Summary of “Communal living with kids”

Many cohousing kids talked about learning to play sports that their parents didn’t know anything about from various members of the community, learning to cook dishes that their own parents didn’t cook, and even getting spiritual and emotional counsel from people other than their parents when going through a challenging time.
Many cohousing kids talked about the power of being exposed to a wide range of professions through the adults in their communities.
Like Durrett, most cohousing kids have been coloring under a table or building Legos in proximity to more meetings than they could possibly count.
While most so-called typical families face food insecurity, strains on their time or energy, sickness, and any number of other challenges within the four walls of their own private homes, cohousing kids are raised in an environment where many of these things are treated as collective problems and possibilities for growth.
Helen Thomson, who grew up in Heartwood Cohousing near Durango, Colorado, from the age of 5 until she left for the University of Montana, explains: “I think that all of us who grew up in Heartwood are much better at communicating and working together than many other kids our age.”
Cohousing kids often have freedom to roam between houses and in the shared outdoor spaces, even as little kids.
Many of the kids who grew up in cohousing attest to having a different way of moving through the world than most people.
For all its potential flaws, almost all of the young adults I interviewed said that, given the chance, they would raise their own kids in cohousing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘If it gets me, it gets me’: the town where residents live alongside polar bears”

“If you were to build a town today, you would never put it here,” explains Geoff York of Polar Bears International, a research and advocacy organization whose members, understandably, spend much time in Churchill each year.
“Polar bears are creatures of the sea ice, and they come ashore in the summer here when the sea ice on Hudson Bay melts and then they wait for the ice to return.” That return tends to begin sometime in November; by October, the bears are already stirring, wandering in anticipation toward the bay along a route that takes them past, and sometimes directly through, Churchill.
Polar bears have made Churchill famous, and led to it being dubbed the “Jewel of Manitoba” and one of the top destinations in Canada.
The challenge for Churchill residents is to encourage the bears to head to the tundra without tarrying in town.
Signs around the town remind residents and visitors alike to exercise caution and report bear sightings on the hotline – 675-BEAR. Culvert traps, baited with seal scent, line the perimeter of the community; bears that are caught in them are taken to a holding facility, popularly known as the polar bear jail, where they are held for up to 30 days, before being drugged and helicoptered to a spot safely away from town – or, if late enough in the season, on to the sea ice.
For residents, living with polar bears is an unavoidable fact of life, and one that instils an understandable caution.
“But if you have to go out in an area that’s a bad area or where bears have been spotted, and there’s a line down, I always get resources: set up security fences, for example, and carry shotguns with cracker shells. Ninety per cent of bears won’t bother you at all, but there are some who are hungry or are curious and want to bat you around like a baseball.”
For a community that in the last two years has been buried by snow and cut off from the world, and that even in the best of times must beware of polar bears around the corner, it is just the latest challenge among many.

The orginal article.

Summary of “John Galton Wanted Libertarian Paradise in ‘Anarchapulco.’ He Got Bullets Instead.”

Galton was part of a small community of fellow anarcho-capitalists formed by Jeff Berwick, who promised a drug-friendly haven and hosts the annual “Anarchapulco” festival.
Berwick says Galton and Forester should’ve known what they were getting into.
Anarchapulco will go on as scheduled next week and might be even bigger due to the murder, Berwick says.
After moving to Acapulco in 2009, Berwick became something of an ancap pied piper, selling passports and real estate to non-Mexican anarchists who wanted to live in the city, according to a 2014 Wired profile.
Today, Berwick’s real estate business appears dead. Its website, which advertised “Paradise,” now redirects to the homepage for Anarchapulco.
“Mike,” who spoke to The Daily Beast on the condition of anonymity, is a former Berwick colleague who lived in Berwick’s Acapulco community for two years.
With Galt’s Gulch drying up, Berwick returned his focus to Acapulco, launching the first Anarchapulco festival in 2015.
Berwick’s old real-estate sites might have advertised paradise in Acapulco, but the reality was something different, Mike said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When the Closest Grocery Store Is a Dollar Store”

“While dollar stores sometimes fill a need in cash-strapped communities, growing evidence suggests these stores are not merely a byproduct of economic distress,” the authors of the brief write.
While dollar store might not be causing these inequalities per se, they appear to be perpetuating them.
When a dollar store opened up in Haven, Kansas-subsidized through tax breaks by the local government-sales at the the nearby Foodliner grocery store dropped by 30 percent, The Guardian reported earlier this year.
A dollar store NIMBY movement has been gaining traction.
In Chester, Vermont, for example, residents argued in 2012 that allowing dollar stores to come to town “Will be the beginning of the end for what might best be described as Chester’s Vermontiness,” per the New York Times-a statement that itself perhaps signals the class and race associations dollar stores have come to embody.
In Buhler, Kansas, the mayor saw what happened to surrounding grocery stores in neighboring Haven and rejected the dollar store chain, also citing a threat to the town’s character.
More recent efforts have used zoning tweaks to limit dollar stores, whose small footprint usually lets them breeze past restrictions big-box stores cannot.
In Mendocino County, California, dollar store foes passed legislation restricting chain store development writ large.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How they survived: Owners of the few homes left standing around Paradise, Calif., took critical steps to ward off wildfires”

At least 88 people died in the Camp Fire, many inside homes with flammable roofs and open vents that allowed in smoldering material, turning them into death traps.
The state updated its fire code in 2008, mandating that newly built homes near wildland areas meet standards for fireproof roofs, windows and decks, and follow rules for creating “Defensible space” clear of flammable material in the 100 feet immediately surrounding a home.
Jack Cohen, a former firefighter and longtime fire behavior expert for the Forest Service, says maintenance of a house and the area immediately around it can be as important in protecting it from wildfires as its construction.
The blaze became a structure fire that spread rapidly, with burning debris carried by 50 mph winds from home to home, said Cal Fire information officer Scott Mc­Lean.
The updates to California’s fire code focus on protecting communities like Paradise that border natural areas – the fastest-growing kind of community in America.
About a third of U.S. homes are built in what’s known as the “Wildland-urban interface,” said Kelly Pohl, a researcher at the nonprofit Headwaters Economics, who studies fire ecology and community planning.
Officials also developed a statewide fire-risk map that reflects how topography can put people at greater risk; in Paradise, for example, canyons acted as chimneys, funneling fire toward homes on upper slopes.
“We learned a lot,” said Moore, who studied how the recent fire behaved – appearing to die down before roaring back up a dry creek bed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happens When You Treat The Addiction Crisis Like A Natural Disaster”

In the poll, 48 percent of people said opioid addiction has gotten worse in their community in the past five years.
Snohomish County in Western Washington is taking a unique approach to tackle the problem.
The county is now responding to the drug crisis as if it were a natural disaster, the same way they’d mobilize to respond to a landslide or flu pandemic.
Snohomish County is the first county in the country to treat it this way.
The idea grew out of their experience with another tremendous disaster in the county: the massive 2014 landslide in Oso, Wash., which killed 43 people.
Seven big, over-arching goals, which include reducing opioid misuse and reducing damage to the community, are broken down into manageable steps, like distributing needle clean-up kits, and a project to train school teachers to recognize trauma and addiction.
The county’s program includes small steps, like making transportation easier for people in drug treatment.
That’s just one item in the county’s plan, and problems with opioids are far from solved here.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the Community Keeping Obsolete Supercomputers Alive”

The hardware may be the same, but the SGI community is evolving.
The 16-year-old, who pays for his SGI hobby via a laptop resale business, finds himself a leading light in the SGI scene due in no small part to that passion, though shifts in the SGI community itself have also played a role: Just a few months ago, the main forum for the community, a site called Nekochan, was shut down, precipitating a subcultural sea change.
The SGI community has only occasionally gotten notice from the outside world.
“Hard to buy an SGI to stick a Mini ITX board inside if everyone who owns an SGI refuses to sell it to you.” Noting this interest, Dodoid came up with a 3D-printed case, styled after the SGI Indigo, that fits the ODROID single-board computer.
The thing about SGI that makes it interesting to consider from an online community standpoint is that, even though it’s fairly small now, it has a reach that dates back to some of the earliest days of the internet.
Mapleson has experience on the SGI platform dating back to the days even before the web browser Netscape-a company cofounded by longtime SGI head Jim Clark-so as a result, he’s seen the SGI community shift a lot over the last quarter-century.
That’s why users like Dodoid and Raion, young and fairly passionate about what the SGI platform represents, are so important to this community right now.
Unlike the days of Usenet, Raion emphasizes the important of keeping a positive tone and welcoming approach-something that could help keep the interest in SGI alive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “India Hills Community Center Displays Sign with Countless Funny Puns”

One group to master the art of funny puns is the Indian Hills Community of Colorado, who’ve been making regular punny roadside signage to the delight of every passerby.
“I put up a sign that really stirred up the area,” he says.
“We have a heavy police presence in the town of Morrison, which is next to Indian Hills, and they run a ton of speed traps. The sign said ‘Indian Hills annexed by Morrison, slow down.’ Many people believed that prank, and the amount of attention it brought was really surprising.”
With the aim to make people laugh, Rozmiarek puts up a sign with a new pun or joke a couple of times every week.
He even creates holiday and event-themed puns on special occasions.
You can find all of the funny pun signs on the Indian Hills Community Sign Facebook page.
The Indian Hills Community of Colorado have mastered the art of funny puns with their regularly-changing outdoor signage.
He puts up a sign with a new pun or joke a couple of times every week.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The sinking islands of the Southern US”

Nearly 50 years after Elting first taught his young daughter Victoria Smalls about the traditions integral to their identity, many Gullah Geechee can no longer work the land, as the land – and thereby the Gullah Geechee way of life – is being rattled by climate change.
For Victoria, Gullah Geechee wasn’t the mystic, isolated culture of inherited Africanisms and Southern landscapes that had become of interest to 21st-Century academics, tourists and hungry land developers.
The isolated geography, which is spread out over 12,000 sq miles known as the Gullah Geechee Corridor, created insulated coastal and island communities, most of which were at least 90% black, with well-preserved cultural traditions.
Gullah Geechee religion incorporates Christianity with African belief systems, much of which was reflected in the lessons Victoria was taught as a child.
The Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor, which strives to preserve the Gullah Geechee sites and stories, describes the Gullah Geechee language as a creole dialect that sprung from the linguistic influences of “European slave traders, slave owners and diverse African ethnic groups”.
According to Dr Albert George II, director of conservation at the South Carolina Aquarium who was raised Gullah Geechee, individuals residing in the more isolated communities such as St Helena still subsist on their own agriculture, sourcing food from their farms and gardens and fish from the waterways rather than going to the grocery store.
His father was a proud Gullah Geechee man who told him “Unless there was rice with the meal, it wasn’t a full dinner.” As homage to the crop that is agriculturally obsolete in most Gullah Geechee farming communities, George founded RICE. RICE strives to open a “Two-way flow of communication,” George said, between the Gullah Geechee and the local municipal, county, business and state government leaders.
“All we have now is our name. We’re the last Saltwater Geechee on Sapelo,” said Maurice Bailey, a resident of Sapelo Island, Georgia’s only remaining Gullah Geechee community, Hogg Hummock, and vice president of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Paradise lost? What happened to Ireland’s model eco-village”

The plans for Cloughjordan, a settlement in the heart of Ireland, provided for a working farm, solar power, an “Edible landscape” and district heating.
Though it may not be fully self-sufficient, the village has a working farm, an array of well-tended polytunnels and a bakery providing the community with good food year round.
Philip, a Scotsman who moved to Ireland 25 years ago and now lives on Cloughjordan’s main street, takes me on a tour.
“Horses provide dung and they disturb the soil much less than tractors. The challenge working with horses is to create time. For that, you need more people. We want to bring people back on to the land.”
At Cloughjordan, rather than relying on distant administrative bodies, the residents do all the work themselves – from governance to lawn-mowing.
Many who consider themselves part of the project, including Philip, live in the old village of Cloughjordan nearby.
“Some people in the pub will give out about us after a few drinks, but that’s to be expected,” Philip says.
The biggest challenge, says Philip, is getting more young people involved.

The orginal article.