Summary of “9 CEOs Share Their Favorite Productivity Hacks”

A study published in Harvard Business Review found that each week CEOs work an average of 62.5 hours and attend 37 meetings.
Moskovitz wants managers to be makers some of the time, so NMW ensures they get some flow time, too, he said.
“At the rate at which StockX is growing, it’s a 24-hour job and I spend 70 to 80 percent of my time on the road across varying time zones, which can be hard on your body. I take 11-minute naps once or twice per day and find that it makes for increased energy and efficiency.”
Katia Beauchamp, cofounder of Birchbox, says one of her best productivity tricks is something simple: She insists that her team includes a deadline in their email.
“Having fewer things to do is the best way to get things done. I’m very careful with my time and attention-it’s my most precious resource. If you don’t have that, you can’t do what you want to do. And if you can’t do what you want to do, what’s the point?”.
“The way to solve this is allow free flow of information between all levels. If, in order to get something done between depts, an individual contributor has to talk to their manager, who talks to a director, who talks to a VP, who talks to another VP, who talks to a director, who talks to a manager, who talks to someone doing the actual work, then super dumb things will happen. It must be ok for people to talk directly and just make the right thing happen.”
LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner sends fewer emails to receive fewer emails.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Only Five Email Folders Your Inbox Will Ever Need”

For every email I deleted, two more landed in my inbox.
Where do you file an important update that covers two unrelated projects? What do you do with that same email if it requires a response?
If I think I may need to reference an email again, I’ll save it to this folder.
Email will quickly become your master if you don’t take charge.
Occasionally I’ll add items to that list based on the content of an email that didn’t require a response.
If an email thread results in deciding that we need to schedule a meeting, I’ll make a note to prep my boss with some information from those emails-but I’ll delete them once I’ve finished that prep session.
Don’t confuse having an opinion with leadership, or mounting email volume with weightier job duties.
My rule is simple: If my wife asked me to come home early and I was willing to leave emails in the “Today” folder, that doesn’t mean I need to blast through them once I get home-it means those emails didn’t belong in that folder to begin with.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Only Five Email Folders Your Inbox Will Ever Need”

For every email I deleted, two more landed in my inbox.
Where do you file an important update that covers two unrelated projects? What do you do with that same email if it requires a response?
If I think I may need to reference an email again, I’ll save it to this folder.
Email will quickly become your master if you don’t take charge.
Occasionally I’ll add items to that list based on the content of an email that didn’t require a response.
If an email thread results in deciding that we need to schedule a meeting, I’ll make a note to prep my boss with some information from those emails-but I’ll delete them once I’ve finished that prep session.
Don’t confuse having an opinion with leadership, or mounting email volume with weightier job duties.
My rule is simple: If my wife asked me to come home early and I was willing to leave emails in the “Today” folder, that doesn’t mean I need to blast through them once I get home-it means those emails didn’t belong in that folder to begin with.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Write an Out of Office Message”

If you’re heading out for some vacation this summer, crafting a perfect out-of-office email probably isn’t something you’re terribly stressed out by.
It’s a simple message – how tricky could it be?
Your message should explain that you’re out, when you’ll be back, and how reachable you are.
You don’t need to specify whether you’re on vacation or out sick, although if you want to, that’s fine to share! So are some more personal announcements; go ahead and share that you’re taking time off to get married or to attend a family reunion if you’d like! But people don’t need the more mundane details of life, like that you’re dealing with a flooded laundry room or taking a child to the dentist, or overly personal information, like that you’re out sick with an allergic reaction or finalizing your divorce papers.
I’m currently attending the Tofu Marketers’ Annual Conference and will be out of the office until July 5.
If you have a job where it makes sense to list alternate contacts for while you’re away, do that but don’t get so detailed that you’re recreating your company’s email directory in your out-of-office message.
If you have a job where it’s not, you might be better off designating one main contact, who can act as traffic cop in your absence and figure out where to send each person.
I once received an out-of-office message from someone who had written that she’d decided to sip margaritas on the beach in order to avoid having a nervous breakdown.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to follow up on a cold email”

Thanks to the wonders of email and DM, even massive celebrities and moguls are just a few well-crafted lines of text away.
For clarity, I am talking about the cold networking email.
Not only is this idea of being owed a reply wrong, but it can also give the sender an excuse to make the cold email mediocre.
Okay, so you now have a well-crafted, thoughtful, and short email.
Your cold email is off into the nether spots of the internet.
Your follow-ups should be pleasant and direct, such as “I wanted to bump this to the top of your inbox.” I believe in your third email that it’s helpful to say something like, “I wanted to try one last time” as it is direct and not manipulative, but otherwise avoid playing games.
I’ve sent cold emails that have led to everything from deep friendships to opportunities that I never could’ve imagined.
Follow the 3×3 rule, send thoughtful emails, and be rewarded by having doors open-really wide.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 3 Rules Of Writing Successful Pitch Emails”

After “Failing” many times, I created 3 rules for sending pitch emails that actually work.
You open the email by saying something nice about the other person.
I know how much time it takes to craft one of these emails.
Why? Well, if you’re able to describe exactly what your email is about in one short sentence, you’ve already accomplished your task.
Rule 3: Never “Follow-up” Most pitch emails you send will not get a response.
So please keep this in mind: NEVER “FOLLOW UP” WITH PEOPLE. “What?” Yes, never mention in your emails that you’re following up.
“I never refer to a failed pitch attempt. Instead, I give it some time and reach out again. But the next time, I try an entirely different approach. It’s clear the first time didn’t work. So you need to be creative.”
That, my friend, is the key to sending good pitch emails.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Reasons to Type in Lowercase”

We can add emojis and acronyms, use inventive punctuation, type like thiiiiis, and choose lowercase in instances that traditionally call for uppercase.
Is it cool to type in lowercase? Is it lame? Does it all depend? While typing in lowercase seems simple – it’s casual, it’s easy – it signals an array of sophisticated/nuanced approaches.
Here’s a sort-of-comprehensive list of all the reasons we type in lowercase, specifically in email and DMs. IntimacyTyping in lowercase signals familiarity.
SpeedIt’s faster and easier to type in lowercase, so when it’s valuable to be quick and natural, like on IM, lowercase is often the default.
CasualnessMessages typed all in lowercase can feel more offhand.
The first staff-wide email that David Haskell, the new editor-in-chief of New York Magazine, sent out was typed entirely in lowercase.
CasualnessSimilarly, typing in lowercase can be a sign that someone is trying to convey casualness, even if they’re not actually feeling casual.
CutenessIt can be cute and a little flirtatious to type in lowercase letters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Behavioral Economist Tries to Fix Email”

In a 2002 paper researchers found that for 70 percent of messages, it took workers an average of only six seconds to react to a notification indicating an email was unread. And these interruptions come at a steep cost, as it takes a while Astoundingly, it’s been estimated that it takes 25 minutes, on average, for a worker to return to a task after being interrupted-this appears to hold true even for quick diversions, such as sending a single email.
“Should each email be able to interrupt people? Is the email from someone’s boss as important as the weekly industry newsletter he’s signed up for?” To get a sense of the answer to these questions, he posted a survey on his blog asking respondents to review the last 40 emails they’d received, saying for each one how long they could’ve waited to read it: Right away? Two hours later? A week later? Never?
How Soon Does Any Given Email Need to Be Seen?When asked to sort 40 recent emails by time-sensitivity, Ariely’s respondents said that the majority were not urgent.
Even though every email, by default, triggers a notification, it’s unlikely that any given email deserves one.
Ariely’s curiosity about email has not just led him to help create Filtr, but also Shortwhale, a web app that makes emails arrive in a form that’s easier for recipients to process.
Gloria Mark, the informatics professor, sees the seed of a powerful idea-“Batching,” or checking email at set times, in batches-that, if fleshed out and taken up more widely, could make countless people much less stressed out about email.
“The logic for doing that is because then everybody’s expectation is that emails only come three times a day,” she says, adding, “Everybody knows that everybody’s getting emails at a certain time.” The insight here is that what really makes email so stressful is the social expectation of a quick response-something individual batchers don’t have control over, but something an employer could.
“His boss could have simply walked down the hall and given him the tasks. They weren’t that far apart. But the boss just simply stopped because he didn’t have that email channel.” Mark’s explanation? “It has to do with the social cost. It’s much less of a social cost for me to request something via email.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Spend Way Less Time on Email Every Day”

Our team at Zarvana – a company that teaches research-backed time management practices – set out to see if there is a data-supported way to reduce the 2.6 daily hours spent on email without sacrificing effectiveness.
What we found surprised even us: we realized we could save more than half of the time we currently spend on email, or one hour and 21 minutes per day.
If people checked their email hourly rather than every 37 minutes, they could cut six email checks from their day.
Between checking email six times more than needed, letting notifications interrupt us, and taking time to get back on track, we lose 21 minutes per day.
Turn off notifications and schedule time every hour to check email.
If people go to their inboxes 15 times per day and spend just four seconds looking at each email and re-reading only 10% of them, they’ll lose 27 minutes each day.
Roughly 10% of the total time people spend on email is spent filing messages they want to keep, a process that involves two phases: deciding where the emails should go and then moving them to the selected folders.
Move every email out of your inbox the first time you read it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why it pays to declutter your digital life”

Digital clutter has invaded my life and I have no idea what to do with it.
Emerging research on digital hoarding – a reluctance to get rid of the digital clutter we accumulate through our work and personal lives – suggests that it can make us feel just as stressed and overwhelmed as physical clutter.
The term digital hoarding was first used in 2015 in a paper about a man in the Netherlands who took several thousand digital photos each day and spent hours processing them.
Defining digital hoarding as the “Accumulation of digital files to the point of loss of perspective, which eventually results in stress and disorganisation”, they suggested it might be a new subtype of hoarding disorder – something that itself only was recognised as distinct from obsessive compulsive disorder in 2013.
The Netherlands man had hoarded physical items before turning to digital photos.
Nick Neave, director of a hoarding research group at Northumbria University, says he has noticed that themes he’d seen in physical hoarding are coming up in the digital space too.
The team has used those responses to develop a questionnaire to assess digital hoarding behaviours in the workplace, and have tested it with 203 people who use computers as part of their job.
In a paper he presented in December 2018, he and co-author Sachithra Lokuge asked 846 people about digital hoarding habits, as well as the levels of stress they felt.

The orginal article.