Summary of “Brexit: what happens the next day if there is no deal?”

Currently, a driver of a UK-registered car is allowed to drive anywhere in the EU, the EEA, Switzerland and Serbia, and not have to carry a green card that proves you have insurance cover.
If the UK leaves without a deal, all changes and drivers will be expected to carry a green card when in mainland Europe and Ireland.
The official advice from the UK government is: “From 29 March 2019, in the event that there is no EU exit deal drivers of UK-registered vehicles will need to carry a motor insurance green card when driving in the EU and EEA.”.
Direct Line insurance says: “In the event of a no-deal Brexit, we have plans to ensure customers are provided with a green card if they drive in Europe on or after 29 March. Customers will need to contact us at least two weeks in advance of when they are due to travel.”
From 29 March, if the UK leaves without a deal, the government says: “You may need a GB sticker even if your vehicle has a europlate. You will not need a GB sticker to drive outside the UK if you replace a europlate with a numberplate that features the GB sign without the EU flag.” PC. Driving with a UK licence when abroad. In a sentence You will have to buy an International Driving Permit to drive in Europe, at a price of £5.50, with different ones required for France and Spain.
If there is no deal with the EU then recognition of UK driving licences in the EU ends.
So British drivers will have to go to the Post Office and obtain an International Driving Permit, which you will need to carry with you in conjunction with your UK driving licence.
It was also revealed this week that British citizens resident in Ireland – estimated to number about 300,000 – will be required to swap their UK driving licence for an Irish one at a fee of €55 if there is no deal on Brexit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Uber and the Ongoing Erasure of Public Life”

The improved design of Uber marks another milestone in the company’s journey to legitimacy.
In her recent book, “Uberland: How Algorithms are Rewriting the Rules of Work,” the technology ethnographer Alex Rosenblat studies the company’s “Algorithmic management,” which forces drivers “To accept the odds that Uber has designed in its favor.” Drivers have no control over pricing, which spikes and dives according to demand.
A study by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority, published in October, concluded that, from 2010 to 2016, over fifty per cent of the increase in traffic delays in San Francisco were due to Uber and Lyft-and that Uber and Lyft cars constituted an estimated quarter of the total delay on the city’s streets.
Despite all of this, Uber claims to support mass transit.
In some suburbs or city peripheries, where these solutions are most necessary, Uber has become a subsidized alternative to the transit to which it supposedly offers a connection, partnering with municipal and transit agencies to replace their existing bus services.
In midtown Manhattan, where Uber and Lyft drivers spend forty per cent of their time idling without passengers, congestion has reached crisis proportions.
In August, New York’s City Council moved to institute a moratorium on new vehicles and a minimum wage for Uber and Lyft drivers.
A more serious proposal might start with the possibility that Uber is opposed to public transit by design-every ride taken on a subway or bus is competition for its growing supply of cars.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The CRISPR machines that can wipe out entire species”

If we dropped the father of evolution into 2019, the idea that humans can willfully alter the genes of an entire species would surely seem like wizardry to him.
CRISPR gene drives – a new, inconceivably powerful technique that forces genes to spread through a population – have the ability to do just that.
CRISPR is being turned against some of the biggest ecological problems in the world by combining it with a “Gene drive,” a powerful genetic engineering tool used to spread genes through an entire population.
Scientists have toyed with the possibility of modifying selfish genes to control insect species since the 1960s, but in 2003, Austin Burt, from Imperial College London, penned a seminal paper that first conceptualized the gene drive.
CRISPR is a powerful genetic engineering tool, often referred to as a “Pair of molecular scissors,” because of how precisely it can cut and edit genes in almost any species.
If one parent carries the CRISPR gene drive, it can cut out the other parent’s gene, and copy the gene drive over in its place.
Over many generations, that would allow the gene drive to spread through the gene pool of an entire species.
Where there’s an enzyme, there’s a gene, and where there’s a gene, CRISPR can go to work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What the chauffeur saw: what is it really like driving the rich and famous?”

The then-chauffeur had been driving the twentysomething party boy up and down Santa Monica Boulevard in her Lincoln Town car as he tried to procure a “Transvestite prostitute” for his girlfriend who, he said, “Wanted to convert a gay guy”.
The driver then refused to resume work at 7am, explaining he would be too tired to drive safely if he only got two or three hours’ sleep.
When Larson first became a chauffeur unusually, she had no experience of private driving.
The demands of her celebrity clients paled in comparison with those of the Saudi royals Larson worked for after driving for a couple of months.
Larson subsequently wrote a play and a book, Driving the Saudis, about her experiences.
Wunstel, who most recently worked as the senior driver for the LA Philharmonic, recalls how a rich Saudi businessman he chauffeured around San Francisco and the Napa valley wine region challenged this.
He says driving celebrities can be more hassle than it’s worth.
She says: “One of the first things I do if I’m in a private-hire car now is ask: ‘How long have you been driving today?’ I know that if that guy has been driving 10, 12 or 14 hours, he’s exhausted. But I also make a point of having a conversation, even if I’m not in the mood. Because I know that whenever anybody had a conversation with me, for a moment, I felt like not just a lowly chauffeur. I’m also much more careful in a car now, because I know that the chauffeur could potentially be clocking everything I’m saying or doing.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Went to China to Race a New Car. Then Things Got Weird”

The people in our racing field, on the other hand, had just a couple of hours in the car and a little over an hour on the actual track before going out there and racing wheel to wheel.
The production version of the stripped-out race car we drove, the Emgrand GL, is a midsize sedan on the Chinese car market that comes with 131 HP and the choice between a manual and dual-clutch transmission.
We were told he got his driver’s license seven years ago and that “The first time he drove a race car was around four years ago.”
“He’s driven a race car, but he’s never raced a race car,” a representative said, translating the interview.
The translator, a Geely representative unfamiliar with racing, didn’t understand all of the instructions or workings of the car and its manual transmission, even having to ask myself and the other English speaker at one point what order the three pedals were in and how stalling a car works.
The HANS, a head and neck restraint that became mandatory in many racing environments after Dale Earnhardt Sr.’s fatal Daytona 500 wreck in 2001, was something I didn’t want to race without.
The loose HANS, for some reason, gave me a sense of security that dissipated as soon as I lined up on the grid for the race, locked into my starting spot between race cars in front, beside and behind me, and pit wall a few feet to my right.
Geely paid to bring around 20 race cars to a Formula One circuit, provided a maintenance team big enough to service all of them, and assumed the risk of mechanical failures and of anyone wrecking a car, which at least one person did during the race.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why driving is hard-even for AIs”

So I’ve been analyzing the way I drive: How did I know that the other driver was going to turn left ahead of me? Why am I paying attention to the unleashed dog on the sidewalk but not the branches of the trees overhead? What subconscious cues tell me that a light is about to change to red or that the door of a parked car is about to open?
The car itself already takes care of a million details that make the car go, stop, and steer, and that process was complex enough when I was young and cars were essentially mechanical and electric.
Uber suspended its autonomous car program early in 2018 when one of its cars struck and killed a bicyclist.
The commercially available car currently considered the most autonomous-the Cadillac CT6 with Super Cruise-makes it to Level 2… but only on the 130,000 miles that its maps know.
As fast as a car’s onboard computer may be, it must also be able to learn and understand its surroundings, then make immediate decisions on its own-and it must know when to consult with remote resources when necessary.
If there are other cars around when your car takes action to avoid the cat, your car should be able to communicate with them, too, so they can understand instantly whether they need to brake, swerve, or accelerate; otherwise, your car might hit them instead of the cat.
For your car to understand all those hazards, it needs a bit of infrastructure called V2X-“Vehicle to everything” or V2I. And, since it will be a good long time before every vehicle on the road is self-driving and safe, your car will have to take into account bad driving by the considerable number of meat-piloted vehicles still on the road. That’s a lot of resources just to keep you and grandma happy.
Maybe someday, in order to drive in rural areas, you’ll still need to operate a car on your own-just as it’s still handy today to know how to use a stick shift.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alex Rosenblat’s Uberland: Review”

Drawing on four years of ethnographic research among Uber drivers, Rosenblat has produced a thoroughly dystopian report that details how millions of drivers are now managed by a computerized system that combines the hard authoritarianism of Frederick Winslow Taylor with the cynical cheerleading of Michael Scott.
Wait: Isn’t the whole point of Uber that you can be your own boss? After all, Uber talks of its drivers not as employees but “Partners.” In its propaganda, Uber portrays itself not as a taxi company at all but a technology platform that connects drivers directly to riders.
How else can you explain the credulousness of reporters who relayed a claim by Uber in 2014 that an average driver made $90,000 a year? The Washington Post gushed: “Uber’s remarkable growth could end the era of poorly paid cab drivers.”
A recent study by the ride-sharing trade publisher Ridester suggests half of all Uber drivers make less than $10 an hour, while BuzzFeed examined leaked Uber data and found that, after expenses, the average Uber driver in the U.S. takes home $10.87 an hour.
In Rosenblat’s telling, the rates only go down as Uber becomes more established and more drivers flood the streets, trapping drivers who take out subprime car loans at usurious rates to drive for Uber in a state of near-indentured servitude.
Many of the drivers that Rosenblat speaks to seem more or less satisfied with the job.
One driver who works 12- to 14-hour shifts for Uber and Lyft when he has time off as a fast-food manager gushes to Rosenblat, “I’m a people person. I love meeting people.” Uberland conveys a variety of driver experiences that you rarely get from exposés about Uber’s work conditions, which focus on extreme cases.
“For some drivers, this job is a millstone, and for others, it’s a life preserver,” Rosenblat writes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Willpower Doesn’t Work. Here’s the Key to Being More Productive According to Neuroscience.”

So the Driver speeds past the library, races home, and plunges into his client work instead. The next morning, he wakes up and wonders, “What the hell was I thinking?”.
As a result of these sudden changes of hearts, the Driver puts off the now aversive growth activity in favor of the more immediately rewarding maintenance activities.
We should hesitate to advise the driver to rely on willpower for two reasons.
First, as much as the Driver may want to initiate the right turn, willpower just doesn’t stand a match for the powerful surge of emotions triggered by the fear response.
Granted, willpower might help the Driver win a few of his battles, but over the long haul, trust me, he’ll lose the war.
There’s another reason, a more important one I argue, that willpower is not a reliable way for the Driver to overcome the 180: the Passenger often manipulates the Driver into not even wanting to initiate the right turn.
As a result, the Driver doesn’t even think to recruit willpower until after the episode is long over and he’s finally come to his senses.
If we want to beat the Passenger once and for all, we have to find a way to deter him from sabotaging the Driver’s implementation intentions, despite them being a delayed gratification activity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the Future of Data Storage is Magnetic Tape”

To begin with, tape storage is more energy efficient: Once all the data has been recorded, a tape cartridge simply sits quietly in a slot in a robotic library and doesn’t consume any power at all.
More recently, Microsoft let it be known that its Azure Archive Storage uses IBM tape storage equipment.
Tape storage costs one-sixth the amount you’d have to pay to keep the same amount of data on disks, which is why you find tape systems almost anyplace where massive amounts of data are being stored.
Because tape has now disappeared completely from consumer-level products, most people are unaware of its existence, let alone of the tremendous advances that tape recording technology has made in recent years and will continue to make for the foreseeable future.
To understand why tape still has so much potential relative to hard drives, consider the way tape and hard drives evolved.
More recently, in collaboration with Sony Storage Media Solutions, we demonstrated the possibility of recording data at an areal density that is about 20 times the current figure for state-of-the-art tape drives.
In 2015, the Information Storage Industry Consortium, an organization that includes HP Enterprise, IBM, Oracle, and Quantum, along with a slew of academic research groups, released what it called the “International Magnetic Tape Storage Roadmap.” That forecast predicted that the areal density of tape storage would reach 91 Gb per square inch by 2025.
The authors of that road map each had an interest in the future of tape storage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google Drive vs OneDrive vs Dropbox: Which Storage Service Is Best?”

Picking a cloud storage service is a difficult choice, thanks to the abundance of the service available.
The three most prominent names in cloud storage – Google Drive, Dropbox, and OneDrive – have earned their positions by offering professional features for free.
Each of these features makes Google Drive, Dropbox, and OneDrive killer apps in the cloud storage space.
That’s more free storage than its competition, but it’s important to note that Google Drive storage gets shared between your Gmail, Google Drive, and Google Photos accounts.
For each friend you refer to the service, Dropbox Plus and Professional accounts receive 1GB of storage for each new user, up to 32GB, while Dropbox Basic accounts earn 500MB per referral, topping out at 16 GB. Users who follow Dropbox on Twitter get an additional 125MB, while finishing the Dropbox Basic tutorial.
Google Drive vs OneDrive vs Dropbox: The best overall service.
When you’re looking for the best possible cloud storage service, Dropbox beats them all.
When it comes time to invest in some cloud storage we recommend Dropbox, but go ahead and make yourself free OneDrive and Google Drive accounts while you’re at it.

The orginal article.