Summary of “Meet the two amazing women running across America”

The 55-year-old grandmother began running “Out of total vanity” almost two decades ago, and somehow she got hooked on seeking out – then crushing – the most grueling long-distance challenges possible.
“The human body is an amazing machine,” Anderson said, before she set out on the run.
“So for me, it’s, What is it capable of achieving? What can I do for myself? Can my body run across America? Is my mind strong enough to take me?”.
That same year, across the Atlantic in northern California, Sandra Villines had just started running to get in shape and be a role model for her daughter.
Villines – who goes by Sandra Vi – is running to break the record simultaneously.
Villines, 44, closely followed Pete Kostelnick’s record-setting 2016 run across the U.S. and thought, “All right, I can do that.” She checked off a bunch of 50K races before a victory in Death Valley in the Badwater 135 in July.
Both women know the other is running; and both are adamant that they will focus on their attempt, and their attempt alone.
Erson’s first route was based solely off Google Maps, but crowdsourcing from running communities across the country helped her cross off impassable routes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s the ultimate way to defy depression, disease and early death? Exercise”

Dr Justin Varney, the adult health and physical activity lead at PHE, likes to talk about “Physical activity”.
Varney has just been working with the World Health Organization on a new global action plan for physical activity.
The key to a healthy body and mind is a combination of aerobic and strength exercises several times a week, explains Dr David Broom, a senior lecturer in physical activity and health at Sheffield Hallam University.
“Variety is the spice of life and we should be doing a different range of physical activity so we don’t get bored. It is also about reducing sedentary behaviour and getting up and moving around every 20 minutes.”
The main focus in this age group is aerobic activity to reduce the risk of disease and premature death, and strength training to support “Activities of daily living” such as carrying heavy shopping bags.
The minimum recommended exercise length is 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity a week or 75 minutes of vigorous activity, or a mixture of both.
Older adults are also advised to exercise moderately for at least 150 minutes a week, or do 75 minutes’ vigorous activity.
There are no restrictions on the types of activities older people should do, and they should continue to do the exercise or sport they enjoyLily Canter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Stay Focused When You’re Working from Home”

As someone who has worked from home for 12 years, and been a time management coach for remote workers, I’ve seen and experienced the good, the bad, and the ugly.
It may sound silly, but if you want to have a focused day of work, pretend you’re not working from home.
A big shift occurred when I set up “Office hours” for working from home and clarified what was or wasn’t acceptable to do during that time.
If you work from home only one day a week or on occasion, make it a meeting-free day.
If you can’t entirely avoid meetings, reserve at least half a day for focused work.
Explain to friends, family, and other acquaintances that the days you’re working remotely aren’t opportunities for non-work-related activities.
Lay them out factually, having the same respect for your time working from home that you would have if you were on-site.
As you consistently communicate and live by these expectations, other people will begin to expect them, and you’ll find yourself having more time for focused work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Visit to Italian Villages That Inspired the Term ‘Riviera'”

A new generation of young chefs, inspired by the mix of cultures and flavors, are helping reshape the Italian palette along this coast, grabbing the local seafood, as well as meats, fruits and vegetables produced from the nearby mountains, to produce some of the best food coming out of Italy today yet largely ignored by foodies worldwide.
OUR journey started in the Roman-era town of Ventimiglia, just four miles from the French border, where we stayed in a tiny bed-and-breakfast named Casa Fenoglio, built inside a 500-year-old home.
The town – whose historic core is only a couple of blocks long – is overlooked by most tourists but as you walk the cobblestone streets, you can’t help but marvel at how much history took place on land that was occupied by the Romans in the Punic Wars in 181 B.C., and later was home to Christians who in the 10th century constructed the Romanesque Church of San Michele Arcangelo, which remains intact.
Centuries ago, the inn was home was apparently owned by a family with ties to the prince of Genoa, hence the balcony for observing the assembled residents of the town, now used as an open-air patio where the fresh fruit and just baked pastries for breakfast are served.
As is typical in these small towns, it was a run by a chef who also owned it, in this case Emanuele Donalisio, 32, who once worked alongside Michel Roux, the London-based French chef, while also doing stints in Monte Carlo and on cruise ship, where he tried out different flavors, from Latin America to Asia.
THE nearby town of Imperia has a restored port, lined with small fishing trawlers and luxury yachts, and also features a long row of restaurants and casual nighttime entertainment, including, the day we were there, a festival of jugglers, clowns and various children’s games.
The town, population of about 900, is built on a hillside, with a mountain-fed stream running right through it, and again, narrow streets, bordered by ancient homes, many in disrepair, but others that have been turned into what is known as an “Albergo diffuso” which is a hotel spread among various buildings, in renovated townhouses, now collectively called Relais Del Maro.There is next to nothing to do in this town – other than enjoy quiet afternoons, with local kids scurrying around the nearly empty streets.
The town has its own museum-quality, walled-in medieval village, named Finalborgo, which is so well preserved it looks almost as if the Middle Ages wrapped up a week ago.

The orginal article.

Summary of “For Nebraska long snapper Jordan Ober, a Yom Kippur dilemma”

He’s the “Hebrew Hammer” to his former Wisconsin teammates, some of whom would notice him sitting out practice on Yom Kippur and ask: “Man, can I be Jewish today?”.
Bernstein will fast – no food or drink – and part of him will wonder why he’s at a football game rather than temple.
If you play, watch or cover college football, you simply hope that Yom Kippur, the solemn Day of Atonement, does not fall on a Saturday.
When Jordan Ober heard that the Nebraska-Illinois game had been moved from Saturday to Friday night, he thought: Oy! Of all weekends.
He takes tremendous pride in being Jewish – and in being Nebraska’s long snapper.
The 6-foot-1, 225-pound junior from Las Vegas took a leap in committing to Nebraska, which has a microscopic Jewish population.
In 2004, Yom Kippur fell on the final Saturday of September.
“Oh, my God; you dream of games like that where you can be that special guy for your team,” said Bernstein, who now works in Milwaukee for an IT staffing company.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Science-Backed Ways to Take Better Breaks”

Done properly, breaks can reduce mental fatigue, boost brain function and creativity, and actually keep us on-task for longer periods of time.
So how do you take a proper break? Here are 7 science-backed studies can help you maximize your downtime.
For years, productivity methods like Pomodoro have suggested that working in a series of short bursts or ‘sprints’ followed by short breaks are the best ways to keep yourself on track.
The hardest part about taking regular breaks during your workday is that it can be incredibly hard to ‘switch off’.
One of the most common reasons we take a break is because our body tells us we need to.
You might scoff at your co-worker hitting the treadmill on their lunch break, but exercise is one of the easiest ways to reduce fatigue, boost energy, and increase your productivity throughout the day.
In our culture of doing, taking regular breaks can be seen as lazy or unproductive.
So stop glorifying long days and burnout-inducing hours and take a break.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Consistency Beats Talent, Luck, Good Intentions, and Even Quality”

My articles are read by thousands of people every day.
It’s OK If You Can Only Put in a Few Hours a Day”Although Gary Vaynerchuck claims to work 20 hours per day, many highly successful people I know work between 3-6 hours per day. Gary Vaynerchuck wants to own the New York Jets. He’s also fine, apparently, not spending much time with his family. And that’s completely fine. He’s clear on his priorities.” -Benjamin HardyA common misconception in the side-hustle business is that you need to work 12 hours a day, 90 hours a week.
You can still outwork your opponent even if they claim to work more hours a day than you.
Spending quality time with my wife is priority #2.I won’t sacrifice that time for work.
The Boston Globe once studied a typical day for Olympic snowboarders.
The athletes are “Up at dawn, stretch, watch a video of the previous day, hit the slopes till lunch, go to class, do more conditioning, eat dinner, and then go to study hall for an hour and a half. At most, they get about an hour of ‘free time’ a day, but it’s usually used for homework.”
“The right sort of practice can help pretty much anyone improve in just about any area they choose to focus on.” -Anders Ericcson, Peak If You’re Not That Good Now, Consistency Will Make You Better”Don’t coast on talent alone. Let it remind you of the responsibility you have to honor your gift. And if you’re not that good, well here’s the good news: you can get better.” -Jeff GoinsOdds are, you’re not your best self yet.
If you’re not that good now, consistency will make you better.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Hard Things to Start Doing for Yourself”

We put the hard things off until tomorrow-because the “Weather” is bad-until we’ve lost our edge.
Then one day we wake up and we’re emotionally incapable of doing the hard things that must be done.
If you haven’t pushed yourself in lots of little ways over time-if you always avoid doing the hard things-of course you’ll crumble on the inevitable days that are harder than you expected.
Start putting your heart and soul into the things you do.
You must remind yourself to take a deep breath when things don’t go your way.
The ability to not overreact or take things personally keeps your mind clear, your heart at peace, and yourself moving forward.
When you bring clarity into your life, you bring the best of yourself into everything you do-you tend to treat yourself and others better, communicate more constructively, do things for the right reasons, and ultimately improve the world you’re living in.
Then interesting things begin happening-good things that are outside of your immediate purview-good things you haven’t even thought of yet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Keys to Making the Most of the 100 Days Left in 2017”

100 days is a great time period for achieving goals.
To use the example of wanting to train to run a marathon in 100 days, it’s not enough to say, “I want to get in better physical shape.” Instead, you need something you can measure-26.2 miles.
The point is to ensure that whatever you’re going to spend 100 days trying to accomplish will ultimately help you achieve a higher purpose.
The last 10 days will either be a cushion, a time to push past your goal, or a celebration, depending on how successful you are.
Each day should be filled in, even if-in the case of a marathon training plan-there might be days on which your daily input is: Nothing.
It also doesn’t matter greatly if in putting together your inputs, you realize you will need a bit longer than 100 days to achieve your goal.
If you were supposed to run five miles yesterday, did you? If you were supposed to cold-call 20 potential widget customers, did you make the calls? And if you didn’t meet your daily goal, how does that shortfall affect your daily goals for the next few days?
By banking 10 percent of your 100 days, you significantly increase the odds you’ll achieve the final goal on time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hate practicing? This brain hack could help you improve memory and learn faster.”

Researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel have found people may not need to work so hard to learn new skills or concepts, though they are still in the early stages of their research.
“We have exposed a new mechanism, a new form of learning that is much faster but not less efficient than standard classical learning.”
So how does it work, exactly? The authors believe that something they call “Brief memory activations” could substitute for procedural training, aka the process of “Doing something over and over again until it comes naturally.” Procedural training is how people learn most abilities, from how to ride a bike to how to balance a checkbook.
The concept of brief memory activations is actually quite simple: You teach someone something, and then instead of making them repeat it until they get better, you simply flash images that remind them of what they learned.
People are “Virtually guessing” the first time they take the test, Censor said, but after taking it four times, they usually do 20 to 30% better, which Censor added is a typical learning curve.
It would work to learn algebra, maybe, but probably not abstract physics.
This does suggest you might be able to improve your comprehension with a lot less effort by reminding yourself visually what you learned throughout the day; that’s an insight that has been supported by other research as well.
So the next time you learn a helpful work hack or attend an insightful lecture, write down a short phrase or print out an image to jog your memory.

The orginal article.