Summary of “Ethiopia and Eritrea’s Long History With Lasagna”

The lasagna served at habesha gatherings is a kind of culinary rebellion, a testament to the transformative connections within our communities.
To watch your mother or aunt prepare lasagna is to know there will soon be love surrounding you-and no shortage of people, either.
Where the original dish combines its eponymous noodles with acidic tomato sauces and soft ricotta, Ethiopian and Eritrean pair the noodles with pungent aromatics, piquant seasonings, and meats common to the region.
Some particularly adventurous eaters-myself included, as long as my mom’s not looking-also season the finished dish with mitmita, a saltier, spicier cousin of berbere.
Ricotta is uncommon, with most habesha home cooks opting for a mix of the more readily available mozzarella and cheddar instead. Lasagna is a curious dish to rally around.
Even within Ethiopian and Eritrean diasporic communities, there’s no consensus on how a standard lasagna is prepared.
Even with slight tweaks-berbere quantity, bechamel presence, and the like-there’s something distinctive about the dish as made by Ethiopian and Eritrean home cooks.
Just as my mother’s tastes have shifted subtly in the time since she first learned to make the dish with fellow Ethiopian friends learning to cook in their strange new home, surely my palate has also adapted to the country of my birth even if it’s not the land to which I am loyal.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nicaragua on the Brink, Once Again”

In the street, people continued to chant “Ortega, Somoza, son la misma cosa”, and not only have the protesters refused to disperse but many of them are now calling for Ortega to step down.
It’s clear now that, for all their pragmatic backpedalling on the social-security bill, Ortega and Murillo’s long time in power, and their near-total control of Nicaragua’s public institutions, have left them out of touch with the feelings of many of their countrymen.
Ortega initially rose to power after the 1979 Sandinista revolution, when he was known as a Marxist firebrand, and he served as the country’s strongman President until 1990, when he ceded power after losing elections.
In the years since, Ortega and his wife have steadily consolidated their power, eliminating their opponents through a canny combination of economic co-option and, when necessary, outright repression.
In addition to the executive branch of government, Ortega and Murillo dominate Nicaragua’s Congress and judiciary.
There are many historical ironies to be found in Nicaragua’s crisis, not least the fact that, forty years ago, Ortega was a young revolutionary who convinced many Nicaraguans that he was part of a righteous campaign against Somoza, whose father and brother had previously ruled the country in a dynastic reign that stretched back to 1933.
While Ronald Reagan was President, Nicaragua became a front in the Cold War, which, eventually, thanks to the C.I.A.-backed Contra war against Ortega’s regime, led to the economic devastation of Nicaragua and the collapse of the Sandinistas’ hold on power.
Part of what makes the recent protests in Nicaragua so notable is that, amid a collapse of the political left across Latin America that is under way, Ortega was beginning to look like the Great Survivor.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The easiest places in the world to get citizenship or residency-if you’re rich”

To improve your ability to move and settle around the world with ease, the report points to another option: Simply buying residency or citizenship in another country by investing in a property or government fund, or paying some other kind of fee.
Country Visa-free destinations Minimum capital requirement Time frame Portugal 177 250,000 3 to 8 months Malta 173 671,972 4 to 6 months Thailand 75 15,902 Less than 1 month UK 177 2,789,108 Less than 2 month US 176 500,000 12 to 18 months Switzerland 176 Annual lump-sum tax payment of between 153,382 and 1,022,550 dependent on the canton of residence 2 to 6 months Canada 176 622,960 24 to 48 months Cyprus 163 366,433 2 months.
Buying citizenship isn’t necessarily more expensive than buying residency.
In the Caribbean islands Antigua and Barbuda, Grenada, St. Kitts and Nevis, and St. Lucia, citizenship can be bought from between $100,000 to $150,000.
Once paid for, citizenship is issued within three to four months.
Citizenship in these islands offers visa-free travel to more than 130 destinations.
Malta offers citizenship to those who invest $1.2 million, usually after 12 months.
For double that amount, Cyprus issues citizenship within three to six months.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sweden’s violent reality is undoing a peaceful self-image – POLITICO”

To understand crime in Sweden, it’s important to note that Sweden has benefited from the West’s broad decline in deadly violence, particularly when it comes to spontaneous violence and alcohol-related killings.
The overall drop in homicides has been far smaller in Sweden than in neighboring countries.
In response, the Swedish government has launched an international campaign for “The image of Sweden” playing down the rise in crime, both in its media strategy and through tax-funded PR campaigns.
During a visit to the White House in March, Sweden’s Prime Minister Stefan Löfven admitted that his country has problems with crime and specifically shootings, but denied the existence of no-go zones.
After repeated attacks against Jewish institutions in December – including the firebombing of a synagogue in Gothenburg – Bildt took to the same paper to claim that anti-Semitism is not a major problem in Sweden.
One “False claim” listed by the government is that “Not long ago, Sweden saw its first Islamic terrorist attack.”
The government’s excuse for denying the Islamic terrorist attack in Sweden is that no Islamic group has officially claimed responsibility.
The article caused a scandal in Sweden and was widely seen as part of the reason why the British and Canadian foreign ministries issued travel advice about the country, citing gang crime and explosions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Climate Change Is Messing With Your Dinner”

The world’s dinner tables are seeing the impact of climate change.
An evolving climate means big changes for people who grow, catch and rear for a living, and everyone else who buys and eats what they produce.
CERES-wheat crop model based on past climate data and HadGEM2 projections for 2050.
In the U.S., North Dakota now has a longer growing season, while some California farmers are planting coffee.
English sparkling wine is winning international awards as the climate in some areas of the country begins to resemble France’s Champagne region, while Poland is growing chardonnay and finicky pinot noir varieties.
Brazil, the top coffee grower, has also been battling drought in the past few years that curbed crops.
Whether through crop failures or price impact, changes in climate have serious implications for nations concentrated in equatorial and tropical regions, whose economies and people rely on agriculture more than others.
Natural disasters have cost farmers in poorer countries billions of dollars a year in lost crops and livestock, and it’s getting worse thanks to climate change.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The United States could have Nordic-style welfare programs, too”

Left-leaning Americans should be thrilled that a new subgenre of political commentary has emerged aimed at explaining why the United States simply can’t brook Nordic-style welfare programs.
The reasons adduced to argue that the United States has no hope of establishing programs like the ones enjoyed by Europe’s social democracies are more disturbing than commonly credited.
In a 2014 Slate essay calling for an end to the United States’ Nordic fantasies, Emily Tamkin cited the “Homogeneity of the Nordic countries, on which, one could argue, their stability and equality hinges.” This would prove to be a running theme.
The United States is a liberal democracy, and a unique one at that: While many of Europe’s liberal democracies were formed with a distinctive nationalist bent – that is, as nation-states, or countries composed primarily of single, self-governing ethnic groups – the United States was never any such thing.
Romantic nationalists argued that a country built on a contract – the theoretical premise that one can be an American as long as it’s in his or her best interest, and no longer if it isn’t – simply couldn’t be as successful as states united by language, tradition, an intrinsic sense of shared destiny, and so on.
On the above view, the United States was always doomed to merely marginal achievements where justice, equality and freedom are concerned.
This is where the thinking of romantic nationalists dovetails with today’s Scandi-skeptics: If the United States has a poverty rate about triple that of Denmark, or a child poverty rate about eight times higher, or millions more lacking access to health insurance, each camp would propose, it’s at least partially due to the kind of country we are.
The United States might have to chart a different political and sociocultural path to the universal programs Scandinavians enjoy, but if some zeal for justice and equality is there, I’m not sure why we can’t aspire to cultivate more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My 72-Hour Safari in Clinton Country”

For the first few minutes of his shift, the Clinton voter laid out a relatively straightforward, if improbable, way Donald Trump could gain his support.
The idea: Just as reporters from New York and D.C. trek into Trump Country to visit greasy spoons and other corners of Real America™ to measure support for the candidate, I’d venture from Trump Country to the most stereotypical bastions of coastal liberal elitism, and ask the people I met whether they still support Hillary Clinton.
The deeper I plunged into the Blue Abyss, the more I realized how broad the political chasm between Clinton Country and Trump Country really is.
Of course, voters in Clinton Country are generally horrified by Trump.
It wasn’t just the clichéd dispatches from Trump Country that Clinton Country voters had come to loathe-it was Trump Country itself.
“I feel like people who are in Clinton Country are a little too quick to be critical of people in Trump Country, if you will, and maybe aren’t willing to give an earnest consideration of the opinions and emotions that drive people in Trump Country as they should,” he said.
“People in Trump Country have quite a different value set than Clinton Country, and we need to respect those differences. When I look at people there who are still supporting Trump, I’m a bit taken aback by that.”
In Trump Country, Trump voters’ disdain for reporters may be more choleric and louder, marked by raspberries blown at the press.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Wild Wild Country’ Is Not Your Average Cult Exposé”

How does one process a cult story without a culmination? There is no climax to the events of Wild Wild Country, the six-part Netflix docu-series tracking the rise and fall of a religious sect’s settlement in rural Oregon.
The filmmakers of Wild Wild Country, brothers Maclain and Chapman Way, happened upon their subject by chance.
All the tropes of a classic cult story are in place: the bewildered small-town residents, looking back with 30 years of hindsight; the slow-motion shots of an anonymous sea of red clothing, taking over the landscape like a parasite; the straight-from-a-movie origin story about a mysterious stranger giving Antelope advance warning that “They are coming.” At the beginning of Wild Wild Country, the Rajneeshees are comfortably positioned as a monolithic, faceless other, all the easier for the audience to gawk at from a distance.
Over the ensuing hours, Sheela becomes the single most compelling figure in Wild Wild Country, a warm, passionate, determined presence who seems fundamentally at odds with the Machiavellian supervillain described in other testimonials.
Sheela is a particularly extreme example of Wild Wild Country’s overall narrative ethos, which allows the Rajneeshees to come through as the individuals they were and are.
Wild Wild Country is not an exposé of a cult, and those hoping to have their voyeurism indulged with outlandish details about group sex and assassination plots may come away disappointed.
The Rajneeshees, possibly on Sheela’s orders, really did engineer a strain of salmonella and deliberately infect the townspeople of The Dalles, Oregon-an unprecedented and well-documented act of bioterrorism that Wild Wild Country faithfully relates.
Wild Wild Country makes clear that the Rajneeshees were far from blameless in their clashes with Antelope and the authorities, playing the role of aggressor as often as aggressed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kacey Musgraves’s ‘Golden Hour’: March 2018 Cover Story”

On a dreary afternoon in late March, Kacey Musgraves pulls up to a Walgreens in the town of Sioux City, which sits at the intersection of South Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa, tucked just inside the border of the latter.
Earlier in the day, we were sitting at Crave, a regional “Fusion” chain Musgraves found on Yelp that rests next to the Missouri River in the shadow of the arena where she’s playing tonight and a Hard Rock Hotel & Casino where I’ll later lose money playing roulette.
Where Musgraves had previously worked closely with a small group of collaborators headlined by the songwriters Shane McAnally and Luke Laird, Golden Hour was created with a different team: Ian Fitchuk and Daniel Tashian, two Nashville-based songwriters and session players who Musgraves knew previously but had never written with.
“Butterflies,” the first song Musgraves wrote after meeting Kelly, is about how the excitement of a new crush can make you feel like you’ve rediscovered yourself.
The album began to take shape in the fall of 2016, after Musgraves met Tashian and Fitchuk at Tashian’s house in Nashville.
Musgraves says Fitchuk and Tashian were crucial in landing the album in a place that still felt true to her artistry.
The conversation surrounding Musgraves inevitably ends up settling in the same spot: hand-wringing over her place in modern country music.
In Sioux City, Musgraves ends her set with her latest single, the disco experiment “High Horse.” She walks off the stage under a shower of confetti and into the bowels of the arena, where she goofs around with her band for Instagram content before retreating back to her bus as Little Big Town takes the stage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hygge is the reason Denmark is consistently happier than America”

Hygge can be used as a noun, adjective or verb, and events and places can also be hyggelige.
Hygge is sometimes translated as “Cozy,” but a better definition of hygge is “Intentional intimacy,” which can happen when you have safe, balanced, and harmonious shared experiences.
A family might have a hygge evening that entails board games and treats, or friends might get together for a casual dinner with dimmed lighting, good food and easygoing fun.
Research on hygge has found that in Denmark, it’s integral to people’s sense of well-being.
In a highly individualized country like Denmark, hygge can promote egalitarianism and strengthen trust.
Google trends data show a big jump in searches for hygge beginning in October 2016.
In the US-which also places a high value on individualism-there’s no real cultural equivalent of hygge.
At its core, hygge is about building intimacy and trust with others.

The orginal article.