Summary of “Why Six Hours Of Sleep Is As Bad As None At All”

Subjects in a lab-based sleep study who were allowed to get only six hours of sleep a night for two weeks straight functioned as poorly as those who were forced to stay awake for two days straight.
This sleep deprivation study, published in the journal Sleep, took 48 adults and restricted their sleep to a maximum of four, six, or eight hours a night for two weeks; one unlucky subset was deprived of sleep for three days straight.
In the last few days of the experiment, the subjects who were restricted to a maximum of six hours of sleep per night showed cognitive performance that was as bad as the people who weren’t allowed to sleep at all.
Getting only six hours of shut-eye was as bad as not sleeping for two days straight.
Another sleep study published in Epidemiology, indicates people generally overestimate their nightly sleep by around 0.8 hours.
If you think you sleep seven hours a night, as one out of every three Americans does, it’s entirely possible you’re only getting six.
Even just a little bit of sleep deprivation, in this case, six rather than eight hours of sleep across two weeks, accumulates to jaw-dropping results.
Fixing bad sleep habits to get enough sleep is easier said than done.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Colin O’Brady Wants to Tell You a Story”

For 54 days, O’Brady had trudged alone, fighting whiteouts and howling wind.
O’Brady hadn’t seen Rudd since day six, when the captain had shuffled up beside him in a whiteout.
As news of O’Brady’s victory made its way around the world, ExplorersWeb, an online hub for expedition news that “Makes sure credit is given where credit is due,” pushed back and noted what many in the media had failed to mention-that for the last 300-plus miles of the crossing, O’Brady had followed a man-made “Snow road,” the South Pole Overland Traverse.
When O’Brady takes the stage during lunchtime at the Riverhouse, he tells his story masterfully.
At this point, the story of Colin O’Brady takes off in a rocking montage.
In the early days of his triathlon career, O’Brady made Besaw his manager.
At the time, only two people had completed the Explorers Grand Slam in under a year, but O’Brady did it in 139 days, beating the previous record by 53 days.
At the top of Snow King, Besaw reminds O’Brady of the day’s schedule.

The orginal article.

Summary of “31 Ways to Improve Your Life in Just a Month”

Remind yourself frequently that the purpose of your life is not to work 10 hours per day, five days per week for 30 years, then retire to a golf course in Florida.
Day 6: Stop getting the attention and focus it on other people.
Day 14: Journal about three new things you are grateful for.
Psychologist Shawn Achor told Oprah that you train your brain to be optimistic if you do this for 21 days in a row: Each day, write down three new things you are grateful for.
Day 23: Have lunch with someone, and listen to that person selflessly.
Day 25: Look at people in the eye, smile, and say hello.
Elderly people have a rich and long history full of stories, experiences, and perspectives you’ve never thought of from simpler days gone by.
What would your life look like if you practiced some of these things everyday, extending this plan beyond a 31-day cycle? It just might help you live the life you’ve always wanted rather than settling for whatever comes your way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “31 Ways to Improve Your Life in Just a Month”

Remind yourself frequently that the purpose of your life is not to work 10 hours per day, five days per week for 30 years, then retire to a golf course in Florida.
Day 6: Stop getting the attention and focus it on other people.
Day 14: Journal about three new things you are grateful for.
Psychologist Shawn Achor told Oprah that you train your brain to be optimistic if you do this for 21 days in a row: Each day, write down three new things you are grateful for.
Day 23: Have lunch with someone, and listen to that person selflessly.
Day 25: Look at people in the eye, smile, and say hello.
Elderly people have a rich and long history full of stories, experiences, and perspectives you’ve never thought of from simpler days gone by.
What would your life look like if you practiced some of these things everyday, extending this plan beyond a 31-day cycle? It just might help you live the life you’ve always wanted rather than settling for whatever comes your way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Total Recall: The People Who Never Forget”

The HSAM subjects turned out to be far better than people with average memories at recalling long-past autobiographical data; in memories that could be verified, they were correct 87% of the time.
Significantly, research shows that people with average memories are bad at temporally placing remembered events – we don’t have a sense of whether that thing happened two weeks ago or two months ago.
Plenty of people rehearse their memories and don’t have HSAM, and plenty of people with OCD don’t have incredible recall of their autobiographical memories.
Despite their amazing recall there is one way that HSAM subjects are just like everyone else – they are just as prone to memory “Distortions”, the editing, assumptions, conflation of time, and other discrepancies that are part and parcel of making memories.
In a study published in 2013, Dr Lawrence Patihis, a memory researcher at the University of Southern Mississippi working with scientists at UCI, asked 20 HSAM subjects and 38 people with standard memories to participate in a series of tests designed to assess their susceptibility to false memories.
When people with average memory recall an experience, it is formed not only by what they think happened and how they felt at the time, but by what they know and feel now.
First, the initial process of encoding memories – that is, when the brain makes an experience into a memory, translating elements of that experience into a network of neurons and synaptic connections – seems no different for people with HSAM than for the rest of us.
For all the terrible things that people with HSAM can never forget, there are also wonderful memories.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be Super Successful? Science Says Do Any 1 of These 10 Things”

Jack Canfield, co-author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series, suggests that you practice visualization 10 minutes a day to “Harness the power of your subconscious mind.”
For people who have trouble closing their eyes and “Seeing anything,” use a pen and paper and write out how you want your day to unfold.
“The day you find someone just as passionate about your goal to hold you accountable will be the day you make your first permanent step towards success,” he says.
One great way to be fully prepared for the day ahead is to make a to-do list, just like Barbara Corcoran from Shark Tank; Jim Koch, founder of Sam Adams; and Jim McCann, founder and CEO of 1-800-FLOWERS. I plan up to six tasks that I want to complete during the day on mine, and the reason this works is twofold.
The dimensions of a Post-It Note are perfect because the size constraint will force you to only write down the most important things that you have to do each day.
Spend as much time as possible doing what you want by maximizing output in minimal time – this is the goal each day.
Now, look at your own day, figure out how you can break it into chunks, and determine what you need to do to spend your time doing what you want to do.10.
Even if you can’t set aside full days to deal with certain issues, you can probably block off certain hours of the day to handle them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be Super Successful? Science Says Do Any 1 of These 10 Things”

Jack Canfield, co-author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul series, suggests that you practice visualization 10 minutes a day to “Harness the power of your subconscious mind.”
For people who have trouble closing their eyes and “Seeing anything,” use a pen and paper and write out how you want your day to unfold.
“The day you find someone just as passionate about your goal to hold you accountable will be the day you make your first permanent step towards success,” he says.
One great way to be fully prepared for the day ahead is to make a to-do list, just like Barbara Corcoran from Shark Tank; Jim Koch, founder of Sam Adams; and Jim McCann, founder and CEO of 1-800-FLOWERS. I plan up to six tasks that I want to complete during the day on mine, and the reason this works is twofold.
The dimensions of a Post-It Note are perfect because the size constraint will force you to only write down the most important things that you have to do each day.
Spend as much time as possible doing what you want by maximizing output in minimal time – this is the goal each day.
Now, look at your own day, figure out how you can break it into chunks, and determine what you need to do to spend your time doing what you want to do.10.
Even if you can’t set aside full days to deal with certain issues, you can probably block off certain hours of the day to handle them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Two Things Killing Your Ability to Focus”

Second, we rely excessively on meetings as the default form of interaction with other people at work.
As entrepreneur, investor, and Y Combinator cofounder Paul Graham described in “Maker’s Schedule, Manager’s Schedule,” his now famous 2009 post, “a single meeting can blow by breaking it into two pieces, each too small to do anything hard in.” Creative tasks require dedicated time when you are fresh, not a few distracted minutes squeezed in between meetings.
How many people were in your last meeting? More important, how many of them were actually involved in the creation or fulfillment of deliverables from that meeting? This question might seem like a strange way to stay focused, but countless studies, starting with this 2015 HBR research, have shown the benefits of smaller teams.
Focus and responsibility are more challenging with too many people – which is how you end up with folks staring down silently at their laptops for an entire meeting.
Limit the number of people in any meeting to eight or fewer unless it is a meeting that is purely informational.
You cannot be on top of your game if you run from meeting to meeting.
If you want to avoid wasting time and burning out, add buffer time between each meeting.
For every 45-60 minutes you spend in a meeting, make sure to take 15 minutes or more to process, reflect, and prioritize.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Plan a Successful Road Trip”

A good road trip means more than just getting there and back.
The moral of the story-other than youth often serves up more energy than good sense-is that a good road trip means more than just getting there and back.
My wife, Jen, and I have been living on the road on and off for three years and have developed a dialed process for trip planning.
Long Weekend The three-day trip can be the trickiest to plan and execute, because time is short and overdoing it is tempting.
You’re getting into “More road time than sleep time” territory.
Pick Somewhere You’ve Always Wanted to Go A weeklong trip should put you in range of some marquee destinations, but again, unless you want to spend half your time driving, rein in your aspirations.
At 13 hours, Grand Teton National Park would be a good bet from our house in Santa Fe. Figuring six hours a day driving, the trip to and from the Tetons will take four days total, leaving just five days on the ground, which will go quickly between biking, hiking, climbing, boating, and seeing friends.
Plan Your Route, Including Pit Stops When planning long trips, I’ll spend a lot more time with Google Maps for a macro view of towns, recreation sites, and parks we might want to visit en route.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One Thing Steve Jobs Did at Apple That Will Instantly Improve Your Productivity”

What did you achieve yesterday, the day before? Not so easy is it? We like to think of achievement as something we do over long periods of time, monthly, quarterly, yearly, but not daily.
If you set the expectation that each day should include a defined achievement, let’s call it an “Achievement goal,” then you are creating a nearly instant metric for how productive each day will be and you are taking direct personal responsibility for that goal’s achievement.
Taking a Bite of the Apple Steve Jobs used to do this at Apple on a larger scale at the company’s yearly strategy meetings.
One Day at a Time The purpose of having a daily achievement goal is to use these same strategies of intense focus and clear responsibility to drive your actions on a daily basis.
Are there days you might not accomplish your achievement goal? Of course, otherwise you’re not setting the bar high enough.
To maximize your chances of success set your achievement goal at the end of each day for the following day.
The reasons are simple; you’ll be able to sleep better at night once you have determined what you need to accomplish the next day, sleeping on one critical objective will tune your mind into the many nuances of how you can achieve it, and most importantly, you can start the next day off with a clear objective-no need to waste time each morning trying to shuffle all of the inevitable email priorities that have accumulated overnight.
Over time you will prove to yourself and to your team that a strategic approach to dealing with each day creates much more value than constantly tending to distractions.

The orginal article.