Summary of “How to Weather a Storm”

On day eight of my 2014 North Pole expedition, my expedition partner and I woke to 50 mph winds and a complete whiteout.
1. Relax and Take a NapToo often on expeditions, I’m operating on too little sleep and too little energy.
The first thing I do on a storm day is take all my gear out of stuffsacks, make sure everything is in good working order, then repack it in a way that keeps important items accessible.
3. Don’t Demonize the SmartphoneI once spent nine days in a tent stuck on a small ice sheet off the coast of Siberia with nothing to read and only a small, 512-megabyte MP3 player.
Had smartphones been around at the time, those nine days would have flown by.
Wary of getting too closed off from teammates and adventure buddies by too much earbud alone time, we often listen to podcasts together on a Bluetooth speaker, which often spawns additional conversation.
4. Read a BookI don’t think it’s all that hyperbolic to say that nearly every piece of poetry and prose ever written has been read and appreciated on the side of a mountain in a storm.
My Garmin InReach goes with me on any expedition or adventure, and downtime is often a chance for me to send messages to friends and supporters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to ‘Grease the Groove’ and Exercise Easy”

Over time, greasing the groove has trickled down through the fitness realm, with each lifter and CrossFit champ who practices it slightly changing its meaning.
Greasing the groove has become something of a catchphrase for people who don’t have the time or ability to do a full workout, but still want to squeeze in a little exercise.
One way to grease the groove is to just do the exercise whenever you think of it.
Ben Greenfield, in Beyond Training, describes how he would do three to five pull-ups every time he walked under a pull-up bar installed in his office doorway.
McKay opted for something similar: He set up a pull-up bar in his door frame, and every time he walked under it, he would do one.
“If you’re constantly thrashing your body, doing max sets every time you do a pull-up, you’re gonna have a bad time.” Anyone who has tried to climb the stairs to their apartment on achy quads after an ambitious leg day knows the risks of overexertion.
Brad Schoenfeld, an associate professor of exercise science at CUNY’s Lehman College, also sees a potential benefit.
Because of how the brain learns, he says, doing four sets of an exercise over five days rather than 20 sets in one day might be a way to improve technique or form, which could result in getting stronger even if you don’t add additional weight.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Wisdom of Trees”

Hermann Hesse wrote in his lyrical love letter to our arboreal companions, “Then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy.” Two generations earlier, a different titan of poetic sentiment extolled trees not only as a source of joy but as a source of unheralded moral wisdom and an improbable yet formidable model of what is noblest in the human character.
“How it all nourishes, lulls me,” he exulted, “In the way most needed; the open air, the rye-fields, the apple orchards.” The transcendent record of Whitman’s communion with the natural world survives in Specimen Days – a sublime collection of prose fragments and diary entries, restoring the word “Specimen” to its Latin origin in specere: “To look at.” What emerges is a jubilant celebration of the art of seeing, so native to us yet so easily unlearned, eulogized with the singular electricity that vibrates in Whitman alone.
Standing at its mighty four-foot trunk, he contemplates the unassailable authenticity of trees as a counterpoint to what Hannah Arendt would lament a century later as the human propensity for appearing rather than being.
How strong, vital, enduring! how dumbly eloquent! What suggestions of imperturbability and being, as against the human trait of mere seeming.
Almost emotional, palpably artistic, heroic, of a tree; so innocent and harmless, yet so savage.
Science scoffs at reminiscence of dryad and hamadryad, and of trees speaking.
One lesson from affiliating a tree – perhaps the greatest moral lesson anyhow from earth, rocks, animals, is that same lesson of inherency, of what is, without the least regard to what the looker on supposes or says, or whether he likes or dislikes.
Complement this particular fragment with a tender illustrated ode to our bond with trees, the story of how Marianne Moore saved a rare tree’s life with a poem, and a lyrical short film about our silent companions, then revisit Whitman on democracy, identity and the paradox of the self, and his timeless advice on living a vibrant and rewarding life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Predict Your Future”

“I want to have a close family.”
“I want to help and inspire people.”
No matter what you want to achieve in life, your actions must back up your words.
It’s not about what you want – it’s about what you do.
Still, I keep adding new things to my daily habits.
There are a lot of other things that I can do better.
What useful and helpful things are you doing today?
The point is that all those little useful things like reading books, taking courses, making tough calls, sending emails, looking at real estate, going for a walk, spending quality time with people you love, ALL ADD UP. But when you do useless things, they add up to nothing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “17 Daily Habits My Dad Insists Will Make You Happier and More Successful”

My dad has enjoyed business success as a lawyer who built his own firm, and who has worked for himself since the early 1970s.
They’re devoted to their grandchildren, and moreover my dad is a man who enjoys both his work and the rest of his life.
My dad went on to offer four daily habits, each of which made great sense to me, and which I know he’s backed up with experience.
There are many different kinds of love, and here my dad is talking about showing respect and concern for the people you spend your days with.
“Get the rest you need. Your body needs sleep-not just ‘rest and relaxation’-for it to work well,” my dad insists.
My dad’s sport is swimming, and while he came to it late, my dad has the zeal of a convert.
A few years ago he did a half-mile open water swim off the beach in Narragansett, R.I. Regardless of what sport or activity works for you, my dad advises, your day will be improved if you do something athletic.
In a few weeks, guess what I’ll get my dad for Father’s Day: a book, most likely something on the top of the New York Times nonfiction bestseller lists.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Great Unsolved Mystery of Missing Marjorie West”

The “Haggard, sleep-robbed faces of scores of men,” as the Bradford Era newspaper described them, told onlookers the grim truth: another day had passed without finding the little red-haired four-year-old, Marjorie West.
The Marjorie West case reminds us that decades before mass media coverage of child kidnappings, there were hazards that terrified parents.
On Sunday, May 8, 1938, the West family – father Shirley; mother Cecilia; and children Dorothea, 11, Allan, 7, and Marjorie – attended church in Bradford, a small city 90 minutes south of Buffalo, New York, and 90 minutes east of Titusville, Pennsylvania, the site of the country’s first oil boom in 1859.
Many people believed in 1938, as they do now, that Marjorie was picked up at the road. Witnesses told police of three cars that had passed through the area around three p.m. The drivers of two were identified by Tuesday night.
A few days after Marjorie disappeared, a taxi driver in Thomas, West Virginia, told police that late at night on Mother’s Day, a man and weeping young girl checked into the town’s Imperial Hotel.
Beck kept his promise and self-published Finding Marjorie West in 2010.
Bob Lowery, a vice president at the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, hadn’t heard of Beck’s book, but says Beck or anyone else with information about Marjorie should come forward.
Police told the press that his daughter resembled Marjorie, but wasn’t her, and the girl spotted that night had different clothes than Marjorie.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Many Hours of Sleep do You Actually Need?”

That begs the question: how much sleep do we actually need? And can we train ourselves to need less?
The researchers on Dinges’ team then assigned the participants to one of four groups: one group was allowed eight hours of sleep for the following two weeks, the next six, then four, and the last group received zero hours of sleep for up to three days straight.
While the group that received eight hours of sleep saw virtually no change to their cognitive performance throughout the two-week study, after just 10 days the participants that slept six hours each night were as cognitively impaired as those suffering from a night of total sleep deprivation.
When the study researchers actually compared the two performances, the tests completed after six hours of sleep were significantly worse than the ones done after eight hours of sleep.
“You don’t know you are sleep deprived when you are sleep deprived,” says Walker, “That’s why so many people fool themselves into thinking they are one of those people who can get away with six hours of sleep or less.” Walker argues that there’s no way you can effectively train yourself to need less sleep.
Researchers who have looked at cultures that remain completely untouched by electricity, such as the Hadza of Tanzania, found that, especially in the summer, these groups tend to sleep biphasically: packing in six hours a night, and then a few hours again in the afternoon.
Walker says, if you ever want proof of how much of an effect just one hour less sleep can have on human beings, just remember how you feel the days after daylight savings begins every March, when nearly the entire country has intentionally deprived themselves of an hour of sleep.
Perhaps the most relevant thing to remember, Walker says, is this: When someone tells you the reason they can only get five hours of sleep is that they simply have too much to do, “I tell them, I’m sorry, but there’s an irony in your statement. The reason you are left with so much to do could likely be because you are only getting five hours of sleep and your cognitive functioning is deficient, so it’s taking you forever to do everything.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Ode to Running in the City”

Here’s the thing: occasionally, and unexpectedly, I’m hit with a bout of nostalgia for a run through the city.
Most of the time, I specifically long for nighttime city runs.
Before I moved to D.C., I lived in Boston-a city overflowing with running culture and history.
On those inevitable rough days when the miles inched by and I forgot what it meant to be fast, it felt like I was out running with the rest of the city.
Because of the crowds and inherent busy nature of the city, living in one also often means returning to a small roster of reliable running routes.
Every morning, as I passed the same piers, tennis courts, and grassy parks, I was confronted by the same thoughts I’d had while running the identical route the day before-and I could watch as my thoughts slowly evolved for the better.
The banality of running the same route over and over turned my attention back toward myself; my surroundings acted as bookmarks for what I’d been thinking at that spot on the previous day’s run.
The nature of city running also makes any opportunity for a trail run-where you can find it-feel even more precious.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Be More Productive Without Putting in Extra Hours”

Make sure you work on those before you move on to less critical tasks and you’ll find you feel a whole lot more productive at the end of the day.
The whole idea of working smarter rather than harder stems from the fact that many of us put in more and more hours only to find we don’t get more done.
If you evaluate yourself by what you actually get done rather than the time it takes to get something done, you’ll start to notice a difference in how you work.
If you start keeping a list of everything you get done in a day, you might be surprised how much more motivated you are to do work that matters and stay focused so you get even more done.
Although you might be tempted to let go of your routine entirely on your days off, our CEO has found that maintaining a weekend routine that doesn’t differ too much from his weekdays works well: The more he let go of his routine on the weekends, the longer it took him to pick it up again during the week.
Some of us struggle to stop working, rather than start working.
You could make this work with an evening cut-off time to get you out of work by, say, 5 p.m. Ogle gets up early, so he has five to six hours of work time before his midday cut-off point.
Light exercise works well for me, so I like to walk home from the office or take a walk after work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Giving Up Refined Sugar Changed My Brain”

Still, I found it hard to believe the refined sugar I was eating at every meal could really effect my cognitive abilities so much, so my friend said there was only one way to find out for sure: give up all refined sugar for two weeks to see if I noticed any changes.
The Refined-Sugar-Free Diet Giving up refined sugar isn’t easy from a practical standpoint.
It’s also important to note that for these two weeks I did not give up sugar entirely, only refined sugar.
“As you were not feeding your addiction, your brain was shouting out to have sugar to satisfy its cravings,” says Rebecca Boulton, a nutritional therapist who specializes in hormonal health and sugar cravings, whom I contacted to help me make sense of what was happening in my body.
“Your blood sugars are balanced without the constant roller coaster of sugar highs and lows,” says Boulton, “Which reduces your brain fog and increases mental clarity.”
I had no expectation that giving up refined sugar would help me sleep better, but it did.
After giving up refined sugars for only two weeks, I feel as if a veil has been lifted and I can see clearly for the first time.
Refined sugar is hidden in tens of thousands of foods and its addictive effect on the brain is more powerful than that of cocaine.

The orginal article.