Summary of “Why You Need Emotional Intelligence To Succeed In Business”

“Emotional intelligence, as we described it, is the capacity to reason about emotions and emotional information, and of emotions to enhance thought. People with high EI, we believed, could solve a variety of emotion-related problems accurately and quickly.”
Identify Your Emotions Daniel Goleman, another EI pioneer, and the author of Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ, argues that we have two minds.
If you don’t journal, start doing it for the sake of EI. The first step is to identify how you feel and what triggers your emotions.
Interpret Your Emotions Once you have a better picture of how you respond to different situations in life, it’s time to understand them.
Manage Your Emotions This is a big part of succeeding in business.
I’ve applied the above 3-step method to improve my ability to identify my own emotions.
What you will find is this: When you can identify your own emotions, you will also get better at identifying other people’s emotions.
A real leader knows the emotions of another person better than the person himself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Need Emotional Intelligence To Succeed In Business”

“Emotional intelligence, as we described it, is the capacity to reason about emotions and emotional information, and of emotions to enhance thought. People with high EI, we believed, could solve a variety of emotion-related problems accurately and quickly.”
Identify Your Emotions Daniel Goleman, another EI pioneer, and the author of Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ, argues that we have two minds.
If you don’t journal, start doing it for the sake of EI. The first step is to identify how you feel and what triggers your emotions.
Interpret Your Emotions Once you have a better picture of how you respond to different situations in life, it’s time to understand them.
Manage Your Emotions This is a big part of succeeding in business.
I’ve applied the above 3-step method to improve my ability to identify my own emotions.
What you will find is this: When you can identify your own emotions, you will also get better at identifying other people’s emotions.
A real leader knows the emotions of another person better than the person himself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Kind of Emotions Do Animals Feel?”

As one of the world’s most prominent primatologists, de Waal has been observing animals for four decades now, debunking myths around the differences between animals and humans.
De Waal witnessed the other chimpanzees touching, washing, anointing, and grooming her body-gestures very similar to what humans do after a death.
While de Waal begins his observations with chimpanzees, he also presents fascinating glimpses of the emotional lives of other animals.
De Waal also digs at an oft-asked question: Do dogs feel shame when they do something wrong? It reminded me of online videos where you see garbage overturned and a dog slouched down, staring at the floor in a way that viewers interpret as “Guilt.”
“No one doubts that dogs know when they are in trouble,” writes de Waal, “But whether they actually feel guilty is a point of debate.” According to a study by Alexandra Horowitz, the canine guilty look-“Lowered gaze, ears pressed back, slumped body, averted head, tail rapidly beating between the legs-is … not about what they have done but about how their owner reacts. If the owner scolds them, they act extremely guilty. If the owner doesn’t, everything is fine and dandy.”
De Waal draws a clear distinction between animal behaviors that connote emotions readable to outside observers and what animals actually feel.
“The possibility that animals experience emotions the way we do makes many hard-nosed scientists feel queasy,” de Waal points out, “Partly because animals never report any feelings, and partly because the existence of feelings presupposes a level of consciousness that these scientists are unwilling to grant to animals.”
“For me,” de Waal writes, “The question has never been whether animals have emotions, but how science could have overlooked them for so long.”‚Ä®Just as de Waal’s book makes readers more attuned to the emotional life of animals, it gives us more than enough to ponder about our own human emotions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Are You Most Likely to Catch Other People’s…”

Their study found that when a person wanted to stay calm, they remained relatively unfazed by angry people, but if they wanted to feel angry, then they were highly influenced by angry people.
The researchers also discovered that people who wanted to feel angry also got more emotional when they learned that other people were just as upset as they were, according to the results from a series of laboratory experiments the researchers conducted.
To learn how people react to upsetting situations and respond to others around them, the researchers examined people’s anger toward politically charged events in a series of laboratory studies with 107 participants.
The researchers found that participants who wanted to feel less angry were three times more likely to be influenced by people expressing calm emotions than by angry people.
Participants who wanted to feel angry were also three times more likely to be influenced by other people angrier than them, as opposed to people with calmer emotions.
“They are a little bit of a tool. We have the ability to use our emotions to achieve certain goals. We express certain emotions to convince other people to join our collective cause. On social media, we use emotions to signal to other people that we care about the issues of a group to make sure people know we’re a part of it.”
One of the next topics Goldenberg says he wants to examine further is whether the desire of people to want to see and experience certain emotions lies at the core of how they choose their network of friends and other people around them.
“If you don’t want to be angry today, one way to do that is to avoid angry people. Do some people have an ingrained preference for stronger emotions than others? That’s one of my next questions.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Humans aren’t designed to be happy”

A huge happiness and positive thinking industry, estimated to be worth US$11 billion a year, has helped to create the fantasy that happiness is a realistic goal.
Chasing the happiness dream is a very American concept, exported to the rest of the world through popular culture.
Happiness, as the Brazilian poet Vinicius de Moraes put it, is “Like a feather flying in the air. It flies light, but not for very long.” Happiness is a human construct, an abstract idea with no equivalent in actual human experience.
Different geographical locations and circuits in the brain are each associated with certain neurological and intellectual functions, but happiness, being a mere construct with no neurological basis, cannot be found in the brain tissue.
Advocates of a morally correct path to happiness also disapprove of taking shortcuts to pleasure with the help of psychotropic drugs.
George Bernard Shaw said: “We have no more right to consume happiness without producing it than to consume wealth without producing it.” Well-being apparently needs to be earned, which proves that it is not a natural state.
Chemicals alter the mind, but since happiness is not related to a particular functional brain pattern, we cannot replicate it chemically.
The model of competing emotions offered by coexisting pleasure and pain fits our reality much better than the unachievable bliss that the happiness industry is trying to sell us.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School”

Most of us aren’t taught how to identify or deal with our own emotions, or the emotions of others.
Emotional intelligence is a shorthand that psychological researchers use to describe how well individuals can manage their own emotions and react to the emotions of others.
People who exhibit emotional intelligence have the less obvious skills necessary to get ahead in life, such as managing conflict resolution, reading and responding to the needs of others, and keeping their own emotions from overflowing and disrupting their lives.
Measuring emotional intelligence is relatively new in the field of psychology, only first being explored in the mid-80s. Several models are currently being developed, but for our purposes, we’ll examine what’s known as the “Mixed model,” developed by psychologist Daniel Goleman.
The order of these emotional competencies isn’t all that relevant, as we all learn many of these skills simultaneously as we grow.
Emotional intelligence isn’t an area that most people receive formal training in.
My struggle with depression taught me that some emotions persist long after the overflow.
Resolving conflict can be one of the best ways to learn how to apply your emotional skills.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Benefits of Optimism Are Real”

The researchers found that the most resilient people were also more positive in day-to-day life.
One of the major findings of Fredrickson’s studies was that resilient people took a different attitude toward the speech task than non-resilient people.
Interestingly, resilient people who were told to view the task as a threat.
Resilient people, no matter how they approached the task, had the same cardiovascular recovery rate.
The people who benefitted from the priming were non-resilient people.
In each of Fredrickson’s studies, resilient people experience the same level of frustration and anxiety as the less resilient participants.
While resilient people reported the same amount of anxiety as less resilient people in the essays, they also revealed more happiness, interest, and eagerness toward the problem.
For resilient people, high levels of positive emotions exist side-by-side with negative emotions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School”

Most of us aren’t taught how to identify or deal with our own emotions, or the emotions of others.
Emotional intelligence is a shorthand that psychological researchers use to describe how well individuals can manage their own emotions and react to the emotions of others.
People who exhibit emotional intelligence have the less obvious skills necessary to get ahead in life, such as managing conflict resolution, reading and responding to the needs of others, and keeping their own emotions from overflowing and disrupting their lives.
Measuring emotional intelligence is relatively new in the field of psychology, only first being explored in the mid-80s. Several models are currently being developed, but for our purposes, we’ll examine what’s known as the “Mixed model,” developed by psychologist Daniel Goleman.
The order of these emotional competencies isn’t all that relevant, as we all learn many of these skills simultaneously as we grow.
My struggle with depression taught me that some emotions persist long after the overflow.
Some social skills just involve meeting new people , socializing with people of different mindsets , or just playing games.
Resolving conflict can be one of the best ways to learn how to apply your emotional skills.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Raise Resilient Kids, Be a Resilient Parent”

The nature of the parent’s response may vary, Dr. Markham said, but the message is the same – that anger, sadness or frustration are unacceptable.
This, Dr. Markham noted, is the opposite of resilience; instead, it’s a fragile rigidity that leaves both parent and child fearful that outsized emotions could shatter them.
In contrast to this fragility, parents who don’t flinch from the power of emotions like anger have a greater capacity to absorb challenging interactions with their children, said Dr. Siegel, who is executive director of the Mindsight Institute.
To respond thoughtfully to our child’s outbursts, we have to first silence the alarm bells going off inside our head. Dr. Markham coaches parents to “Hit the pause button” before taking any action, even in the face of a screaming child.
Dr. Markham noted that it is actually when we don’t express our emotions that we lose control of them – not the other way around.
“Notice what’s happening with you, and start to take responsibility for it,” Dr. Markham suggested.
“We’re living in this culture of ‘yes’ parenting,” Dr. Newman said, “And it’s easier to say yes than to deal with a child’s meltdown.” But parents can consider, “How will a ‘no’ help?” as a way to explore the reason for a particular boundary so that you and your child can better understand it.
“Our egos are very tied up in our parenting,” said Julie Lythcott-Haims, author of “How to Raise an Adult.” Dr. Naumburg noted that this is partially informed by a cultural narrative that suggests that “If the kids are not O.K., then it’s because we parents have done something wrong.” As Ms. Lythcott-Haims put it, “If we can get a life, maybe our kids can have one too.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Raise Mentally Strong Kids? Do These 3 Things”

Sometimes, parents are quick to say things like, “Quit worrying” or, “It’ll turn out fine,” when kids express concerns.
Most parents never teach kids how to develop healthier self-talk.
A child who initially thinks, “I’ll never be able to pass math class,” can learn to reframe his negative thinking by telling himself, “I can improve my math grade by studying hard, asking for help, and doing my homework.” Kids who think realistically feel better about themselves and are more resilient.
How to Teach It: Encourage your kids to become thought detectives who evaluate the evidence that supports and refutes their assumptions.
It’s important to educate kids about their emotions and how those emotions influence them.
How to Teach It: Teach your kids to recognize their feelings.
How to Teach it: Proactively teach your kids problem-solving skills.
To learn more about how to raise mentally strong kids, pick up a copy of 13 Things Mentally Strong Parents Don’t Do..

The orginal article.