Summary of “The Comment Moderator Is The Most Important Job In The World Right Now”

Last week, the Verge published an explosive look inside the facilities of Cognizant, a Facebook contractor that currently oversees some of the platform’s content moderation efforts.
Facebook moderators in developing countries like India are even worse off, according to a recent Reuters report.
In the meantime the human moderators at Facebook or YouTube spend their days getting high to numb themselves so they can keep scrubbing suicides from our News Feeds.
There are only so many comments, posts, and videos that a human being can watch in a day.
Sites like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter have failed to support clear and repeatable moderation guidelines for years, while their platforms have absorbed more and more of our basic social functions.
Content moderators, audience development editors – they’re all shades of the same extremely important role that has existed since the birth of the internet.
For about nine months, I worked as BuzzFeed’s comment moderator.
In 2009, one of 4chan’s janitors wrote about the job in a Reddit AMA. In response to a question about whether 4chan is really that bad of a community, the janitor wrote something that will sound familiar to anyone who has spent any time on Facebook, YouTube, or Twitter since 2015.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How meal timings affect your waistline”

Mounting evidence suggests that timing is also important: it’s not just what you eat, but when you eat that matters.
Ancient Chinese medics believed that energy flowed around the body in parallel with the sun’s movements, and that our meals should be timed accordingly: 7-9am was the time of the stomach, when the biggest meal of the day should be consumed; 9-11am centred on the pancreas and spleen; 11am-1pm was the time of the heart, and so on.
Most weight-loss schemes revolve around reducing the overall number of calories consumed – but what if the timing also determined the benefits? When overweight and obese women were put on a weight-loss diet for three months, those who consumed most of their calories at breakfast lost two and a half times more weight than those who had a light breakfast and ate most of their calories at dinner – even though they consumed the same number of calories overall.
What else could be going on? Some preliminary evidence suggests that more energy is used to process a meal when it’s eaten in the morning, compared with later in the day, so you burn slightly more calories if you eat earlier.
His own research has revealed that the majority of North Americans eat over the course of 15 or more hours each day, with more than a third of the day’s calories consumed after 6pm, which is very different to how our ancestors must have lived.
It’s not only consistency in the timing of meals, but in the amount of food we eat at each meal that seems to be important.
What should we do about it? Striving for greater consistency in the timing of our sleep and meals is a good first step, and ideally, all our clocks should be operating on the same time zone.
Dimming the lights in the evenings and getting more exposure to bright light during the day time has been shown to shift the timing of the master clock in the brain several hours earlier, making people more lark-like.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How I lost my legs and gained… you want me to say something inspiring here”

The legs are pretty ugly: I want to make that clear.
The legs are beginner prosthetics, called dead legs because the ankles don’t bend – this is supremely annoying, but as long as I’m not walking up or down a steep hill I can get where I’m going okay, and if I am on a hill, it’s a good excuse to desperately drape my arm around someone for balance.
My prosthetist helped me click on the legs and pulled me up onto a set of parallel bars, telling me to take a step, careful, careful – and then – I put a foot down and pushed forward and it worked.
There were still a lot of things that needed to be worked out: the sockets had to be padded or thinned out depending on if the end of my legs hurt, the metal bars had to balance just right so that I didn’t tip forwards or backwards, and the feet need to be turned out just enough.
The definition of disability that I use when talking to other people is “Something that limits your daily functions – you need something to help you live a ‘regular life,’ so to speak.” I need my fake legs and sometimes a cane if I want to get around, walk like everyone else, take the bus and the subway and the occasional Lyft.
Everything’s a little floppier, a little looser; arms flail and legs get twisted into strange positions.
I’d rather talk about the legs themselves: how I put them on each morning, how my doctors make them fit, how the foot looks real but also totally not real.
If I didn’t know how to relate to my body before I lost my legs – then, I used to half-jokingly refer to myself as a “Flesh sack” – I certainly don’t know how to relate to my body now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “14 Things About Life I Need To Remind Myself Of Every Day”

No matter how much I read, journal, and process all the wisdom of life, I keep on forgetting the things that make life better.
You also nurture your brain by reminding yourself of all the things that make life better.
What matters is that you have good intentions and that you do your best to make today the best day of your life.
The funny thing is, that the middle IS our life.
Who are you? What kind of life do you want? Shape your life by your decisions.
Believe me, I try hard to convince myself that I don’t need to work out every day.
So you want to wake up, meditate, read, go to the gym, work, have lunch with a friend, pick up a few things from the store, work on your hobby, AND go to the movies?
All of a sudden, we think we can do 10 things on one day instead of the regular 4/5. Make a decision.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Opioid Addict Who Was Also a Top Doctor Shares Her Story of Recovery”

Sufentanil is an opioid painkiller five to seven times more potent than fentanyl-another powerful opioid-at the time of peak effect and 4,521 times more powerful than morphine, but Alison wasn’t intimidated.
On Father’s Day in 2015, Alison was home alone; her husband was with his dad, and her kids were with their dad. She was putting away laundry in her husband’s closet when she found pockets and shoes full of empty fentanyl vials-more than she’d ever stolen for him.
The following Tuesday, Alison got a text from her boss saying, “Hey, are you around? We need to meet with you.” Dembowski and her boss sat Alison down and told her what they knew.
Alison called her husband and her children from the road. “I’m sure she probably hated me,” says Dembowski, remembering how Alison worried about how she would pay her bills, what would happen to her kids, and whether she would be home in time for Easter and Mother’s Day.
The program is lengthy, which is particularly good for doctors because “They are really, really smart, and the smarter you are, the harder it is to get the basics of recovery because you can kind of outthink your feelings,” says Debbie Ray, Alison’s case manager at Talbott.
“We have to get them to put themselves out there and be vulnerable, which is not an easy thing for a physician to do. I always tell my patients, ‘You’re going to see a sadistic-looking smile on my face when you’re in the middle of telling the hardest story of your life.’ Because when I hear them do that, that’s where the work begins.” In treatment, Alison had to “Learn I’m a regular person, not superhuman,” she says.
The stigma on addicts in society as a whole has started to decrease amid the opioid crisis, thanks in part to the fact that people of privilege like Alison got hooked, cluing the public in to what researchers have always known to be true: Anyone can become addicted.
There’s still so much disgrace surrounding physicians in recovery that Alison worried she’d never work again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to cut your work hours in half”

Working this way has cut my hours almost in half, and has allowed me to run a nearly seven-figure business in just 20 hours a week.
The formal name for this type of schedule is “Context switching.” I discovered just how big an impact it can have on your productivity when I worked as a coordinator overseeing autism programs at two schools in a particular district.
Now, I manage to get all my client work done in just 12-15 hours a week and my administrative work in another 5-8 hours, which leaves me plenty of time to focus my energy on dreaming up new products and find the right market for them.
Examine your current schedule: Look closely at how many hours you’re spending on each task, or the role your work demands.
Could you put all your meetings in one or two days? Reserve one day a week for deep, creative thinking? Would an alternate-week schedule like mine work best for you?
Communicate: Once you’ve decided what sort of schedule blocking might work for you, be sure to communicate your new approach in advance to your clients and colleagues.
Keep your health in mind: Remember, the goal of developing an A/B schedule is to feel great about your work at the end of the day.
For every two hours of work, I schedule a 20-minute movement break in my calendar.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Friendship Files: The Great British Bake Off’s Selasi and Val”

Everyone’s from different backgrounds, and there are huge age gaps, but we all managed to get along because of one thing, and that’s baking.
Val: When we met for the first time at the hotel, that was the moment that you knew who the other bakers were.
I just said, “Hey, I’m here for the baking show.” And everyone looked at me like, Who the hell is this?
From day one, that’s when the friendship began.
It’s two days of baking, so we arrive on the evening before the first day and then we all catch up on what’s been going on in the week.
Then on the first day of baking we wake up, we get ready, we get on the same bus.
Then we go in the tent and we bake and then after we bake the challenge, we go into a green room and we catch up there.
We were up at 5 o’clock, on the bus at 6 o’clock, on the set at 7 o’clock checking your ingredients, and we would bake often till half past 9 o’clock at night.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Time Management Hacks That Very Successful People Practice Daily”

Have you ever wondered how certain people could run a business, spend time with their family, hit the conference circuit and write a book? It’s not because they have superpowers.
These people have learned the time management hacks that successful people practice daily.
What better way to improve your time management than by learning the hacks from some of the most successful people in the world?
In “The Ultimate Guide to Time Management,” life and business strategist and best-selling author Tony Robbins suggests you treat your time the same way as you take care of your money.
Robbins recommends converting wasted time into productive time.
Both men have said that the secret to their success and time management is filling their calendars with plenty of blank spaces.
It gives a person the time to focus on their passions and control their time.
This “Allows me to essentially have more quality time overall, and even when I don’t have quality time, if I get caught in commute, I tend to do a lot of learning and some of that thinking time during that. So I have a lot of productive time, either avoiding the commute or if I’m in the commute, making sure I use that time in a really valuable way.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “If Self-Discipline Feels Difficult, Then You’re Doing It Wrong”

We do what feels good and avoid what feels bad. And the only way we can ever NOT do what feels good, and do what feels bad instead, is through a temporary boost of willpower-to deny ourselves our desires and feelings and instead do what was “Right.”
That’s because a) sex feels awesome, and b) we’re biologically evolved to crave it.
You were punished for wanting it, and therefore, have a lot of conflicted feelings around sex: it sounds amazing but is also scary; it feels right but also somehow so, so wrong.
Any non-productive minute feels like an untenable failure.
You wake up early because it feels good to wake up early.
You eat kale instead of smoking crack because it feels good to eat the kale and feels bad to smoke crack.
You stop lying because it feels worse to lie than to say an important truth.
You exercise because it feels better to exercise than it does to sit around, covering yourself in a thin layer of Cheeto dust.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Starting Your Day on the Internet Is Damaging Your Brain”

I’ve said before the first 3 hours of your day can dictate how your life turns out.
You can either start you day with junk food for the brain or you can start the day with healthy food for the brain.
Anytime I start my day with junk food for the brain, the quality of the day goes down.
As Mark Manson so brilliantly said, cell phones are the new cigarettes, And a significant amount of what’s on the internet is nothing more than junk food for the brain.
The idea for this article was actually the result of giving my brain some health food to start the day.
When you start the day with health food for your brain, you don’t end up depleting your willpower, and as a result you get more done in far less time.
So how exactly do you start the day with health food for your brain? To wean ourselves off of junk food for the brain, we have to actually replace it with something else.
You can accomplish extraordinary things in just one focused hour a day of uninterrupted creation time.

The orginal article.