Summary of “The Rise and Fall of Working From Home”

Last year, Richard Laermer decided to let his employees work from home on a regular basis.
Flexible work remains popular at many organizations, but most companies want workers at work at least some-if not most-of the time.
Telecommuting comes in many flavors, and 77 percent of organizations don’t let people work from home on a full-time basis.
Most employers allow ad-hoc remote work for the person who needs to stay home for the plumber or wait for a package.
Technology such as chat programs and collaboration software made remote work feasible for many white collar workers in the last couple of decades.
Some organizations found the most lenient work-from-home policies kept workers too isolated for that kind of work.
Earlier this year the tech giant told 2,000 U.S. workers they could no longer work from home and about the same number of employees that they had to commute into offices more often.
“IBM’s strategy is about adopting the best work method for the work being done,” said an IBM spokesperson.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Employees Quit on Their Bosses? Because They Never Get Asked These Important Questions”

There is a high commitment on the part of these leaders to give employees the right exposure and skills that fit their strengths, a well-defined career track, and meaningful work; there’s also a commitment to identifying next-generation leaders to carry the torch so high-performing cultures are sustained.
Part of growing employees is ensuring them of an engaging and positive work experience.
Over the decades, it has interviewed tens of thousands of employees to find the core of a great workplace, resulting in its “Q12 Engagement Survey.”
If you’re a leader or manager and your employees were asked the following about you, how would you do in this assessment?
Here’s a fact: When employees don’t get the tools, training, time, development, clear expectations, vision, or resources to do their jobs well, they experience low morale.
Great managers don’t just tell employees what’s expected of them and leave it at that; instead, they frequently talk with employees about their responsibilities and progress, especially during those first few months on the job.
Asking these questions fosters a sense that employees are doing meaningful work, belonging, and making a difference.
Asking smart follow-up questions will help such managers understand where each employee is coming from.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Manage Your Star Employee”

How do you manage someone who is knocking it out of the park? How do you keep stars excited about their work? And what risks should you watch out for?
Whether your star performer has just joined your team or has been working for you for a while, here are some tips on how to manage her.
Another way to ensure your star employee stays engaged and excited about coming to work is to “Give her more autonomy,” Shapiro says.
“Ask your rock star to work with other people on the team to mentor them and develop them.”
You don’t want to “Get into the habit of feeding an ego.” She recommends giving your stars “The appropriate amount of feedback” by “Acknowledging their contributions.” If your star executed a project beautifully or made a stellar presentation, say so.
“You want to give [all] the tasks to the rock star, because you know the rock star will get the job done,” Shapiro says.
Demonstrate trust by delegating responsibility over certain projects and letting your star decide how she does the work.
Overload your star employee – otherwise you risk burning him out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Your Company Culture Should Match Your Brand”

Their leaders understand that a strong, differentiated company culture contributes to a strong, differentiated brand – and that an extraordinary brand can support and advance an extraordinary culture.
If your culture and your brand are driven by the same purpose and values and if you weave them together into a single guiding force for your company, you will win the competitive battle for customers and employees, future-proof your business from failures and downturns, and produce an organization that operates with integrity and authenticity.
How can you tell if your culture and your brand aren’t interdependent and mutually reinforcing? A disconnect between your employee experiences and your customer experiences is a telltale sign.
Another indicator of a mismatch between your culture and your brand is the lack of understanding of and engagement with your brand among your people.
If your people think they don’t play a role in interpreting and reinforcing your brand and that brand building is your marketing department’s responsibility, then your culture lacks brand integrity.
To address these gaps and align and to integrate your brand and culture, start by clearly identifying and articulating your brand aspirations.
Do you want your brand to be known for delivering superior performance and dependability? Or is your intent to challenge the existing way of doing things and position your brand as a disruptor? Or is your brand about making a positive social or environmental impact?
In the case of a performance brand, you should work on cultivating a culture of achievement, excellence, and consistency inside your organization, while a strong sense of purpose, commitment, and shared values is needed for a socially or environmentally responsible brand.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Motivating Employees Is Not About Carrots or Sticks”

While the concept of motivation may be straightforward, motivating employees in real-life situations is far more challenging.
Why not consider another way to motivate employees? I’d like to suggest a new dialogue that embraces the key concept that motivation is less about employees doing great work and more about employees feeling great about their work.
The better employees feel about their work, the more motivated they remain over time.
To motivate your employees, start by sharing context about the work you’re asking them to do.
What are we doing as an organization and as a team? Why are we doing it? Who benefits from our work and how? What does success look like for our team and for each employee? What role does each employee play in delivering on that promise? Employees are motivated when their work has relevance.
What might make an employee’s work difficult or cumbersome? What can you do to ease the burden? What roadblocks might surface? How can you knock them down? How can you remain engaged just enough to see trouble coming and pave the way for success? Employees are motivated when they can make progress without unnecessary interruption and undue burdens.
As tempting as it is to try to influence employee satisfaction with the use of carrots and sticks, it isn’t necessary for sustained motivation.
What aspects of your role do you enjoy? What makes you proud to lead your team? What impact can you and your team have on others both inside and outside the organization? How can you adapt your role to increase your energy and enthusiasm? Employees feel motivated when their leaders are motivated.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leaked recording: Inside Apple’s global war on leakers”

The briefing, titled “Stopping Leakers – Keeping Confidential at Apple,” was led by Director of Global Security David Rice, Director of Worldwide Investigations Lee Freedman, and Jenny Hubbert, who works on the Global Security communications and training team.
According to the hour-long presentation, Apple’s Global Security team employs an undisclosed number of investigators around the world to prevent information from reaching competitors, counterfeiters, and the press, as well as hunt down the source when leaks do occur.
He’s directed the Global Security team at Apple for more than six years, according to his LinkedIn page.
Rice says, Apple has cracked down on leaks from its factories so successfully that more breaches are now happening on Apple’s campuses in California than its factories abroad. “Last year was the first year that Apple [campuses] leaked more than the supply chain,” Rice tells the room.
The Global Security team in China has been “Busting their ass” to solve the problem of leaks stemming from Apple’s factories, Rice says, describing the efforts as “Trench warfare non-stop.”
Later, during the employee Q&A, Rice gleefully recounts a blog post written by longtime Apple watcher John Gruber, in which Gruber criticized Apple scoop machine Mark Gurman, who now works at Bloomberg, for not having juicy details on Apple’s new HomePod speaker before it was released.
Apple embeds members of a team within Global Security, called Secrecy Program Management, on some product teams to help employees keep secrets, he explains.
Hubbert prompts him to talk about two major leakers who were caught the previous year, one who worked at Apple’s online store “For a couple years” and one who worked on iTunes for “About six years.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want Your Best Employees to Never Leave You? Ask Them 5 Simple Questions”

Want to do something that will launch you into the new era of HR? Get rid of your exit interviews and replace them with “Stay interviews.”
If you’re new to this concept, unlike the exit interview, managers are using stay interviews to get fresh insight into improving the work environment or their own leadership skills to retain those valued employees today-not after they have emotionally disconnected and stopped caring.
The whole premise is based on honest two-way conversations between manager and employee, where each side gets to listen, ask questions, and agree to follow up on ideas and action plans.
The stay interview builds trust with employees, who feel valued because leaders are sending the message that they see them as important and want to get a feel for what’s working and not working for them.
Here’s what to do: Make stay interviews questions simple and informal when meeting with direct reports one-on-one.
This question sets a positive tone to assess their work satisfaction and helps a manager clue in to what parts of the job employees like and want to experience more of.
Best case scenario here is discovering that the employee has skills the company or leader never knew about, which is a win-win: The employee wins by using personal strengths that raise personal motivation and engagement; the leader wins by offering new opportunities to tap into those strengths, which releases discretionary effort that will benefit the company, project, or team.
Studies show respect is a key driver in overall employee engagement, and its absence as a contributor to employees leaving.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Things Great Bosses Say to a New Employee That Most Bosses Never Think to Say”

Here are four things great bosses say on an employee’s very first day to make sure that person gets off to a great – and focused – start.
New employees need to learn how to do their jobs, but first they need to thoroughly understand your company’s underlying value proposition and competitive advantage.
As a new employee, I certainly need to know what to do, but more important, I need to know why I do it.
Every new employee has external customers, even if he or she never meets them, and every new employee definitely has internal customers.
Set a productivity tone by ensuring that every new employee completes at least one job-related task on his or her first day.
Why? Not only do you establish that results are all-important, but also, every new employee will go home feeling a sense of personal achievement.
That way new employees can immediately see how their role directly connects to creating value for the company, and you get great opportunities to provide immediate, constructive feedback – which helps new employees do an even better job of creating value for the company.
Tell your new employee why you hired her – not the role she will fill, but why she is such a great fit for that role.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To become a better leader, don’t read Steve Jobs’s biography”

Steve Jobs has been called the greatest businessman the world has ever seen and the best CEO of this generation.
Walter Isaacson’s biography Steve Jobs didn’t just create a Hollywood hit: It created a manual for any bosses seeking a hall pass for their temper tantrums.
Along with recounting Jobs’s blistering behavior and his “Perverse eagerness” for putting people down, Isaacson remarks that “People who were not crushed ended up being stronger” and that those employees who were most abused by Jobs ended up accomplishing things “They never dreamed possible” thanks to his harsh treatment.
As recounted in the Isaacson’s biography, Jobs’s acid tongue eventually caused his employees to burn out.
After working 10 months of 90-hour workweeks, one employee finally quit in exasperation after Jobs walked into the room and told everyone how “Unimpressed” he was with what they were doing.
Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak said “Some of the most creative people in Apple who worked on the Macintosh” left the company and refused to ever again work for Jobs again.
Because of Jobs’ nasty temper, Apple lost out on impressive talent.
“Managers who try to emulate Mr. Jobs by just being rude or aggressive are missing the point,” Issacson says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Manage a Needy Employee”

What do you do about that needy person on your team? How do you balance being a responsive manager with the need to get your own work done? And how should you manage your frustration?
“Say, ‘You’ve been coming in a lot for XYZ. But all these informal check-ins are not an efficient use of time for either of us. What’s going on? How can I better support you?'” You could even make it about you, says Hill, “Which allows the employee to save face a little.” She suggests saying something like, “It’s my perception that I’m in your work too much, and I’m worried I might be a bottleneck.'” Boost your employee’s ego, she says.
Once you’ve said your piece, listen carefully to how your employee responds.
Remember, “Your job is to coach your staff and help them grow,” says Jen Su. Does your employee require more direction? A deeper relationship with you? More training? Or something else altogether? “Figure out if there are small adjustments you can make” to resolve the neediness.
“You need to help your employee unlearn a pattern of coming to you for every little thing.”
Emotionally needy employees are “Much harder to deal with” than operationally needy ones, he says.
“She didn’t know how to deal with an employee who showed up late seven times in a row. She didn’t know how to motivate a sales rep that was missing his numbers. There was a lot of grooming that needed to take place.”
Case Study #2: Empower your employees and offer positive feedbackKelly Max, president and CEO of Haufe, the San Francisco-based HR software company, says that whenever he encounters a needy employee, he tries to look at the bigger picture.

The orginal article.