Summary of “Why your app doesn’t care who you are – Experience Magazine”

The popular app for runners had no setting that let her pause her goals toward faster run times without erasing them altogether.
Kelly O’Leary of Berkeley, California, complains that Planned Parenthood’s Spot On app couldn’t be paused when she got pregnant, and now might miscalculate her ovulation cycle.
Wachter-Boettcher, the author of Technically Wrong: Sexist Apps, Biased Algorithms, and Other Threats of Toxic Tech, cites the industry concept of the “Minimum viable product:” releasing an app with basic features as quickly as possible, then “Not necessarily going back and asking deeper questions about it,” or taking steps to expand upon that basic functionality in later versions.
“All these big companies that view themselves as technology companies, but not as security companies. They’re learning [safety] on the back end,” Kayyem says.
Who drives for Uber and Lyft in Florida, says he’s asked to pick teenagers up all the time.
Many drivers complain about the challenges of transporting minors, says Brett Helling, a former Uber driver who runs the website Gigworker.com.
Uber is testing an option that would allow passengers to request car seats in four U.S. cities, and the company recently relaxed its stiff penalties for drivers who cancel rides.
“Being a woman, driving at night, it’s not always the most comfortable situation. You don’t know who’s getting in your car,” says Natalie Kostich, who used to drive for Uber and now has a few regular ZemCar customers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Insurance Companies Are Paying Cops To Investigate Their Own Customers”

Erie Insurance, one of the nation’s largest auto insurers, had not only provided the cops with evidence against its own loyal customer – it had actively worked with them to try to convict him of insurance fraud.
Insurance companies provide financial incentives to scores of police departments, prosecutors, and other public agencies to encourage them to focus on insurance fraud, a crime that has traditionally not been a priority for local law enforcement.
These efforts to fight phony claims have netted insurers at least a sevenfold return on investment since the ’90s, according to the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud, a nonprofit that receives most of its funding from insurance companies.
Insurance company officials make up the majority of the authority’s board, which last year doled out $14 million in targeted grants to fund the work of roughly 100 prosecutors, investigators, and support staffers across the state dedicated exclusively to rooting out insurance fraud.
Those law enforcement officials collected $5.6 million in restitution from people accused of insurance fraud in 2018, money that went back to the insurance companies.
His salary of $93,549, as well as those of the police officers assigned to work on insurance fraud, was entirely covered by grants from the Pennsylvania Insurance Fraud Prevention Authority.
Three years later, the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud, a group composed of insurance companies, consumer groups, and other stakeholders, helped craft model legislation that guaranteed companies broad immunity from any customer who wished to sue for being wrongly accused of fraud.
NICB agents help vet thousands of suspected fraud reports shared by insurance companies, embed in task forces with the FBI, and help craft threatening letters to customers suspected of fraud on behalf of state insurance regulators.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Funko Pop! vinyl figurines are a $686 million dollar business”

They are Pop Vinyl figurines, created by the 20-year-old company Funko Inc., based in Washington state, and launched in 2011.
Known to fans simply as “Funko Pops,” each toy is based on a pop culture character, and according to the official Funko App, there are now 8,366 different figures.
It’s likely you’ve now encountered a Funko Pop – be it on a coworker’s desk, wrapped under a Christmas tree, or waiting, blank-eyed, in your date’s home.
Collectors like Jack make up 36 percent of Funko’s customers, while 31 percent are “Occasional buyers.” Wilkinson says Funko Pops appeal to both markets because of the “Science of cute” behind the figurines’ design.
It’s also undeniable that many people find Funko Pops ugly or unnerving – in the past two months, a YouTube video titled “I HATE FUNKO POP VINYLS” has accumulated more than a million views.
On the Funko website, there are currently 29 distinct figurines of TV host Conan O’Brien – you can get the comedian dressed as Jon Snow, an Armenian folk dancer, or Pennywise the clown, or even just painted entirely orange.
Is it possible that Funko will run out of things to Pop? At present, the company’s profits continue to climb, from $98 million gross profit in 2015 to $258 million in 2018.
Ten years ago, Funko – which had grown a loyal customer base for its bobblehead range – was feeling the heat of a declining fad. Now it is one of the world’s most recognizable pop culture merchandisers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The World’s Most Ruthless Food Startup: The Inside Story of How HelloFresh Clawed Its Way to the Top”

In 2018, after lagging far behind Blue Apron in the U.S. for most of its entire history, HelloFresh caught up and overtook it, making it the No. 1 meal-kit company in America as well as the rest of the world.
So how has HelloFresh managed to defy the fate of its competitors? Richter explains the startup’s strategy as he would one of its recipes: His team finds the target customer, busy families; fine-tunes the efficiency of the marketing efforts; improves the quality of the recipes; expands the range of the offerings to cater to even more customer segments.
Believing their best potential customers were busy white-collar professionals, the teams packed bags with prepared HelloFresh food and headed for office buildings, talking their way past security.
Enlisting ex-contestants from ‘The Bachelor,’ like Ashley Iaconetti, to push HelloFresh on Instagram is one of the less aggressive marketing tactics the startup uses to lure new customers-and keep them from quitting.
In June 2014, New York City-based Insight Venture Partners led a $34 million round, according to company filings, that valued HelloFresh at $178 million, several times its previous valuation.
In September 2018, two months after the repeated health department complaints and Linden police reports, HelloFresh successfully closed an $85 million round, led by Baillie Gifford, which valued HelloFresh at $2.9 billion, more than four times its valuation just seven months earlier.
In January 2016, the customer in the Netherlands who had tried and failed to get HelloFresh to stop contacting him after canceling the service wrote a profanity-laced Medium post railing against the hyper-aggressive tactics of the startup, comparing HelloFresh to some combination of stalker ex-boyfriend, religious proselytizer, and mobster.
In March, HelloFresh bought Green Chef, a Denver-based meal-kit company that specializes in organic food.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Overcome Your Fear of Failure”

Behind many fears is worry about doing something wrong, looking foolish, or not meeting expectations – in other words, fear of failure.
Let’s go back to Alex as an example of how to execute this.
In coaching Alex through this approach, I encouraged him to redefine how he would view his performance in the interview.
Was there a way he might interpret it differently from the get-go and be more open to signs of success, even if they were small? Could he, for example, redefine failure as not being able to answer any of the questions posed or receiving specific negative feedback? Could he redefine success as being able to answer each question to the best of his ability and receiving no criticisms about how he interviewed?
Goals can be classified as approach goals or avoidance goals based on whether you are motivated by wanting to achieve a positive outcome or avoid an adverse one.
Though nervous about the process, Alex’s desire to become a CEO was an approach goal because it focused on what he wanted to achieve in his career rather than what he hoped to avoid.
If Alex had instead become discouraged about the outcome of his first C-level interview and decided to actively avoid the pain of rejection by never vying for the top spot again, he would have shifted from approach to avoidance mode.
To return to Alex, he was able to recognize through the coaching process that being hyper-focused on his previous company’s flop – and overestimating his role in it – caused him to panic about the CEO interview.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Inside Story of How McDonald’s Innovated the Quarter Pounder”

“McDonald’s new fresh-beef Quarter Pounder is hotter and juicier. It’ll leave you speech-less. I can almost feel that juice sizzling…. Oh baby, the melted cheese is hugging every corner of that grilled patty…. That cheese is so hot, so melty.”
It was timed to the arrival-at every one of the restaurant chain’s 14,000 U.S. outposts-of fresh, never-frozen beef patties in its signature Quarter Pounder burgers, a change that execs say has been as seismic for the company as the introduction of all-day breakfast, in 2015, or even the drive-through window, which McDonald’s began experimenting with in 1975.
Menu chief Linda VanGosen, who joined McDonald’s from Starbucks last year, works closely with chefs and food scientists at McDonald’s suppliers and keeps a close eye on food trends, which have to reach a certain level of mass appeal to make sense for McDonald’s.
McDonald’s began testing fresh-beef Quarter Pounders a few years ago at restaurants in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Dallas, markets selected because they are serious burger country.
On a late-spring Tuesday, not long after the new patty began being served nationwide, Christa Small, one of the company’s top operations executives and the person whose team was responsible for coming up with the procedures that make fresh beef possible, visits a McDonald’s near the old campus in Oak Brook.
In crafting the new Quarter Pounder, McDonald’s has made subtle improvements to the entire sandwich, adjusting grill time and the bun-toasting process, for example.
McDonald’s switched from batch cooking to preparing each Quarter Pounder when ordered.
To demonstrate, Small takes me to the other side of a McDonald’s counter and asks an associate for a Quarter Pounder.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Inside Story of How McDonald’s Innovated the Quarter Pounder”

“McDonald’s new fresh-beef Quarter Pounder is hotter and juicier. It’ll leave you speech-less. I can almost feel that juice sizzling…. Oh baby, the melted cheese is hugging every corner of that grilled patty…. That cheese is so hot, so melty.”
It was timed to the arrival-at every one of the restaurant chain’s 14,000 U.S. outposts-of fresh, never-frozen beef patties in its signature Quarter Pounder burgers, a change that execs say has been as seismic for the company as the introduction of all-day breakfast, in 2015, or even the drive-through window, which McDonald’s began experimenting with in 1975.
Menu chief Linda VanGosen, who joined McDonald’s from Starbucks last year, works closely with chefs and food scientists at McDonald’s suppliers and keeps a close eye on food trends, which have to reach a certain level of mass appeal to make sense for McDonald’s.
McDonald’s began testing fresh-beef Quarter Pounders a few years ago at restaurants in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Dallas, markets selected because they are serious burger country.
On a late-spring Tuesday, not long after the new patty began being served nationwide, Christa Small, one of the company’s top operations executives and the person whose team was responsible for coming up with the procedures that make fresh beef possible, visits a McDonald’s near the old campus in Oak Brook.
In crafting the new Quarter Pounder, McDonald’s has made subtle improvements to the entire sandwich, adjusting grill time and the bun-toasting process, for example.
McDonald’s switched from batch cooking to preparing each Quarter Pounder when ordered.
To demonstrate, Small takes me to the other side of a McDonald’s counter and asks an associate for a Quarter Pounder.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The worst sales promotion in history: Hoover’s free flight fiasco”

They pitched the company a novel idea: A sales promotion where anyone who spent more than £100 on a Hoover product at a qualifying department store would get two free round-trip tickets to a destination in Europe.
Hoover advertised the promotion heavily in newspapers and TV commercials with an enticing caption: “Two free flights. Unbelievable!”.
Under a new promotion, that same £100 Hoover purchase could net a UK-based customer two free round-trip flights to New York or Orlando – a package worth £600+. When Hoover ran this plan by risk management professionals, the company was warned that it would be an absolute disaster.
As free flight entries ballooned, Hoover began to realize it had made a terrible mistake.
Sales soon outpaced Hoover’s projections by 10x: an estimated 300k people bought qualifying products – 600k flights that Hoover would potentially have to pay for.
Though the company generated around £30m in gross sales from the promotion, the cost of the flights was conservatively estimated to be more than £100m. So, Hoover began to do everything it could to fleece customers out of the free flights.
“The whole idea is to dissuade [customers] from going, because each time they go it costs Hoover money,” one Hoover exec told a participating travel agency.
One of them, Harry Cichy, formed Hoover Holiday Pressure Group, a coalition to hold Hoover accountable for what they’d promised.

The orginal article.

Summary of “New York Attorney General Sues ExxonMobil Over Alleged Climate Change Fraud”

The state of New York is suing ExxonMobil on charges that the energy goliath consistently misled its investors about what it knew concerning the climate crisis-essentially lying to them about what it might eventually cost the company in eventual climate-related financial risks, because the company knew better than practically anyone else what those risks were.
From Inside Climate News:.Exxon engaged in “a longstanding fraudulent scheme” to deceive investors by providing false and misleading assurances that it was effectively managing the economic risks posed by increasingly stringent policies and regulations it anticipated being adopted to address climate change, the lawsuit states.
“Instead of managing those risks in the manner it represented to investors, Exxon employed internal practices that were inconsistent with its representations, were undisclosed to investors, and exposed the company to greater risk from climate change regulation than investors were led to believe,” the lawsuit said.
The hardball has begun in earnest, again via ICN:.New court filings reveal that Exxon sent letters to a group of investment advisers and shareholder activists who prosecutors want to put on the stand, informing them they will be subject to subpoenas from the company seeking documents relevant to the case if they choose to testify.
Because of their roles investing in and engaging with Exxon over climate change, these witnesses’ testimony could prove critical to the state’s case.
With opening statements scheduled to begin Oct. 23, a lawyer in New York Attorney General Letitia James’s office wrote that the request would “Impose disproportionate burdens on these witnesses in a transparent attempt to discourage them from testifying voluntarily, and threatening to upend the trial schedule.”… While prosecutors had agreed to allow Exxon to interview the witnesses before the trial, the company went further by sending at least one witness what the attorney general described as an expansive request for documents and communications, including “All documents concerning your oil and gas holdings” and more.
The case is historic, especially in light of the revelations that Exxon and other energy companies knew as long ago as 30 years that carbon emissions were becoming perilous to the planet.
Global changes in air temperature would also “Drastically change the way people live and work.” All told, Shell concluded, “The changes may be the greatest in recorded history.”Talk about your hoaxes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 7 Basic Human Needs That Successful Businesses Focus On”

Let’s start with the concept of basic human needs.
The famous economist Manfred Max Neef said, “That the aim of development must be neither producerism not consumerism, but the satisfaction of fundamental human needs, which are not only needs of humanity, but needs of being as well.”
Neef created the ‘Human Scale Development,’ which states, among other things, the following two assumptions: First, fundamental human needs are finite, being limited in number and classifiable.
Second, Neef stated that fundamental human needs are the same in all cultures and in all historical periods.
The idea that all of us, as human beings, have basic needs can be quite revolutionary, especially when you grow up in a society that imposes needs, represented by “Shoulds” and “Should-nots” passed down by previous generations.
These highly successful companies learned early on the importance of connecting their business directly to human needs.
If your main needs are connection and expression, then you want to market to groups that also prioritize those needs.
Once you have identified your own needs and your chosen market and its needs, then it’s time to define your company’s values and needs.

The orginal article.