Summary of “If You’re About to Take a New Job, Should You Consider Your Boss’s Counteroffer?”

In a recent national survey we conducted about best practices in resignation, nearly 40% of senior executives and HR leaders alike agreed that accepting a counteroffer from a current employer will adversely affect one’s career.
Some 78% of senior executives and 80% of HR leaders indicated that it is sometimes acceptable to embrace a counteroffer.
There’s no doubt that counteroffers are stressful for all concerned – bosses aware of today’s intense competition for talent and well-intentioned resignees suddenly finding themselves tempted by a counteroffer they didn’t expect.
Participants in our study differed widely on the advisability of accepting a counteroffer purely on the basis of compensation.
Asked to check off as many negative consequences of accepting a counteroffer as apply, nearly 80% of senior executives and 60% of HR leaders cited diminished trust and compromised reputation among the executives and board members of the employee’s current company.
What are the odds that your accepting a counteroffer will be good for your career? Our interviewees variously estimated that counteroffers work out well in only 5% to 25% of cases.
Even an authentic-sounding revelatory counteroffer may simply be a sign of a strengthening economy buoying the market for top executives and pressuring companies to hold onto their people – including those whom they may have previously neglected or underappreciated.
Perhaps the best advice about a counteroffer is don’t let it come to that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “OxyContin Maker Explored Expansion Into “Attractive””

Citing extensive emails and internal company documents, the redacted sections allege that Purdue and the Sackler family went to extreme lengths to boost OxyContin sales and burnish the drug’s reputation in the face of increased regulation and growing public awareness of its addictive nature.
Among the allegations: Purdue paid two executives convicted of fraudulently marketing OxyContin millions of dollars to assure their loyalty, concealed information about doctors suspected of inappropriately prescribing the opioid, and was advised by global consulting firm McKinsey & Co. on strategies to boost the drug’s sales and burnish its image, including how to “Counter the emotional messages” of mothers whose children overdosed.
In 1998, two years after OxyContin was launched, Dr. Richard Sackler, a son of Purdue co-founder Raymond Sackler, instructed executives in an email that its tablets were not merely “Therapeutic” but also “Enhance personal performance,” like Viagra.
From 2009 until at least 2014, McKinsey helped Purdue shape its message for selling OxyContin and overcoming concerns about addiction and overdoses, according to redacted passages.
While OxyContin sales were declining, the internal team at Purdue touted the fact that the addiction treatment marketplace was expanding.
Although Richard Sackler had blamed OxyContin abuse in an email on “Reckless criminals,” the Purdue staff exploring the new business opportunity described in far more sympathetic terms the patients whom it now planned to treat.
The Massachusetts complaint cites multiple incidents of Purdue allegedly sitting on information, sometimes for years, about doctors it had reason to believe were inappropriately prescribing OxyContin.
In 2012, a Purdue employee appealed to the company’s head of sales to alert health insurers to data the company collected about doctors suspected of abusing or illegally prescribing OxyContin.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Security Company Cashed In on America’s Wars-And Then Disappeared”

As Thapa lay in a hospital bed, his son-in-law, who speaks English, emailed the guard’s employers, a well-established company called Sabre International Security, with urgent questions: How would the critical surgery Thapa needed be paid for? What would happen to him afterward, given that he clearly wouldn’t be able to work for a long time? Apart from one brush-off email, no one responded.
New companies sprang up to profit from the opportunity, among them Sabre International Security.
One former Sabre employee told The Bureau that this new company was effectively Sabre under a different name.
Elisha, who spent weeks on the ground, concluded in a court statement that Sabre had been banned from operating in Iraq and that company assets had indeed been transferred to Near East Security Services.
The contract terms, a 2013 copy of which has been seen by The Bureau, required Sabre to hire guards from Nepal and India, giving the company around $5,000 a month for each one.
A spokesperson for the Canadian minister of foreign affairs said that he could not publicly discuss details relating to the Sabre contract “Given the nature of security contracts,” and that he was unable to comment on details of operational security.
In the message, which was obtained by lawyers working on the Nepalis’ case, Sabre said that the $300,000 figure was based on a mistaken interpretation of an old document, and argued that $30,000 was “More than the majority of policies from Private Security Companies.” To the question of why employees were not informed that their coverage had been drastically cut, the company said: “Personnel are not required to be advised.”
Sabre’s defense was to argue that although a company registered in the British Virgin Islands called Sabre had hired Harty, his employer in Iraq was a different entity, also called Sabre, and that company had to be sued in Iraq.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Personal Toll of Whistle-Blowing”

During his time at Freedom, Sewell had become convinced that the company was defrauding the government of hundreds of millions of dollars by carrying out a sophisticated set of scams targeted at a new program called Medicare Advantage.
Medicare Advantage, the program that Sewell believed Freedom was abusing, is at the center of a growing number of fraud cases, some of which involve the biggest names in the health-insurance industry.
Most of the Sewell boys’ free time was devoted to sports: Sewell played baseball, basketball, and varsity soccer, and was a competitive swimmer, eventually qualifying for nationals.
According to Sewell, the internal philosophy at Freedom was to keep costs low, to move swiftly, and to be aggressive.
Inman told me that, when Sewell walked into the room, she thought, “This guy is weird. He’s tall, he’s awkward, he’s got this eye thing going on.” But, she continued, “It sort of added to the mad-scientist bit. He was so impossibly intelligent.” She was soon won over by his self-deprecating humor, and described him as a “Gentle giant.” Sewell told her that he believed Freedom was “Cherry-picking”-recruiting healthy enrollees who needed little or no medical care-in addition to lemon-dropping.
Inman warned Sewell that being a whistle-blower would take a personal toll.
Ortega approached Panara after a conference and confronted him with comments that Sewell had recorded-comments that, from their context, likely made it clear that Sewell was the government’s source.
In April of 2012, Freedom placed Sewell on administrative leave; in September, he submitted his “Involuntary resignation.” Later that fall, while he was at home looking for a new job, Sewell heard that his former employers were telling others in the industry to avoid working with him.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Ugly Produce’ Subscription Boxes Have Ignited a Food War”

Depending on who you ask, ugly produce is either the salvation or destruction of America’s food system.
Last week on Twitter, the crop scientist Sarah Taber wrote a long thread arguing that ugly produce isn’t the problem or solution.
“The food system is a hot mess but using ugly produce is one thing it’s actually really good at,” she says in the thread. In her estimation, my carrot nuggets are proof of concept: Odd produce might not go to Whole Foods, but much of it still does go to stores that serve working-class people, or gets sent to processors who turn it into salsa or apple juice.
The vast majority of American produce does indeed make it to a packinghouse for processing and distribution, but farmers point out that efficiency varies wildly depending on what kind of producer you are.
According to David Earle, the business manager for the farm collective Tuscarora Organic Growers Cooperative, in Pennsylvania, around 20 percent of the produce from his organization’s small growers doesn’t meet stringent grocery-store or restaurant standards.
Tuscarora has started distributing its excess produce through the ugly-produce-box company Misfits Market, and Earle says it’s been a boon to the business.
In an interview with The New Republic, Imperfect Produce, the start-up that serves Terra Organics’ former community, conceded that it works with industrial-scale producers like Dole to source food, which critics say can make these start-ups an ally of exactly the food system that creates waste and hunger in the first place.
If affluent consumers can feel as if they’re making ethical purchases while enjoying the savings and convenience of wonky vegetables delivered from commercial producers, they might be less likely to buy from local producers and cooperatives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Bought a Fake Canada Goose Jacket on Amazon”

Between the time I received my counterfeit coat and the day I presented myself to the company as a journalist, Adamserft was still selling coats, even as other one-star reviews flooded his seller’s page warning of fraud.
In a statement, Amazon said it has many processes in place to combat counterfeit products, including machine learning, automated systems, dedicated teams of software engineers, research scientists, program managers, and investigators.
According to the company, more than 99 percent of Amazon pages that customers visit have not received notices of potential infringement.
Read: Knockoff appeal: Counterfeits can boost sales of the real thing.
Elliott, who helps run Project Chargeback, a collaboration between the Canadian Anti-Fraud Center, credit-card companies, and banks, calls the fakery not only of luxury goods but also of strollers, tools, generators, and so much more a “Huge problem worldwide” across e-commerce sites.
“We have assisted over 40 thousand victims mainly from Canada and recovered approximately $15 million since January 2013, when we started Project Chargeback,” Elliott says.
On the plus side, Elliott notes, if you use a credit card to pay for counterfeit goods, you should be guaranteed a refund when a product is verified as fake.
According to Elliott, his office for Project Chargeback in Ontario and the City of London Police are the only criminal investigators in the world working directly with defrauded customers and banks to combat the online sale of counterfeit goods.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook Block: I Cut Facebook Out of My Life. I Missed It”

Originally, I just planned to block myself from using Facebook the same way I’d blocked myself from using Amazon, by routing all my internet traffic through a virtual private network controlled by the technologist Dhruv Mehrotra, who is prohibiting my devices from communicating with the 122,880 IP addresses controlled by Facebook.
The Amazon block took out whole websites and services for me, but that’s not the case with Facebook, because it doesn’t control the building blocks of the internet.
The vast majority of Facebook’s requests are likely its attempts to track my movements around the web, via Like and Share buttons, Facebook Analytics, Facebook Ads, and Facebook Pixel.
Facebook Pixel, if you haven’t heard of it, is a little piece of code that a company can put on its website-say, on a particular sneaker page that you look at while signed into Facebook on your work computer.
Cutting Facebook out of my life is easy technically; Dhruv’s IP address block works well.
The first day of the Facebook block is Halloween, which is particularly hard because I can’t post cute photos of my 1-year-old, Ellev, dressed up as Boo from Monsters Inc. And I can’t find out what my friends are dressed as unless I individually text or email them, which is weird.
If you give up Facebook and all the companies it owns, you’re cut off from participating in your community, whatever your community may be.
Freedom From Facebook has been pushing the Federal Trade Commission to treat Facebook like a monopoly and break it up.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Before You Can Be With Others, First Learn to Be Alone”

Like many poets and philosophers through the ages, Poe stressed the significance of solitude.
Two decades later, the idea of solitude captured Ralph Waldo Emerson’s imagination in a slightly different way: quoting Pythagoras, he wrote: ‘In the morning, – solitude; that nature may speak to the imagination, as she does never in company.
In the 20th century, the idea of solitude formed the centre of Hannah Arendt’s thought.
What Eichmann showed Arendt was that society could function freely and democratically only if it were made up of individuals engaged in the thinking activity – an activity that required solitude.
We might ask, we become lonely in our solitude? Isn’t there some danger that we will become isolated individuals, cut off from the pleasures of friendship? Philosophers have long made a careful, and important, distinction between solitude and loneliness.
Echoing Plato, Arendt observed: ‘Thinking, existentially speaking, is a solitary but not a lonely business; solitude is that human situation in which I keep myself company.
In solitude, Arendt never longed for companionship or craved camaraderie because she was never truly alone.
Arendt reminds us, if we lose our capacity for solitude, our ability to be alone with ourselves, then we lose our very ability to think.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Marijuana: How Cannabis Stock Tilray Brought Weed to America”

Kennedy’s family moved into the new house a few weeks after Tilray went public, and he still struggles to find things in his own kitchen.
The day before the predawn pancakes, Kennedy and I had boarded a 10-seat Cessna prop plane at Seattle’s Boeing Field for an hour-long flight to Tilray’s official headquarters, in Nanaimo on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, the lush, rugged province renowned among cannabis connoisseurs for its “BC bud.” It was cold enough to see your breath inside the plane.
Kennedy, who previously started and sold two dotcom-era software companies before getting an MBA from Yale, claims he didn’t anticipate the investor frenzy that Tilray ignited as the first cannabis producer to go public on a major U.S. exchange.
“Brendan thinks in terms of a timeline,” says Michael Blue, one of Kennedy’s Yale MBA classmates and the third cofounder of Tilray.
At the same time, Kennedy was troubled by the law’s failure to distinguish marijuana from other narcotics like heroin, even as cannabis seemed to truly help people without putting them at risk of an overdose.
To stay ahead, Kennedy spends a lot of time trying to predict which country will be the next to legalize marijuana, so that Tilray will be there when it does.
Even Kennedy, previously a valuation expert, has trouble putting a number on how big Tilray could be.
In five years, Kennedy hopes, 90% of the pot Tilray sells will be cultivated by other companies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Write a Resume That Stands Out to Hiring Managers”

So how do you make your resume stand out among hundreds of applicants?
Hiring managers don’t have a ton of time to thoroughly look over each resume, which means you have to be judicious about what to include.
A good resume includes specifics on what you’ve actually accomplished throughout your career, says Traci Schweikert, Vice President of Human Resources at POLITICO. If you’re looking to make your resume stand out, consider these six tips from HR executives.
One of the best ways to make your resume stand out is to use the job posting as a guide.
It may sound tedious, but taking the time to customize your resume for each individual job you apply to is a surefire tactic to stand out among the pack of applicants, she says.
For starters, you never know exactly how a hiring manager will be reading your resume; they may pull it up on their phone, or go through an applicant tracking system.
Most applications are submitted online, and the volume of resumes that hiring managers must sift through can be overwhelming at times – so establishing a personal connection can help you get noticed, she says.
After your informational interview, you can reach out to that contact and ask that they glance over your resume, making sure to pose as many specific questions as possible about how you should tailor your resume to the company or specific role, Schweikert adds.

The orginal article.