Summary of “Crave more stillness in your life? You can find it in beauty |”

“Beauty remains, even in misfortune,” Anne Frank wrote.
“Beauty remains, even in misfortune,” she wrote.
What a source of peace and strength beauty can be.
The philosopher must cultivate the poet’s eye – the ability to see beauty, even in the banal or terrible.
Which is why the philosopher must cultivate the poet’s eye – the ability to see beauty everywhere, even in the banal or the terrible.
It is not the sign of a healthy soul to find beauty in superficial things – the adulation of the crowd, fancy cars, enormous estates, glittering awards.
It is better to find beauty in all places and things.
Even when we are killing each other in pointless wars, even when we are killing ourselves with pointless work, we can stop and bathe in the beauty that surrounds us, always.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do When You’re Losing Your Audience During a Presentation”

You can tell when an audience has stopped listening to you during a presentation.
As a speaker, it’s dispiriting when you feel you’re trying to convey important information and your audience has obviously lost interest.
As a professional speaker who has given more than 300 talks over the past half-decade, I’ve addressed plenty of audiences under adverse conditions, from the serious to the banal.
You don’t want to overdo this maneuver, but used judiciously it keeps audience members guessing where you’ll go next, which means their eyes are trained on you.
Fast speakers barrage their audiences, slow speakers keep drawling, and audience members – confident they know what to expect – starts to fidget.
We’ve discussed physical techniques for snapping the audience back to attention.
Even if your audience isn’t versed in particular technical specifications, they can still understand the difference between, say, a regional Amtrak versus a high-speed train.
Effective speakers ensure that audiences are actually paying attention to their remarks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Signs You Need to Rethink Your Career”

Even people who love their jobs may find themselves bored or feeling dissatisfied from time to time.
Boredom is the top reason that people leave their jobs, according to a 2018 survey by Korn Ferry.
Roughly one-third said that they were looking for a new job to find a new challenge.
The data analysis and visualization company Flowing Data analyzed data from the 2015 American Community Survey to find jobs with the highest rates of divorce.
The analysis found that those people with low-paying jobs and jobs in materials movement and transportation had among the highest divorce rates.
Of course, the site notes, correlation is not causation, but it’s not a surprise that low-pay, high-stress jobs may have an affect on other areas of life.2.
A May 2018 study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health found that ostracism, incivility, harassment, and bullying have direct negative effects on job productivity.
Another study from the University of Manchester found that being in a job you hate is worse for your health than being unemployed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “19 Things Future Multimillionaires Do in Their 20s”

The truth is that even if you’re starting with little, there are things you can do early in your life and career-in your 20s, mostly-that can make it far more likely you’ll be very wealthy by the time you hit 30.
Boil down their experiences and there are common things they did earlier in life.
As a young person, spend your time doing things that matter to you and that build value.
Lots of people in their 20s quickly submit to things they shouldn’t.
Volunteer, but do so with three things in mind: First, volunteer to do things that you feel good about.
Second, volunteer to do things that will be learning experiences.
Life is a lot more fun if you spend it working hard at things you really enjoy and value.
Travel, write, play music, jump out of airplanes-do the things you’ll be talking about for years to come.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Didn’t See It Coming”

The effects of large changes in scale are frequently beyond our powers of perception, even our imagination.
The phase change I’m seeing shocked even me-and I’ve spent the past 30 years writing about the underlying math and science of precisely how quantitative changes can produce such dramatic changes in quality.
“The greatest shortcoming of the human race,” he said, “Is our inability to understand the exponential function”-that is, change that builds on previous changes.
At the subatomic scales of quantum physics, rules change completely.
Which is to say: Predicting the qualitative effects of quantitative changes takes more than mere genius.
The introduction of nuclear weapons brought about a phase change so profound it provoked Einstein to remark: “I do not know with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”
The community knows when a big enough change in quantity has created a qualitatively different environment, even when individuals may not know.
Could a tipping point exist where a concentrated quantity of power and money really change society? Even individual behavior? The evidence is mounting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Ways Busy People Sabotage Themselves”

When we’re busy and stressed, we often default to working on whatever has the most imminent deadline, even if it’s not particularly important.
We respond to emails and go through the motions of getting things done, without actually stepping back and considering what’s most important to work on.
You might find yourself spending several hours on a task that wasn’t that important to begin with, even though you have a mountain of other things to be doing.
The solution is to step back and work on tasks that are important but not urgent.
Lots of busy people don’t keep enough food in the house.
To get out of the trap of overlooking easy solutions, take a step back and question your assumptions.
So you put it off, week after week, doing the work yourself – even though even reallocating the time spent on one cleaning session would realistically be enough to hire someone else to do it.
With practice, you’ll start to notice when you’re just doing something to avoid doing something else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Ways Busy People Sabotage Themselves”

When we’re busy and stressed, we often default to working on whatever has the most imminent deadline, even if it’s not particularly important.
We respond to emails and go through the motions of getting things done, without actually stepping back and considering what’s most important to work on.
You might find yourself spending several hours on a task that wasn’t that important to begin with, even though you have a mountain of other things to be doing.
The solution is to step back and work on tasks that are important but not urgent.
Lots of busy people don’t keep enough food in the house.
To get out of the trap of overlooking easy solutions, take a step back and question your assumptions.
So you put it off, week after week, doing the work yourself – even though even reallocating the time spent on one cleaning session would realistically be enough to hire someone else to do it.
With practice, you’ll start to notice when you’re just doing something to avoid doing something else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask Polly: My In-Laws Are Careless About My Food Allergy!”

My mother-in-law said, very rudely, “I would’ve liked to add mushrooms directly to the salad, but SOMEBODY has problems with it!” They even added mushroom powder to the mashed potatoes at one holiday dinner.
What’s worse is my husband told me that mushrooms were not a common dish served by his parents before he started dating me.
His dad said, “We can’t promise that. Everyone except your wife likes mushrooms, and we’re not changing what we eat for one person.”
So what should you do about it? I guess you could get a doctor to write a letter explaining that mushrooms have almost killed you a few times already.
Maybe the doctor could describe in graphic detail exactly what would happen to your body if you were to eat mushrooms by accident.
Have these humans ever indicated that they’re open to new information? Have they ever shown the slightest bit of curiosity about you or your challenges? They can’t seem to do a simple Google search on “Mushroom allergies,” so the mind naturally imagines the many, many other things they’re incapable of doing.
Even if they agreed never to serve mushrooms or mushroom powder, I would still be afraid to eat anything they served me.
I would still stop at Burger Doodle on my way to Thanksgiving dinner, and bring my own bottle of wine to drink, and maybe even hire someone to test every food served to me for traces of mushroom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Find Quiet Time and Get Away From It All”

At the same time, the caregiver emerges from Mom’s room with a question for me.
I’d thought there was something wrong me with for craving solitude and silence so much I dream of running far, far away to get it.
Curious, I began to reach out to the friends who responded to my post, asking if they ever manage to find any peace and quiet in their daily lives, and if so, where? How? Baltimore, Maryland resident Carolyn Turgeon, 47, who somehow manages to juggle writing novels and non-fiction books while editing Enchanted Living tells me she’s discovered silence, and a strange measure of solitude, at the local pool.
“I was visiting a friend in Omaha recently and went to the pool at his gym and there was a sign ‘You Shall Not Swim Alone,’ and even though I understood what it meant I couldn’t help but laugh. How do you not swim alone? It’s such a lonesome activity, even if every lane around you is filled with swimmers. It’s silent, magical, just your body moving through the water, the only sound the gurgle of water, that splash of your arm breaking the surface. It’s such a powerful escape.”
“My husband is super at helping out with the housework and spending time with the kids,” she explains to me, “But I have to have moments of quiet where there are no demands on me or I really do completely lose my mind … I shut the door between classes and try to do some yoga breathing in those three minutes and often turn off the lights for the first five minutes of lunch to let me brain reset. But there have been times with deadlines looming when I’ve had to go way more extreme. Once I got a super cheap motel for a weekend so I could have a few days uninterrupted.”
They make time – whatever little bit they can in between all their duties – for silence and solitude.
Maeve Kelley, 45, lives in Omaha, Nebraska, where she’s a single mom to two sons, ages 13 and 9, as well as a grown daughter.
Experts agree that to maximize the benefits of solitude and silence, it’s crucial that you leave your cell phone behind; time spent with technology that connects us to other people isn’t really time spent alone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Healing Power of Gardens”

As a writer, I find gardens essential to the creative process; as a physician, I take my patients to gardens whenever possible.
In forty years of medical practice, I have found only two types of non-pharmaceutical “Therapy” to be vitally important for patients with chronic neurological diseases: music and gardens.
I cannot say exactly how nature exerts its calming and organizing effects on our brains, but I have seen in my patients the restorative and healing powers of nature and gardens, even for those who are deeply disabled neurologically.
In many cases, gardens and nature are more powerful than any medication.
Biophilia, the love of nature and living things, is an essential part of the human condition.
Hortophilia, the desire to interact with, manage, and tend nature, is also deeply instilled in us.
The effects of nature’s qualities on health are not only spiritual and emotional but physical and neurological.
Complement this particular fragment of the altogether delicious Everything in Its Place with naturalist Michael McCarthy on nature and joy, pioneering conservationist and Wilderness Act co-composer Mardy Murie on nature and human nature, and bryologist and Native American storyteller Robin Wall Kimmerer on gardening and the secret of happiness, then revisit Oliver Sacks on nature and the interconnectedness of the universe, the building blocks of identity, the three essential elements of creativity, and his stunning memoir of a life fully lived.

The orginal article.