Summary of “How to persuade your favorite meat eater to try a meatless Monday |”

“In 2019 30 of the world’s leading scientists released the results of a massive three-year study into global agriculture and declared that meat production is destroying our planet and jeopardizing global health,” said Bruce Friedrich, cofounder and executive director of the Good Food Institute, an organization that supports the creation of plant-based and cell-based meat, in a TED Talk.
The World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified processed meat as a human carcinogen due to its association with colorectal cancer, and WHO has classified red meat as “Probably” carcinogenic because of its links to colorectal cancer.
Whether it’s your steak-loving partner or parent or your tween cousin who lives on chicken nuggets, here are 7 steps to take to persuade them to cut down on eating meat.
Let’s call the meat eater in your life “M.” The absolute worst time to engage M in a discussion like this is when they’ve got a forkful of roast beef or roast chicken en route to their mouths.
The meat industry is rapidly changing, and plant-based meat – such as the Impossible Burger and Beyond Meat – is gaining popularity.
Although plant-based meat is currently pricier than conventional meat, the cost is expected to go down as demand and competition rise.
According to Friedrich, plant-based meat will be cheaper than traditional meat.
It’s made from actual meat cells, so it will look and taste just like the meat they currently eat.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why We Fell for Clean Eating”

At its simplest, clean eating is about ingesting nothing but “Whole” or “Unprocessed” foods.
At first, clean eating sounded modest and even homespun: rather than counting calories, you would eat as many nutritious home-cooked substances as possible.
Clean eating has been attacked by critics such as the baker and cookbook author Ruby Tandoh for being an incitement to eating disorders.
Why has clean eating proved so difficult to kill off? Hadley Freeman, in this paper, identified clean eating as part of a post-truth culture, whose adherents are impervious, or even hostile, to facts and experts.
To understand how clean eating took hold with such tenacity, it’s necessary first to consider just what a terrifying thing food has become for millions of people in the modern world.
A second version of clean eating was spearheaded by a former cardiologist from Uruguay called Alejandro Junger, the author of Clean: The Revolutionary Program to Restore the Body’s Natural Ability to Heal Itself, which was published in 2009 after Junger’s clean detox system had been praised by Gwyneth Paltrow on her Goop website.
Alice Liveing, a 23-year-old personal trainer who writes as Clean Eating Alice, argued in her 2016 book Eat Well Every Day that she was “Championing what I feel is a much-needed breath of fresh air in what I think is an incredibly saturated market”.
McGregor’s main concern about clean eating, she added, was that as a professional treating young people with eating disorders, she had seen first-hand how the rules and restrictions of clean eating often segued into debilitating anorexia or orthorexia.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How processed food makes us fat”

What it does mean is that modern industrial food processing – and only modern industrial food processing – has enabled the manufacture of the cheap, convenient, calorie-dense foods engineered to appeal to us that have become staples of our obesogenic diet.
In general, studies find a correlation between processed food consumption and obesity, but since I dismiss population studies that connect artificial sweeteners to obesity, I obviously also have to dismiss the ones that connect processed food to obesity for the same reason.
People who eat a lot of processed food are different from people who don’t.
Still, a controlled trial on ultra-processed food versus minimally processed food would be nice.
So what do we do about it? It’s a tough problem because, as historian Rachel Laudan, author of “Cuisine and Empire,” points out, “Processed food is what we eat.” We’ve been processing food for the entirety of human history, and it was a huge boon – until it wasn’t.
When it freed women from, say, having to bake their own bread, it was a win, but modern food processing is different, and books such as Michael Moss’s “Salt, Sugar, Fat” and Mark Schatzker’s “The Dorito Effect” have detailed just how seriously food manufacturers take the challenge of winning consumer hearts, minds and stomachs.
Although he doesn’t pin all the blame for obesity on processed foods – he points to those changing social mores and our increasingly sedentary lives – he acknowledges that convenient, inexpensive processed food is one element.
“The most important thing we can do as a society is figure out how to make more nutritious food, more nutrient-dense food in a manner that’s convenient, but to make them affordable and accessible,” he told me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Did This Poisonous Plant Become One of the American South’s Most Long-Standing Staples?”

Despite the fact that the kudzu-like Phytolacca americana sprouts up all across North America, poke sallet, a dish made from the plant’s slightly-less-toxic leaves, is a regional thing, popular only to Appalachia and the American South.
If pokeweed is so toxic, why did people start eating it in the first place? In a word, poke sallet is survival food.
The towering, perennial, poisonous pokeweed can grow up to 10 feet tall.
According to Nicole Taylor, chef and author of The Up South Cookbook, poke sallet is a stretch food, and it happened to be the first fresh vegetable to rise from the ground in the earliest days of spring.
Though mostly obscure to the mainstream, poke sallet, which is sometimes referenced as “Polk salad” or “Poke salet,” has occasionally dipped its toe into the pop culture pool.
In New York City, you can even learn to track down pokeweed in its prime with a trained expert like Leda Meredith, author of “The Forager’s Feast: How to Identify, Gather, and Prepare Wild Edibles.”
There’s Winston Blick, a Baltimore-area chef who played around with poke sallet on the menu at his now shuttered restaurant, Clementine, and Chef-owner Clark Barlowe, of Heirloom Restaurant in Charlotte, NC, who grew up eating the dish.
Taylor said it’s definitely not something she’d expect to see at a farmers market, and laughed when asked about who might be eating it these days, saying, “I think people who are eating it now are definitely not young people.” At the many poke sallet-themed festivals that take place across the region each year, you’d be hard pressed to find a plate of the mess.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why these 4 habits are bad for your brain”

5 minute Read. If someone asks you how you spend your time when you’re not at work, do you know where most of your day goes? It still surprises me that most busy people have their workday mapped out meticulously, yet they don’t realize how their time outside of work slips away.
Partly, it’s a result of the fact that the tasks that take up time in our personal and home lives are difficult to quantify and account for.
There is a more insidious reason for the time vortex.
Consider deleting, even for a while, apps that you’re tempted to open all the time.
Toxic comparison is a habit that’s as old as time.
It’s an evolutionary hangover from times when we lived in tribes and understanding our place in the social order was key to survival.
Each time we try and batch unrelated tasks together, we tax our brain and use up energy in the transition.
Give yourself longer chunks of time to complete one thing at a time, and shut down other distractions such as email when you’re working on something.

The orginal article.

Summary of “14 Behind-the-Scenes Secrets of Hollywood Food Stylists”

Shellie Anderson, who styles food ads for clients including Burger King and Rag├╣, says it’s the consumers who are demanding food look more realistic and therefore more approachable.
Food stylists usually have relationships with produce vendors, who can look for products with the specific size, shape, and color that stylists need.
Good food stylists often compete with the caterers: Actors usually have to eat the food during their scenes, and the crew finishes off the scraps.
Another reason food stylists swap out on-camera food so much is because of safety concerns-hot and cold foods need to be kept at certain temperatures that may not be practical on-set.
Not every food styling team does; some prepare food in their homes.
While there are a few well-known male food stylists, for the most part the key food stylists in the U.S. are women.
Before food styling became its own career in the 1990s, it was up to network employees with home economics degrees to cook on-camera food.
Food stylists who work on multiple projects at a time, like Oliver, can’t always stick around to see how their food will be used.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Life as a Public Health Crisis”

We were discussing the neighborhood, and how we could help people here get healthier food.
I’ve seen too many well-meaning efforts to help people access healthy food couched in toxic narratives about what a disgusting burden fat people are on society.
Go-bags were shopping bags full of food for people living in “Unstable circumstances” – i.e., homeless.
We weren’t the ones who made fresh food a luxury and junk food an easily obtained comfort.
We want to give people healthy food that is relevant to their tastes and needs, but we work in neighborhoods where it hasn’t been readily available in decades.
Food justice is not about forcing people to eat food they don’t want.
It’s measuring success not in shrinking bodies, but in growing appetites for the food that keeps people happy and healthy.
She has worked in the public sector for over a decade and is a proud advocate for food justice in the communities she serves.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 “Health and Happiness” Tips From the Novels of Jane Austen”

While most of us have focused on the heart of Jane Austen’s novels or its portrayal of the society of the period, Austen herself was equally fascinated by something rather more functional: health.
It is incorporated into nearly everything Austen wrote, as this quote from Emma shows: “Where health is at stake, nothing else should be considered.” Themes of health are woven into her earliest stories; they continue strongly throughout Emma and Persuasion; and are centre-stage in her last, unfinished novel Sanditon.
Ironically, as Austen’s own health was fading , she wrote about cherishing true health even more.
What Austen had to say about health more than 200 years ago, and what science says today, is astonishingly similar.
The discovery led me on a personal research project that has forever transformed my image of Austen – from ‘dowdy Hampshire spinster’ to timeless health guru with a sparkling wit.
Here are just a few of the many health lessons that Jane Austen advocated in her writing.
Compared to today’s clinical definitions of health – often defined by numbers on a bathroom scale or on a BMI chart – Austen viewed health in far broader terms.
Influenced by classical medicine and the ‘non-naturals’ theory, which based good health more on environmental factors and less on fretting over one’s body size, health for Austen seemed to hold a refreshingly literal meaning.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are Calorie Counts on Menus Actually Making Us Healthier?”

As I opened up the menu to my usual pick-a chicken-fried steak with hash browns, eggs over easy, and black coffee-I noticed the calorie count of my meal staring up at me from the menu.
I’d forgotten what it was like to be faced with calorie counts, probably because I’d spent the last year living in Berlin.
Growing up in the U.S., calories were often a point of focus for me.
I’d never personally been a calorie counter, but I’d watched both my mom and my sister do so excessively, and I frequently felt their influence as a result.
In Berlin I’d never seen calorie counts written on menus, not even on my occasional trips to chain restaurants like McDonald’s.
Displaying calorie counts on menus is a fairly new concept.
The first law requiring calorie counts was introduced in New York City in 2007, but it took a legal case and a lot of rounds of revision before a version of it was passed in 2008, as Brian Elbel, M.P.H., Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Population Health at NYU, tells me.
I watched my sister spend years obsessively restricting and tracking her calorie intake, so much so that a single misstep would often send her spiraling.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s What Actually Happens in Your Body When You Eat Protein”

We know protein is a great thing to have, but why exactly do we need it, and what does our body even do with it? Here’s a rundown of what actually happens when you eat protein.
“If we don’t get enough protein, our bodies actually won’t be able to rebuild properly and we’ll start to lose muscle mass,” Colleen Tewksbury, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., senior research investigator and bariatric program manager at Penn Medicine and president-elect of the Pennsylvania Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, tells SELF. In addition to muscle growth, protein is essential to the growth and repair of virtually all cells and body tissues-from your skin, hair, and nails to your bones, organs, and bodily fluids, according to the FDA. That’s why it’s especially important to get enough of it during developmental periods like childhood and adolescence.
Dietary protein gets broken down and reassembled into the various kinds of proteins that exist in the body.
These amino acids get sent to the liver, where they’re shuffled around and reconfigured into any type of protein your body needs, Tewksbury explains.
How much protein your body actually requires for the purpose of tissue growth and repair is determined by factors like sex, age, body composition, health, and activity level, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, but most of us are getting more than enough protein to fulfill these needs.
So what happens to the rest, once our dietary protein intake exceeds what our tissues need? The body doesn’t have a protein holding tank like it does for carbs, where it can siphon away extras for quick access when we need it.
Now, what we just walked you through is still oversimplifying the reality of what happens when we eat protein.
Even just grasping the broad strokes can make you really appreciate what your body actually does with the protein you eat.

The orginal article.