Summary of “Why Some People Get Burned Out and Others Don’t”

While we know that stress often leads to burnout, it’s possible to handle the onslaught of long hours, high pressure, and work crises in a way that safeguards you from the emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and a lack of confidence in one’s abilities that characterizes burnout.
The findings surprised us: despite the fact that an overwhelming 69 percent of the CMOs described their current stress level as severe, very severe, or worst possible, the majority were not burned out according to the Maslach Burnout Inventory.
As one of us has written about before, research suggests that emotional intelligence supports superior coping abilities and helps people deal with chronic stress and prevent burnout.
What we learned from our study of chief medical officers is that people can leverage their emotional intelligence to deal with stress and ward off burnout.
People who have a high need to achieve or perfectionist tendencies may be more prone to creating their own stress.
As one CMO described, “I’ve realized that much of my stress is self-inflicted from years of being hard on myself. Now that I know the problems it causes for me, I can talk myself out of the non-stop pressure.”
One CMO described the shift in her mindset, “What once felt like stress is now good stress; I’m motivated to think of it as a problem to be solved.”
The stress from conflicts often leads to burnout so it’s best to deescalate conflicts when you can.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emotional Intelligence Has 12 Elements. Which Do You Need to Work On?”

Her manager feels lucky to have such an easy direct report to work with and often compliments Esther on her high levels of emotional intelligence, or EI. And Esther indeed counts EI as one of her strengths; she’s grateful for at least one thing she doesn’t have to work on as part of her leadership development.
Because they’re focusing only on Esther’s sociability, sensitivity, and likability, they’re missing critical elements of emotional intelligence that could make her a stronger, more effective leader.
These gaps aren’t a result of Esther’s emotional intelligence; they’re simply evidence that her EI skills are uneven.
Rather than smoothing over every interaction, with a broader balance of EI skills she could bring up the issue to her colleague directly, drawing on emotional self-control to keep her own reactivity at bay while telling him what, specifically, does not work in his style.
Into this category fall our own model and the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory, or ESCI 360, a commercially available assessment we developed with Korn Ferry Hay Group to gauge the 12 EI competencies, which rely on how others rate observable behaviors in evaluating a leader.
These assessments are critical to a full evaluation of your EI, but even understanding that these 12 competencies are all a part of your emotional intelligence is an important first step in addressing areas where your EI is at its weakest.
Daniel Goleman, best known for his writing on emotional intelligence, is Co-Director of the Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations at Rutgers University.
His latest book is Building Blocks of Emotional Intelligence, a 12-primer set on each of the emotional intelligence competencies, and he offers training on the competencies through an online learning platform, Emotional Intelligence Training Programs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Emotional Intelligence Boosts Your Endurance”

The study involved 237 runners at a half-marathon in Verona who filled out a questionnaire called the Trait Emotional Intelligence Short Form the day before the race, which involves agreeing or disagreeing with statements like “Expressing my emotions with words is not a problem for me” or “I often pause and think about my feelings.” Their scores on this test turned out to be the strongest predictor of their race time the next day-even stronger than prior race experience or typical weekly training mileage.
Before going any further, I should acknowledge that there is already plenty of hype-and controversy-about the concept of emotional intelligence.
It’s pretty clear, from what I can tell, that people who test highly on emotional intelligence tend to be successful in many walks of life.
What’s less clear is if testing someone’s emotional intelligence tells you something new about their prospects that you wouldn’t get from testing more traditional things like their IQ and “Big Five” personality traits.
Leaving aside the question of whether emotional intelligence is a new concept or a new name for old concepts, it’s fascinating either way that a simple questionnaire could make such powerful predictions about half-marathon performance.
The researchers used a multi-factor model to explore how various contributors like training, previous race experience, and goal setting interact with emotional intelligence to influence race performance.
There were some indirect links, too: those with higher emotional intelligence tended to be more optimistic and confident in their abilities, so they set higher pre-race goals but also tended to do less training in the months leading up to the race.
Even more intriguingly, they’ve started testing a mental training protocol to improve emotional intelligence.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Happiness Is Not Enough”

What Do Emotions Do Anyway? Emotions are the result of your mind comparing your external environment to your expectations.
Chances are you’re going to feel some strong emotions like anger, jealousy, and betrayal, among others.
How Diversifying Your Emotions Makes You A More Resilient Person There’s a concept in psychology called “Emotional diversity.” Emotional diversity is just what it sounds like: experiencing a variety of emotions.
People who practice a wide range of emotions are self-aware enough to know what triggers these emotions and then act accordingly.
What you’ll likely find is that if you’ve denied a certain emotion in yourself for long enough, you’ll actually stop realizing when you’re feeling it.
I’ve talked before about identifying and unfusing from your emotions as one way to become more self-aware and to understand your emotions better.
Learning to identify the emotion and then separating your decision-making from the emotion.
Once you unfuse your emotions from your decisions, it often causes you to experience greater depth and complexity in your emotions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Do the Most GIF-able TV Shows Have In Common?”

According to the GIF-hosting site Giphy, this GIF of the character Patrick from SpongeBob SquarePants has been viewed over a billion times.
What is it about Patrick that makes him so eminently GIF-able? Giphy’s viewing data suggests that the most viewed of their TV channels in 2019 – the collections full of GIFs from individual TV shows – are from Saturday Night Live, SpongeBob, Fallon’s Tonight Show, Game of Thrones, Broad City, and The Bachelor.
The first part of the answer lies in how these GIFs get used, and the SpongeBob examples are prime illustrations of what makes a GIF effective.
If you’ve seen SpongeBob or if you haven’t, if you’re looking at the GIF while quickly scrolling through your feed, if you speak any language – those images will translate.
Looking up “Happy” on a GIF search engine is like looking up “Happy” in a thesaurus: You are presented with hundreds of variations, thousands of more specific ways of expressing the idea you’re trying to communicate.
Great GIF-worthy TV is especially accessible for being clipped and excerpted, so that its most dramatic reaction moments are set adrift from their original contexts and made to float freely among the vast GIF collections of various emotional states.
Once set loose, it’s incredibly easy for a GIF to be divorced from its original framing, forever severed from the ideas and characters and creators who made it.
After searching for half an hour, I still cannot tell you where precisely my beloved happy-faced-girl GIF comes from, although I suspect it’s Toddlers and Tiaras.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Persuade Someone, Look Emotional”

David Pizarro and his colleagues argue that emotional expression functions as a signal to others that you’ve incorporated feelings into your moral decision.
When we judge someone by their response to a moral dilemma, be they a stranger on the street or a presidential candidate, instinct may trump reason.
According to a recent study, people who make instinct-based moral judgments are perceived by their peers to be more moral and more trustworthy than those who rely on reasoning alone.
The reverse is true as well: We tend to be wary of people who react to moral dilemmas by calculating costs and benefits-it’s a large part of why we’re so reluctant to trust robots.
Consider, for example, how psychopaths can feign emotional expression to manipulate their peers, or how empathy-an instinctive, emotion-laden process-can distort our morals.
“People want to see that you’ve thought a lot about a tough moral decision. They want to see that you’ve experienced some conflict between reason and emotion and deliberated through it.”
Pizarro and his colleagues argue that emotional expression functions as a signal to others that you’ve incorporated feelings into your moral decision.
Will we ever get to a point at which it’s okay to be morally impartial and calculating, like Spock often is? There is emerging evidence that the average person is becoming more and more likely to calculate costs and benefits during moral dilemmas.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The magical earnestness of the new adult cartoon”

In this way, Tuca & Bertie joins the plethora of 21st century adult cartoons that insist there is tremendous power in re-imagining our everyday lives as something magical.
From shows like Rick and Morty to BoJack Horseman to Big Mouth to online web-comics like Lunar Baboon and Strange Planet, today’s adult cartoon is not only positioned as a silly place, but a tender and honest one too.
Unlike the live action sitcom, which often follows a template for sentimentality, the earnest adult cartoon is provocative precisely because it insists on allowing viewers a range of emotions, from utter delight to absurd fascination to outright sorrow.
In contrast, the 21st century cartoon is clearly indicated for grown-ups, insisting that animation for adults doesn’t have to just be about snark, but also about substance.
From the range of absurd delights found on Adult Swim, to the continued influence of beloved animated sitcoms like The Simpsons, Futurama, South Park, and Family Guy, no one today could possibly argue that animation is just for kids.
At a time when one’s appetite for sarcasm and just general meanness can be whetted by simply going on Twitter for a few minutes, adult cartoons are increasingly positioning themselves as a respite from the cruelties of the world, rather than a place to indulge in bad behavior.
Instead, today’s new wave of smart, nuanced adult animation is earning viewers precisely because of its daring and the way it trusts audiences to tackle complexity.
The absurd scene brings levity to a serious episode and also illustrates one of the core truths of the modern adult animated series: that things that are broken may not be able to be fully repaired, but they can be a site of beauty and wonder too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Are So Many Monsters Hybrids?”

Monster Mash: The face-hugger in Alien taps into fears and terrors symbolized in folklore and religions throughout human history.
Creating monsters is a way of channeling our cultural and political fears into tangible forms, into objects of loathing and dread. Monsters might not seem like helpful memes because they frighten us and increase stress, but they are almost always part of a larger cultural cautionary tale.
When we conceptualize gods or monsters or other memes, those concepts are infused with shades of fear, or lust, or anger, and complex mixtures of these.
While category mismatches arouse our curiosity and improve memory retention, hybrids that carry strong emotional associations will be especially sticky.
More important are the universal emotional systems that link natural predator fear and dread with cultural images.
The late neuroscientist, Jaak Panskepp, a pioneer in the study of emotions and mammals, located seven major emotional systems that mammals share: fear, care, lust, rage, panic, seeking, and play.
Emotions like fear seem dedicated to certain environmental threats, and fear operates faster and more powerfully than mere taxonomy confusion.
Psychologists Donald Hebb and Wolfgang Schleidt separately experimented on fear in animals and found that fear is not a result of a hardwired phobia of specific predators, but a developmental pairing of our categories and our feelings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emotional Intelligence Needs a Rewrite”

To teach emotional intelligence in a modern fashion, we need to acknowledge this variation and make sure your brain is well-equipped to make sense of it automatically.
Books and articles on emotional intelligence claim that your brain has an inner core that you inherited from reptiles, wrapped in a wild, emotional layer that you inherited from mammals, all enrobed in-and controlled by-a logical layer that is uniquely human.
A reasonable, science-backed way to define and practice emotional intelligence comes from a modern, neuroscientific view of brain function called construction: the observation that your brain creates all thoughts, emotions, and perceptions, automatically and on the fly, as needed.
Your brain spends most of its time issuing thousands of microscopic predictions of what your body needs and attempts to meet those needs before they arise.
Emotional intelligence requires a brain that can use prediction to manufacture a large, flexible array of different emotions.
How do you enable your brain to create a wider variety of emotions and improve your emotional intelligence? One approach is to learn new emotion words.
In short, every emotion word you learn is a new tool for future emotional intelligence.
Two decades ago, when Emotional Intelligence hit the bestseller list, scientists didn’t know about the predicting brain, or that the words you hear affect how your brain is wired, and emotional granularity was only newly discovered.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School”

Most of us aren’t taught how to identify or deal with our own emotions, or the emotions of others.
Emotional intelligence is a shorthand that psychological researchers use to describe how well individuals can manage their own emotions and react to the emotions of others.
People who exhibit emotional intelligence have the less obvious skills necessary to get ahead in life, such as managing conflict resolution, reading and responding to the needs of others, and keeping their own emotions from overflowing and disrupting their lives.
Measuring emotional intelligence is relatively new in the field of psychology, only first being explored in the mid-80s. Several models are currently being developed, but for our purposes, we’ll examine what’s known as the “Mixed model,” developed by psychologist Daniel Goleman.
The order of these emotional competencies isn’t all that relevant, as we all learn many of these skills simultaneously as we grow.
Emotional intelligence isn’t an area that most people receive formal training in.
My struggle with depression taught me that some emotions persist long after the overflow.
Resolving conflict can be one of the best ways to learn how to apply your emotional skills.

The orginal article.