Summary of “Having the best mattress, suitcase, and vitamins nearly broke me”

Day one: Friday I wake up on my Casper Wave mattress in my Brooklinen sheets.
I’ve just come from a few days in DC having used an Away suitcase, which is millennial pink and is extremely fun to zag around on the cobblestones of Brooklyn and between the insufferable crowds at Penn Station.
I’m more easily annoyed about tiny imperfections – the way my feet are still clammy when I wake up, that tumbleweed of blonde hair on the floor, an annoying text that I’ll feel bad about ignoring all day.
Day two: Saturday I wake up on my Casper mattress in my Brooklinen sheets feeling absolutely miserable.
Day three: Sunday The first thing to go is the bullet journaling.
What I did not know about Care/of is that based on your answers, you can easily end up having to take nine vitamins a day.
Day six: Wednesday On the subway on the way to work, I catch a glimpse in the reflection of the door: the headless body of a woman wearing an Everlane trench coat and a tasteful $200 bag.
The last day: Friday again I wake up in my Casper mattress in my Brooklinen sheets far too early for having gone to bed at 2 am.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to balance full-time work with creative projects”

So think about it: What type of work or situations might you seek out that wouldn’t leave you in a bad mood after working? By spending some time brainstorming about the job that could be a nice complement to your personality and side projects, you’ll put yourself in a better position to find the right type of gig.
Finding the right gig to nicely balance with your personality and creative work isn’t going to happen overnight.
Would you like a job that makes you lots of money? Expands your network? Gets you working with your hands? Trust your brain and your body-you’ll thank yourself when you’ve landed the right job that’s actually helping you get what you want, and are also able to have time and energy to produce creative work you’re proud of.
If you choose to really focus on creative work while continuing to have a full-time day job, chances are you’ll be sacrificing time for friends, family, partners, and all the other ways you could be spending your days.
“Done” is better than “Perfect.” Watching highly creative friends fail to finish a promising project always makes me sad. Regardless of whether or not you ever plan to publish the work, it’s important to make every effort to see your work through.
The environment you make your work in impacts the quality and quantity of your work.
You can chip away at creative work and over time, it will add up.
Finding balance between full-time and creative work is a process.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Fuel for a Solo, Unassisted Antarctic Crossing”

Two days before Colin O’Brady flew to Antarctica to attempt the first solo, unassisted crossing of the earth’s most inhospitable continent, I asked him about the definition of a perfectly planned expedition.
The more food you bring with you, the heavier your sled becomes, the more calories you burn pulling it, and the slower you move, meaning that you have to bring even more food to cover the extra days.
O’Brady started his trip with 280 of them lashed to his sled: four a day for 70 days.
Scott’s rations added up to between 4,200 and 4,600 calories per day.
Careful measurements of energy consumption using isotope-labeled water showed that they were burning an astounding 7,000 calories a day for 96 days.
While Scott maxed out at 4,600 daily calories and Stroud and Fiennes took 5,000, O’Brady is taking 8,000 calories per day, including oatmeal in the morning and Alpineaire freeze-dried meals in the evening.
Four days into his trek, O’Brady acknowledged in an Instagram post that the sled’s weight was pushing him to his limits: “Today was the first day I haven’t cried into my goggles,” he wrote.
“If it starts to look like it’s going to take 80 days to do this expedition,” he says, “I do think that I have the ability to switch some of those calories and stretch the expedition to 75 or 78 days.” After all, most Antarctic travelers before him made do with less.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The truth about time management: how I went from chaos to punctual calm in one week”

She says, is never entirely unchosen: when you are always 17 minutes late for everything, constantly procrastinating because you don’t even want to start looking for a vital scrap of paper in case you can’t find it, it feels like a triumph every time you are punctual.
The principle of time is like the principle of space.
“The biggest obstacle we have to organising time is our perception of it,” Morgenstern says.
On Saturday, I hit the Gordian knot: I couldn’t organise anything bigger than my coat because I didn’t have time and I couldn’t organise my time until I had done my space.
“A day is a limited amount of time. We have 24 hours. You’re sleeping eight hours. Let’s say you’re spending 10 hours at work; you have six hours of personal time. If you plan more than will fit, you’re just shoving things in. That haphazard arrangement, like a closet, becomes chaotic and intimidating. You don’t even look at your to-do list, you’re just freestyling, because you already know your day is impossible.”
“It’s very important; it comes out of eight years of research. How much time and attention do kids need to feel loved and secure? The answer is this: short bursts of five to 15 minutes of truly undivided attention delivered consistently – not big blocks of time delivered erratically.”
Sod it, borrow Morgernstern’s: “I’d love to do it, but my time is accounted for right now.” If it makes you sound like a robot with an American motherboard, the upside is that at least you reply to people fast, rather than leaving them hanging for six weeks, agreeing, then pulling out at the last minute, which is my current MO. By Tuesday, I knew not only what that day held, but more or less the entire week: I knew that I was free to go on a school trip with my daughter.
I am deviating here from the time-management point, but if you think of Holbein’s core message as being that all things will crumble to dust and that the only everlasting truth is death, it brings us back neatly to Morgenstern: “How we spend our time is how we spend our life. This couldn’t be more important.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Father’s SOS-From the Middle of the Sea”

Dad was in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, on his way from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, to the Marquesas Islands, 26 days into a single-handed, 2,780-mile crossing that was to be the first major leg of a lifelong dream: sailing around the world.
About two hours later, Dad followed up with this message to John: “Apparently, I’ve been spared.” A few minutes after that, at 6:54, he messaged Mom: “Hugewind pirates left. I’m fine. Talklater.” He said he’d sent out an SOS and an alert from his EPIRB, an emergency device that transmits a satellite signal to rescuers when a boat is in distress.
At 7:54, shortly after sunrise where Dad was, he wrote Mom: “Message me as soon as u can. I’m really shaken.” Then he tried John again: “Very scarey. Thought I would not see day.” For Dad, sunrise meant nearly 13 hours of sitting in humid 80-degree weather in the doldrums-an area near the equator with fickle conditions that leave sailors becalmed one minute, huddled in squalls the next, and then scrambling to catch a big gust of wind.
Dad, who had learned to sail in California, sold a boat he owned-a 31-foot Mariner ketch called Cortez-and bought an old Spanish-style house in the San Fernando Valley, where Tim and I grew up and where Mom still lives.
At 8:48, Tim wrote: “Satellite shows nearest boat is many many miles away. This isn’t just a lack of sleep right?” At 9:08, with no new message from Dad, Tim begged: “Hit SOS please.”
Another question loomed: Had anything at all happened to him? Dad said he’d sent EPIRB and SOS signals, but he hadn’t.
Finally, on June 13, two weeks after my dad’s last communication, the unidentified boat was close enough that the Coast Guard deployed a plane from Hawaii.
It’s the checkout point for boats departing Mexico in the Nayarit region, 30 minutes north of Puerto Vallarta by car, and the last place Dad docked before setting out to sea.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stephen Willeford Still Grappling With the Sutherland Springs Mass Murder”

Stephen Willeford had just taken a bite of chocolate cake when the stranger approached.
It was a warm evening in August, and Willeford was eating at Baldy’s American Diner, just a few miles from his home in Sutherland Springs.
On most Sunday mornings, Willeford would have been 45 minutes away, in San Antonio, at the Church of Christ he and his family had attended since his kids were young.
Just as Willeford reached the front yard of Fred and Kathleen Curnow, whose house faces the church entrance, a man wearing black body armor and a helmet with a visor emerged from the church.
Then Willeford looked to his left and noticed a navy-blue Dodge Ram stopped at a nearby crossroad. Johnnie Langendorff, a 27-year-old who had driven down from Seguin, thirty minutes north, that morning to visit his girlfriend, had arrived at the intersection across the street from the church just as the gunman walked out and began firing at Willeford.
Willeford sees the crosses outside the Baptist church every day.
So in those moments, when his mind is unoccupied, here is what Willeford is fated to ponder: if he’d arrived fifteen seconds sooner, Kris Workman might still be able to walk.
As Willeford settled in for the sermon, there was an announcement: instead of Pomeroy’s preaching, the congregation would be treated to a presentation by the children from the church’s vacation Bible school.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 Time-Management Hacks to Optimize Your Life In and Outside Work”

Time is everyone’s most valuable and scarce resource.
To really manage and maximize your time – to squeeze every opportunity out of it – you have to appreciate how much you have.
Time is either invested or wasted, so I don’t like white space on my calendar.
It’s playing with my kids, having a good time and making them laugh.
Every successful entrepreneur I’ve met has dedicated time in their life where they go all-in on their business.
As a CEO, I manage my time by being extremely aware of my profit-producing activities.
You need to be available at a time that works both for your clients and your team.
We all have personal lives, and it’s important to take time for yourself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is What Happens to Your Body if You Don’t Eat For Three Days”

Fasting, in one form or another, is all the rage as evidenced by the volume of ripped bros on YouTube who are itching to share the fasting secrets that have finally gotten them over that thing that happened in high school.
Another popular variant is alternate day fasting, in which adherents typically eat no calories one day and whatever they want the next.
I’ve tried to reconcile all the anecdotal fasting with conversations I’ve had with with doctors and dieticians to figure out what might happen to my body if I commit to this increasingly popular fad-within-a-fad and eat nothing for 72-hours straight.
“The gradual decrease in hunger is well documented in physiological studies showing gradual decrease in ghrelin over multiple days of fasting,” says Jason Fung, Toronto-based nephrologist and co-author of The Complete Guide to Fasting.
Fung goes on to explain that an abatement of hunger happens more often than not during an extended fast.
They’ll tell you that fasting and ketosis is what’s gotten their body fat percentage down into the single digits and studies have shown that they may be right about that.
“As you release glycogen, you lose water and that is usually the reason for the rapid weight loss. Losing fat takes more time.” Fasting proponent Fung disagrees and maintains that you could lose 1.5 pounds of fat over a 72-hour period.
He explains that people who have fasted for three days often report that it causes them to face their bottled-up emotions so that they are more mentally stable after fasting is completed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can’t sleep? Perhaps you’re overtired”

Dr Ramlakhan should know: she is a sleep psychologist and is increasingly seeing people who remind her of her little girl when she was younger.
Overtiredness, sleep experts agree, is down to our always-on existence.
“There’s a growing tendency to hold on, to keep on going, and it’s manifesting in our sleep patterns as well. People say to me that they feel they’re on the edge of sleep all night. They’re getting up in the morning feeling exhausted. They say they keep waking up at night and can’t get back to sleep. But it’s normal to wake up at night; most of the time, we just go back to sleep.”
Vik Veer is an ear, nose and throat consultant who specialises in sleep apnoea.
He has become something of a sleep expert because so many people who consult him turn out to have different sleep issues, including – he believes – overtiredness.
Paradoxically, another society-wide symptom, says Ramlakhan, is our communal obsession with sleep.
It’s not the mechanics of sleep that are failing us; it’s our inability to pace our day and to understand that some of the business of rest at night is actually done during the day – and especially during the evening.
Veer recommends sleep hygiene techniques, especially cutting out coffee in the second half of the day and having a wind-down routine, just as children do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Ran 4 Experiments to Break My Social Media Addiction. Here’s What Worked.”

Social media can connect us to new ideas, help us share our work, and allow previously unheard voices to influence culture.
Over the last two years, I conducted four different experiments to monitor my own behavior, implementing trackers and blockers in order to better understand how social media usage affected my productivity.
In the end, these four experiments opened my eyes about my relationship to social platforms, and taught me effective strategies to maximize the benefit of these social tools while limiting the downsides.
My social media usage clearly spiked at certain times.
The biggest insights were that social media usage dripped throughout the day drains the energy and focus I have for writing and other work, and that there’s something insidiously satisfying about pressing publish on a status update, and each time I do it, I get the dopamine hit of satisfaction and response.
My later experiments opened my eyes to the power of addition: planning ahead for dedicated social time, or a Saturday spent outdoors.
With social media, many of us want to reduce our consumption, but we miss an important piece of the puzzle: we’re craving something that we want, and we think that social media has a quick answer.
These experiments helped me realize that at the heart of my cravings around the social internet are deep connections with friends, access to new ideas and information, or time to zone out and relax after a hard day.

The orginal article.