Summary of “Revenge of the clothes moths: as numbers boom, can they be stopped?”

In houses up and down the country, there is a war being waged against clothes moths.
Unlike the many moths that are in decline, these moths – the webbing clothes moth and the case-bearing clothes moth – are believed to be increasing in numbers.
Moth traps used by English Heritage at its properties and storage sites found a 216% increase in the number of webbing clothes moths caught between 2012 and 2016.
“Wool insulation is great environmentally, but if you stick wool up in your attic you’re going to get moths in it. Even worse, I know one house where they blew wool in cavity walls. They can’t get it out and they’ve got moths – they’re going to have to live with moths the whole time they live in that house.”
Moths will happily breed in warm, centrally heated homes throughout the year, says Pinniger, “But there is a peak of adult emergence usually in April and May, and often another one in late August/early September when you get another generation through. Some of the museums I work with, there are moths all year round because the temperatures are constant, and we’re getting at least three generations a year. Each female can lay 100 eggs. That’s a pretty big potential increase.”
Clothes moths can’t fly very far, so it is unlikely that they come into homes through open windows, although this is possible in urban areas.
“In some cases where we need to go beyond that, we use a commercial product called Constrain, which has a residual effect for a number of months. We use that to treat nooks and crannies where moths might like to hide away.” The National Trust has done a trial using tiny parasitic wasps, which seek out moths’ eggs and lay their own inside, hatching new wasps.
“They’re busy living on your clothes, slowly breaking it down. So, even when you don’t have moths, the idea that your clothes last for ever is an illusion. You’ve also got your skin bacteria that wait for you to put clothing on and then they metabolise your sweat. With that motley crew, the clothes moth is the most charismatic of the bunch.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How It Feels to Be the Biggest Woman at a Clothing Swap”

Instead, I throw the clothes in my car and take off, headed for my first ever clothing swap – where women get together to trade things they no longer want.
As I schlep my bags of clothes up to Sarah’s pre-war walk-up, I start to worry that, as a size 12, I’ll be the biggest woman there and nobody will want my offerings.
The whole purpose of those clothes was to show myself off, to push me to socialize more, but in reality, they kept me in my studio apartment, away from the world, afraid to live.
One short woman with a black long bob actually takes off her blouse and begins to try on the clothes right in front of us, her white cotton bra bright like neon lights.
I am no prude, but how can she take off her clothes in front of all of these people like she’s in a Loehman’s dressing room? What is that like, to be confident enough in your body to strip down in front of strangers like it’s no big deal?
I want the ladies to love my clothes as much as I once did, to realize how important these items were to me in my life – my nostalgia, my years of trying to change myself, and this final moment of release as I let all of that pressure go.
It’s a bittersweet feeling to let them go, knowing that I bought these clothes hoping for a different type of life.
All of my old insecurity isn’t going to disappear overnight, but passing along my clothes, my past, and my younger self feels noble, graceful, and it leaves room in my life for me, the real me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How It Feels to Be the Biggest Woman at a Clothing Swap”

Instead, I throw the clothes in my car and take off, headed for my first ever clothing swap – where women get together to trade things they no longer want.
As I schlep my bags of clothes up to Sarah’s pre-war walk-up, I start to worry that, as a size 12, I’ll be the biggest woman there and nobody will want my offerings.
The whole purpose of those clothes was to show myself off, to push me to socialize more, but in reality, they kept me in my studio apartment, away from the world, afraid to live.
One short woman with a black long bob actually takes off her blouse and begins to try on the clothes right in front of us, her white cotton bra bright like neon lights.
I am no prude, but how can she take off her clothes in front of all of these people like she’s in a Loehman’s dressing room? What is that like, to be confident enough in your body to strip down in front of strangers like it’s no big deal?
I want the ladies to love my clothes as much as I once did, to realize how important these items were to me in my life – my nostalgia, my years of trying to change myself, and this final moment of release as I let all of that pressure go.
It’s a bittersweet feeling to let them go, knowing that I bought these clothes hoping for a different type of life.
All of my old insecurity isn’t going to disappear overnight, but passing along my clothes, my past, and my younger self feels noble, graceful, and it leaves room in my life for me, the real me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “These clothes don’t need to be washed for 100 days”

These clothes don’t need to be washed for 100 days.
Washing machine company AEG estimates that 90% of clothes washed aren’t actually dirty enough to be thrown in the laundry basket.
Part of this has to do with the fact that laundry detergent brands have convinced consumers that they need to wash their clothes frequently, perhaps even after every wear, to be clean and hygienic.
“The only way to grow as a laundry detergent brand is to make customers feel like they need to keep washing their clothes more and more,” he says.
So one of the biggest challenges for brands pitching clothes that don’t need to be washed frequently is to convince people that they will not be gross, smelly, or dirty if they aren’t constantly doing loads of laundry.
Before brands can convince consumers to stop washing their garments, they first need to design clothes that will live up to this promise.
They have treated the fabric with peppermint oil, which has antibacterial properties and ensures that clothes don’t need to be washed as frequently.
“They’ll suddenly realize they haven’t washed their clothes in a couple of weeks and it still feels fresh.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “We have to fix fashion if we want to survive climate change”

9 minute Read. Fashion brands, I’m talking to you: Enough is enough.
For the past three decades, fashion brands have perfected the art of manufacturing cheap clothing by relying on poorly paid labor in developing countries, inventing inexpensive plastic-based materials, and increasing the speed of production.
Activists, world leaders, and the public at large are just beginning to reckon with the way the fashion industry is accelerating the pace of climate change.
One thing is clear: The fashion industry is helping to propel climate change.
The vast majority of brands in the $1.3 billion fashion industry-whether that’s Louis Vuitton or Levi’s-measure growth in terms of increasing production every year.
The current state of the fashion industry is not working for consumers, or even the brands themselves.
These brands, while still small, are making durable clothes and accessories designed to outlast any given fashion trend-and crucially, they’re differentiating themselves to consumers in ways that fast fashion brands cannot.
While the eight-year-old brand is hard to compare to fashion giants, it recently announced that it was profitable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Don’t feed the monster!’ The people who have stopped buying new clothes”

Cowdery is one of a growing number of people who love clothes but try their hardest to resist buying them for reasons of sustainability.
Curious about a post she saw on Facebook, one weekend Cowdery dropped into the Leeds Community Clothes Exchange, a local swap shop.
She doesn’t totally eschew new clothes for her own wardobe; they make up about 10%. She buys gymwear new, for instance.
“But people are always going to want to buy clothes. Buying secondhand is probably the best way they can do it.”
Each year 430,000 tonnes of clothing are disposed of and not recycled in the UK. Meanwhile, the number of new clothes sold is rising: 1.13m tonnes in 2016, an increase of 200,000 tonnes on 2012.
“It’s a slow, gradual mindset change,” says Zoe Edwards, a sewing teacher and blogger who 11 years ago pledged never to buy new clothes.
So how difficult is it to stop buying clothes? Tania Arrayales, a self-described “Fashion disruptor”, has founded an organisation in New York called Fashion of Tomorrow to advocate a more sustainable approach to the clothing industry.
So what can a person who loves new clothes but wants to live more sustainably do? As Edwards says, if you are spending time on fashion sites, it doesn’t take a huge leap of imagination or will to switch your browser to eBay, Depop, thredUP, HEWI London or any of the raft of “Resale disruptors”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s the best laundry detergent? We asked 5 experts.”

Isn’t that last part the rub? Which bottle or box do you choose from the three long shelves in the laundry aisle? Elsberry has high standards: The detergent should clean the clothes, yet not destroy fabrics, and the bottle should be easy to use and not take up too much space on the counter.
She and other experts have a few good candidates when it comes to detergents – and some laundry tips, too.
Once you’ve chosen a detergent, use less than you think you need, says ¬≠Alexa Hotz, senior editor for Remodelista in Brooklyn: Too much detergent “Will leave a film on your clothes and on the inside of your washing machine.” Separate your laundry into different loads: dark, light and workout, and towels and bedding.
In general, one all-purpose detergent will work for all fabrics, except of course, silk, wool, down and cashmere, which would benefit from delicate detergents or professional treatment.
This past summer, Erin Barbot , an organizer in Silver Spring, Md., did her own test of laundry detergents, looking for products that were low in chemicals but still effective, without spending too much.
Hotz, of Remodelista, starts with what she does not want in her laundry detergent: sulfates, synthetic fragrance or fragrance of any kind.
The Honest Company’s Multi-Enzyme Stain Fighting Laundry Detergent, the free-and-clear unscented version, meets her high standards, as it’s made with natural acids and enzymes.
Mrs. Meyer’s Basil Scented Laundry Detergent is the go-to detergent for Elsberry of Todd Alan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ocean plastic pollution: why our clothes are part of the problem”

These fibers contribute to ocean plastic pollution in a subtle but pervasive way: The fabrics they make – along with synthetic-natural blends – leach into the environment just by being washed.
Most of the plastic that’s in the ocean is not in the form of whole products like cups or straws, but instead broken-down shreds of plastic.
“Think about how many people are washing their clothes on a daily basis, and how many clothes we all have,” says Imogen Napper, a marine scientist at the University of Plymouth who co-authored a 2016 study on the plastic fibers that shed from our clothing.
As we seek solutions to the overall issue of plastic pollution, we need to recognize that our clothing is a major part of the problem and will need to be part of the solution as well.
Often, plastic textile fibers are the dominant source of plastic pollution found in surveys.
A 2017 study of microplastic pollution along the shores of the Hudson River in New York state found that river transports around 150 plastic million microfibers into the Atlantic ocean every day.
It’s hard to say how much microplastics from textiles contributes to the overall plastic pollution problem in the ocean.
So what can we do about it? It might seem like there’s an easy solution to the problem of our clothes shedding plastic: Just buy natural fibers, or fewer clothes overall.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Buy Sustainable, Eco-Friendly Clothing on a Budget”

Brands across the fashion industry learned how to make and sell products at rock bottom prices.
Over the last couple of years, I’ve written extensively about how our clothes are damaging the earth and harming human beings in other countries, and I’ve been finding brands that are fighting back against the status quo to create clothes in a more responsible way.
Until more consumers feel they can afford to buy clothes from values-driven socially conscious brands, it is hard to fundamentally change the problems in the fashion industry.
If you’re in the market for a swimsuit or workout clothes, I would suggest looking at sustainable brands that use polyester made from recycled bottles pulled out of the ocean, rather than virgin polyester made from petroleum.
The good news is that there are some innovative brands on the market now creating sustainable shoes using the most cutting-edge methods.
The brand is a certified B Corporation that uses sustainable materials in every part of the shoe.
Online retailers like Thred Up and Poshmark allow you to search for brands and products you like and buy them for a fraction of what you would pay for new items.
The brand rents organic cotton T-shirts that are made in the most sustainable method possible for prices as low as $12 a month for three shirts of different styles and colors.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The biggest laundry mistake you’re probably making”

You love how your laundry smells and feels after you use fabric softener or dryer sheets.
Dryer sheets are woven sheets of fibers coated with stearic acid or fatty acids, scents and a cocktail of various chemicals.
In the dryer, the stearic acid melts from the heat, coating the clothes to make them soft and reduce static.
The film from the dryer sheet also coats your entire dryer.
Avoid using dryer sheets when washing bath, kitchen, microfiber or cleaning towels or rags.
If you have children, avoid washing their pajamas with dryer sheets.
Fabric softener doesn’t have all the problems that dryer sheets have.
Once they’re made, all you do is toss them in the dryer with your wet clothes.

The orginal article.