Summary of “Big Brother isn’t just watching: workplace surveillance can track your every move”

How can an employer make sure its remote workers aren’t slacking off? In the case of talent management company Crossover, the answer is to take photos of them every 10 minutes through their webcam.
Today’s workplace surveillance software is a digital panopticon that began with email and phone monitoring but now includes keeping track of web-browsing patterns, text messages, screenshots, keystrokes, social media posts, private messaging apps like WhatsApp and even face-to-face interactions with co-workers.
The majority of surveillance tech providers focus their attention on the financial sector, where companies are legally required to track staff communications to prevent insider trading.
Last year an employee at an IT services company sent a private chat message to a friend at work worried that he had just shared his sexual identity with his manager in a meeting and fearing he’d face career reprisal.
Wiretap detected the employee’s concern and alerted a senior company exec who was then able to intervene, talk to the manager and defuse the situation.
The demonstrator opened the email in front of a room full of peers to discover his best employee was plotting to move to another company.
The spying technique that most companies avoid, despite Crossover’s enthusiasm, is accessing employees’ webcams.
American companies generally aren’t required by law to disclose how they monitor employees using company-issued devices, although they tend to include a catch-all clause in employment contracts declaring such monitoring.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Change Management Is Becoming Increasingly Data-Driven. Companies Aren’t Ready”

Data science is becoming a reality for change management, and although it may not have arrived yet, it is time for organizations to get ready.
The companies best positioned to change in the next decade will be the ones that set themselves up well now, by collecting the right kind of data and investing in their analytics capacity.
Although predictive models for change management are still a ways off, organizations can get themselves on the right path by adopting the right tools and capturing the right data.
These tools have obvious relevance to change management and can help answer questions like: Is a change being equally well received across locations? Are some managers better than others at delivering messages to employees?
Waggl.com goes further, creating an ongoing conversation with employees about a change effort, allowing change managers to tie this dialogue to the progress of initiatives they are undertaking.
These tools can already have a big impact on change programs, but the data stream they create could be even more important as we learn to build predictive models of change.
Change managers can also look beyond the confines of the enterprise for insight about the impact of change programs.
If every change leader and team member underwent psychometric testing and evaluation before the project, this data would become variables to include as you search for a causal model on what leads to successful change projects.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Tell Your Boss That You’re Not Engaged at Work”

William Kahn first introduced the term in 1990, defining it as “The degree of psychological identification employees experience with their job role or work persona.” He noticed that organizations tended to overlook the influence that everyday experiences have on people’s work motivation, focusing instead on their talents, skills, and expertise.
Although such qualities are no doubt critical, they are not sufficient to account for the wide range of subjective experiences employees have at work.
Despite the organizational benefits of engagement, global estimates indicate that most employees are not fully engaged at work – particularly in developed economies, where employees’ expectations are highest.
Using this line will remind your boss that employee engagement is not a philosophical or metaphysical notion.
Employees and managers are equally prone to optimizing work for efficiency and making everything as reliable and predictable as possible.
For managers, it’s a way to de-risk employees’ performance, ensuring they do what is expected as efficiently as possible, making Frederick Taylor – the father of management consulting and work efficiency – proud.
“I find my work exhausting – can you help me?” This final line is a gentle reminder that managers are largely responsible for the motivation levels of their employees and teams.
All motivation is ultimately self-motivation, but it is a manager’s job to help employees avoid draining and demotivating work situations – where exhausting barriers outweigh exciting challenges.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Teach Employees Skills They Don’t Know They Lack”

After spending billions of dollars a year on corporate learning, U.S. companies probably assume that their employees have the knowledge and skills they need to carry out their jobs.
One global technology company my team works with, for example, discovered that, on average, its sales employees didn’t understand or know about 22% of its product features, even though they believed they did.
It’s often more prominent among experienced staff, which is particularly problematic because, as the go-to people in their circles, they often pass incorrect or incomplete information and skills on to others via to peer-to-peer learning and training.
How does a company, manager or individual employee correct a competency gap about which no one is aware? As a physician who studies brain function, biological variation and how people learn, I have some suggestions.
Corporate training programs need to be redesigned to better engage learners and empower them to admit what they don’t know.
Better learning models are instead adaptive-that is, molded to each person’s needs by probing what they know and don’t know, then offering tailored content as the learner performs well or struggles.
When corporate learning programs prompt employees to admit to that they’re guessing in the same way, they, too, begin to see the previously hidden gaps in their skills and knowledge.
With a mindful approach that allows learners to probe their knowledge, uncover what they don’t know, and admit when they are unclear, incompetence is uncovered and, thus, no longer unconscious: Employees know what they don’t know and their employers can do something about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Great Storytelling Connects Employees to Their Work”

We go through the motions, phoning it in, but engage in our work less than we are capable of.
There is a lot a leader can do to help employees feel a deeper sense of motivation in their work.
When you feel connected to the moral purpose of your work, you behave differently.
The first responsibility of leaders – whether front line supervisors, middle managers, or executives – is to compensate for the inevitable alienation that complex organizations create, and provide employees with a visceral connection to the human purpose they serve.
People’s feelings about their work are only partly about the work itself.
They are equally, if not more so, about how they frame their work.
In one study we did at a large healthcare provider, we examined why some employees were somewhat casual about hand hygiene while others were zealots.
We stop seeing past our work to the people we affect.

The orginal article.

Summary of “LinkedIn’s CEO Jeff Weiner Just Shared Some Brilliant Career Advice”

With a 97 percent employee approval rating on Glassdoor, LinkedIn’s Jeff Weiner has developed a reputation as one of the most beloved CEOs in the world.
Of course, good leadership involves maintaining interest in your people’s work, and offering helpful advice when appropriate.
Effective leaders know that good listening is an art.
If you saw an employee engage in a dangerous behavior, you wouldn’t wait too long to correct it, would you? Similarly, you should positively reinforce your employees’ good behavior when you see it-to encourage them to continue.
Show your people you’ve got their backs by staying by them even when they make mistakes do more than tell people where they should go-set the example and show them the way.
Leaders who recognize the importance of humility and emotional intelligence are the ones who are able to inspire.
These leaders concern themselves with action instead of position.
“There are leaders and there are those who lead. Leaders hold a position of power or authority, but those who lead inspire us. Whether they’re individuals or organizations, we follow those who lead, not because we have to, but because we want to.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Help an Employee Who Rubs People the Wrong Way”

No matter the specific behavior, your employee is clearly rubbing people the wrong way.
“You want neutral observations, such as, ‘I observed X in the last meeting, and the impact was Y.” It’s also wise to strategize how your employee might respond to your comments.
“Emotions are contagious. If you go in full of awkwardness, that will radiate itself. If you go in with a desire to criticize, you are more likely to have a combative conversation.” Think, too, about how you plan to raise the topic with your employee, and consider the physical setting as well.
Imagine you believe your employee alienates fellow colleagues by constantly interrupting them.
“Stand your ground, and don’t let your employee reframe your message,” she says.
Finally, Su says, you should “Offer to be your employee’s sounding board.” You could say, “I’m happy to prepare with you before the next team meeting, or to debrief with you afterward.” It’s smart to get your direct report “Involved in how to solve the problem by brainstorming ideas and suggestions together,” Webb adds.
You’re more likely to see a shift in behavior if your employee feels as though he’s had an opportunity to help come up with a solution.
The employee – we’ll call him Peter – would constantly interrupt his colleagues, roll his eyes during meetings, and be much too forward with his often unwarranted feedback.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Motivate Employees to Go Beyond Their Jobs”

As a result, a critical task for successful managers is to motivate their employees to engage in these extra-role behaviors, which researchers refer to as “Citizenship behaviors.” Given the importance of citizenship behavior for organizational success, it is important that managers help employees find the best possible ways to go beyond the call of duty in order to help make work more meaningful and less depleting.
These are important decisions because research shows that when employees are willing to go beyond their formal roles by helping out coworkers, volunteering to take on special assignments, introducing new ideas and work practices, attending non-mandatory meetings, putting in extra hours to complete important projects, and so forth, their companies are more efficient and effective.
As a result, a critical task for successful managers is to motivate their employees to engage in these extra-role behaviors, which researchers refer to as “Citizenship behaviors.”
As this work continues, consensus is emerging that citizenship behavior tends to have negative implications when employees go above and beyond at work not because they intrinsically want to, but because they feel that they have to, or when they are unable to carry out their regular job duties and be a good citizen at the same time.
Given the importance of citizenship behavior for organizational success, it is important that managers help employees find better ways to go beyond the call of duty in order to help make work more meaningful and less depleting.
Whereas job crafting captures how employees redesign their formal role at work, citizenship crafting is based on the notion that employees can proactively shape the ways in which they to go beyond the call of duty such that they not only contribute to the organization, but that they are also personally meaningful, rewarding, and consistent with their strengths.
First, to the extent that jobs contain tasks that align with employees’ intrinsic motives, and are absent of tasks that employees feel forced to complete, job performance tends to be significantly higher; as such, citizenship crafting should result in higher quality and more impactful acts of citizenship.
Finally, citizenship crafting should reduce the need for managers to rely on extrinsic sticks and carrots to motivate employees to go the extra mile.

The orginal article.

Summary of “As Your Company Evolves, What Happens to Employees Who Don’t?”

Some individuals who fit our company in its infancy became a weaker fit over time.
Much of the dialogue around company fit assumes that it’s a concrete concept: Round pegs go in round holes and, once they’ve found the right spot, stay there.
You don’t have to sit on the sidelines and watch your company’s culture evolve away from your best employees.
No test reveals everything about a person, but learning about what drives someone can help you see where they would fit best in your company.
We encourage employees to discuss their goals and plans for the future openly with their managers, even if those plans don’t mesh with their current roles or don’t involve staying with the company.
In contrast, less-experienced but high-aptitude hires may need more training feel and may be a bit overwhelmed in the beginning, but they have the raw ability and desire to grow with your company and adapt to the needs of the position.
Fit between employee and company is not a one-time check on a list of hiring criteria; it’s a constantly evolving relationship that changes to meet the needs of the time.
Don’t leave your company culture and employee fit to chance.

The orginal article.