Summary of “The Lonely Life of a Professional YouTuber”

There are more professional YouTubers than ever before.
More people than ever are tuning in and desiring the life of a YouTuber.
“My flatmate is a YouTuber too, and she sells glitter.” Another YouTuber, Memeulous, lives on one of the floors below.
The tone became more and more ironic and self-deprecating, yet he somehow retained a bit of that old school YouTuber hyper-sincerity when encouraging people to like and subscribe.
Seven months before the now-famous Logan Paul controversy in Japan, a YouTuber was shot in the chest by his wife and co-star while trying to make a prank video.
At the same time, these controversies fuel the YouTuber ecosystem.
In some ways, you can see the YouTuber as the ultimate distillation of modern neoliberal culture: an entire community of self-promoting individualistic entrepreneurs, desperately battling each other for economic success, while their work simultaneously benefits advertisers and drives the success of a corporate monolith: YouTube.
In an era of “Bullshit jobs”, when the radical idea of a post-work society is becoming more realistic by the day, the unconventional career of the professional YouTuber becomes inherently interesting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Olympic Cross-Country Skiers Eat 8,000 Calories a Day. It’s Exhausting.”

Female elite skiers must eat about 3,500 to 4,000 calories a day – about double the calories consumed by the average woman.
After morning training she quickly eats about 300 calories in snacks – beef jerky, almonds, a few Fig Newtons and maybe an orange.
Moeller, who is six feet tall and about 176 pounds, says he trains four to five hours a day and takes in about 8,000 calories a day, following a rigorous eating schedule to get it all into his body.
“When you have to eat a lot, you have to eat the stuff you like to eat,” he said.
“If you come to a point where the training is so hard your desire to eat goes down, that’s a critical balance,” Ronsen said.
Susie Parker-Simmons, a senior nutritionist for the United States Olympic Committee, says that meeting the calorie demands of the sport can be especially challenging for women, who can lose their menstrual cycle and bone mineral density if their eating falls behind.
“They said, ‘If you come look after us we’ll just eat or drink what you give us,'” she said of the American skiers.
Linda Bakkman, a sports nutritionist with the Swedish Olympic Committee, said that even Olympic athletes must contend with cultural biases around eating high-calorie foods.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When You’ve Procrastinated On Your Goals For Too Long”

In the beginning, when we set the goal, we feel usually motivated, for about a day.
As each additional day passes, the resistance starts to grow.
As more time passes by, we feel more overwhelmed, especially if we have attempted to start several times, and failed.
The biggest problem in this scenario is that we think of the sheer size of the goal, or to be more accurate, the list of the activities we need to do, and how much time it will take us to do them all.
There is nothing wrong with the big picture, on the contrary, we need it, but in the beginning, when it’s the planning phase.
Don’t think about the science or that you need 66 days to establish a habit, it will just overwhelm you additionally, which you don’t need.
Next, to the “ONE DAY” principle, the only other one you need is the consistency.
Let’s get down to concrete steps you can take a right this moment to take action and start working on your goal.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s What It’s Like At The Headquarters Of The Teens Working To Stop Mass Shootings”

On Wednesday night CNN will air a special town hall meeting with students and lawmakers.
David Hogg, the 17-year-old student journalist who had interviewed his classmates while they hid from the shooter, went on television the next day, pleading with the country for action.
Some of the students hold leadership positions at their school, so they’re used to planning committees and meetings.
Although the room was big, the students worked closely together on a rug, making decisions communally.
At one point that day, a student had a panic attack, while another later cried on the floor.
In these moments, the group repeated a mantra, reminding one another that they were doing this for the students – their classmates – who died on Valentine’s Day.
As others answered phone calls, Jaclyn Corin, the 17-year-old in charge of logistics for the Tallahassee event on Wednesday, worked on a press release about the event – although she referred to it as “An essay.” The teens are planning to meet with Florida’s attorney general, House speaker, and Senate president.
One student mentioned she was supposed to be home at a certain time, while another negotiated with his folks, who seemed to be telling him to get more rest.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Get Schooled in the No-Nonsense Art of Survival”

We three people-who had met just a few days earlier-were alone on the sea ice of Frobisher Bay, on the east coast of Canada’s Baffin Island, 2.5 degrees south of the Arctic Circle.
My excitement arm-wrestled with fear and dread. For the past three days, Sarah had led us out across the ice from her home in Iqaluit, the capital of Nunavut, the largest and northernmost territory in Canada.
To get there, we would have to ski across the ice in harnesses, towing heavy pulks-fancy sleds, basically-loaded with all the gear we needed to stay alive in extreme cold.
We practiced throwing on our heaviest layers the moment we stopped skiing, watering and feeding ourselves, and then delayering and skiing on.
As we started skiing, I tried to focus on the harsh beauty of the ice walls lining the frozen channel we were moving through.
We had figured the day’s required mileage would likely take us 12 to 14 hours of skiing.
With the sun vanishing around 7 p.m., it would mean night skiing, finishing our long day a few hours after sunset.
With the sun behind me, I navigated by the feel of the wind on my right backside, the angle of my shadow falling ahead and to the left of my skis: the Incredible Human Sundial! I kept twisting in my skis to turn back to Jonatan, in line behind me, trying to transmit my delight.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How You Can Create A Schedule That Really Works For You”

The minimalist? Well, they’re just living in la la land, aren’t they? They’ve offloaded their schedule to some other format-most likely a to-do list, scheduling app, or series of angry emails asking “Where is this?”.
Build recurring time into your daily schedule for your most important work before everything else.
“If you’re like most, you schedule what others demand of you first and only later look for empty slots in the calendar where you might ‘fit in’ what is important to you.”
Taking the weekly template idea even further, you can create a template for your entire day, not just the morning.
“There are scheduled times during which I can be fully immersed in email and for the rest of the day I’m forcing myself to ignore it. Most of all, there are scheduled blocks of time where my wifi will be off.”
If how you picture yourself spending every day isn’t lining up with how you’re actually spending your time, then it might be time to step back and re-evaluate your priorities.
With your meaningful morning and daily skeleton schedule set, the next question is: How do you fit in the inevitable tasks, appointments, meetings, and responsibilities that creep up and throw your day out of whack?
“Many people don’t check in to figure out how much time should be realistically allotted to something. They just default to 30 minutes for a small conversation and 60 minutes for a larger conversation. This contributes to calendars looking like Swiss cheese.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Along the Rio Grande, a Hot Spring and a Warm Welcome”

There’s hardly a more delightful way to pass over a border; on our first of two trips, we had barely rounded the bend of the descending trail from the Boquillas Crossing Port of Entry before a young man in a “Houston Strong” T-shirt was rowing his way across the river to get us in a waterlogged metal boat, the “Seats” covered in what looked like bathmats.
It’s $10 round-trip for this makeshift ferry, which hauls its tiny load of camera-wielding tourists back and forth all day during official crossing hours.
Once on shore it’s up the hill by foot, burro, or bed of pickup truck to a trailer, where your passport is stamped and you’re granted formal entry into Boquillas del Carmen, the colorful, sparsely settled remains of a former mining town.
For decades the Boquillas border crossing was decidedly informal, illegal but never monitored, a conduit for supplies, a lifeline for loved ones residing on opposite sides, a day’s amusement for tourists.
In Boquillas proper, the specter of the wall seems to be just that, haunting the dish towels and koozies for sale on every corner, their hand-embroidered wildflowers, roosters, and javelinas accompanied, in slightly crooked letters, by a simple phrase: “No wall.” A succinct “Trump no bueno” was all we got from a congenial gentleman who walked us into town, that and the declaration in small black letters on his white baseball cap: “The border makes America great”.
Existential musings aside, a visit to this village of a few hundred people feels much as it has for years.
The joy in a trip to Boquillas, other than its old-world charm, is the hospitality of the people, allowing a visitor brief proximity to the kind of community you’d expect to find in a remote, only recently electrified town 150 miles away from the nearest city.
At Boquillas Restaurant, the proprietor offered to give us the souvenirs we happily picked out before realizing we had run out of cash.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jimmy Buffett Does Not Live the Jimmy Buffett Lifestyle”

In December, Mr. Buffett was still looking to make the show an even more authentic testament to the lifestyle he created and the escapism he knows his fans want.
He had to get on a stage with a pickup band like in the old days and really get back into the original iteration of Jimmy Buffett.
Jimmy Buffett – the nibbling on sponge cake, watching the sun bake, getting drunk and screwing, it’s 5 o’clock somewhere Jimmy Buffett – has been replaced with a well-preserved businessman who is leveraging the Jimmy Buffett of yore in order to keep the Jimmy Buffett of now in the manner to which the old Jimmy Buffett never dreamed he could become accustomed.
Therein lies the Margaritaville® Mesquite BBQ Rub: The more successful you become at selling the Jimmy Buffett lifestyle, the less you are seen as believably living the Jimmy Buffett lifestyle.
Jimmy Buffett entered a point of no return where the lifestyle of the erstwhile Jimmy Buffett became so distant and unrecognizable to the new Jimmy Buffett that he understood there could be a problem in the making.
Mr. Buffett and I both saw “Escape to Margaritaville” in New Orleans on Oct. 28, which is a day that fans have long since designated as Parrothead Day, though Mr. Buffett doesn’t know why.
Perhaps the inspiration for Mr. Garcia’s previous affable bums had always been the old Jimmy Buffett: the kind of ne’er do well who grapples with living a life of purpose while not wanting to work very hard.
If Jimmy Buffett was a Jimmy Buffett kind of guy, these thoughts would have been incidental, thought up in a hammock then lost to memory the way the best boozy thoughts always are.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Michael Mosley: ‘Forget walking 10,000 steps a day'”

These days it is hard to walk the streets without running into someone who is anxiously looking at their wrist to see if they are on target to reach the magic 10,000 steps.
In Japanese, “Man” means 10,000, “Po” means steps and “Kei” means meter.
Our aim was to do a small experiment in which we would compare the benefits and ease of doing 10,000 steps against something called, “Active 10”.
One was asked to hit the 10,000-step target – around five miles – in a day, while the other group was asked to do three sessions of “Active 10” – which adds up to around 1.5 miles – more like 3,000 steps.
When we looked at the volunteers’ results, two out of the three asked to do 10,000 steps had managed to hit their target.
They had formed a small walking group and met together at convenient times during their working day to go for a brisk walk together.
Steps was harder to achieve – but which activity was better for health?
“The Active 10 group actually did 30% more ‘moderate to vigorous physical activity’ than the 10,000-step group, even though they moved for less time.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leave The Office On Time and Don’t Take Your Work Home”

I still have to remind myself that life is bigger than work.
Like my mother always says, “Too much of a good thing becomes bad.” I believe that’s the same with work.
Leave Your Work At Work But don’t just go home and bring your work with you.
You’re also not doing yourself a service by continually thinking about work when you’re at home.
We work too much to obtain those things that don’t even make us happy in the first place.
All I know is that too much work has a negative impact on the quality of your life and work.
That’s why the first rule of work is that we leave the office on time.
The second rule is that we don’t take our work home.

The orginal article.