Summary of “How To Get Life-Changing Clarity Within 90 Minutes Of Waking Up”

The first 90 minutes of your day are crucial to everything that happens thereafter.
If you don’t produce something special during those first 90 minutes, chances are, your whole day will falter.
Make A “Cognitive Commitment” That You Will Produce A ResultYou need to make a commitment to yourself that you will produce a result.
If you produce a result during the first 90 minutes of your day, every single day, your life will look VERY VERY different from the lives of most people.
You’ll have created a result - which produces confidence and clarity.
Abandoning the old ineffective thoughts;formulating the new and effective thoughtsexperiencing the intense thrilling feeling of “Aha”During your first 90 minutes, your job is to get an epiphany and to then do something about that epiphany.
ConclusionHow you spend the first 90 minutes of your day will determine your success in life.
It is your job during the first 90 minutes of your day to produce a result.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Time to Book Flights, Based on 917 Million Airfares”

Anyone who has ever purchased a plane ticket can tell you there’s a “Right” and “Wrong” time to buy.
Travel booking site CheapAir.com recently revealed the results of its 2018 Airfare study, a study where it looked at 917 million different flights listed on its site to determine where the perfect time to buy is.
Everyone knows a last-minute plane ticket is probably expensive, but how far in advance do you need to purchase a ticket is a little less known.
According to the study, the best window of time to purchase a ticket in 2017 was 70 days in advance, a bit higher than the sweet spot in 2016 which was 54 days.
In winter you want to try for 62 days in advance, spring 90 days in advance, summer 47 days in advance, and fall 69 days in advance, on average.
As for that theory that there’s a best day of the week to buy-CheapAir says that’s not really true.
Airfare during the week traditionally doesn’t fluctuate more than $2 from day to day, so you’re fine buying a ticket any day you want.
The cheapest days to fly are Tuesday and Wednesday, while Sunday is the most expensive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mars One Is a “Money Grab” Where Everyone Loses”

In 2012, Josh Richards was not a soldier, or a miner, or a Mars One hopeful.
The bit was exactly what it sounds like – Richards, who describes himself as a “Short, obnoxious, ginger Australian” would dress up as his country’s most notorious marsupial and swear at a live audience.
Richards, a former soldier-turned-traveling comic, says being Keith was oddly therapeutic.
“It was a way of sharing stories I had never been able to talk about,” Richards tells Inverse, referring to his time in the Royal Marine Commandos.
Through all this, Richards could feel the spark slowly drain from his body.
Logging long, brutal hours, Richards had become an unrecognizable, unsatisfied, wholly unfulfilled version of himself.
For Richards, an angry koala roaming between various Edinburgh Starbucks, began to wonder if he could leave life on Earth for something else and never return.
Amid all this, Richards was putting the finishing touches on a one-koala show he’d written about a trip to Mars.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here are 22 of the best day-to-day, time-saving tips to use now”

We try to squeeze as many hours in one work day, to be “Productive”, but in the end everything depends less on time, and more on your focus, motivation and overall well-being.
The 2-minute rule: if you can do something in two minutes, do it now.
The 5-minute rule: the biggest cure against procrastination is to set your goal not to finish a scary big hairy task, but to just work five minutes on it.
Seinfeld’s productivity chain: if you want to be good at something, do it every day.
You need discipline, and this means for me two things: I plan my day first thing in the morning, and I write a short daily log every day.
Don’t read your email first thing in the day, don’t read it in the evening, and try to do it only 3 times a day: at 11am, 2pm and 5pm. And your email inbox is not a todo list.
Start with the most important first thing in the morning.
The new one took two and a half days and we did it over one hackathon weekend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Gérard Lhéritier, Marquis de Sade, The 120 Days of Sodom and How Aristophil Got in the Middle”

Once home to the author of France’s code of civil law and, after that, sundry dukes and duchesses, the seventeenth-century mansion was now the headquarters of Aristophil, an upstart investment company founded by Gérard Lhéritier, the son and grandson of a plumber.
Two years before lhéritier’s indictment, as a troop of Napoleonic guards played an imperial march and women made up to look like eighteenth-century courtesans sipped Champagne with government ministers, Aristophil’s founder stood behind a podium at the Hôtel de La Salle and welcomed his guests to the brand-new “Pantheon of letters and manuscripts.” Recent reports that the outfit was in trouble were nothing but unfounded “Attacks,” he said.
Not quite a year later, in March 2014, Lhéritier announced that he’d purchased The 120 Days of Sodom for $10 million.
Out on a $2.5 million bail, Lhéritier now spends his days preparing for his criminal trial, a date for which has not yet been set.
According to Triboulet, Lhéritier cannot be convicted of fraud because Aristophil never guaranteed it would buy back investors’ manuscript shares.
Vrain, who hasn’t spoken to Lhéritier since the raids, dismisses criticisms he’s faced because of his connection to Aristophil.
One treasure that probably won’t ever reach Lhéritier’s predicted value is The 120 Days of Sodom.
Perhaps, Lhéritier muses, the scroll really is cursed: “Maybe if I hadn’t touched the manuscript, Aristophil would still be here.” He says this with a laugh as he sits in the rooftop restaurant of a posh Nice hotel, drinking an espresso in the brilliant sunshine and looking out over the sea.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Boy Who Lived on Edges”

At 13, Adam climbed Mount Adams, a 12,276-foot stratovolcano, with his father and brother.
“Adam just didn’t have that. He and I had a relationship that, I think, is very, very rare between male peers. I’d never loved a girlfriend as much as I loved Adam Roberts.”
Another time, Cunningham descended the north face of the northwest ridge of Mount Adams one day after Adam had been there and was horrified to see the sweeping turns his friend had laid down, the signature of a skier moving at more than 30 miles an hour.
They wondered: Were Adam’s adult troubles caused by the same demons, reemerged? The boy with the welcoming smile now struggled to live normally.
Adam lived for days on end in the parking lot of Mount Baker.
Years ago, Judy says, when Adam was wracked by his eating disorder, “Almost every day he’d call and say, ‘I want to kill myself.'” Do you have any idea, she says, what it’s like for a mother to write the memorial service for her son-not once, or twice, but many times? Later, Adam routinely sent her as many as 400 texts per day.
Adam’s actions had stripped him even of the solace of skiing: during the summer of 2016, he was required to wear a GPS ankle bracelet, so he couldn’t wear a ski boot.
They hiked to a spot where the family had camped when Adam was a boy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Internet Breaks Your Brain”

New research from Pew found that 77 percent of Americans go online daily, but 26 percent claimed to be online “Almost constantly.” Reading this brought me back to one day a few months ago, when I went outside for a cigarette, bringing my phone and cocktail with me.
Feinberg, a HuffPost reporter, is a first ballot inductee for Extremely Online Hall of Fame.
“No matter what happens, he is so confident that he’s right and that he’s an intelligent person. And he’s acquired all these hordes of fans, so he starts performing for them even harder when they cheer him on.” In other words, Don Jr. is also the epitome of being Extremely Online.
Feinberg has broken a number of stories online, but does she feel that online has broken her brain in the process?”Absolutely,” she said.
Krang T. Nelson, an exceptionally prolific tweeter, says he has to keep a firewall between his online life and his real life, if only because most of his friends don’t suffer from the same internet brain worms that he does.
We think nothing of calling someone a piece of shit online 10 times a day.
If you spend all day online being an asshole, is it any wonder that you might start acting like one everywhere else?
What’s more important to me, being right online, or making a living?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How I Finally Kicked My O.C.D.”

It started in seventh grade, when two childhood friends aged out of hanging out with me.
My entire day was an effort to recreate the patterns of the previous one.
On the good days, obessive-compulsive disorder can just feel like a bunch of extra chores.
On the bad days, when nothing is “Working,” you are trapped in a living nightmare, helplessly enslaved to an oppressive and delusional belief system that has swallowed nearly every moment of your waking life.
I’m eventually forced to tell her about my O.C.D. and depression, but I pretend it’s over: “When I was a kid, I did these rituals so I would have good days.”
“So wait, what was the shaving-with-no-pants-on one about?” my friend Nate asked.
In sharing with friends and family the weirdest things about me, I expect humiliation, or at least some solid recoils in horror.
Over time, I even become a trusted resource for friends newly tackling their own mental health.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Need an Untouchable Day Every Week”

To share a rough comparison, on a day when I write between meetings, I’ll produce maybe 500 words a day.
On an Untouchable Day, it’s not unusual for me to write 5,000 words.
I look at my calendar sixteen weeks ahead of time, and for each week, I block out an entire day as UNTOUCHABLE. I put it in all-caps just like that, too.
It’s the perfect time to plant the Untouchable Day flag before anything else can claim that spot.
On the actual Untouchable Day itself, I picture myself sitting in a bulletproof car surrounded by two-inches of thick impenetrable plastic on all sides.
So what happens if the bulletproof car really does get bumped? Say I get an incredible speaking invite or somebody much more important than me only has this one day to get together? Red alert: The Untouchable Day is under threat.
The beauty of this approach is that when you plant the Untouchable Day flag on your calendar, it really does feel permanent in your mind.
With a year of Untouchable Days under my belt, do I still go through the exercise of scheduling one Untouchable Day every single week?

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Control Your Life, Control What You Pay Attention To”

Or said another way: you must control your attention to control your life.
Attention management is the practice of controlling distractions, being present in the moment, finding flow, and maximizing focus, so that you can unleash your genius.
Rather than allowing distractions to derail you, you choose where you direct your attention at any given moment, based on an understanding of your priorities and goals.
So if your attention continues getting diverted, and email, meetings, and “Firefighting” consume your days, pretty soon weeks or months will have gone by and your life becomes full of the “Experiences” you never really intended to have.
Practicing attention management means fighting back against the distractions and creating opportunities throughout your day to support your priorities.
Remember, it’s there to serve you, not the other way around! Decide to take control by turning off email and “Push” notifications which are specifically designed to steal your attention.
Practicing attention management will not eliminate distractions from your day.
Instead, control your attention to control your life.

The orginal article.