Summary of “How One Tiny-Home Designer Makes a Small Space Feel 10 Times Bigger”

Matt Impola was already living in a small space when he decided he would take on a new weekend project: his first-ever tiny home.
The most striking thing about Impola’s tiny homes is that they don’t immediately look.
Clearly Impola has picked up on plenty of ways to make even the smallest spaces feel much larger, and his advice can be applied to cramped apartments or even not-so-tiny homes.
“Motor homes and travel trailers can feel so temporary, especially when they use cheaper materials like vinyl and plastic, funky wallpapers, and all that,” says Impola.
Opt for High-Quality MaterialsThose aren’t the only elevated pieces Impola swears by.
“Everything’s got to be a bit scaled down, especially sofas,” says Impola.
Kondo Your Belongings”Especially in a kitchen, you’re not going to have room for a ton of extra stuff. It’s about choosing your favorite 10 to 20 dishes,” Impola says.
Impola advocates for more unexpected choices: “I do a lot of behind-the-scenes tricks with my loft floors,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “New Caledonian Crows Are Even Smarter and Scarier Than We Thought”

Crows, in particular, are smart as heck: They make tools out of sticks, and even spontaneously make tools without being taught.
New research could deepen this picture even more, as researchers have found that crows may possess mental capabilities that we didn’t think were possible.
In a 2018 paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, a team of researchers showed evidence that New Caledonian crows, which have been observed making several types of tools out of sticks, may be able to build tools from memory – even if they have only seen the tool itself and haven’t ever seen the tool being constructed.
This suggests that crows can form a “Mental template” of tools based on other crows’ tools and their own past tools, which would explain why New Caledonian crows’ tools could have improved over time.
To conduct this study, the researchers, led by Sarah Jelbert, Ph.D., a postdoctoral psychology researcher at the University of Cambridge, trained New Caledonian crows to put pieces of paper into a slot to receive a food reward.
By requiring crows to use this man-made material to create items that take different shapes than pandanus tools, our task had sufficient novelty to prevent the crows from transferring learnt rules formed during their prior tool manufacture experience in the wild.
Their results suggest that crows can produce the proper tool from their memory, even though the task was new to them.
In future studies, they hope to investigate just how long crows can hold these mental templates in their heads.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Should I Kill Spiders in My Home? An Entomologist Explains Why Not To”

Photo by Matt Bertone, CC BY-ND. I know it may be hard to convince you, but let me try: Don’t kill the next spider you see in your home.
Some species even enjoy the great indoors, where they happily live out their lives and make more spiders.
The most common species we encountered were cobweb spiders and cellar spiders.
Cellar spiders sometimes leave their webs to hunt other spiders on their turf, mimicking prey to catch their cousins for dinner.
So killing a spider doesn’t just cost the arachnid its life, it may take an important predator out of your home.
Spiders are not out to get you and actually prefer to avoid humans; we are much more dangerous to them than vice versa.
Although there are a few medically important species like widow spiders and recluses, even their bites are uncommon and rarely cause serious issues.
If you can stomach it, it’s OK to have spiders in your home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Coronavirus Could Hit American Workers Especially Hard”

They’re also concentrated in the service industry or gig economy, in which workers have contact, directly or indirectly, with large numbers of people.
These are the workers who are stocking the shelves of America’s stores, preparing and serving food in its restaurants, driving its Ubers, and manning its checkout counters.
So workers with no good options end up going into work, interacting with customers, swiping the debit cards that go back into their wallets, making the sandwiches they eat for lunch, unpacking the boxes of cereal they take home for their kids, or driving them home from happy hour.
Even for people who have paid sick leave, Gershon noted, the choices are often only marginally better; seven days of sick leave is the American average, but many people get as few as three or four.
For workers with ample sick leave, getting it approved may still be difficult.
Some managers believe leadership means forcing their employees into the office at all costs, or at least making it clear that taking a sick day or working from home will be met with suspicion or contempt.
In other places, employees bring their bug to work of their own volition, brown-nosing at the expense of their co-workers’ health.
She advised that workers stay at least three to six feet away from anyone coughing or sneezing, but in office layouts that put desks directly next to one another with no partition in between-often to save money by giving workers less personal space-that can be impossible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Franco’s Invisible Legacy”

Decades after his death, Franco continues to cast a long shadow over Spain, from the rise of the far-right Vox party to the hundreds of mass graves of people who died in the war that are still waiting to be exhumed.
One other hugely important legacy that few people are aware of is the continuing effect on books, both in Spain and throughout the Spanish-speaking world.
Spain abandoned these policies after Franco’s death in 1975, yet most of the same texts are still widely available today.
Spain’s 2007 Law for the Recovery of the Historical Memory was a major step away from these years of forgetting.
The upshot is that Spain’s literary censorship problem is alive and well today.
The effect on culture in Spain and in other hispanic countries is almost incalculable.
The point is that while Spain has increasingly been addressing the impact of Franco’s regime in the country’s social and historical memory since the early 2000s, the process of coming to terms with the past is far from complete.
The pact of forgetting has not only marred Spain’s democratic progress, it has severely damaged the country’s cultural heritage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Capicola Became Gabagool: The Italian New Jersey Accent, Explained”

Meadow Soprano on an early episode of The Sopranos, perhaps the most famous depiction of Jersey Italian culture in the past few decades.
I spoke to a few linguists and experts on Italian-American culture to figure out why a kid from Paterson, New Jersey, who doesn’t speak Italian, would earnestly ask for a taste of “Mutzadell.” The answer takes us way back through history and deep into the completely chaotic world of Italian linguistics.
That’s because each of the old Italian kingdoms had their own well, D’Imperio, who is Italian, calls them “Dialects.” But others refer to them in different ways.
During unification, the northern Italian powers decided that having a country that speaks about a dozen different languages would pose a bit of a challenge to their efforts, so they picked one and called it “Standard Italian” and made everyone learn it.
This gets weird, because most Italian-Americans can trace their immigrant ancestors back to that time between 1861 and World War I, when the vast majority of “Italians,” such as Italy even existed at the time, wouldn’t have spoken the same language at all, and hardly any of them would be speaking the northern Italian dialect that would eventually become Standard Italian.
Italian has undergone huge standardization changes in the past few decades, and it’ll be hard for modern Italian speakers to understand them, even harder than if somebody showed up in New York today speaking in 1920s New Yorker “Thoity-Thoid Street” slang and accent.
Let’s do a fun experiment and take three separate linguistic trends from southern Italian dialects and combine them all to show how one Standard Italian word can be so thoroughly mangled in the United States.
Italian is a very fluid, musical language, and Italian speakers will try to eliminate the awkwardness of going consonant-to-consonant.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ancient animistic beliefs live on in our intimacy with tech”

We are returning to the oldest form of human cognition – the most ancient pre-scientific way of seeing the world: animism.
The word ‘animism’ was first employed by the English anthropologist Edward Burnett Tylor to describe the early ‘primitive’ stage of human religion – a stage that was eventually supplanted by what was later called Axial Age monotheism, which in turn would be supplanted, Tylor hoped, by what we’d call Deism.
Anthropologists today debate the usefulness of the term animism since folk religions are so diverse, but two essential features mark all animism: one, belief that there are ‘agents’ or even persons in natural objects and artifacts; and two, belief that nature has purposes woven throughout it.
Animism commits to the view that there are many kinds of persons in the world, only some of whom are humans.
Sigmund Freud typified the usual condescension about animism when he wrote in Totem and Taboo that ‘spirits and demons were nothing but the projection of primitive man’s emotional impulses’.
Animism is not so much a set of beliefs as a form of cognition.
If animist thinking is childish and uneducated, then why are indigenous peoples so much better at surviving and thriving in local natural ecologies? Some kinds of animism are adaptive and aid our survival, because they focus our attention on ecological connections, but they also train our social intelligence to predict and respond to other agents.
Our new animism – animism 2.0 – might be quite helpful in keeping the social emotions and skills healthy enough for real human bonding, perspective-taking and empathy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wikipedia Is the Last Best Place on the Internet”

Wikipedia is built on the personal interests and idiosyncrasies of its contributors; in fact, without getting gooey, you could even say it is built on love.
One challenge in seeing Wikipedia clearly is that the favored point of comparison for the site is still, in 2020, Encyclopedia Britannica.
If you encountered the words Encyclopedia Britannica recently, they were likely in a discussion about Wikipedia.
When did you last see a physical copy of these books? After months of reading about Wikipedia, which meant reading about Britannica, I finally saw the paper encyclopedia in person.
Nine years later, a working paper from Harvard Business School found that Wikipedia was more left-leaning than Britannica-mostly because the articles tended to be longer and so were likelier to contain partisan “Code words.” But the bias came out in the wash.
The more revisions a Wikipedia article had, the more neutral it became.
There’s the fact that people tend to read Wikipedia daily, whereas Britannica had the quality of fine china, as much a display object as a reference work.
At Britannica rates, the English-language version of Wikipedia would cost $1.75 billion to produce.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You’re Never Going to Have a Legacy, so Give up Trying”

In time, the TV host will fade from public memory, relegated to a footnote in wonky discussions about early-21st century talk shows.
“Two years later, it’s going to be, ‘who’s Conan?’ This is going to sound grim, but eventually, all our graves go unattended.” Famous talk show hosts aren’t the only ones who have to reckon with their own insignificance.
“And he looked at me and he said, ‘What are you talking about? None of it matters.’ None of it matters? ‘No, that’s the secret. In 1940, people said Clark Gable is the face of the 20th Century. Who [expletive] thinks about Clark Gable? It doesn’t matter. You’ll be forgotten. I’ll be forgotten. We’ll all be forgotten.'”.
Chuck Berry transformed music by more or less creating rock and roll, but how many of his songs can you name besides “Johnny B. Goode”? Artemisia Gentileschi was one of the most accomplished painters of the 17th century, but the vast majority of people today couldn’t pick her paintings out from other great Baroque artworks.
Conversely, though having a higher Twitter following might open opportunities for me to build my brand as a writer, reminding myself of the impermanence of any possible legacy also reminds me that I really don’t enjoy personal-brand building, so why devote energy to it?
Reckoning with the insignificance of your own legacy can also improve your perspective on life more broadly speaking.
We all die, and our legacies all die, so what really matters? Even in the face of impending mortality, some acts have worth: Great love, acts of kindness, exciting experiences, and personal sacrifices for the wellbeing of others contain the best of human existence.
Your legacy will fade, any importance that people assign to your name will one day be forgotten.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Betelgeuse Is the Most Intriguing Star in the Galaxy”

The Orion constellation can be seen from nearly everywhere on Earth, which means nearly everyone could see the exploding star.
Even more spectacular, the display would stick around.
The gleaming orb would remain visible for more than a year, perhaps even longer.
Betelgeuse isn’t the sort of star whose demise would produce radiation that could roil the planet’s atmosphere.
Read: What if history’s brightest supernova exploded in Earth’s backyard?
So how might people react? Judging by what happened in New York about a year ago, there would be confusion, even panic.
The most recent nearby supernova appeared long before people could panic about it on Twitter, in 1987, but it could be seen only in very dark parts of the Southern Hemisphere, far from artificial lights.
Betelgeuse would provide a far better show; the other stars were thousands of light-years from Earth, rather than hundreds.

The orginal article.