Summary of “How to Take 100% Responsibility for Your Life”

It is your responsibility to put yourself into a peak state, every single day.
Why would you want to live any other way? Why would you want to drag yourself through the day and through your life?
Put yourself into a heightened state and then make some profound and committed decisions to move forward.
You already know within yourself that if you really want something, you’ll get it.
Every day you cause yourself to believe it even more by affirming to yourself that what you want is already true.
If you aren’t consistent with yourself, then you don’t love yourself.
Your desire to be viewed as consistent – firstly to others and then eventually to yourself – shifts how you see yourself.
You begin to see yourself based on the commitment you’ve made.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Things That May Help When It Comes to Making Peak-State Decisions and Investing in Yourself”

Actually, having peak experiences, or putting yourself into a peak state, should be something you do on a daily basis.
If you’re in a state of growth, you’ll need to position your life to have peak moments more frequently.
Even more - you need to set your trajectory from a peak state.
You want to be in a peak state while you make that decision.
The core purpose for having a morning routine is to put yourself into a peak state in the morning - so you can then operate from that state for the rest of your day.
Rather than being reactive, addicted, and unconscious in your morning - it’s far better to proactively put yourself in a peak state in a ritualistic manner.
You need to develop a routine of regularly getting yourself into a peak state.
You didn’t care enough to create a peak state, and then operate from that state on a daily basis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are You at Risk of a Mid-Career Rut?”

The study asked 500 college-educated adults in professional careers to indicate the degree of their agreement with statements about their behaviors when making important work decisions throughout their careers.
The results were startling: Less than 50% of decisions made in mid-career were rated as successful.
People are most susceptible to making decisions that lead to less-than-successful outcomes between the ages of 40 and 48, according to respondent assessments.
In other words, at the very time when people attain management roles and need to make the decisions that could improve the enterprise – as well as decisions that could advance their career – many become trapped in the status quo.
If you find yourself in this position, the first step is to get help from a trusted mentor – someone who has made difficult decisions, taken risks, and managed those risks, and who has the self-awareness to give good counsel.
Ask for a meeting to discuss a particularly challenging or exciting work matter, or to learn about how the mentor went about making a difficult decision and helped an initiative become a success.
Coaching helped John understand that, while he was delivering results, his decision making around strategic questions needed work.
Do you avoid or procrastinate making decisions that you perceive as creating more work for you or as taking on risk you would like to avoid?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Successful People Make Decisions Differently”

Many of these decisions are opportunities that can change your life, yet many of us don’t know how to assess a decision to yield a good outcome, says Mike Whitaker, author of The Decision Makeover: An Intentional Approach To Living The Life You Want.
“Successful people approach decisions differently; they have a methodical way of looking at choices.”
Successful people recognize that there are small, medium, and big decisions.
Successful people don’t spend a lot of mind share on small decisions.
Bigger decisions are made once or twice a year, and successful people use their goals to navigate to the right choice.
We all make bad decisions, but successful people course correct more quickly, says Whitaker.
“When successful people have enough evidence that they’ve made a bad decision, they don’t look for more. They’re willing to shut down a business, for example, and go in a different direction. They fail fast, move on, and then they don’t talk about it again.”
“We say, ‘Well I didn’t want that job anyway.’ Goal grooming is a bad thing to do for the future. Successful people keep goals solid and reverent, and then continue to make decision purposefully around them.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Managers Can Make Group Projects More Efficient”

We may have hit a saturation point when it comes to collaboration.
Research out of the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School and the University of Virginia’s McIntire School of Commerce shows that time spent by managers and employees in collaborative activities has ballooned by 50% or more over the last two decades.
Research has found that although some teams have a collaborative culture, they are not skilled in the practice of collaboration itself.
As a manager or team leader, how do you reap the benefits of effective collaboration without inviting inefficiencies and messiness?
Don’t engage in collaboration for the sake of collaboration.
Collaboration becomes messy when there is ambiguity over who is accountable for which decisions, causing decision making to stall.
How will we share in any assets, intellectual property, or business value created in the collaboration?
By considering the situations where more minds are better than one, bringing the right people to the table, staying open to listening, demonstrating courage to negotiate, and making sure work gets prioritized, leaders can get the benefits of collaboration without getting mired in its messiness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Mountaineer’s Choice to Never Have Kids”

Lydia Bradey on a small New Zealand mountain in 1995.
Lydia Bradey always knew she didn’t want kids of her own.
Bradey grew up as the only child of a single mother.
Bradey’s decision wasn’t widely publicized.
While Bradey’s trajectory is unique, the factors behind her decision are well-known to women who are big mountain professionals, including mountaineers, guides, avalanche forecasters, and pro skiers.
In her early 40s, Bradey began the process to adopt a child.
“She had enough money to have a permanent full-time nanny who’d become part of the family, and she could afford to call her children on the satellite phone for a half hour every day,” Bradey says.
Since 1988, Bradey has summited Everest three more times, claimed first ascents of Antarctic mountains, and is a sought-after high-altitude guide for missions all over the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The First Thing Great Decision Makers Do”

As a statistician, I appreciate the quote by applied statistics pioneer W. Edwards Deming, “In God we trust. All others bring data.” But as a social scientist, I’m compelled to warn you that many decision-makers chase data with too much zeal, running from ignorance but never improving their decisions.
Is there a way to land in the sweet spot? There is, and it starts with one simple decision-making habit: Commit to your default decision up front.
The key to decision-making is framing the decision context before you seek data – a skill that unfortunately is not usually covered in data science courses.
Many decision-makers think they’re being data-driven when they look at a number, form an opinion, and execute their decision.
There were numbers near that decision somewhere, but those numbers didn’t drive the decision.
By leaving the decision criteria open, you’re free to interact with the data selectively to confirm the choice you’ve already made in your heart of hearts.
The first part of that process is determining what you’re planning to do in the absence of further data.
You ask yourself, “If I see no additional data beyond what I’ve already seen, what will I do?” Answering this takes strength of character  –  you can’t punt it to the data.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want To Make Better Decisions? Do This”

Do you ever look back on your decisions and think, “Why I on earth did I do that?”.
The funny thing is that bad decisions never seem like bad decisions in the moment.
You can do your best to avoid making dumb decisions.
You can fear decisions altogether because you might make mistakes.
“The difference between a good business and a bad business is that good businesses throw up one easy decision after another. The bad businesses throw up painful decisions time after time.”
The earlier and more you decide, the more chance that you make better decisions.
I often say that there are no right or wrong decisions – only decisions.
No matter what, you’re making decisions all the time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Resulting Fallacy Is Ruining Your Decisions”

She’s written two books on poker strategy, and next year will release a book called Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don’t Have All the Facts.
If a well-reasoned decision leads to a negative outcome, was it the wrong decision? How do we distinguish between luck and skill? And how do we move beyond our cognitive biases?
You get into these complex situations where the outcome is the result of multiple decisions.
In life, it’s usually even more complicated because in most real decisions we haven’t examined the coin.
You can think about it as creating too tight a relationship between the quality of the outcome and the quality of the decision.
If we know that outcomes infect us, we want to separate ourselves from outcomes as much as we possibly can when we’re thinking about decision quality.
Doesn’t matter to me whether you got in an accident or not-I should be able to ask you questions to decide whether your decision quality while you were driving was good, because there’s certain things that I do know go into a good decision about driving.
You should be sort of trying to think about that for yourself, but also, don’t talk about the outcome when you’re asking other people about the quality of their decisions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Principles for Making Better Life Decisions”

Because not only will the hall itself be a bad decision, but anyone who ever attempts to visit it will clearly be making a bad decision as well.
Inside the hall, we will have exhibits for all of the worst decisions ever made.
They’ll offer some principles on how to make better life decisions.
Train yourself to adopt the correct habits and make better decisions.
In making decisions, we’ll often consider the options available to us, imagine our future selves after choosing one of these options, and then try to feel how much regret we experience in this simulated future state.
I personally know a lot of people-myself included-who ultimately made big life decisions largely based on the path of least regret.
These decisions are almost always described as the best decisions they’ve ever made.
What is your motivation behind the decision and is that a value you want to cultivate in yourself? All the decisions we make, big or small, are motivated in some way or another by our intentions.

The orginal article.