Summary of “To Seem More Competent, Be More Confident”

One important reason this happens is that people are simply not great at assessing competence – a crucial trait for succeeding at work – and perceptions of competence are just as important for success as actual competence.
Because of this, people tend to evaluate competence based on other factors, meaning you have to do more than produce results to convince them of your expertise.
Lo and behold, the person’s prediction had a strong influence on how subjects perceived their competence: Observers evaluated those who made optimistic predictions as much more competent than their modest contemporaries – no matter how accurate those predictions were and how well they actually performed.
A negative forecast may lead you to be perceived as distinctly less competent – no matter how well you actually perform.
Why do people view confident others as more competent, even when their performance suggests otherwise? One explanation is that we have a tendency to believe what we are told, and to confirm our beliefs by selecting information that supports them.
To feel more authentic demonstrating confidence, you may first have to convince yourself.
Do you think they have a good sense of your competence and expertise? If not, could you be demonstrating more confidence in your tasks? This doesn’t necessarily mean praising yourself at every opportunity; rather it means projecting an optimistic attitude.
By displaying more confidence in your abilities, you set yourself up to be recognized for your competence and your contributions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research: When Overconfidence Is an Asset, and When It’s a Liability”

What happens to people who are overconfident? Are they generally rewarded, promoted, and respected? Or do we distrust them and avoid collaborating with them? Our research suggests it may depend on how they express confidence.
We noticed a pattern in the existing research: that the confidence expressions in studies on in-person groups were primarily nonverbal; whereas in studies with vignettes or videos, they were primarily verbal.
Participants overwhelmingly selected the confident candidate, regardless of whether confidence was described using verbal statements from the candidates, or was inferred from how the candidates carried themselves on recorded video.
Then participants received performance information that could help them detect overconfidence; they found that, despite their confidence, all candidates were equally mediocre at a pre-screening version of the task.
If the candidate had expressed confidence verbally, the candidate suffered a big blow to reputation and lost the advantage; fewer people selected them as collaborators compared to the cautious candidate.
Our participants found the denial much more plausible when the candidate had expressed confidence nonverbally rather than verbally.
The results replicated our previous studies, in that confidence, no matter how it was expressed, was beneficial until it became clear that performance fell short.
It’s harder to hold people accountable for overestimating their abilities or knowledge when they express that confidence in nonverbal ways.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Puberty Kills Girls’ Confidence”

A lack of confidence isn’t what’s holding back working women.
The female tween and early-teen confidence plunge is especially striking because multiple measures suggest that girls in middle and high school are, generally speaking, outperforming boys academically, and many people mistake their success for confidence.
The girls we talked with and polled detailed, instead, a worrisome shift.
From girls 12 and under, we heard things such as “I make friends really easily-I can go up to anyone and start a conversation” and “I love writing poetry and I don’t care if anyone else thinks it’s good or bad.” A year or more into their teens, it was “I feel like everybody is so smart and pretty and I’m just this ugly girl without friends,” and “I feel that if I acted like my true self that no one would like me.”
Confidence is an essential ingredient for turning thoughts into action, wishes into reality.
So the cratering of confidence in girls is especially troubling because of long-term implications.
Indeed the confidence gender gap that opens at puberty often remains throughout adulthood.
The boys in our survey seemed to have a greater appetite for risk-taking: Our poll shows that, between ages 8 and 14, boys are more likely than girls to describe themselves as confident, strong, adventurous, and fearless.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Processing My Struggle With Depression And Imposter Syndrome in Silicon Valley”

I didn’t have that skill in 2011; I wasn’t processing my emotions, how I was feeling and even worse, how I was making others feel around me.
While working to overcome my depression, I was still in San Francisco, going through the life cycles of entrepreneurship, working for a startup, launching a startup,, meeting with investors, raising money, looking at job opportunities, launching hackathons and winning hackathons.
Thinking about each of those meetings, I know how the Silicon Valley network effects and culture works.
Some Lessons learned from depression: 1) Be honest with yourself 2) Once you start feeling depressed, acknowledge it and seek help 3) Find out what makes you happy and repeat it 4) Get out of your comfort zone and do something fun 5) Talk to and trust real friends 6) Work towards security 7) See professional help, therapist.
Slowly I started feeling better emotionally over the last three to four years, but I noticed another emotional roadblock, impostor syndrome.
Impostor syndrome is a feeling that you’re a fraud.
Feelings of failure, a sense of not being satisfied, feelings of not knowing your strengths.
Once you combine depression, imposter syndrome and introversion, it’s like creating a mind poison.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How do you become a more confident person? Psychological research says the key is taking risks”

Confidence is an elusive goal for many people.
We tend to think confidence is a personality trait, and treat it as a pre-requisite for action.
The truth is that confidence isn’t an innate trait; it’s a quality gained through experience.
Entire cottage industries popped up selling superficial solutions to boost people’s confidence in 20 minutes or less by repeating positive affirmations to themselves.
The key to cracking the confidence may lie in tackling those uncomfortable emotions head on, as entrepreneur Steph Crowder did live on her podcast.
We would all do better if we understood, as Mindy Kaling has put it, that confidence isn’t something that ought to come to us naturally.
Once you’ve proven to yourself that you can perform in front of a crowd or run a marathon or ask a person out on a date, it’s a lot easier to have confidence the next time you face a big challenge.
Let’s learn to view confidence not as a personality trait but as an acquired skill-one that’s available to all of us, if we’re willing to put in the work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You Need to Give Up These Toxic Habits If You Want to Be Confident and Successful”

If you emanate confidence, others will be drawn to you.
Without further ado, here are some common behaviors you should give up in order to be more confident and successful.
American journalist, activist, author of six best-selling books Maria Shriver once said, “Perfectionism doesn’t make you feel perfect; it makes you feel inadequate.”Often, we strive for perfection because we seek approval and praise from others.
Power posing is when we use our bodies, on purpose and with intent, to create powerful movements that are more spread out and take up more space, creating this message of confidence to ourselves and others.
“Comparison is the thief of joy” - Theodore RooseveltIf you are in the habit of comparing yourself to others, and a big majority of us are, it’s time to stop.
If you feel good about something you’ve done, enjoy it - you don’t need the recognition from others to affirm your accomplishments.
“The difference between successful people and others is how long they spend time feeling sorry for themselves.” - Barbara CorcoranIf you’re waking up every morning thinking about what went wrong the day before, you’re going about your career the wrong way.
Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”Like many other success stories, Roosevelt realized that she couldn’t choose who was happy with her and who wasn’t.

The orginal article.