Summary of “The California Sunday Magazine”

During the Bush years, this rhetorical tic greased our path into the Iraq quagmire, of course, but it also helped shoehorn the country into its massive mortgage crisis: Bush’s “Ownership society” nudged millions of citizens into bad loans on the premise of “More freedom and more control over your own life.” Before that, he launched the USA Freedom Corps in 2002, followed by the so-called Freedom Agenda, his tectonic foreign-policy shift away from “[s]ixty years of Western nations excusing and accommodating the lack of freedom in the Middle East.”.
Eager to shed its establishment vibe, corporate America long ago co-opted the personal-freedom language of the ’60s. The CEO of Dreyer’s has equated ice cream with freedom, and skin-care professionals have linked freedom with the removal of unsightly neck bands.
The Scientologists put out the magazine Freedom, and the Valley Forge Freedom played hockey.
You may “Learn to beat the IRS” at Freedom Law School or live in any of more than a dozen places in the U.S. called Freedom.
Hum “Full Tank of Freedom” enough and you start wondering if commercials like these sell us a desire for freedom as much as anything.
Freedom is what’s been taken, and freedom is what they have left.
Arranged near her was a collection of hats doing just that, ostensibly focused on the Second Amendment but with broader overtones: Don’t tread on my freedom and Freedom isn’t free and Free men don’t need permission.
There is external freedom and there is internal freedom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happens When You Drink a Gallon of Water a Day?”

In an effort to overcompensate my way to better life habits, I decided to slosh through a feat known across the internet as the Water Gallon Challenge: drinking a gallon per day for a month, with the promise of glowing skin and a lot more energy.
Day 5: Yes! Water is life! I no longer hobble into my day with my feet and spine curled up like dry leaves.
Day 7: Can we talk about how good I am at yoga right now? My hamstrings are much more flexible, and my back bends with ease.
Day 10: A switch to water that’s been ultrapurified by reverse osmosis has proved revelatory.
Day 14: I crave water first thing in the morning instead of coffee.
Day 19: The peeing has decreased to ten times per day.
Day 32: Oops, the month is over and I didn’t even notice-hydration is routine, and I’m loving it.
How much: “Proper hydration means 85 ounces of water a day from food and beverages, plus more to replenish what you lose when exercising.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you can’t be productive without routines and rituals”

6 minute Read. There are few things that impact your daily productivity, career trajectory, and overall well-being as much as your routines.
According to research, up to 40% of our daily actions are powered by habits-the unconscious actions and routines we’ve developed over time.
So how do routines and rituals fit into the modern workday? And how can we develop ones that maximize our ability to do meaningful work?
Not everyone consciously crafts their routines to maximize their time.
Blindly following someone else’s routines won’t make you as productive as them.
While routines keep us grounded, they don’t always do much to help us get through the day.
Routines power your day, but rituals help you get through them.
While routines help us feel in control of our time, rituals make sure we stick to our plans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Spend Way Less Time on Email Every Day”

Our team at Zarvana – a company that teaches research-backed time management practices – set out to see if there is a data-supported way to reduce the 2.6 daily hours spent on email without sacrificing effectiveness.
What we found surprised even us: we realized we could save more than half of the time we currently spend on email, or one hour and 21 minutes per day.
If people checked their email hourly rather than every 37 minutes, they could cut six email checks from their day.
Between checking email six times more than needed, letting notifications interrupt us, and taking time to get back on track, we lose 21 minutes per day.
Turn off notifications and schedule time every hour to check email.
If people go to their inboxes 15 times per day and spend just four seconds looking at each email and re-reading only 10% of them, they’ll lose 27 minutes each day.
Roughly 10% of the total time people spend on email is spent filing messages they want to keep, a process that involves two phases: deciding where the emails should go and then moving them to the selected folders.
Move every email out of your inbox the first time you read it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Ultimate Habit Tracker Guide: Why and How to Track Your Habits”

If you want to stick with a habit for good, one simple and effective thing you can do is keep a habit tracker.
A habit tracker is a simple way to measure whether you did a habit.
No matter what design you choose, the key point is your habit tracker provides immediate evidence that you completed your habit.
Alright, those benefits sound great, but it’s not necessary to fill your habit tracker with every habit that makes up your day.
Habit tracking can help kickstart a new habit or keep you on track with behaviors that you tend to forget or let slide when things get busy.
You can track whatever habits you want in your habit tracker, but I recommend starting with these super small habits to make sure that you are at least showing up in a small way each day.
Again, the Habit Journal offers a proven template and the fastest way to create your habit tracker.
Basically, what we are talking about here is getting in the habit of using your habit tracker.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Idea of Hell Has Shaped the Way We Think”

The further from childhood I get, the fewer people I meet who worry about-or even believe in-what Scott G. Bruce, the editor of a new and quite terrifying compilation, “The Penguin Book of Hell,” calls the “Punitive afterlife.” But the Hell here on earth-the one that the preachers promised would lose in the end-hasn’t gone anywhere.
From antiquity forward, our stories about Hell often feature some prematurely damned hero-Orpheus or Aeneas, the three Hebrew boys in the furnace or Jesus during his three days dead, the innocent prisoner or the untried detainee-passing through the state of hopelessness, then coming back, blinking, into the light.
The vision is also, perhaps more harrowingly, characteristic of how the idea of Hell has shaped perceptions of our own time.
In the “Summa Theologica,” his grand synthesis of Aristotelian philosophy and Christian teaching, he defended the doctrine of Hell and insisted that we should think of it as a benefit, not a bug.
Not only does Hell exist, Aquinas reasoned, but those blessed souls who make it to Heaven must be able, by some miracle of cosmic surveillance-the worst and longest season of “Big Brother”-to see and delight in the fate of Hell’s inhabitants.
Surrounded by the loveliness of the new creation, he feels his internal awfulness all the more: “Which way I fly is Hell; myself am Hell; / And in the lowest deep a lower deep / Still threat’ning to devour me opens wide, / To which the Hell I suffer seems a Heav’n.” He and Hell belong to each other; where he goes, torture goes, too.
Mostly I come back to Dorothy Day’s questions: Why are some people caught and not others? Why do the “Least of these” keep catching hell while the richest and most powerful slide through life unaccosted and unaccountable, leaving God knows what in their wake? There’s a cruel paradox at work: the more secular our representations of Hell become, the more the poor and rejected and otherwise undesirable tend to populate it.
Grotesque, the child-detainment centers at the U.S.-Mexico border are not Hell but the reason for a Hell to exist, so that those responsible for them can one day get their deserts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “50 Ways To Live On Your Own Terms”

Research done by economists have found - even after controlling for age, education, and other demographics - that married people make 10 to 50 percent more than single people.
Say “No” to people, obligations, requests, and opportunities you’re not interested in from now on”No more yes. It’s either HELL YEAH! or no.” - Derek Sivers.
According to neuroscience research, the more you express love, the more other people feel love for you.
Make friends with five people who inspire you”Surround yourself with people who remind you more of your future than your past.” - Dan Sullivan.
Even more fundamental is: what types of people are you comfortable around?
Unless you live in a big city, I’m baffled how many people pay outlandish amounts on rent each month.
Instead of living life on their own terms, they’d rather respond to other people’s agendas.
According to psychological research, people who make their bed in the morning are happier and more successful than those who don’t.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 strategies to find more time in 2019”

You can feel like you have more time every week by making different choices about how you allocate your hours.
Here are tips from my own experience as well as working with time management coaching clients around the world to help you feel like you have more time in the New Year.Quit something.
The start of a year is a great time for you to reassess why you’re doing what you’re doing, and to let go of activities that no longer make sense.
One of the fastest, easiest ways to take back your time in 2019 is to quit something.
You might limit the amount of time you spend on email by checking it three times a day instead of constantly having it open.
Stopping for a moment to assert your ability to do the non-urgent reduces the sense that everything has to happen at a frenetic pace, and that there’s no time to slow down.
Another way to have extra time in 2019 is to delegate activities that you don’t need to do yourself.
Finally, if you want more time to do something you “Never have time for,” start putting that activity first.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Sandwich Consumed Britain”

“There’s no small-talk. It’s all action.” By 1990, the British sandwich industry was worth £1bn. A young economics graduate named Roger Whiteside was in charge of the M&S sandwich department by then.
One of the great strengths of the sandwich over the centuries has been how naturally it grafts on to our lives, enabling us to walk, read, take the bus, work, dream and scan our devices at the same time as feeding ourselves with the aid of a few small rotational gestures of wrist and fingers.
“It is sometimes hard to tell how much has changed with our sandwich consumption, because we feel really nostalgic towards them,” Bee Wilson, the food writer, told me.
According to the British Sandwich Association, the number grows at a steady 2% – or 80 million sandwiches – each year.
Greencore, which grew out of Ireland’s former state-owned sugar beet industry, has eight facilities in Britain and a large US business, and claims to be the largest sandwich maker in the world.
As a result, most sandwich factories have relied on immigrant labour for at least a decade; in 2014, the news that Greencore was recruiting in Hungary prompted an infamous Daily Mail headline, which asked: “IS THERE NO ONE LEFT IN BRITAIN WHO CAN MAKE A SANDWICH?” According to the BSA, about 75% of people in the sandwich and cafe sector in the capital are from overseas; in the rest of the country, it’s 40%. For Chahar, who dreams of introducing the sandwich to Algeria, it is a baffling situation.
In the centre of the hall, I came across the Soho Sandwich Company, an upmarket supplier, which, I learned, provides sandwiches to the Guardian canteen.
In their way, the new evening sandwiches, which Greggs is calling “Street food”, sound as unlikely as the M&S packaged sandwich did in 1980.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Norwegian art of the packed lunch”

“In Norway, you’re not supposed to look forward to your lunch,” says Ronald Sagatun, who works in advertising and hosts a YouTube channel about Norwegian culture.
“Like most Norwegians, I eat my matpakke every day when I work,” says Holm.
In the UK, productivity output per hour worked still hasn’t recovered from the 2008 economic collapse; the same report revealed that while productivity in Norway grew by 9%, in Britain it fell by a further by 7%. Could other countries learn a thing or two from the steadfast, simple culture of the matpakke?
In Norway, employees are given just 30 minutes for lunch, regardless of whom they work for.
Although the regulation might sound strict, it’s necessary; the nation has among the shortest working hours in the world, at just 38.5 hours a week on average – and many workers go home at three in the afternoon.
Assuming an eight-hour working day, this is equivalent to more than three weeks of extra work every year when compared to Norway.
Regardless of what you put in your matpakke, there are other things that we can learn from Norwegian lunch culture.
Still, the Norwegian culture of the packed lunch seems to have plenty of upsides.

The orginal article.