Summary of “How To Get A Job Without Prior Experience”

Here’s the challenge everyone who starts their career faces: You can’t get a job because you don’t have experience, but you can’t get experience without getting a job.
It’s called the experience paradox or Catch-22 of getting a job.
“Create a resume, browse job boards, and respond to job applications.” Sorry to disappoint you.
When you do the following 2 things, you will become better-that will significantly increase your odds of getting a job without prior experience.
The reality is that there’s a massive difference between someone who doesn’t have experience at a particular job and someone who has two years under their belt.
Even though two years might not sound like a lot of time, it’s actually a lot of time to learn the ins and outs of a job.
If you seek out companies who hire for experience and skills, you have a good chance of getting hired-even if you don’t have experience.
So how can you do free work? Larry Stybel, a clinical psychologist, wrote an article for HBR about his experience launching his career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Be Creative on Demand”

Here are some of the ways I’ve learned to be more predictably creative.
For months before my trip to Nairobi, I carried around a pad of paper on which I had handwritten the following statement: “How, with no outside resources, will we create 300 middle class jobs for the people in our group?” The problem turned in my mind.
Walk away for a bit, and allow the unconscious work – that which draws from a fuller complement of mental resources, experiences, and creative connections – to begin.
If you want to be more creative, you need to have more things to connect.
The best way to build a rich mental database that will help you solve problems later is to honor passing curiosities.
It’s tempting to let these opportunities pass, but you do so at your creative peril.
Another great creative stimulus is to regularly engage in conversations with people from whom you might normally recoil.
At times, a member of our group engaged in the graft so common to their experience.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Science of Stress and How Our Emotions Affect Our Susceptibility to Burnout and Disease – Brain Pickings”

In the immeasurably revelatory The Balance Within: The Science Connecting Health and Emotions, Sternberg examines the interplay of our emotions and our physical health, mediated by that seemingly nebulous yet, it turns out, remarkably concrete experience called stress.
The same parts of the brain that control the stress response play an important role in susceptibility and resistance to inflammatory diseases such as arthritis.
We are even beginning to sort out how emotional memories reach the parts of the brain that control the hormonal stress response, and how such emotions can ultimately affect the workings of the immune system and thus affect illnesses as disparate as arthritis and cancer.
This is where stress comes in – much like memory mediates how we interpret and respond to various experiences, a complex set of biological and psychological factors determine how we respond to stress.
These effects of stress exist on a bell curve – that is, some is good, but too much becomes bad: As the nervous system secretes more and more stress hormones, performance increases, but up to a point; after that tipping point, performance begins to suffer as the hormones continue to flow.
Stress isn’t a direct causal function of the circumstances we’re in – what either amplifies or ameliorates our experience of stress is, once again, memory.
The most acute manifestation of how memory modulates stress is post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. For striking evidence of how memory encodes past experience into triggers, which then catalyze present experience, Sternberg points to research by psychologist Rachel Yehuda, who found both Holocaust survivors and their first-degree relatives – that is, children and siblings – exhibited a similar hormonal stress response.
In the remainder of the thoroughly illuminating The Balance Within, Sternberg goes on to explore the role of interpersonal relationships in both contributing to stress and shielding us from it, how the immune system changes our moods, and what we can do to harness these neurobiological insights in alleviating our experience of the stressors with which every human life is strewn.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Simple Way to Map Out Your Career Ambitions”

Get the experiences and create a personal experience map.
Create Your Personal Experience Map.Since the 70-20-10 ratio says that experiences best accelerate your development, you’ll want to understand which experiences will build your career and the few, most powerful experiences that can close your from/to gap.
A regularly updated personal experience map will help you chart your path.
A personal experience map shows which experiences you want to acquire in the next two to five years to grow your career.
The interviews will provide you with the raw material to create your personal experience map.
Your goal is to sort through this information to find the few experiences that will most accelerate your career.
Select four to seven functional experiences and three to four management experiences you believe will benefit you most and list them on your personal experience map.
The personal experience map is now your guide to continuously grow your high-performing self.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Do Scholastic Book Fairs Live Up to the Nostalgia?”

For some, Scholastic book fairs provided a distinct brand of uncontaminated joy that exists only in childhood.
I’ve spent my whole adult life chasing the high of a scholastic book fair.
It is with this high in mind that I walked into a Scholastic book fair at Woodfield Elementary, a school of about 300 students in Gaithersburg, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, D.C. When my tour guides, a pair of regional Scholastic sales representatives, arrived, they led me from the main office, down hallways covered in posters and drawings, to the library.
A person dressed from head to toe as Clifford the Big Red Dog, the star of a well-known Scholastic-made book series, waved his fluffy red paws enthusiastically.
Unlike the fairs I attended in elementary school, the sight was underwhelming.
Memories are notoriously malleable, and my recollection of Scholastic book fairs had become warped over the years.
I didn’t have much time to process my reaction anyway, because the students, a group of fourth graders, wanted to give me a tour of the fair and talk about their favorite books.
There were Picture Books, for the younger readers; Chapter Books, for older readers ready for some narrative; Friendship Tales, stories of kids and their furry companions; Fearless, stories of adventure and survival; Fun Facts, for a hint of science; and Girl Power!, a section I didn’t remember from my own experience.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Go See a Movie by Yourself”

Too young to go to a movie alone and too old to go with my parents, I asked my friend Amanda to go see it with me.
I decided right then that the best way to see a movie was alone.
Now I’m 29 and I will only see movies with other people if there are extenuating circumstances.
Watching a movie is best as a solitary experience, which is something that we just need to admit to ourselves.
Going to dinner and a movie is still heeded as an ideal date.
Whenever I watch a movie with someone else, I find myself watching it through their eyes and brains and emotions in addition to my own.
I want my first impression of a movie to be filtered through my brain and my brain only.
Are you wondering if there is a single correct way to go to the movies? Of course there is.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Will Guidara spends 5 percent of company budget foolishly”

4 minute Read. Years ago, a family of four from Spain spent the last night of their New York City vacation with us at Eleven Madison Park, at the height of the holiday season.
A chauffeur-driven SUV greeted them after their meal was over and whisked them away for a night of revelry in Central Park.
Before we get into the 5% side of the equation, let’s look at the other 95%. To the general public, Eleven Madison Park is known as a standard-bearer for fine dining, for earning four stars from the New York Times, and three stars from the Michelin Guide.
Those who have dined with us, at Eleven Madison Park and our other restaurants, know that we are also surprisingly fun.
If you join one of our weekly business meetings, you’d see some of the same people who “Host the party” every night in our dining rooms breaking down the bottom line with Terminator-like efficiency.
At Eleven Madison Park, we employ two “Dreamweavers,” whose job it is to create experiences comparable to what we did for that Spanish family.
It’s what makes our restaurants and our company such fun places to serve and be served.
Will Guidara is the co-owner of Make It Nice, a hospitality group that currently includes Eleven Madison Park, the NoMad restaurants, and Made Nice..

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Museums of Instagram”

Candytopia doesn’t purport to be a museum, exactly, or an amusement park, or a retail location.
Some explicitly brand themselves as museums, and others shy away from the term, but they’re all exhibits of sorts that are also mostly a series of backdrops for Instagrams.
What the creators of these experiences have realized is that a lot of people want to take pictures of themselves in a museum, without going to a traditional museum.
Opening soon in New York: Human’s Best Friend, a dog-themed pop-up, as well as the Museum of Pizza.
The pop-ups, above all, are a bright series of backgrounds for photographs, which is what a lot of traditional museums have started to become.
Some museums pander to the Instagram habit-or at least unwittingly encourage it-by using splashy technology.
See: augmented reality for the René Magritte exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Art; virtual reality for Bodys Isek Kingelez at MoMA, in New York.
Winky Lux, a makeup brand, raised six million dollars in venture capital for a series of “Experience-first retail plans.” The founder pitched the Winky Lux Experience as what you’d get “If Sephora and the Museum of Ice Cream had a baby.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Our inner narrator gives us continuity and a sense of self”

Do people in adulthood experience inner speech in the same way as children – or even as each other? Do most of us even have an inner voice – an internal commentator narrating our lives and experiences from one moment to the next?
Now, with DES, Hurlburt believes in the possibility of obtaining unbiased, accurate snapshots of inner experience that includes inner speech.
Noted consciousness researcher Bernard Baars has asserted that ‘overt speech takes up perhaps a tenth of the waking day; but inner speech goes on all the time’.
Hurlburt’s research shows this isn’t true; he finds that inner speech consumes about 25 per cent of an average person’s day, and thus, he is careful to not communicate any assumption about what type of inner experience a DES interviewee may have had at the time of the beep.
After the private speech of childhood has finally been internalised, suggests Fernyhough, inner speech emerges in a multiplicity of ways – each comparable to speech spoken out loud.
Fernyhough calls the most familiar level of inner speech ‘expanded’ because it is basically the same as external speech – grammatical and fully formed, but not vocal.
Condensed inner speech is defined as a highly abbreviated and ungrammatical version of regular speech.
Some people passively experience inner speech in voices not their own – essentially as auditory hallucinations that they cannot control.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Walt Disney’s Disneyland is a master class in experience design”

Created by Walt Disney in 1955, Disneyland has been a magical destination for kids and adults alike for the past 63 years.
Written by Chris Nichols, an architectural historian, preservationist, writer, and Disneyland fanatic, the book touches on everything from Disney’s involvement in the park’s development to the famous designers and engineers who built it.
Disneyland was different from the other theme parks 0f the era because it was designed to be more like a World’s Fair than a carnival.
Rather than showing off different country’s achievements, Disneyland instead focused on some of the most foundational American stories of the last century-fairy tales, fantasy, and science fiction-all told through immersive experiences, decades before virtual reality became a thing.
It’s true-unlike some other Southern California theme parks, notably Universal Studios, Disneyland doesn’t feel like a mall.
Even if Disney didn’t want his park to feel like a mall, the place was exquisitely gifted at convincing visitors to open their wallet-which remains true today.
The key? A wearable called the MagicBand, currently available at Disney World in Florida, that makes the park’s many attractions more interactive-and attempts to ease many of the user experience headaches the park’s popularity causes, like long lines and throngs of people.
Ultimately, the goal is the same: to create such a seamless user experience for visitors so that they continue to come back to the park and spend money buying tickets, food, and merchandise.

The orginal article.