Summary of “How to Work 40 Hours in 16.7”

No matter how many hours I worked, it never seemed to fill it up.
Everything in just 16.7 hours a week?!Right now you’re probably thinking, “I work more than that in two days! And you’re trying to tell me that’s all I need to work in an entire week?”.
I truly work 16.7 hours each weekand I get about five times more accomplished in those few hours than in the other 25 hours.
You can work smarter without having to work harder.
I’d be equally enthusiastic and motivated about each one, wouldn’t be interrupted, and would finish my day’s work in less than three hours.
My energy level and attitude affect my work and output, so I had to stay present to how I was feeling, and master myself.
Of course, I also had to find work I enjoyed, that fulfilled merather than work that drained me.
Want to go further?Slowly but surely, Pomodoro has forever change how I work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Watch your step: why the 10,000 daily goal is built on bad science”

They concluded that the average Japanese person took between 3,500 and 5,000 steps a day, and that if these people increased their daily step count to 10,000, they could decrease their risk of coronary artery disease.
While the World Health Organization, the American Heart Foundation and the US Department of Health & Human Services have all gradually adopted 10,000 steps as a daily activity recommendation, in recent years the veracity of this number has been increasingly called into question.
Most of the scientific studies that have been conducted to try to test whether 10,000 steps a day is optimal for health are themselves relatively arbitrary.
“So, the study might find that 10,000 helps you lose more weight than 5,000 and then the media see it and report: ‘Yes, you should go with 10,000 steps,’ but that could be because the study has only tested two numbers. It didn’t test 8,000, for example, and it didn’t test 12,000.”
Scientists who have attempted to calculate an exact number of steps that equate to the public health guidelines of 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day, have found that we should perhaps aim for a minimum of 7,500 steps.
Scientists who have studied the Amish people in rural Canada, who use no motorised forms of transport, have found that they average 14,000-18,000 steps a day, while a study of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes from the mid-90s found that those who averaged about 19,000 steps a day had far better outcomes compared with those who remained largely sedentary.
Researchers are currently conducting studies to see whether people who take 10,000 steps a day merely by pottering around their house achieve the same health benefits as those who do so by brisk walking or playing sport.
“More recently, scientists have started looking at cadence, which is the idea of step rate or frequency of stepping,” Tudor-Locke says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to minimize jet lag? Here’s what the doctors order.”

Caldwell explains that while our bodies are able to adjust to about one time zone change per day, jet lag sets in when we cross three or more of them, because it wreaks havoc on our circadian rhythms.
Work to align your sleep schedule with your destination: Because your body can naturally adjust to about only one time-zone change per day, you’ll want to manually adjust your schedule, and that means changing your bedtime to be better mesh with the destination to which you’re traveling.
To be ready to hit the ground running when she arrives, she starts adjusting her bedtime two to five days in advance to match the local time at her destination.
Caldwell creates a timetable so that, at a glance, he can see what time it is at home and at his destination and plan accordingly.
“Similarly, bright light exposure after waking up also will help advance our biological clock to suit the new time zone.” When traveling westward, he adds, the biological clock is ahead of the latest time zone.
It provides a brief plan to avoid jet lag, sharing the ideal time to get to sleep and the ideal time for light exposure.
“Taking a very small dose helps to recalibrate its release so that it is in sync with the time zone of your destination,” says Kern Singh, a spine surgeon in Chicago with Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush.
Turn your wine into water: Having a glass of wine or two on the plane may sound tempting, but it could negatively impact your sleep, which could worsen jet lag, says Quay Snyder, president and CEO of Aviation Medicine Advisory Service of Centennial, Colo., who advises pilots on staying in top condition while in the air.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask Polly: ‘Should I Quit My Day Job to Write a Book?'”

I’m terrified of becoming one of those people who never succeed with their art, so all they’re left with is the day job they hate.
Writing a first book tends to be a letdown for most people: It’s just very hard to feel it, particularly if you’re a little panicked or too much is riding on it or you hate your day job or you haven’t learned to connect with the work while you’re writing it.
That’s not to mention how extensively people with “Just a day job” tend to talk about how much they loathe their day jobs.
The other problem with the day job is that people tend to pick one that pays reasonably well immediately – it’s just a day job, after all – but has no growth potential.
Never take a job for the pay alone if you know you’ll hate yourself for having that job a decade from now.
You can write and also pursue a version of your career that feels less like a day job.
Your first job is to ENJOY YOUR DAY. Enjoying your day means feeling good about how you spend your time.
So that’s your to-do list: Upgrade the day job and upgrade the dream and speed up the publication schedule.

The orginal article.

Summary of “101 Time Management Tips to Boost Productivity Every Day”

Thankfully, you can prevent that from happening by using these 101 time management and productivity tips.
While there are a number of factors that influence the life expectancy of these animals, Evans notes that, “a tortoise breathes around four times every minute. An elephant breathes around eight times every minute and we breathe around 12 to 15 times every minute.”
“Now you don’t have to do it all the time but just doing seven to nine deep and slow breaths at the start of the day is enough to slow things down. You can also do it before any creative task or if you have been stressed. It works especially well if you are running late for a meeting. By breathing more slowly, we ‘expand’ time.”
By recording how you spend your time for a month or two, you’ll see where you’re wasting time and what influences productivity.
One of the most effective ways to gain more time is to eliminate those commitments that are, well, a waste of your time.
On top of an online calendar, a calendar tool creates a daily routine, puts time limits on tasks, keeps your time in-check, and helps you plan for breaks.
Calendars are paramount to time management and productivity.
It’s probably one of the easiest and most powerful time management and productivity tips.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Benefits Of Waking Up Early”

The Wall Street Journal calls 4 a.m. the most productive hour, citing powerhouses of industry who swear by getting up early to avoid distractions.
The first order of business was waking up and getting out of bed.
Waking up at 4 a.m. really is like rising and shining.
The only time I remember waking up this early on purpose was to catch a flight, and I was too groggy and preoccupied to notice or care about my surroundings.
The early hours of the morning really are wonderful.
The guaranteed quiet time meant by the time my kids were out of bed, I’d already had my coffee, answered email, and had a whole lot me time.
The best part of waking up early is that distractions are way down and willpower is way up.
The morning didn’t magically turn me into a novelist, but getting my to-do list done early did mean more creative match-strikes throughout the day.7.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why high-performers don’t use to-do lists”

At JotForm, we approach to-do lists with caution, too.
With to-do lists what happens is that we optimistically assume most of the day’s tasks will take less time than what they’ll actually take.
In addition to horrible time estimation, the reason to-do lists roll into the next day is because they place us into a mindset where everything must go on the list - regardless of the level of impact it has on our day.
In many ways, to-do lists cause us to be overly proactive in our thinking.
To-do lists also allow us to avoid the most important tasks of the day - they aren’t unlike email in that way.
While certainly not in all cases, many times people use to-do lists to avoid doing the things they don’t want to do.
He certainly didn’t have time to make to-do lists.
“Long hours spent checking off a to-do list and ending the day with a full trash can and a clean desk are not virtuous and have nothing to do with success. Instead of a to-do list, you need a success list - a list that is purposefully created around extraordinary results.”While this concept might seem a bit abstract, executing it is simple.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ten habits of people who lose weight and keep it off”

Most people who diet will regain 50% of the lost weight in the first year after losing it.
Most people inherently know that keeping a healthy weight boils down to three things: eating healthy, eating less, and being active.
A new study has found the key to staying a healthy weight is to reinforce healthy habits.
New research has found weight-loss interventions that are founded on habit-change, may be effective at helping people lose weight and keep it off.
We recruited 75 volunteers from the community with excess weight or obesity and randomised them into three groups.
Habit-based interventions have the potential to change how we think about weight management and, importantly, how we behave.
People who succeed at long term weight loss tend to have a regular meal rhythm.
Time spent sedentary is related to excess weight and obesity, independent of physical activity level.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Outside Online”

Otter hadn’t planned on hiking the CDT in 2015.
Otter returned to the campground latrine, a six-by-six foot structure made of cement blocks with a vault toilet in one corner.
Martinez ended up being a pivotal liaison between trail friends, Otter’s family, and SAR. “I just got off the phone with Search and RescueI’m considering putting a call out to local trail community. Do you know anyone who may [want] to head into area?” she wrote to the group on December 9.
Otter couldn’t know for certain that he’d been abandoned, but as days passed without any sign of the searchers, he grew more and more concerned.
All his life, Otter had said “Hike your own hike,” an admonition to not get caught up in what others thought.
Then his friend Chas Bolling, a golfer on the PGA Tour who hired Otter as his coach and caddy every year: “I so enjoyed you-love ya and thanks for everything-Sorry I didn’t get to caddy.”
Otter had a message for me, too: “What can I say? I fucked up. You were so nice to me over the last few years.” Then he came to his trail friends: “TO ALL OF YOU-Get as much joy out of the rest of your lives as you can.”
Having said his goodbyes, Otter attempted to asphyxiate himself by lighting the stove, hoping it would burn up the oxygen in the outhouse.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We’re terrible at planning our time. Here’s how to fix it”

How many hours do you work each day? If you’re like most of the U.S. working population, you probably think you get a solid eight hours in.
Why does the myth of the 40-hour workweek still persist? And if we don’t have eight hours a day to do work, how much time do we actually have? At best, you have 2.5 to three hours a day to do focused work.
If you were to plan a perfect week, you’d most likely schedule the majority of your time to do this type of work.
Let’s go on the low end and say 15%. Next, let’s get rid of all the time spent doing the tasks that support your “Core work.” This means communication and email.
In general, we’ve found that people tend to spend 25%-30% of their computer time at work on communication like email, work chat like Slack, or video calls like Skype, Zoom, or Google Hangouts.
Lastly, we need to talk about all that time spent working in a less than optimal way.
If you planned your day assuming you would have eight hours of time for productive work, and you end up with just over one hour, it’s going to be really frustrating.
Even worse, you’re going to keep adding more and more to your plate, thinking you have all this extra time to do “Core work” each day.

The orginal article.