Summary of “AI Gaydar and Other Stories of the Death of Ignorance”

AI can find patterns and make inferences using relatively little data.
While medical data is strongly regulated, data used by AI is often in the hands of the notoriously unregulated for-profit tech sector.
The types of data that AI deals with are also much broader, so that any corresponding laws require a broader scope of understanding of what a right to ignorance means.
The more radical-and potentially more effective-approach to protecting the right to ignorance is to prevent data from being gathered in the first place.
In line with this way of thinking, the European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation, which became effective in May 2018, states that companies are permitted to collect and store only the minimum amount of user data needed to provide a specific, stated service, and to get customers’ consent for how their data will be used.
GPDR’s focus on the alignment between data and a given service does not exclude categories of data we find morally questionable, nor completely stop companies from buying excluded data from a data broker as long as the user has consented-and many people consent to sharing their data even with relatively meager incentives.
Second, putting economic value on personal data may coerce people to share their data and make data privacy a privilege of the rich.
As a first step, taking profit out of data provides the space we need to create and maintain ethical standards that can survive the coming of AI, and pave the way for managing collective ignorance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Deleting Your Online DNA Data Is Brutally Difficult”

Deleting my data there was simple: With a click, it disappeared from view.
I was told that the tools for deleting my data and sample from 23andMe’s records were “Not currently available.” I had to wait until May 25, when the company planned to roll out new privacy tools in compliance with Europe’s data-protection regulations, the GDPR. On the morning of May 25, 23andMe’s email arrived, heralding how easy it now was to delete your data.
There was another problem: Deleting my genetic information at my request is against federal law.
Fourteen frustrating customer-service emails later, I ascertained that the “Minimal amount” of information the company was required to keep on hand was, essentially, all of my raw genetic information.
Helix, which bills itself as the “App store” for DNA, processes the DNA sample and then shares the relevant data with other companies from which consumers purchase tests for interpretation.
This seemed to spell it out most clearly: When you delete your DNA information, you are mainly hiding your information from yourself.
Hazel, the researcher studying the privacy policies, said even if a company did offer to delete all your data, it’s unlikely that it could really purge your information from all the places it had already wound up.
In two studies in 2013, researchers showed it was possible to identify people from anonymous DNA information.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google Is Training Machines to Predict When a Patient Will Die”

The harrowing account of the unidentified woman’s death was published by Google in May in research highlighting the health-care potential of neural networks, a form of artificial intelligence software that’s particularly good at using data to automatically learn and improve.
Google had created a tool that could forecast a host of patient outcomes, including how long people may stay in hospitals, their odds of re-admission and chances they will soon die.
In contrast, Google’s approach, where machines learn to parse data on their own, “Can just leapfrog everything else,” said Vik Bajaj, a former executive at Verily, an Alphabet health-care arm, and managing director of investment firm Foresite Capital.
Another Google researcher said existing models miss obvious medical events, including whether a patient had prior surgery.
“Companies like Google and other tech giants are going to have a unique, almost monopolistic, ability to capitalize on all the data we generate,” said Andrew Burt, chief privacy officer for data company Immuta.
Google is treading carefully when it comes to patient information, particularly as public scrutiny over data-collection rises.
With the latest study, Google and its hospital partners insist their data is anonymous, secure and used with patient permission.
Even if consumers don’t take up wearable health trackers en masse, Google has plenty of other data wells to tap.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Death of Supply Chain Management”

The supply chain is the heart of a company’s operations.
New digital technologies that have the potential to take over supply chain management entirely are disrupting traditional ways of working.
With a digital foundation in place, companies can capture, analyze, integrate, easily access, and interpret high quality, real-time data – data that fuels process automation, predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, and robotics, the technologies that will soon take over supply chain management.
Using driverless trains, robotic operators, cameras, lasers, and tracking sensors, the company will be able to manage the whole supply chain remotely – while improving safety and reducing the need for workers in remote locations.
A steel company built a customized scenario-planning tool into its control tower platform that increases supply chain responsiveness and resilience.
The trend is clear: Technology is replacing people in supply chain management – and doing a better job.
Since the skills needed for these new roles are not readily available today, the biggest challenge for companies will be to create a supply chain vision for the future – and a strategy for filling those critical roles.
Clearly, the death of supply chain management as we know it is on the horizon.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why a DNA data breach is much worse than a credit card leak”

Though the hackers only accessed encrypted emails and passwords – so they never reached the actual genetic data – there’s no question that this type of hack will happen more frequently as consumer genetic testing becomes more and more popular.
One simple reason is that hackers might want to sell DNA data back for ransom, says Giovanni Vigna, a professor of computer science at UC Santa Barbara and co-founder of cybersecurity company Lastline.
There are plenty of players interested in DNA: researchers want genetic data for scientific studies, insurance companies want genetic data to help them calculate the cost of health and life insurance, and police want genetic data to help them track down criminals, like in the recent Golden State Killer case.
Already, we lack robust protections when it comes to genetic privacy, and so a genetic data breach could be a nightmare.
In the future, if genetic data becomes commonplace enough, people might be able to pay a fee and get access to someone’s genetic data, too, the way we can now to access someone’s criminal background.
As the Equifax hack last year showed, there’s a lack of legislation governing what happens to data from a breach.
Ultimately, a breach of genetic data is much more serious than most credit breaches.
Genetic information is immutable: Vigna points out that it’s possible to change credit card numbers or even addresses, but genetic information cannot be changed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Web Searches Reveal What We’re Really Thinking”

What are the weirdest questions you’ve ever Googled? Mine might be: “How many people have ever lived?” “What do people think about just before death?” and “How many bits would it take to resurrect in a virtual reality everyone who ever lived?” Using Google’s autocomplete and Keyword Planner tools, U.K.-based Internet company Digitaloft generated a list of what it considers 20 of the craziest searches, including “Am I pregnant?” “Are aliens real?” “Why do men have nipples?” “Is the world flat?” and “Can a man get pregnant?”.
This is all very entertaining, but according to economist Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, who worked at Google as a data scientist, such searches may act as a “Digital truth serum” for deeper and darker thoughts.
As he explains in his book Everybody Lies, “In the pre-digital age, people hid their embarrassing thoughts from other people. In the digital age, they still hide them from other people, but not from the internet and in particular sites such as Google and PornHub, which protect their anonymity.” Employing big data research tools “Allows us to finally see what people really want and really do, not what they say they want and say they do.”
People may tell pollsters that they are not racist, for example, and polling data do indicate that bigoted attitudes have been in steady decline for decades on such issues as interracial marriage, women’s rights and gay marriage, indicating that conservatives today are more socially liberal than liberals were in the 1950s.
Using the Google Trends tool in analyzing the 2008 U.S. presidential election Stephens-Davidowitz concluded that Barack Obama received fewer votes than expected in Democrat strongholds because of still latent racism.
This difference between public polls and private thoughts, Stephens-Davidowitz observes, helps to explain Obama’s underperformance in regions with a lot of racist searches and partially illuminates the surprise election of Donald Trump.
More optimistically, these declines in prejudice may be an underestimate, given that when Google began keeping records of searches in 2004 most Googlers were urban and young, who are known to be less prejudiced and bigoted than rural and older people, who adopted the search technology years later.
As members of the Silent Generation and Baby Boomers are displaced by Gen Xers and Millennials, and as populations continue shifting from rural to urban living, and as postsecondary education levels keep climbing, such prejudices should be on the wane.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3DFS’s technology for electricity could double the efficiency of the power grid”

3DFS has two core messages, both of which promise to shake up the status quo, not only in the power sector but in our general understanding of electricity.
If it can scale its technology up to wide use, across the grid, 3DFS says, it could effectively double the energy efficiency of the electricity system, getting twice the energy services out of the same amount of generation.
It doesn’t help that 3DFS technology measures and manipulates electricity at a level most of us never think about, acting on characteristics of power most people aren’t even aware exist.
Electricity in its natural state is chaotic So we’re wasting electricity on the grid.
The technology 3DFS developed in its Pittsboro, North Carolina, research facility measures 26 separate parameters of electricity, including voltage, phase angle, phase imbalance, active power, reactive power, harmonics, power factor, and more.
3DFS measures electricity digitally, in real time This is the first half of 3DFS’s breakthrough: It can measure electricity continuously.
Using real-time data, 3DFS can clean up electricity So 3DFS tech is gathering and analyzing enormous amounts of data in real time.
3DFS has developed a power quality rating that it claims is more accurate than existing PQ ratings; it takes into account all 26 parameters of electricity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Vermont passes first law to crack down on data brokers – TechCrunch”

Data brokers in Vermont will now have to register as such with the state; they must take standard security measures and notify authorities of security breaches; and using their data for criminal purposes like fraud is now its own actionable offense.
As long as they step carefully, data brokers can maintain what amounts to a shadow profile on consumers.
Data brokers have been quietly supplying everyone with your personal information for a long time.
Vermont’s new law, which took effect late last week, is the nation’s first to address the data broker problem directly.
“Until Vermont passed this law there was no regulation for data brokers. It’s that serious. We’ve been looking for something like this to be put in place for like 20 years.”
While data brokers offer many benefits, there are also risks associated with the widespread aggregation and sale of data about consumers, including risks related to consumers’ ability to know and control information held and sold about them and risks arising from the unauthorized or harmful acquisition and use of consumer information.
Consumers may not be aware that data brokers exist, who the companies are, or what information they collect, and may not be aware of available recourse.
Data breach rules mean prompt notification if personal data is leaked in spite of them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Is Your Location Data No Longer Private?”

The past month has seen one blockbuster revelation after another about how our mobile phone and broadband providers have been leaking highly sensitive customer information, including real-time location data and customer account details.
In mid-2016, the FCC adopted new privacy rules for all Internet providers that would have required providers to seek opt-in permission from customers before collecting, storing, sharing and selling anything that might be considered sensitive – including Web browsing, application usage and location information, as well as financial and health data.
Worse, the mobile and broadband providers themselves are failing to secure their own customers’ data.
It’s difficult to think of a bigger violation of those principles than the current practice by the major mobile providers of sharing real-time location data on customers with third parties, without any opportunity for customers to opt-in or opt-out of such sharing.
T-Mobile US Inc. in late 2013 announced that its GoSmart Mobile brand had “Become the first wireless providerto offer free access to Facebook and Facebook Messenger for all of its wireless customers, even those without monthly data service.” The GoSmart Mobile plans started at $25 a month for “Unlimited talk” with no other data service.
AT&T Mobility offers a zero-rating plan called “Sponsored Data” that allows content providers to pay up front to have streaming of that content allowed without counting against the provider’s monthly data caps.
SHOCK AND YAWN. When I first saw a Carnegie Mellon University researcher show me last week that he could look up the near-exact location of any mobile number in the United States, I sincerely believed the public would be amazed and horrified at the idea that mobile providers are sharing this real-time data with third party companies, and at the fact that those third parties in turn weren’t doing anything to prevent the abuse of their own systems.
While you’re at it, tell your lawmakers what you think about mobile providers giving or selling third-parties real-time access to customer location information, and let them know that this is no longer okay.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s how to see the data that tech giants have about you”

It’s also left average everyday internet users with new questions about what data the tech giants hold about us-and what they’re doing with it.
We’ll show you how to to find and download the data that Facebook, its subsidiary Instagram, Apple, Google, and Twitter have on you.
A word of warning: Depending on how long you’ve used Facebook, you might be shocked at how much data it has on you.
Facebook’s data on you often include things like your political views, who you’ve unfriended, and even facial recognition data.
Under the New File menu at the top of the page, choose your data range, the format you want the data in and the media quality.
Downloading your Facebook data doesn’t include any data the company has on you via its Instagram app.
Select all the data you want to include in your download. Again, we recommend you “Select all” just so you can be sufficiently frightened by the scope of the data.
Twitter probably has a fraction of the data on you that other tech giants possess.

The orginal article.