Summary of “Human intelligence and AI are vastly different”

Everywhere you look, AI is conquering new domains, tasks and skills that were previously thought to be the exclusive domain of human intelligence.
The answer to that question is: It’s wrong to compare artificial intelligence to the human mind, because they are totally different things, even if their functions overlap at times.
The AI is even able to mimic natural human behavior, using inflections and intonations as any human speaker would.
Let’s stop comparing AI with human intelligence.
In contrast, human intelligence is good for settings where you need common sense and abstract decisions, and bad at tasks that require heavy computations and data processing in real time.
AI and human intelligence complement each other, making up for each other’s shortcomings.
A human analyst, on the other hand, is not very good at monitoring gigabytes of data going through a company’s network, but they’re adept at relating anomalies to different events and figuring out which ones are the real threats.
As AI becomes adept at performing more and more tasks, we as humans will find more time to put our intelligence to real use, at being creative, being social, at arts, sports, literature, poetry and all the things that are valuable because the human element and character that goes into them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Who controls your data?”

Just in the past few months, Facebook was reported to have asked hospitals, including Stanford University School of Medicine, to share and integrate patients’ medical data with its own.
A team of nine Engadget reporters in London, Paris, New York and San Francisco filed more than 150 subject access requests – in other words, requests for personal data – to more than 30 popular tech companies ranging from social networks to dating apps to streaming services.
We made unexpected discoveries: the distorted, fun house mirror profile that Acxiom held on one reporter; a kink app with lax security practices; a dating service that sent us a stranger’s data.
Thursday: How a data request turned into a data breach.
Netflix provided full glossaries for its tables of data in a single PDF.Beyond simply what was given to us, would the data be understandable, even meaningful?
Spotify Customer Service did not provide full explanations of the file names, and a spokeswoman said while we could ask about specific data fields, the company did not have a glossary for all of its files.
The right to portability is separate from the right to access one’s data.
A request from a US-based reporter went unanswered for more than a month; the company eventually provided data 12 weeks later.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the Future of Data Storage is Magnetic Tape”

To begin with, tape storage is more energy efficient: Once all the data has been recorded, a tape cartridge simply sits quietly in a slot in a robotic library and doesn’t consume any power at all.
More recently, Microsoft let it be known that its Azure Archive Storage uses IBM tape storage equipment.
Tape storage costs one-sixth the amount you’d have to pay to keep the same amount of data on disks, which is why you find tape systems almost anyplace where massive amounts of data are being stored.
Because tape has now disappeared completely from consumer-level products, most people are unaware of its existence, let alone of the tremendous advances that tape recording technology has made in recent years and will continue to make for the foreseeable future.
To understand why tape still has so much potential relative to hard drives, consider the way tape and hard drives evolved.
More recently, in collaboration with Sony Storage Media Solutions, we demonstrated the possibility of recording data at an areal density that is about 20 times the current figure for state-of-the-art tape drives.
In 2015, the Information Storage Industry Consortium, an organization that includes HP Enterprise, IBM, Oracle, and Quantum, along with a slew of academic research groups, released what it called the “International Magnetic Tape Storage Roadmap.” That forecast predicted that the areal density of tape storage would reach 91 Gb per square inch by 2025.
The authors of that road map each had an interest in the future of tape storage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The School Shootings That Weren’t”

The School Shootings That Weren’t The federal government said schools reported 235 shootings in one school year.
Students around the country are heading back to school this month under a cloud of fear stemming from the most recent mass shootings in Parkland, Fla., and Santa Fe, Texas.
In the 2015-2016 school year, “Has there been at least one incident at your school that involved a shooting?”.
Most of the school leaders NPR reached had little idea of how shootings got recorded for their schools.
The CRDC lists four shootings among the 16 schools of the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District in California.
Ray Poole, the chief of legal services for the Nassau County School District in Florida, told us that at one school where a shooting was reported, Callahan Middle School, on Nov. 21, 2015, a Saturday, a student took a picture of himself at home holding a gun and posted it to social media.
At Redan Middle School, there is a report of a toy cap gun fired on a school bus – not a shooting.
The CRDC shows a shooting at Stone Mountain Middle School, but a police report shows an incident at Stone Mountain High School instead. And district officials provided a police report showing that there was a shooting after a McNair High School football game – in August 2016, after the time period covered in the survey.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google and Facebook Didn’t End Data Privacy”

Many people still think their smartphones are listening to them in secret-recording their conversations in the background, then uploading them to Facebook or Google surreptitiously.
Facebook and Google might not literally be listening in on our conversations, but they are eavesdropping on our lives.
Traveling out of town and searching for restaurants? It’s not just that Facebook or Google knows where you are and what you’re searching for, but also if you’re a foodie or a cheapskate, if you’ve “Liked” Korean hot pot or Polish pierogi, and what your demographics say about your income, and therefore your budget.
Tech companies do collect data in unexpected, and sometimes duplicitous, ways.
Location data was particularly voluminous, with Android smartphones conveying a user’s position in space more than 300 times in a 24-hour period-even if the user has turned off location history in the device’s Google settings.
Revelations like these have spawned a class-action lawsuit against the company, and it’s tempting to imagine that oversight, regulation, or legal repercussions might eventually discourage or even change the way tech companies collect and manage data.
It also ignores the fact that Google and Facebook’s data hunger takes place within the context of a widespread, decades-old practice of data intelligence.
For years, companies slurped up, bought, and sold that data to hone their marketing and sales efforts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Who needs democracy when you have data?”

“No government has a more ambitious and far-¬≠reaching plan to harness the power of data to change the way it governs than the Chinese government,” says Martin Chorzempa of the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, DC. Even some foreign observers, watching from afar, may be tempted to wonder if such data-driven governance offers a viable alternative to the increasingly dysfunctional¬≠looking electoral model.
“Several petitioners told us they have been stopped at train platforms.” The bloggers, activists, and lawyers are also being systematically silenced or imprisoned, as if data can give the government the same information without any of the fiddly problems of freedom.
The government plan, which covers both people and businesses, lists among its goals the “Construction of sincerity in government affairs, commercial sincerity, and judicial credibility.” To date, it’s a work in progress, though various pilots preview how it might work in 2020, when it is supposed to be fully implemented.
What information is available is deeply flawed; systematic falsification of data on everything from GDP growth to hydropower use pervades Chinese government statistics.
The Chinese government rarely releases performance data that outsiders might use to evaluate these systems.
Their accuracy remains in question: in particular, how well can facial-recognition software trained on Han Chinese faces recognize members of Eurasian minority groups? Moreover, even if the data collection is accurate, how will the government use such information to direct or thwart future behavior? Police algorithms that predict who is likely to become a criminal are not open to public scrutiny, nor are statistics that would show whether crime or terrorism has grown or diminished.
“It’s not the technology that created the policies, but technology greatly expands the kinds of data that the Chinese government can collect on individuals,” says Richard McGregor, a senior fellow at the Lowy Institute and the author of The Party: The Secret World of China’s Communist Rulers.
The Xinjiang government employed a private company to design the predictive algorithms that assess various data streams.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Technological Revolution Has Finally Hit the NFL-and the Vikings Are Ready”

Earlier in training camp, in a conversation I had with an NFL team executive and a couple of other people, someone brought up the Minnesota Vikings’ new facility and, specifically, their new draft board.
Now, the Vikings are certainly not the first team to embrace technology, nor are they the first team to use analytics.
The Vikings are the first team to build multiple rooms in a new facility specifically devoted to these things.
Most NFL teams still practice in relatively spartan office parks.
The NFL has finally begun to release leaguewide player-tracking data, which will likely open up a new era of football analytics.
Spielman said the team has been preparing for the release of that data for “Four years,” over which period he started banking an analytics database.
Under an older NFL system, he said, teams would spend more time on an individual report, often simply because a scout visited a school and felt the need to file a report on a player because he was there, not because the player was particularly talented.
During the summer of 2016, I asked the exact question the Vikings are attempting to answer now: What do you do when hours upon hours of your day are suddenly freed up? The answer I got most often from teams was, “We don’t know.” Officials inside the league said that some teams didn’t want to know because all of the busywork, they felt, was a type of job training for younger coaches that should never be replaced.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What You Found In 3 Million Russian Troll Tweets”

Last week, FiveThirtyEight published nearly 3 million tweets sent by handles affiliated with the Internet Research Agency, a Russian “Troll factory.” That group was a defendant in one of special counsel Robert Mueller’s indictments, which accused the IRA of interfering with American electoral and political processes.
The projects reinforce and expand upon the Clemson researchers’ initial finding: The trolls were engaged in a sophisticated and intricate Russian assault on the political debate in America and several other countries.
A number of these projects focused on the networks of users and groups of topics that the Russian trolls both created and operated within.
Christopher Marcum, a staff scientist at the National Human Genome Research Institute, wrote code in R to plot the network of which troll accounts mention which other troll accounts.
Large swaths of the Right Troll network are devoted to topics such as media outlets, free speech, American jobs and discrediting the FBI. The Left Troll network skewed more toward topics such as racism, police brutality and the Black Lives Matter movement.
Still other readers, and news outlets, focused on the geography of the troll tweets.
Christian MilNeil, a reporter with the Portland Press Herald in Maine, highlighted the subset of troll tweets that mentioned that state’s governor and senators – there were hundreds of them.
Canada wasn’t the only country to take an interest in the troll data.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do When Each Department Uses Different Words to Describe the Same Thing”

Each department trusts its own system, but when the task at hand requires that data be shared across silos, the company’s various systems simply do not talk to one and other.
These issues grow more important as companies try to pull more and more disparate data together – to develop predictive models using machine learning, for example.
The term “Customer” means different things to different departments because, at some point, each required the term to mean something specific to them.
In the face of such discrepancies, companies usually seek technological solutions, including data integration, enterprise data architecture, and master data management, since the issue presents itself as a tech problem.
You will need a process owner, often called the Chief Data Architect, and a network of responsible coordinators, often called embedded data managers or stewards.
Since language is the province of the business, the CDA should not report into IT, but rather to the Chief Data Officer, data quality team lead, or other business-aligned group.
Many companies use data dictionaries or business data glossaries, hosted on the company intranet, linked to major systems, and easily accessed by all.
Sound like a lot of work? It is! But unleashing the people’s creativity to invent new language, built on a foundation of a few well-chosen and well-supported data definitions, pays dividends in a myriad of small ways every day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Senator Ron Wyden reckons with the internet he helped shape”

In his more than two decades as a senator since then, Wyden has continued to be a staunch defender of internet freedoms, introducing net neutrality legislation as far back as 2006 and spearheading the congressional fight over SOPA/PIPA, a legislative battle that ignited the internet and helped set the modern playbook for digital activism.
I think there was an awareness of the fact that there might be significant privacy issues, but I don’t think anybody was talking about an Exxon-Valdez of privacy the way people talk about it today,” Wyden says.
I think historians are completely in agreement that this is the law that made the internet what it is today.
I’ve already made it clear: I think the public has a right to control their own data.
If Facebook is allowed to get through this with glorified business as usual, and cozy, gauzy ads on TV about how this is not going to be Facebook anymore, I think we will see more of what we’ve seen the last few years: the milking of peoples’ data for private profit.
One thing we hear a lot from Facebook is, “We messed up, but we’re trying to improve.” When you hear that, do you think that’s sincere?
As you know, we think we’re in a pretty strong position in terms of the legal system.
We can always look at good ideas from elsewhere, but I think the steps that I outlined – three or four, in particular – and then having a federal agency – my gut tells me the Federal Trade Commission – riding point on it, constitute the best steps for us today.

The orginal article.