Summary of “Uniqlo Is Gap for Millennials”

Quality isn’t an attribute typically associated with fast fashion, but Uniqlo has also managed to build a reputation for durability.
Uniqlo can’t promise anything approaching that longevity, but in an era of disposable fashion, a Uniqlo garment, made from hearty materials and cut in a timeless style, can feel like an investment piece.
Like a mountain outfitter, Uniqlo touts the use of a number of signature technologies in its clothing.
HEATTECH, marketed as an innovative insulating system, and AIRism, which is promoted as moisture-wicking, are woven into a variety of Uniqlo staples-socks, underwear, camisoles, leggings, pants-supposedly making them more comfortable and resilient than competitors’ products.
More than 800 of the brand’s stores are in Japan-where Uniqlo, by its own estimates, accounts for about 6.5 percent of the total apparel market.
To achieve the kind of dominance in the U.S. that the company enjoys closer to home, Uniqlo will need to grow significantly.
“They have less brand awareness.” Many Americans have never heard of Uniqlo, or don’t know how to pronounce it.
As Uniqlo learned when it arrived on American shores, first impressions can be hard to manage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chapter 11 bankruptcy, explained”

Bankruptcy can play out in a number of ways, from reorganization to liquidation Just because a retailer can reorganize through bankruptcy doesn’t mean it ought to go that route.
While Chapter 11 bankruptcy is focused on a company reorganizing and paying off its debt, it has a variety of possible outcomes.
Reorganization efforts often fail, and a Chapter 11 bankruptcy can end in liquidation of some or all of the company’s assets.
Gordon Brothers is best known as a liquidator, but Toubassy led its March 2017 acquisition of Wet Seal’s brand name after the mall retailer shut down all of its stores and filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection earlier that year.
It’s not uncommon for a brand to relaunch out of bankruptcy only to stumble and file for bankruptcy again – what those in the bankruptcy business jokingly call a “Chapter 22.” While Chapters 7 and 13 impose waiting periods for filing a second time, Chapter 11 bankruptcy generally comes with no such rules, and Chapter 22s have become common in the retail world recently, highlighting the challenging nature of the business right now.
For bankrupt retailers, reorganization is increasingly unlikely The system that Squire described, one in which a company can restructure via Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, isn’t a realistic option for many retailers today.
That’s in part due to the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act, a 2005 amendment to the US Bankruptcy Code.
Previously, bankrupt retailers had 60 days to either reject or accept their store leases, but they could ask the court for repeated extensions of that deadline – “Often for the full duration of a debtor’s bankruptcy case,” according to the American Bankruptcy Institute.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Spotify’s grand plan for podcasts is taking shape”

In the month since Spotify announced plans to spend up to $500 million on podcasting, it’s homed in on exclusive content plans, hinted at ongoing work to improve discovery, and broadly started to construct a picture of how it views the future of podcasts.
Spotify spent more than $300 million to acquire Gimlet Media, the maker of Reply All and other popular shows, and Anchor, the company behind an app that allows anyone to easily create their own podcasts.
This much is clear: Spotify knows podcasts can generate ad revenue – podcasts are estimated to bring in $659 million in revenue by 2020 – and it’s willing to invest in exclusive content to make sure that people listen on its platform.
Helping a listener find a new show that they’re guaranteed to like is difficult, and no company has made a recommendation algorithm as successful for podcasts as Netflix has made for movies and TV. Spotify has been successful in this realm when it comes to music, with playlists like Discover Weekly, and it intends to create the same kind of feature for podcasts.
Gimlet Media as the Marvel to Spotify’s Disney Creating new podcasts and making Spotify the only place to find them is going to play a big part in Spotify’s podcast strategy.
Spotify isn’t the only company hoping that its exclusive podcasts will compel listeners to pay for access.
“The wider Spotify organization wanted to give Anchor superpowers.” Anchor CEO Michael Mignano tells The Verge’s Vergecast podcast that his company’s creation tools are what made it attractive to Spotify.
Spotify already builds ads into its listening platform for non-paying users, and certain Spotify shows, like the Dissect show with Sonos, have exclusive partnerships that its ad team negotiates on an individual basis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s Time To Get Real About Digital Transformation”

For these leaders, and others like them, the challenge has been to use digital transformation to establish or maintain product leadership.
Declarations like, “Many factors, such as the economy or the desirability of your products, that can affect a company’s success as much or more than its digital capabilities” or “It is multi-faceted and diffuse, and doesn’t just involve technology” don’t tell us how to do things differently.
It’s my strong opinion, backed by dozens of interviews, that companies embarking on a digital transformation are trying to apply company level strategies to a product level problem.
Once the product organization has established it’s own Product Vision and Product Strategy, the executive leadership needs to support that with the company-level capabilities and resources.
In the first year or two of a companies life, it’s very common for the CEO to also have the original product vision and to lead the day-to-day product conversation.
With the support of the CEO the company needs to focus it’s transformation efforts on the product level.
Cognitive bias is at the root of many of the poor product decisions that get made by product companies.
Warning: Product Experience Teams will only work if you have a clear Product Vision, a Product Strategy, Priorities and Metrics to measure outcomes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Navigating the Leap from Big Tech to Startups”

“Because as soon as you get further into your career, even just two or three years in, the stakes just feel higher mentally.” But for those who are already midway through the flight plan of a successful career, as Soni was, the prospect of transitioning from big to small can feel much more daunting.
“Product is more binary in that, either the tech will allow you to do it or it’s not possible. Making sure that you can build a sustainable business model around that product is a far tougher task,” Soni says.
POST-STARTUP PLUNGE: LEADERSHIP OBSERVATIONS FROM THE OTHER SIDEWith idea in hand, funding secured and startup in motion, Soni next had to turn to the nuts and bolts of life as a founder: hiring, team building and leading.
In Soni’s experience, these four challenges were the most surprising – and most difficult – adjustments he had to make as he transitioned from high-profile positions at large companies to startup CEO.1.
Many first-time founders report that they underestimated the magnitude of taking up the mantle as startup CEO. For Soni, it was no different, although he didn’t feel out of his depth in terms of the functional expertise required to run a company.
“In big tech, you only think the stakes are really high. No question there are some tough calls, but you have enough buffer, support and craft to get by – there are fewer chances of disaster striking. If you make the wrong product decision, it’ll most likely be fine. Somehow, people will pick it up and we’ll figure out a way to bounce back,” says Soni.
“What’s hard about hiring at early-stage startups is sifting through the variety of people who show up at your door to find the ones with common motivations. For the first 40 to 50 hires, hunt for a founder mentality,” Soni says.
For Soni, this was another key point of departure from hiring at big corporations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How badly are we being ripped off on eyewear? Former industry execs tell all”

How badly are we being ripped off on eyewear? Former industry execs tell all – Los Angeles Times.
Charles Dahan knows from first-hand experience how badly people get ripped off when buying eyeglasses.
In other words, Dahan, 70, knows the eyewear business from start to finish.
Dahan, who lives in Potomac, Md., was responding to a column I recently wrote about why consumer prices for frames and lenses are so astronomically high, with markups often approaching 1,000%.
Italy’s Luxottica now casts an even longer shadow over the eyewear industry after merging last fall with France’s Essilor, the world’s leading maker of prescription eyeglass lenses and contact lenses.
“That’s how they gained control of so many brands,” Dahan said.
As I’ve previously observed, online glasses sales hold potential for pushing retail eyewear prices lower, but the e-glasses industry still has a ways to go before posing a threat to the likes of EssilorLuxottica.
In the meantime, Dahan and Butler told me, federal authorities should step up and prevent price gouging for eyewear – just as they’ve done with other healthcare products, such as EpiPens.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Compete. Create!”

If you think that you have to compete for better jobs or more market share, you’re as wrong as I was.
If a company has a certain market share, that means you have to compete with that company to “Win” a piece of their share.
When you assume that you have to compete with other businesses or people for money, jobs or attention, you’re engaged in limited thinking.
The biggest mistake that conventional business thinkers make, is that they believe supply is limited.
Similar to how I think entrepreneurs and companies should create market share, I also believe that individual people should create a career.
Here’s the thing: Traditional companies think it’s bullshit.
Here’s the thing: It doesn’t matter what others think.
If you believe in something and if you can create value, go for it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Visionary Leadership Fails”

Not surprisingly science and practice have a very positive view of visionary leadership as a critical leadership competency.
Our research finds that the positive impact of visionary leadership breaks down when middle managers aren’t aligned with top management’s strategic vision.
Visionary leadership is not just important for senior managers; it also matters for middle and lower level managers, who play a key role in carrying out strategic change.
This is why company leadership frameworks typically list visionary leadership as a key leadership competency for managers.
When middle managers were aligned with top management’s strategic vision, things played out as the widespread view of visionary leadership would suggest: the more these managers engaged in visionary leadership the greater the shared understanding of strategy in their team, and the more the team was committed to strategy execution.
Whereas visionary leadership thus was a positive force when managers were aligned with the company strategy, it became a negative force standing in the way of strategic alignment when the manager’s vision diverged from the company’s.
Almost invariably, visionary leadership is seen as a crucial leadership competency in such efforts.
Our research suggests that such efforts are well-advised to ensure that companies benefit from developing their managers’ visionary leadership rather than suffer its dark side.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The data brokers quietly buying and selling your personal information”

The data brokers quietly buying and selling your personal information.
Thanks to a new Vermont law requiring companies that buy and sell third-party personal data to register with the Secretary of State, we’ve been able to assemble a list of 121 data brokers operating in the U.S. It’s a rare, rough glimpse into a bustling economy that operates largely in the shadows, and often with few rules.
Even Vermont’s first-of-its-kind law, which went into effect last month, doesn’t require data brokers to disclose who’s in their databases, what data they collect, or who buys it.
Still, these 121 entities represent just a fraction of the broader data economy: The Vermont law only covers third-party data firms-those trafficking in the data of people with whom they have no relationship-as opposed to “First-party” data holders like Amazon, Facebook, or Google, which collect their own enormous piles of detailed data directly from users.
If you’re concerned about how a company is handling your personal data, you can file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission, which has issued millions of dollars in penalties over unfair or unlawful behavior by credit agencies and data brokers.
A sibling of the giant U.S. credit reporting agency Experian Information Solutions and one of many subsidiaries of the Ireland-based data giant Experian PLC, the company operates Experian RentBureau, a database updated daily with millions of consumers’ “Rental payment history data from property owners/managers, electronic rent payment services and collection companies.”
Data giant “Oracle Data Cloud gives marketers access to 5 billion global IDs, $3 trillion in consumer transactions, and more than 1,500 data partners available through the BlueKai Marketplace. With more than 45,000 prebuilt audiences spanning demographic, behavioral, B2B, online, offline, and transactional data, we bring together more data into a single location than any other solution.”
“Twine is a mobile data platform that works with app publishers who generate mobile data & the companies who need data for ad targeting.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Jail Health-Care Crisis”

The crisis is particularly acute in jails, because large numbers of people booked into custody are in a state of distress or, like Laintz, will suffer withdrawal, which can require close monitoring and specialized treatment that jail wardens are not equipped to provide.
“People really are trying to provide high-quality health care, and jail environments are really tough,” Brent Gibson, a physician who is the chief health officer of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care, said.
The health services at the jail were provided by Correctional Healthcare, the company that was later acquired by Wellpath.
Opioid addiction, too, is an area in which jail health care is increasingly relied on by default.
Nancy Fishman, a criminal-justice policy expert at the Vera Institute, told me that “Every sort of convocation of sheriffs or jail administrators or law enforcement” these days is consumed by the opioid crisis and its impact on jail health care.
The concurrent rise of for-profit health care in jails and prisons has not been accompanied by the kind of public debate, congressional scrutiny, or scholarly research that has informed other fields of health policy.
In some European Union countries, where universal access to health care is fully established, prison and jail health care is often administered by state health services.
Last July, after a woman gave birth in her cell at the York Correctional Institution, in Niantic, Connecticut, where health care was overseen by the University of Connecticut, and where there had been other complaints about care, officials transferred responsibility for prisoner health care statewide back to the state corrections agency.

The orginal article.