Summary of “The day the pirates came”

Although he knew that vicious pirates roamed the labyrinthine wetlands and mangroves of the delta, Sudeep felt safe that tropical South Atlantic morning.
With less than five minutes to act, Sudeep gathered his men in the engine room in the bowels of the ship before running upstairs to set off an emergency alarm that would notify everyone on board.
The pirates fired at the floor and a bullet fragment struck Sudeep in his left shin, lodging itself just an inch from the bone.
Over time, Sudeep would try to strike up a relationship with some of these men.
About 15 days after the attack, the pirates took Sudeep on a boat to another part of the forest, and handed him a satellite phone so he could appeal directly to the ship owner, a Greek businessman based in the Mediterranean port of Piraeus called Captain Christos Traios.
On 17 May 2019 – day 28 – the pirates gave Sudeep the chance to speak to Capt Nasib, who assured him that the ordeal would only last a few more days.
At mid-morning, after handing over the bowl of noodles, one of the guards beckoned Sudeep over and whispered that if things worked out, this could be his last day in the jungle.
Capt Christos did not respond to detailed questions about the kidnapping, whether he disputed that he owed Sudeep money and about the fate of the Ghanaian man left behind with the pirates.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The U.S. Still Has No Plan to Ramp Up COVID-19 Testing”

“We went up to about 150,000 tests a day, and then we plateaued there for a few weeks,” Jha, the Harvard professor, said.
“Some places had reagents, but not enough swabs. Some places had swabs but not the medium you transport them in. And some places had enough capacity, but they hadn’t changed their policies from when only the sickest people could get tested,” Jha said.
In the District of Columbia, where the number of new cases is increasing, Mayor Muriel Bowser said at a press conference today that the city only had enough reagents to test about 1,500 people per day.
How many tests might eventually be enough isn’t clear, in part because the number depends on the size of the underlying outbreak.
Rivers told Congress this week that scaling up to 3 to 4 million tests a week-equal to about 500,000 a day-would allow more serious contact tracing to begin.
It’s unlikely the U.S. can test that many people every day if it continues to use only the polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, nasal-swab tests currently in use, Jha said.
Antigen tests, which are similar to the rapid flu tests used in doctors’ offices, might be some of the first to become available.
This lack of any plan does not only seem to mar the federal testing effort.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Should Manage Your Energy, Not Your Time”

A workplace study found an average working professional experiences 87 interruptions per day, making it difficult to remain productive and focused for a full day.
Knowing something had to give, Congdon began to adjust her approach to work and restructured her day to achieve the same amount of output, without working around the clock.
The key to maintaining focus and energy in shorter bursts was to apply flexibility to those segments – she could use some for exercise, some for meditation, some for work.
Getting rest within her workday helped lower stress levels and therefore achieve better results within the allotted time for working, Congdon found.
While our culture may be pushing us towards working 24/7, Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, a Silcon Valley consultant and author of Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less, believes this is not helping us to be more productive or to come up with creative solutions.
There are a number of approaches to mastering the art of deep work – be it lengthy retreats dedicated to a specific task; developing a daily ritual; or taking a ‘journalistic’ approach to seizing moments of deep work when you can throughout the day.
In the past, Justin Gignac, co-founder of freelance network Working Not Working, left little room in his routine to be lazy.
Now, he believes it is important to build time to kick back and let his brain think by itself, and is one of many successful people debunking the myth that working more equals working best.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When You Eat Breakfast and Dinner Could Affect Your Levels of Body Fat”

Moving back breakfast and dinner time, they show, can have profound effects on the way your body processes meals, akin to the effects of intermittent fasting.
It turns out that what you eat is deeply intertwined with when you eat it.
The team asked ten individuals to delay breakfast by 90 minutes and eat dinner 90 minutes earlier than usual.
Results revealed that all those who were able to stick to the schedule reduced their overall body fat by the end of the ten weeks by an average of 1.9 percent.
This results were enough to establish a trend, but not enough to illuminate exactly why body fat decreased.
An alternative explanation, based on Johnston’s previous research, published in Advances in Nutrition, suggests that the body burns through food at a faster metabolic rate earlier in the day.
In the previous study, Johnston and his team wrote that “Diet-induced thermogenesis was approximately twice as large in the morning at 0800h compared with in the evening at 2000h,” suggesting that the body burns through food at a faster metabolic rate earlier in the day.
“As we have seen with these participants, fasting diets are difficult to follow and may not always be compatible with family and social life,” Johnston said “We therefore need to make sure they are flexible and conducive to real life, as the potential benefits of such diets are clear to see.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “To the Driver Who Hit Me and Ran”

You fractured vertebrae in my neck and back and damaged my spinal cord, paralyzing my left leg and compromising my bladder and bowel function.
Just a few months prior, a distracted driver had hit Gillach with her car while he was riding his bike near his home in Arvada, Colorado.
“They put my 58-year-old body back together, and they will put your body back together,” he said to me.
The first person charged with putting me back together was Dr. Laughlin McCollester, attending emergency physician at the Boulder Community Health emergency department.
It’s the work that was needed to repair my back that now haunts me.
The violent impact with your vehicle did so much damage to my spine that it required two separate operations-one from the back to fuse it and another from the front to remove fragments of bone and to insert metal cages.
I’m barely able to reach my left arm above my head. And there’s nerve pain that constantly sparkles, radiates, pulses, and tingles up and down my paralyzed left leg.
I know it’s highly unlikely that you hit me with your car, but I also know that it’s likely you exhibit dangerous behaviors when driving-every driver does from time to time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bowen Yang Profile: How the Saturday Night Live Star Is Making TV a Little Bit Weirder”

Dad waited in the lobby while Bowen would visit with “Some quack,” and then father and son would make the drive back up I-25-which strangely enough “Became a fun bonding experience,” Bowen says, even if the therapy itself didn’t do all that much.
“Any distortion of what they saw as a normative sexual existence was so foreign to them that they were just trying to figure out how to make sure I was going to be okay,” says Bowen.
Notably around Bowen, the first Asian American person to join the cast provided you discount things like the one-fourth-Filipino part of Rob Schneider.
As the chaos swirled around them, Bowen tracked down Gillis’s contact info, opened up some space in his heart, and texted him something along the lines of: “Hey, this is all really crazy. Let me know if you want to talk.” Bowen didn’t hear anything that night.
Bowen had even gone to Pearl River Mart in Chinatown to get a few gifts for the rest of the crew.
“He deserves some level of progression out of this,” says Bowen.
“We both deserve to not live in this moment that was unfortunate for everybody for the rest of our careers.” Folks on the internet pitted Shane against Bowen when neither of them asked for it, inadvertently showing how tricky it is for a young artist burdened with being a “First”: You might be a product of your different overlapping identities, but you don’t want to be defined by any one of them.
Chris Gayomali is an articles editor at GQ. A version of this story originally appeared in the April 2020 issue with the title “Live From New York, It’s Bowen Yang.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Join Me in My Obsession with “Desert Island Discs””

The first episode of “Desert Island Discs” was recorded at the bomb-damaged Maida Vale Studios, in West London, on January 27, 1942, and aired on the BBC two days later.
It’s an interview show with a simple premise: each celebrity guest discusses the eight recordings that he or she would bring if cast away alone on a desert island.
The show is less concerned with logistics-in the early days, it clarified that guests would have “a gramophone and an inexhaustible supply of needles”-than the trigger of sound.
Each guest wrestles with the question of what you would want a song to remind you of.
Besides the eight songs, guests are allowed one luxury item-the Danish chef René Redzepi asked for a day of snow-and one book other than the Bible and the complete works of Shakespeare, which every castaway automatically receives.
How could you whittle down your personality to eight or ten songs? Could your essence be distilled to one side of a cassette? Some guests, like Morrissey, still playfully self-deprecating in 2009, or John McEnroe, who ratchets up his American bad-boy-isms, delight in sharing a personal canon that has become synonymous with their unruly public images.
For most of the episodes, the guests’ selections are full of inspirational highs, offering insight into why these people chose the paths that eventually brought them fame, or infamy.
Guests usually accustomed to delivering the same old talking points drift off as a stray tune reminds them of the lean times of their youth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Week in Seattle, the Epicenter of America’s Coronavirus Crisis”

Days earlier, on Saturday, February 29th, we woke to news of the first U.S. death from the virus, a man in his fifties, at a hospital in Kirkland, eight miles northeast of Seattle.
Out came declarations of emergency, from the Seattle mayor, Jenny Durkan, the King County executive Dow Constantine, and Governor Jay Inslee.
On Tuesday night, NBC News, sharing its story on the crisis, tweeted, “Seattle a ‘ghost town’ as residents face uncertainty of growing coronavirus outbreak.” We laughed it off and clapped back.
Carmen Gray sat behind the wheel of her Buick in the Life Care parking lot, just before noon, on Tuesday, March 3rd. A line of Douglas firs towered over the sidewalk between the nursing home and the residential street that flanks it.
Among the trees, Gray could see silver-bearded men toting TV cameras.
In a photo Parkhill took with her phone, Hailey appears on the other side of the glass in a wheelchair, an oversized gray hoodie sweatshirt draped over her shoulders.
Gray, a wine-shop clerk who lives in nearby Bothell, had never in her fifty-seven years spoken on record to a member of the media.
As her sister dialled the number of a local TV studio to gain traction that way, Gray opened the driver’s-side door, walked across the parking lot toward those firs swaying in the wind, and stepped into the coronavirus spotlight.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Six NASA Astronauts Describe the Moment in Space When “Everything Changed””

As six NASA astronauts tell Inverse, what you see isn’t necessarily what you envision.
The astronauts – Chris Hadfield, Jerry Linenger, Nicole Stott, Mae Jemison, Leland Melvin, and Mike Massimino – have all had the rare opportunity to view our home planet from space.
Some refer to that change as the “Overview Effect,” a term coined in 1987 by celebrated space writer Frank White to describe the mental shift astronauts experience when they consider the Earth as part of a larger whole.
One of the reasons we take so many pictures is we don’t have time to see what we’re looking at.
In my five months on the Russian Space Station, I had some opportunities where, for 90 minutes, I would just levitate over a window, and I’d see the sun rise, the sun set, the stars come out, and I’d just sort of block the world out.
I do remember initially looking out the window the first couple of days and wanting to see my home, wanting to see Florida from space.
From Russia, can look over to the side and see his home.
You’re floating around; you’re seeing the Earth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A coronavirus cautionary tale from Italy: Don’t do what we did”

The hospital in Bergamo was not the only hospital in the area dealing with a lack of capacity and rationing of care.
The same day, I heard from a manager in the Lombardy health care system, among the most advanced and well-funded in Europe, that he saw anesthesiologists weeping in the hospital hallways because of the choices they are going to have to make.
In the days since, overwhelmed hospitals have set up tents as makeshift hospital wards, and cargo containers have been placed at the entrances of medical centers to sort out patients coming at an increasing pace.
Until last week, the Italian public health care system had the capacity to care for everyone.
Our country has universal health care, so patients aren’t turned away from hospitals here.
As of Friday night, 1,266 people have died in Italy due to the outbreak.
Italy has now been in lockdown since March 9; it took weeks after the virus first appeared here to realize that severe measures were absolutely necessary.
According to several data scientists, Italy is about 10 days ahead of Spain, Germany, and France in the epidemic progression, and 13 to 16 days ahead of the United Kingdom and the United States.

The orginal article.