Summary of “Do All These Things Before Traveling Internationally”

Bank of AmericaYou can set up a Bank of America travel notice on your mobile app or through your online account.
Wells FargoIf you want to take your Wells Fargo credit card with you, set up a Wells Fargo travel plans notice.
Click on “Manage Travel Plans,” which is under the “Manage Cards” section.
Saving on travel is all about flexibility, says the anonymous editor-in-chief of the luxury travel.
Get an international phone planAlways Buy an International Data Plan When You Travel Abroad. Last week a story emerged about a couple that was traveling in Bali and ended up in a scooter.
Verizon offers a similar service, Travel Pass, that costs $5 a day to extend your plan to Mexico and Canada and $10 per day for service in more than 100 other countries.
You can even apply for a duplicate passport if you’re someone who regularly travels abroad and tends to lose things.
If you travel internationally frequently, then Global Entry can.

The orginal article.

Summary of “He’s Vietnamese. She’s From North Korea. They Had To Wait 3 Decades To Marry”

The two are sitting on the sofa in their modest, Soviet-era apartment in Hanoi, speaking of the time back in the early 1970s when they first spotted each other working at a fertilizer plant in North Korea.
Canh remembers taking a trip to North Korea in the late 1970s and sending Ri a letter, asking her to meet.
As relations between the countries started to improve in the late 1980s, he started a personal charm offensive to, as he says, “Build my personal credit with North Korea.”
He set up a Vietnam-North Korea friendship committee, raised money for a 7-ton donation of rice and reached out to North Korean contacts in Hanoi.
In 2001, he made an audacious move, using connections in the Foreign Ministry to deliver a letter pleading his case to Vietnam’s president – who was about to leave on a state visit to North Korea.
“I’ve done all I can. But I knew in my heart that North Korea would say yes.”
In late 2002, after the couple had waited 30 years, North Korea took the rare step of allowing one of its citizens to marry a foreigner.
“That U.S.-North Korean relationship gets better, and that the U.S. lifts sanctions and helps North Korea so that North Korea can develop.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Brexit: what happens the next day if there is no deal?”

Currently, a driver of a UK-registered car is allowed to drive anywhere in the EU, the EEA, Switzerland and Serbia, and not have to carry a green card that proves you have insurance cover.
If the UK leaves without a deal, all changes and drivers will be expected to carry a green card when in mainland Europe and Ireland.
The official advice from the UK government is: “From 29 March 2019, in the event that there is no EU exit deal drivers of UK-registered vehicles will need to carry a motor insurance green card when driving in the EU and EEA.”.
Direct Line insurance says: “In the event of a no-deal Brexit, we have plans to ensure customers are provided with a green card if they drive in Europe on or after 29 March. Customers will need to contact us at least two weeks in advance of when they are due to travel.”
From 29 March, if the UK leaves without a deal, the government says: “You may need a GB sticker even if your vehicle has a europlate. You will not need a GB sticker to drive outside the UK if you replace a europlate with a numberplate that features the GB sign without the EU flag.” PC. Driving with a UK licence when abroad. In a sentence You will have to buy an International Driving Permit to drive in Europe, at a price of £5.50, with different ones required for France and Spain.
If there is no deal with the EU then recognition of UK driving licences in the EU ends.
So British drivers will have to go to the Post Office and obtain an International Driving Permit, which you will need to carry with you in conjunction with your UK driving licence.
It was also revealed this week that British citizens resident in Ireland – estimated to number about 300,000 – will be required to swap their UK driving licence for an Irish one at a fee of €55 if there is no deal on Brexit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A country music artist navigates an art form altered by America’s poisoned politics”

Price’s career – her success and nearly a decade of struggles – is a testament to the way America’s poisonous politics are scrambling country music.
Country music these days is dominated by men, who typically account for about 80 to 90 percent of Billboard’s top 40 country radio hits.
Country music has for decades accommodated different sounds and styles – the Bakersfield Sound, Outlaw Country, Urban Cowboy country and alt-country among others.
Mainstream country music has little patience for messages that fail to celebrate small-town America or tilt even remotely anti-Trump.
Simpson had won a Grammy earlier that same year for best country album like Price, was rejected by mainstream country music radio.
The same pressures that were splitting the country were now fracturing country music.
“Country music is taking collateral damage because so many people these days want blood,” said Kyle Coroneos, who runs the website Saving Country Music.
“Sonically I want to do something different, and I want to reach more people. Country music was a good way to get my foot in the door, but. . . when you venture out of country music you have more freedom to say what you want, and country music radio isn’t doing me any favors.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “FDR and Herbert Hoover’s Fight Over the New Deal”

His Roosevelt is a liberal hero who consistently advocated an expansion of public programs both to ameliorate the immediate suffering of the Depression and to stabilize the economy over the long term.
That is surely true, even if-as was often commented on at the time-the New Deal was not a clear-cut agenda that Roosevelt had ready-to-hand before he came into office.
Rauchway’s revisionist emphasis shouldn’t eclipse the fact that the legislative efforts that went into the New Deal reflected many different interpretations of the problems facing the country in the 1930s.
Even Roosevelt sometimes seemed to retreat from what might appear now to be the most basic precepts of the New Deal.
As the economist Alvin Hansen put it in 1940, when asked whether he believed the “Basic principle” of the New Deal was economically sound: “I really do not know what the basic principle of the New Deal is.”
To make the New Deal seem as though it was a program that Roosevelt had worked out well ahead of time is to simplify this history, and to cut against the sense of crisis and contingency that Winter War so powerfully evokes.
This version of events also makes the New Deal appear somehow a project of Roosevelt alone, rather than a political response to the wave of protests against the economic inequality and poverty that swept up millions of Americans.
How much easier the situation would be if there were a standard-bearer in the Democratic Party, someone with an inspiring vision to move the country forward! But Roosevelt did not create the New Deal alone; it was the product of a generation of struggle and upheaval, of political unrest and agitation that extended well beyond Washington, D.C..

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Study on Driverless-Car Ethics Offers a Troubling Look Into Our Values”

The first time Azim Shariff met Iyad Rahwan-the first real time, after communicating with him by phone and e-mail-was in a driverless car.
A car at level four would be highly autonomous in basic situations, like highways, but would need a human operator.
“We would kind of geek out.” One of their most frequent topics of conversation was the ethics of self-driving cars.
In the game, players are presented with a version of the trolley problem: a driverless car can either stay its course and hit what is in its path, or swerve and hit something else.
The U.S. government has clear guidelines for autonomous weapons-they can’t be programmed to make “Kill decisions” on their own-but no formal opinion on the ethics of driverless cars.
What should a company do if another country wants its vehicles to reflect different moral calculations? Should a Western car de-prioritize the young in an Eastern country? Shariff leans toward adjusting each model for the country where it’s meant to operate.
In twenty to fifty years, the majority of cars on the road will likely be driverless.
In a future dominated by driverless cars, moral texture will erode away in favor of a rigid ethical framework.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The More Gender Equality, the Fewer Women in STEM”

In looking at test scores across 67 countries and regions, Stoet and Geary found that girls performed about as well or better than boys did on science in most countries, and in almost all countries, girls would have been capable of college-level science and math classes if they had enrolled in them.
The more gender-equal the country, as measured by the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index, the larger this gap between boys and girls in having science as their best subject.
What’s more, the countries that minted the most female college graduates in fields like science, engineering, or math were also some of the least gender-equal countries.
“Countries with the highest gender equality tend to be welfare states,” they write, “With a high level of social security.” Meanwhile, less gender-equal countries tend to also have less social support for people who, for example, find themselves unemployed.
Thus, the authors suggest, girls in those countries might be more inclined to choose STEM professions, since they offer a more certain financial future than, say, painting or writing.
When the study authors looked at the “Overall life satisfaction” rating of each country-a measure of economic opportunity and hardship-they found that gender-equal countries had more life satisfaction.
The life-satisfaction ranking explained 35 percent of the variation between gender equality and women’s participation in STEM. That correlation echoes past research showing that the genders are actually more segregated by field of study in more economically developed places.
The upshot of this research is neither especially feminist nor especially sad: It’s not that gender equality discourages girls from pursuing science.

The orginal article.

Summary of “China and the Geopolitics of the Far Side of the Moon”

In recent years China’s space efforts have jumped to warp speed.
In 2018, China launched more rockets into orbit than any other country.
Read: Why it’s a bad idea to launch rockets over land.
The country is aiming to land a rover on Mars in early 2021 and, if successful, would become the second country after the United States to accomplish the feat.
China’s space accomplishments are as symbolic and strategic as the Apollo and Vostok programs were in the 1960s, especially now, when space agencies in Europe, Russia, India, and, most recently, the United States have put a big focus on lunar exploration.
“We are building China into a space giant,” Wu said.
For spacefaring nations, impressive feats, whether it’s landing on Mars or on the far side of the moon, will always be seen through the lens of the nation that managed to pull it off.
We choose to go to the back of the moon not because of the unique glory it brings, but because this difficult step of destiny is also a forward step for human civilization!

The orginal article.

Summary of “Finland’s grand AI experiment – POLITICO”

Originally started as a free-access university course, Finland’s “1 percent” AI scheme is now being rolled out nationally with the support of private companies and the government.
For Helsinki, there is also a clear economic incentive to training large numbers of Finns in the basics of AI: Doing so may allow Finland to stay competitive amid ever growing competition between China and the United States, and in the aftermath of the rapid decline of Nokia, the national mobile champion that has fallen on hard times.
There is no point trying to compete with Beijing or Washington in terms of developing the basic technology of AI. So Finland aspires to occupy a niche, as world leader in practical applications of AI, according to Economy Minister Mika Lintilä.
In addition to the companies’ separate efforts, more than 10,500 people – over 6,300 of them from Finland – had graduated from the course by mid-December, according to Reaktor.
Finland’s ministry of foreign affairs and the country’s tax authority both announced they would also train their staff – and when the first batches of students graduated from Elements of AI in September 2018, Finland’s President Sauli Niinistö showed up at the ceremony.
In October 2017, Finland was the first EU country to put a national AI strategy into writing.
“We are using AI as the flagship project for a bigger kind of setup of themes of digitalization” – Ilona Lundström, a director general at Finland’s economy ministry.
The country is looking at experiments with neighbors to the west and the south, such as cross-border trials in autonomous shipping on the Baltic sea between Finnish or Swedish ports or an experiment to merge some of Finland’s and Estonia’s digital infrastructure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Unfixable: Several nations have tried to restore democracy after populist strongmen. It was never the same.”

Even in places where populists have already severely damaged freedoms, opinion leaders say democracy can be restored after those leaders leave.
Extrapolating lessons for the United States and other nations, the report notes that rebuilding democracy is arduous and hardly guaranteed, but that countries can potentially heal the wounds left by powerful executives who attacked it.
More recent populist regimes haven’t ended with a rupture or a reversion to democracy.
Citizens who lose faith in democracy and turn to antidemocratic tactics to oust populist leaders grease the slide toward permanent authoritarianism.
During long periods of true autocracy, especially in countries that have never experienced democracy, faith in democratic systems fares well.
In Thailand in the 1990s, after years of autocratic and military governments but before the rise of autocratic populism, citizens were similarly optimistic about democracy.
Autocratic populists erode faith in democracy itself – a faith already damaged in many countries by the failures of democratic politicians to deal with issues like inequality, migration and weak worker protections.
Similar declines in faith in democracy can be seen in several hotbeds of autocratic populism.

The orginal article.