the kitchen counters and the dining room table.
I saw the lady from the Porn House after cleaning one time, at the store.
I got used to the loneliness these houses held.
I vowed never to have a house bigger than I could clean myself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Tidying Up With Marie Kondo’ Is a Quiet Delight”

Kondo achieved worldwide fame in 2014 when her first book, The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, was translated into English and published in the United States, where it became a New York Times best seller and sold more than 1.5 million copies.
With the 2016 publication of her follow-up, Spark Joy: An Illustrated Master Class on the Art of Organizing and Tidying Up, Kondo’s books have now sold more than 11 million copies in 40 countries.
Many of the families who welcome Kondo into their home on Tidying Up announce when they meet her that they can’t wait for her to work wonders on their clutter.
Chatting with her interpreter, Marie Iida, on the walk from the car to the front door of her clients’ home at the beginning of each episode, Kondo finds something genuinely nice to say about every house before entering.
Kondo notices what each family cares about right away.
When visiting a grieving widow in Episode 4, Kondo makes a beeline for an antique carousel horse, noting that the house seems to be full of fun.
Seeing Kondo’s joy at hopping on the horse, Margie visibly relaxes.
Barely saying a word, Kondo communicates to her client that it’s okay to keep enjoying things while making way for a new future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I spent 2 years cleaning houses. What I saw makes me never want to be rich.”

I worked for a company cleaning houses for two years.
I found the houses on little winding roads, the hidden keys tucked under gnomes or rugs.
I had 20 clients and two or three houses a day to get to, anyway.
If I cleaned houses quicker than the girl who’d replace me, clients would want to continue paying the lower rate.
The owner spent a lot of time in the hospital, and so his house stayed clean, except for dust that settled on the kitchen counters and the dining room table.
I saw the lady from the Porn House after cleaning one time, at the store.
I got used to the loneliness these houses held.
I vowed never to have a house bigger than I could clean myself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to freelance: 5 steps to profit”

Finding clients can be a mystery of fantastic proportions for beginner freelancers.
The last place I suggest beginners look: Where potential clients live.
I’m referring to the places online and in real life where your potential clients might frequent.
A woman I’d been helping for free – answering her questions about how to set up a basic advertising campaign – asked me how she could work with me, and when I told her the price – $5,000 for six months – she said, without missing a beat, “I’m in.”
No matter what you choose, you need to make sure you stay engaging and provide high-quality answers to your potential client.
You’re going to want to build rapport by introducing yourself and how you know about the client.
You’ll get a good sense of where to start when you’re charging your clients.
How to get inside your potential clients’ heads.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The bad behavior of the richest: what I learned from wealth managers”

If nearly a decade interviewing the wealth managers for the 1% taught me anything, it is that the ultra-rich and the ultra-poor have a lot more in common than stereotypes might lead you to believe.
In conversation, wealth managers kept coming back to the flamboyant vices of their clients.
One of the London-based wealth managers I interviewed said that a willingness to accept with equanimity behavior that would be considered outrageous in others was an informal job requirement.
Clients, he said, specifically chose wealth managers not just on technical competence, but on their ability to remain unscandalized by the private lives of the ultra-rich: “They have to pick someone they want to know everything about them: about Mother’s lesbian affairs, Brother’s drug addiction, the spurned lovers bursting into the room.” Many of these clients are not employed and live off family largesse, but no one calls them lazy.
Discussion of poverty has become almost impossible without moral outrage directed at lazy “Welfare queens”, “Crackheads” and other drug addicts, and the “Promiscuous poor”.
The wealthy people I studied not only had wealth managers but often dedicated staff members who killed negative stories about them in the media and kept their names off the Forbes “Rich list”.
The poor can end up being “Resident nowhere” because no one will allow them to stay in one place for very long; as the sociologist Cristobal Young has shown, the majority of migrants are poor people.
So while the behavior of the ultra-rich gets an ever-widening scope of social leeway, the lives of the poor are foreshortened in every sense.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Did Attorney David Boies Enable Harvey Weinstein?”

“For Harvey, David would always get on the phone.” When I asked him to describe the role Boies played in the constellation of lawyers Weinstein employed, he asked me to put down my pen, paused dramatically, and said: “Consigliere.”
News articles soon appeared in tabloids in which anonymous sources “Close to Weinstein” portrayed Battilana as a blackmailer with “a history of pursuing older men.” The decision about whether to charge Weinstein fell to Manhattan district attorney Cyrus Vance Jr., for whom Boies had been a campaign fund-raiser.
Unbeknownst to them, they claimed, at the same time Boies was representing Weinstein in his fight with the board, he was negotiating a personal business deal with the Weinstein Company.
While Boies and Charlie Prince, a Weinstein Company attorney, repeatedly tried to contact Ajamie regarding what Boies later described as his “False and defamatory statements,” Ajamie met with a well-known advocate for sexual-harassment victims, the L.A. attorney Lisa Bloom.
The New Yorker reprinted a copy of a second contract between Boies Schiller and Black Cube, signed in July 2017, that described the operation in minute detail, referencing the pseudonymous agent “Anna” and a second agent posing as an investigative journalist who was to “Promptly report” back the results of his interviews, and offering a $300,000 bonus for foiling the publication of a “Negative article.” The document was signed by David Boies.
Sources familiar with the correspondence say Boies and other Boies Schiller attorneys were frequently cc’d on emails and otherwise had involvement in coordinating the operation with Black Cube and Weinstein.
“We have always maintained that any work that Boies Schiller did for Harvey Weinstein in connection with Black Cube was completely legal and, under the circumstances, very reasonable,” Weinstein’s defense attorney Benjamin Brafman told me recently.
He pointedly referred to Boies as “a critical witness for Harvey Weinstein in connection with an ongoing federal investigation.” If Weinstein were to be charged, Brafman would be likely to argue that, in hiring Black Cube, his client was relying on the legal counsel of the best attorney in America, whose name is right there on the contract.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Silicon Valley stylist on why tech moguls dress like college kids”

Thousands of aspiring tech entrepreneurs mimic this look, often worn by tech icons like Mark Zuckerberg, Jack Dorsey, and Evan Spiegel, in the hopes that they will eventually earn similar cachet.
These days, she dresses employees at Facebook, Uber, Google, and Apple, as well as venture capitalists and investment bankers; she also dresses newly minted tech guys looking to “Go from boys to men,” as she describes it.
No matter the geography the battle is usually similar: convincing clients to abandon geeky Casio watches, ratty Converse sneakers, and juvenile tees from college in exchange for clean menswear from brands like John Varvatos, James Perse, Zegna, Brunello Cucinelli, AllSaints, and Y3. Many of her clients have zero fashion sensibility, she says, and need plenty of hand-holding during personal shopping sessions, while others turn to her to enhance their closets as they prepare for career upgrades.
In the past, I’ve worked with Hollywood creatives, research scientists, bankers, and lawyers, but over the last few years, the number of clients who are working in Silicon Valley has exploded.
Chavie Lieber Do you abide by the minimalist aesthetic that Silicon Valley is mocked for?
Chavie Lieber So what is it about Silicon Valley and tech culture that promotes this type of appearance?
Chavie Lieber Are you ever wary about creating tech drones who all look and dress the same?
Chavie Lieber What are some trends you’re seeing floating around Silicon Valley now?

The orginal article.

Summary of “This One Simple Thing Is Absolutely Necessary To Be An Expert”

If your process is unique enough, you can build your brand around it and it can become part of your brand’s offerings-you can actually leverage it as a distinct selling point.
In its purest form, process is “The way you work.” Most people have some kind of process, whether they mean to or not, and if you’ve been in business for any length of time, you’ve probably formed some habits that you repeatfor better or worse.
Branding and selling your known-and-proven process has tons of benefits and is one of the necessary parts of being seen as an expert: It instills trust in clients that they will get the promised results, it makes it easier to sell your services as both you and the client know exactly what to expect, it gives you the ability to confidently, simply, and succinctly explain your services to prospects, and once your clients sign on the dotted line, your job becomes much easier because you have clear steps to follow that you are confident you can execute because you have the experience.
Our Brandup process is not a gimmick or even about speed, it’s an expression of our no-nonsense approach to creating brands and trimming all the fat and waste so that all you are left with is what you actually needed in the first place: a BA brand that is effective in getting you noticed, remembered and shared.
Laura kept getting stuck on trying to articulate and define her brand; but, despite not knowing what her brand was she did have a process.
In her case, getting aspiring writers all the way from start all the way to the finish line in a manageable time frame! She can now use her process as a foundation for her brand and message.
Your proven process can be that special, stand out thing.
If those aren’t enough of a reason to develop your branded process, consider this: once you have a proven, branded process, you you can eventually parlay that process into a more scalable model by selling the process itself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Latest Private Jet Amenity Is a Theme Party for Your Children”

Like everything else staged in the back eight seats of the Global 5000 Bombardier business jet-including games of dominoes and croquet-it’s part of an extravagant tea party produced at a turbulence-free 45,000 feet.
For a starting price of $4,000-not including the minimum $12,000 hourly cost of chartering the jet-travelers on the company’s 70 silver-and-red planes can retain Sharky & George, an exclusive London-based children’s party creator with an almost cultlike following, to devise enough antics to keep their kids happily busy from New York to Dubai.
It’s worth the effort to keep parents and children happy, he says, and to attract new flying families.
For most parents who frequent private jets, it isn’t ­lavishness that makes it worthwhile but practical concerns-legroom, flexible scheduling, reliable Wi-Fi, and not having to worry about your kids’ behavior in front of 150 strangers.
Most private jet companies need to go all-out to meet client expectations every now and then.
For parents who want something more special than a coloring book and less expensive than a full-blown party, the company will create activity hampers and ­backpacks-stuffed with treasure maps and stop-motion Lego movie­making kits-to get kids excited.
Private jet “Members” have an average net worth from $670 million to $1.1 billion.
After her VistaJet tea party on a three-hour flight from New Jersey’s Teterboro Airport, Oona was so enchanted, she wondered aloud to me if she’d dreamed it all up.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Email Hackers Are Winning”

The exploit, called Efail by the researchers who released it, showed that encrypted email is not only hard to do, but might be impossible in any practical way, because of what email is at its core.
What we think of as email got its start in the 1970s, with recognizable email addresses, mailboxes, folders, and sending and receiving as we know it now.
Most of what’s changed in the last 45 years is email clients-the software we use to access email.
By the 1990s, when email had opened up beyond universities and defense, and normal people could begin to get email addresses, cryptography was classified by the government as a munition: a material of war that couldn’t be freely used or shared across national borders.
MIME let you specify something you wanted email to do, and if people wrote support for it into the code of email clients, then it became something email could do.
So what if you happened to open an email, which decrypts whatever message it may have inside, even a hidden one, while the same email also tells your email client to fetch an image off the web whose name is now the entire contents of a message it just decrypted? It would just do it, invisibly, sending the now easily readable message anywhere on the net without you ever knowing it happened.
“Email is really dangerous,” says Green, “People don’t care about JavaScript in your browser or remote image access or even fancy encrypted email stuff because mostly the bad guys are phishing the CEO with straight HTML email from PayPal.EvilCompany.com and he goes for it.”
What you’re telling your MIME-enabled email client to do is run this thing in the form that the creator of the email designated.

The orginal article.