Summary of “Is Your Emotional Intelligence Authentic, or Self-Serving?”

Plenty of research has documented manipulative misuses of emotional intelligence – the intentionally subtle regulating of one’s emotions to engineer responses from others that might not be in their best interest.
The capacity to understand and share others’ feelings creates authentic connection and deepens trust.
Being attuned to the spoken and unspoken concerns of others demonstrates an openness to their views, a willingness to engage ideas different from ours, and honors the courage of others to express divergent perspectives.
Unaware of the tension between a genuine desire to take in others’ views and a need to be right, leaders can feign listening while actually trying to lure others to their side without realizing they’re doing it.
Keenly self-aware leaders detect how others experience them, actively solicit critical feedback from others, and accurately acknowledge their strengths and shortfalls.
Genuinely self-aware leaders face that insecurity head on, and don’t put the burden of soothing it on others.
Our ability to express emotional intelligence is sometimes impaired by unacknowledged, unhealthy, emotional needs.
If you want to genuinely employ effective emotional intelligence skills, pay attention to the unaddressed scars and voids lurking beneath the surface of your inner emotional landscape.

The orginal article.

Summary of “13 Signs of High Emotional Intelligence”

Emotional intelligence begins with what is called self- and social awareness, the ability to recognize emotions in both yourself and others.
What are my emotional strengths? What are my weaknesses? How does my current mood affect my thoughts and decision making? What’s going on under the surface that influences what others say or do?
The ability to show empathy, which includes understanding others’ thoughts and feelings, helps you connect with others.
Negative feedback has great potential to hurt the feelings of others.
Doing so demonstrates humility, a quality that will naturally draw others to you.
One of the greatest ways to positively impact the emotions of others is to help them.
Actions like these build trust and inspire others to follow your lead when it counts.
You realize that emotional intelligence also has a dark side-such as when individuals attempt to manipulate others’ emotions to promote a personal agenda or for some other selfish cause.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is How To Increase Emotional Intelligence: 5 Powerful Secrets”

Now most of the work on emotional intelligence has been done around its effects in the workplace but it’ll quickly become obvious how it can improve most any area of your life.
People who have a high degree of self-awareness recognize how their feelings affect them, other people, and their job performance.
I love when people say, “I’m. very emotional. I must have very high emotional intelligence.” Sorry, being very emotional doesn’t make you high in EI; it just makes you a drama queen.
People engaged in such a conversation feel bad moods and emotional impulses just as everyone else does, but they find ways to control them and even to channel them in useful ways.
The ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people.
Skill in treating people according to their emotional reactions.
Emotional empathy: “You feel awful? Then I feel awful too!” Cognitive empathy: “I understand that you are feeling awful. That must suck.” Compassion: “You feel awful? I feel for you. How can I help?”.
Socially skilled people tend to have a wide circle of acquaintances, and they have a knack for finding common ground with people of all kinds-a knack for building rapport.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Happiness Is Not Enough”

The same way you feel hot and cold when you walk outside, your emotions do the same for complex psychological phenomena.
Chances are you’re going to feel some strong emotions like anger, jealousy, and betrayal, among others.
A diverse emotional life isn’t just made up of a few “Good” and “Bad” emotions.
People who practice a wide range of emotions are self-aware enough to know what triggers these emotions and then act accordingly.
What you’ll likely find is that if you’ve denied a certain emotion in yourself for long enough, you’ll actually stop realizing when you’re feeling it.
I’ve talked before about identifying and unfusing from your emotions as one way to become more self-aware and to understand your emotions better.
Learning to identify the emotion and then separating your decision-making from the emotion.
Once you unfuse your emotions from your decisions, it often causes you to experience greater depth and complexity in your emotions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “New Neuroscience Reveals 3 Secrets That Will Make You Emotionally Intelligent”

Her new book How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain turns everything you know about the feels upside down.
It’s a big understatement to say that if the only emotion concepts you recognize are “Me feel good” and “Me feel bad” you’re not going to be very emotionally intelligent.
The more time you take to distinguish the emotions you feel, to recognize them as distinct and different, the more emotionally intelligent you will become.
Similar to the interior decorator, emotionally intelligent people don’t say “Me feel good.” They distinguish between happy, ecstatic, joyful and awesome.
If the only negative emotion concept you have is “Me feel bad” you’re going to have a difficult time making yourself feel better.
If you’re able to distinguish the more specific “I feel alone” from merely “Me feel bad” you’re able to deal with the problem: you call a friend.
In a collection of scientific studies, people who could distinguish finely among their unpleasant feelings- those “Fifty shades of feeling crappy”- were 30 percent more flexible when regulating their emotions, less likely to drink excessively when stressed, and less likely to retaliate aggressively against someone who has hurt them.
So learn new emotion words so you can feel new emotions and increase your emotional granularity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Traits of People With High Emotional Intelligence”

One of the biggest realizations I’ve had in my career is also one of the purest: the simple fact that people are drawn to likable people.
When you look around, you’ll notice that many people don’t make it a priority to learn the habits of likable people.
Whether interacting with customers, vendors, partners or employees, we can all make great strides in our personal relationships and career by raising our emotional intelligence.
Here are five traits shared by people with high emotional intelligence.
When you build better relationships and come across as likable, people tend to share more information with you, make introductions on your behalf and invite you into new opportunities.
They receive the benefit of the doubt If you treat people well, you’ll get the benefit of the doubt.
They possess long-term vision People with high emotional intelligence understand that entrepreneurship is a journey, and that success is a process.
They can read people better People with high EQ foster their natural curiosity, asking questions – and then listening – to get to know people and situations better.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s Wrong with Emotional Intelligence”

To teach emotional intelligence in a modern fashion, we need to acknowledge this variation and make sure your brain is well-equipped to make sense of it automatically.
Books and articles on emotional intelligence claim that your brain has an inner core that you inherited from reptiles, wrapped in a wild, emotional layer that you inherited from mammals, all enrobed in-and controlled by-a logical layer that is uniquely human.
To improve our understanding of emotional intelligence, we must discard the idea of the brain as a battlefield.
A reasonable, science-backed way to define and practice emotional intelligence comes from a modern, neuroscientific view of brain function called construction: the observation that your brain creates all thoughts, emotions, and perceptions, automatically and on the fly, as needed.
Emotional intelligence requires a brain that can use prediction to manufacture a large, flexible array of different emotions.
The more emotions that you know, the more finely your brain can construct emotional meaning automatically from other people’s actions.
How do you enable your brain to create a wider variety of emotions and improve your emotional intelligence? One approach is to learn new emotion words.
Two decades ago, when Emotional Intelligence hit the bestseller list, scientists didn’t know about the predicting brain, or that the words you hear affect how your brain is wired, and emotional granularity was only newly discovered.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 13-Minute Definitive Guide To Living Your Dreams”

As will be shown, what keeps you stuck is your suppressed emotions, subconscious patterns, and environmental signals.
As Dr. Joseph Murphy put it, “What is impressed in the subconscious is expressed.” Consequently, the only way to be, do, and have more than you currently have is to “Retrain”your subconscious mind.
Retraining your subconscious is best done immediately before and after you sleep.
While awake, your conscious and subconscious mind are often at odds with each other.
Theta state occurs directly in the threshold of your subconscious, and is associated with the deepest levels of meditation.
As Dr. Joseph Murphy explains in, The Power of Your Subconscious Mind, “You avoid conflict between your conscious and subconscious in the sleepy state. Imagine the fulfillment of your desire over and over again prior to sleep. Sleep in peace and wake in joy.”
You’ll demonstrate to your subconscious self that you are not interested, or not ready to make the changes you’re priming your subconscious to create.
“People are active, dynamic, and interesting; these are the stimulus properties that direct attention. The situation, in contrast, is normally relatively static and often known only hazily. What you attend to is what you attribute to.”Most people fail to retrain their subconscious mind because the signals in their environment continually reinforce unhealthy patterns.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The key to jobs in the future is not college but compassion”

To fill the sophisticated jobs of tomorrow, the authors argued, the ‘reskilling and upskilling of today’s workers will be critical’.
‘[W]e have to make sure all our kids are equipped for the jobs of the future, which means not just being able to work with computers but developing the analytical and coding skills to power our innovation economy,’ he said.
Today, the rapid shrinking of the industrial sector means that most of us have jobs requiring emotional skills, whether working directly with customers or collaborating with our corporate ‘team’ on a project.
In 2015, the education economist David Deming at Harvard University found that almost all jobs growth in the United States between 1980 and 2012 was in work requiring relatively high degrees of social skills, while Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer at the jobs site CareerBuilder, told Bloomberg BNA in January that corporate hiring this year would prize these skills to a greater degree than in previous economic recoveries.
With the very toughest, very worst-paid jobs, like working with the dying and incontinent, that might be because those of us who don’t have to do the work would rather not think about how crucial and difficult it really is.
Granted, anyone working with older people with disabilities, or with small children, might benefit from studying research on the particular needs of these groups; and widely accessible college education is a good idea for reasons that go far beyond vocational training.
As a society, we could choose to put more resources into providing better staffing, higher pay and more time off for care workers who perform the most emotionally demanding work for the smallest wages.
Applying the metric of efficiency to the expanding field of emotional labour misses a key promise offered by technological progress – that, with routine physical and cognitive work out of the way, the jobs of the future could be opportunities for people to genuinely care for each other.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In the AI Age, “Being Smart” Will Mean Something Completely Different”

To date, many of us have achieved success by being “Smarter” than other people as measured by grades and test scores, beginning from our early days in school.
The smart people were those that received the highest scores by making the fewest mistakes.
What is needed is a new definition of “Being smart,” one that promotes higher levels of human thinking and emotional engagement.
Smart machines can process, store, and recall information faster and better than we humans.
In an age of smart machines, our old definition of what makes a person smart doesn’t make sense.
What is needed is a new definition of being smart, one that promotes higher levels of human thinking and emotional engagement.
The new smart will be determined not by what or how you know but by the quality of your thinking, listening, relating, collaborating, and learning.
The new smart will be about trying to overcome the two big inhibitors of critical thinking and team collaboration: our ego and our fears.

The orginal article.