Summary of “The Legend of Brad Stevens”

It’s just the latest instance in which Celtics coach Brad Stevens has managed to squeeze the most out of a limited roster of players on one of the biggest stages in basketball.
As you probably know, Stevens is already widely considered the greatest coach in basketball history.
On James Naismith’s deathbed, he turned to his loved ones and said, “My greatest achievement is inventing the sport that one day Brad Stevens will coach,” which confused everybody, because the name “Brad” wasn’t invented until 1974.
Widely considered the inspiration for Norman Dale in Hoosiers, Coach Taylor in Friday Night Lights, and Abraham Lincoln in Lincoln, Stevens is the first-and to date, only-recipient of the Nobel Prize for coaching.
Give Stevens a ragtag band of NBA players with no stars, and he will advance through the playoffs.
1997: Air Bud You don’t get college coaching jobs fresh out of college, so at 21, Stevens took a volunteer coaching gig-as the head coach for the Fernfield Timberwolves, a middle school team in Washington.
After consulting the rulebook and ensuring that there were no bylaws preventing a dog from playing basketball, Stevens crafted a role specifically for Buddy.
Air Bud never gave any quotes about how Stevens helped his surprisingly prolific career, but he did roll over and allow the coach to rub his belly in the presence of reporters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Far Can Becky Hammon Go in the N.B.A?”

As a kid growing up in South Dakota, Becky Hammon had two great passions.
Anna Petrakova, who played with Hammon on C.S.K.A. and the national team, told me, “When people come to Russia, they always seem a little standoffish. They don’t always integrate in the culture.” Hammon was different.
Far more painful for Hammon was the reaction at home, in South Dakota.
“At the Summer Games in Beijing, in August, 2008, the U.S. beat Russia in the semifinals. After the game, Lisa Leslie, one of the most decorated Olympic basketball players, refused to shake Hammon’s hand. The U.S. went on to win the finals. At the medal ceremony, Hammon stood on the lowest step of the podium, in her Russian uniform, a bronze medal around her neck. When the American national anthem played, she placed her hand on her heart. Still, she was proud of the Russian national team, and of her ability to integrate with the players. Hammon told me,”I’m Russian to them, and it has nothing to do with the passport I’m holding.
“You don’t try to prove to people how smart you are, or that you have better ideas. She was cognizant of that sort of managerial thing.” In August, 2014, the Spurs offered Hammon the job as an assistant coach.
When Becky Hammon played basketball, she was known as a shooter, but she loved passing.
The big question for Hammon, Popovich told me, is “Is this going to end up being something? Is she going to be able to matriculate and get into a head-coaching position?” Hammon is still early in her career, and it could take some time.
“I tell her, very straightforwardly, I don’t know. Because I look at our country, and I have all kinds of doubts about all kinds of things, let alone whether she’s going to be a head coach.” Steve Kerr, the head coach of the Golden State Warriors, said last week, about the possibility of a female head coach, “I don’t know if it’s going to happen soon. Becky Hammon would be the one you’d say right away who could possibly get an interview.”

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Summary of “Steve Kerr, Gregg Popovich go beyond Warriors, Spurs”

OAKLAND – Gregg Popovich has no interest in running for president of the United States, but he was willing to entertain a hypothetical question about it: If he did run, would he choose Steve Kerr to be his Vice President?
Unfortunately for their supporters, Kerr and Popovich also have something else in common.
There’s a deep well of respect between Popovich and Kerr.
Kerr, 52, played under Popovich during two different stints in 1998-2000 and 2002-2003.
From the outset, Kerr admired how Popovich ran things and marveled at his willingness to scream at his star players.
It’s one of the many things that Kerr learned from Popovich and now uses with his own team.
Before the Warriors hosted the Spurs in February, Popovich joked that Nick couldn’t be trusted and he had to confiscate his cell phone.
David Lee, a two-time All-Star who played for Kerr from 2014-15 and Popovich from 2016-17 before retiring last summer, said the two coaches have completely different styles.

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Summary of “The Warriors’ 70-Year-Old Truth-Teller”

Adams is the exacting, behind-the-scenes coach known for sending out links to essays about Trump and race.
“Coach Adams cared about us in a way that was special.”
Soon Adams began teaching his principles of defense to Jerry Tarkanian’s teams at U.N.L.V. Then he was in Iowa, at Drake.
Still, doubt tore at Adams, not about his defensive tactics, but about coaching itself.
As Adams moved from team to team, whenever he worried about whether he was doing enough to change the world, he beat back the angst.
The years folded one into the other, and on Adams went: Milwaukee, Chicago, Oklahoma City, back to Chicago, and finally to Boston, where he and Brad Stevens, head coach of the Celtics, took over a dismal young team.
Then Kerr took Adams to dinner at A16.Loosening UpOver pizza, Kerr spoke of creating a dynamic Warrior offense that was forceful, fluid and fast.
“I’m an older coach,” Adams adds, “And I had to change.”

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Summary of “What’s the Most Stable Franchise in the NFL?”

Here’s a list of all 32 teams, ranked from most to least stable heading into next season.
Pittsburgh appears ready to hit the ground running in 2018, but a few major questions hang over the team’s figurative head: Will star running back Le’Veon Bell get a new deal-or is a holdout or possible retirement on the table? What will the offense look like under new coordinator Randy Fichtner? And how can the team add depth to a linebackers group and secondary that got exposed by Blake Bortles and the Jaguars in the divisional round?
Carolina Panthers Quarterback Cam Newton was erratic as a passer for most of last season, the team fired offensive coordinator Mike Shula and lost defensive coordinator Steve Wilks to the Cardinals’ head-coach job, and the franchise is up for sale.
Still, what Seattle has over most of the teams that follow is a bona fide, proven franchise quarterback.
Kyle Shanahan-along with GM John Lynch and returning defensive coordinator Robert Saleh-has San Francisco poised for big things, but a few uncertainties remain: First, they must officially lock in quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo for this season, whether that means a long-term deal or the franchise tag.
There are just two huge, glaring issues: Offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur, the architect behind the team’s offensive explosion last year, is gone, and the team has zero quarterbacks under contract.
The team’s got a new set of coordinators, and a new offensive line coach.
New head coach Mike Vrabel sounds dedicated to modernizing the team’s offense under new offensive coordinator Matt LaFleur, and Tennessee gets an experienced, respected defensive coordinator in Pees, who should bring toughness and physicality to that side of the ball.

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Summary of “The 10 Biggest Questions Heading Into the NFL Offseason”

Seven teams will head into 2018 with new head coaches and/or front-office personnel, and a handful more have made changes at the general manager position.
Scheme changes, locker-room culture shifts, and salary cap purges are common among regime changes as new coaches and GMs look to bring in “Their guys,” ditch the players that are not, and create a competitive team.
Will pending superstar contract negotiations stall? Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell is looking for a long-term contract and has already indicated he’s willing to sit out or retire if the team tries to franchise-tag him for a second straight year.
Add in tight end Antonio Gates, defensive end Julius Peppers, running backs Adrian Peterson and Frank Gore, safety Kam Chancellor, pass rusher Cliff Avril, and a slew of other aging vets that could decide to call it a career and a few teams could look a whole lot different in 2018.
The overhaul’s already started, of course, and following the Seahawks’ 9-7 finish, head coach Pete Carroll fired offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell, defensive coordinator Kris Richard, offensive line/assistant head coach Tom Cable, and a few other position coaches-all moves that signaled a desire to return to the type of football Carroll wants his team to play.
The question now is whether that coaching purge will extend to the team’s roster.
Not only did Philly head coach Doug Pederson’s system make Carson Wentz an early favorite for the MVP award, but that quarterback-friendly scheme helped Nick Foles lead the team to a championship after the team lost Wentz for the year with a torn ACL. The NFL’s a copycat league, and plenty of teams were paying attention to what Pederson-and a few other forward-thinking coaches around the league, including his former boss Andy Reid-did this year to stress defenses with run-pass options, option runs, and play-action looks.
Add the Redskins, a team that may incorporate some of Kansas City’s offensive stylings to help smooth Smith’s transition, to that list, and there should be a handful of other teams that work those concepts into their offenses.

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Summary of “The Bucks’ Coaching Choice Will Be the Biggest Move of the Giannis Era”

Giannis Antetokounmpo is now a legitimate superstar, but the rest of the team has not kept pace.
Giannis is leading the Bucks in per-game scoring, rebounds, and assists, and is second on the team in steals and blocks.
The final straw came in a 116-94 loss to Philadelphia on Saturday, which Giannis sat out with a sore knee.
The Bucks are one of the longest and most athletic teams in the NBA, with John Henson at center, Giannis and Khris Middleton on the wings, and Bledsoe and Malcolm Brogdon in the backcourt.
There’s no reason to have so many physically gifted players playing out of position when they should be able to keep their men in front of them.
Giannis won’t be a free agent until after the 2020-21 season, but an NBA team lucky enough to have a player of his caliber is always on the clock.
The opportunity to coach a superstar like Giannis doesn’t come around often.
Who the Bucks hire now is the most important decision the franchise has made since it drafted Giannis.

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Summary of “The Philadelphia Eagles’ secret weapon? An analytics-fueled attack”

PHILADELPHIA – The decision made in this moment can be the difference between a win and a loss, but coach Doug Pederson knows that when the light is green, you go.
“Nobody goes for it like Doug Pederson does,” Cris Collinsworth said during Saturday’s broadcast of the divisional-round game between the Philadelphia Eagles and Atlanta Falcons.
Vikings coach Mike Zimmer rattled those numbers off the top of his head when speaking to reporters via conference call Wednesday, a sign that the Eagles’ fourth-down prowess is on Minnesota’s mind.
There is plenty of credit to hand out for those numbers, including to the defense for routinely answering the bell, but a big slice goes to the analytics department – overseen by vice president of football operations and strategy Alec Halaby – for understanding situational odds and playing them to their favor.
Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie has long had an analytics team in place; the desire for an optimal fourth-down strategy is not new.
Philadelphia has gone for it on fourth down more than any other team in the NFL since Pederson became head coach last season.
Under Schwartz, players are required to know the maximum amount of plays left in the half or game based on time remaining, and the point where the opposition needs to advance the ball to be in field goal range – a variable that changes week-to-week based on the leg strength of the kicker.
Schwartz downplayed the role of analytics a bit this week, noting that it means less than things like guys “Playing with personality,” tackling well and playing fast.

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Summary of “The Process’s Lone Survivor”

At any moment, Brown told him, someone could inform Okafor that he’s been traded, and he has to get on a plane, shake the hand of , and go play minutes.
They’re still finding their way-the Sixers are 19th in net rating-but it’s a real team now and not just the professional version of a pick-up squad. Brown’s staff has remained largely the same over the years, but the coach said they’re not “Doing much different than we used to do.” More talent obviously helps, but so does keeping those players around so they know what to expect.
You wonder if some of the same fans who called sports talk radio stations to complain about Brown might have also applauded him for playing Embiid a career high in minutes in the win over the Clippers on Monday in L.A. The second-guessing is unlikely to end, though Brown thanked his “Tremendous selective deafness” for helping on that front.
During the preseason, before Embiid was officially cleared to play five-on-five, Brown explained how important it was to get Embiid’s recovery from meniscus surgery on his left knee exactly right.
“He’s constantly coaching. That’s his passion, teaching.” Redick thought about it for a second, then smirked a little when he emphasized that Brown gives everyone “a lot of feedback.” The tips aren’t exclusive to NBA players, either.
Much of the teaching Brown did back then was on behalf of players who would quickly become some other coach’s concern.
There are all kinds of stories about how much energy Brown put into otherwise disposable players-like when Darius Johnson-Odom was let go, and Brown spent a long while telling him he believed in him and that he hoped other coaches would get into “The DJO business.” Johnson-Odom played a total of 15 minutes for the Sixers on a 10-day contract back in 2013-14.
As a former staffer put it, Brown is “Borderline amazing” at being able to recover from the previous night’s disappointment and rally the next morning on behalf of his players.

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Summary of “Syracuse’s Jim Boeheim Is the Greatest Coach Who Never Fit the Part”

Jim Boeheim is one of the greatest college basketball coaches to ever live.
Boeheim, after all, has won 903 games as Syracuse’s head coach, placing him directly behind Mike Krzyzewski as the second-winningest Division I men’s coach of all time.
Unlike other top coaches who fit that description, Boeheim has never had much charisma or an intimidating presence demanding of respect.
Tyler Olander won more national championships in four years as a player than Boeheim has in 40-plus years as a coach.
It would be reckless to suggest that Boeheim will never coach a nationally relevant Syracuse basketball team again, but it also doesn’t take a wild imagination to envision a scenario in which that becomes the case.
On Page 2 of his 2014 autobiography, Bleeding Orange-Page 2!-Boeheim addresses his anxieties in length, writing that he has “a fear of failing every day.” He mentions how winning never makes him happy but losing always makes him sad. In recalling his national championship triumph in 2003, Boeheim writes, “Those feelings of euphoria lasted about two days, maybe three. Then it was time, once again, for worry. Time, once again, for fear.” His book is littered with memories of being slighted, including the time that Dave Schellhase took the roster spot on the 1966 Chicago Bulls that Boeheim felt he deserved.
Boeheim’s college head coach, Fred Lewis, went 91-57 in his tenure from 1962-68, with his greatest career achievement being that he convinced Bing to come to Syracuse.
Boeheim doesn’t fit the part of a legendary college basketball coach because he never fit the part.

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