Summary of “I downloaded all my Facebook data”

Those are just a few of the details contained in the archive of my Facebook history, which I downloaded on Monday.
My Facebook is basically a mausoleum of my 20s; a repository of old photos, status updates and conversations with people who have drifted out of my life.
Looking through your downloaded data reveals certain information you ordinarily wouldn’t see.
Facebook assigns one of two labels to what it calls your Friend Peer Group: Starting Adult Life or Established Adult Life.
Facebook doesn’t appear to classify your face into categories like Adult Face That’s Starting to Look Old but I wouldn’t put it past them.
If you haven’t downloaded your Facebook history I highly recommend doing so.
Seeing your digital life organised into folders is something of a wakeup call, particularly when you realise the data Facebook lets you download is just the tip of the iceberg of what it knows about you.
After looking through my Facebook history, I felt inspired to archive my entire digital footprint.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook rolls out job posts to become the blue-collar LinkedIn”

Businesses will be able to post job openings to a Jobs tab on their Page, Jobs dashboard, Facebook Marketplace, and the News Feed that they can promote with ads.
Job seekers can discover openings, auto-fill applications with their Facebook profile information, edit and submit their application, and communicate via Messenger to schedule interviews.
TechCrunch first spotted Facebook testing the Jobs tab in late 2016 before it rolled out in the U.S. and Canada last year.
Facebook partnered with ZipRecruiter to bring more job openings to its platform.
The Job posts rollout could help Facebook steal some of the $1.1 billion in revenue LinkedIn earned for Microsoft in Q4 2017.
“Troy, the owner of Striper Sniper Tackle. in North Carolina had trouble finding people with the specific skills he needed until he posted the job on his Facebook Page. He received 27 applications immediately, and hired 10 people” Facebook writes.
Those jobs probably wouldn’t appeal to LinkedIn users, and some of those who applied probably didn’t think they were job hunting when they opened Facebook.
Referencing the Community Boost program that trains businesses and job seekers to better use the Internetincluding Facebook.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook’s plan to unite AR, VR and News Feed with 3D posts”

Now Facebook 3D posts support the industry standard glTF 2.0 file format, allowing for textures, lighting and realistic rendering of rough or shiny objects.
New Graph API endpoints let developers build 3D modeling apps or even 3D cameras that directly share to the News Feed and make websites that show up as 3D posts.
Users can take 3D posts and bring them into Facebook Spaces, its social VR hangout rooms.
You could make a metallic personalized chess piece in a 3D modeling app, share it straight to News Feed and then bring it into Facebook Spaces, where you could play with it as part of the playground’s native chess board.
“We’re trying to make 3D a native part of the Facebook ecosystem. Stage 3 is getting these 3D objects into AR,” says Facebook’s creative director for social VR, Ocean Quigley.
“We’re trying to lay the foundational steps so Facebook can go with users into their 3D worlds of VR and AR.”.
If you have a 3D object in another format, Facebook is open sourcing converters on GitHub so you can port them to Facebook’s preferred file type.
“In the future, we envision a seamless digital world where people can share immersive experiences and objects like these across VR, AR and Facebook News Feed,” Facebook product manager Aykud Gönen writes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The #1 reason Facebook won’t ever change – Om Malik”

The collective outrage over Facebook and its actions might result in a lot of talk, but it won’t really change Facebook, its ethos, and its ethics.
Just look at these charts and you start to see why Facebook is addicted to growth and engagement.
Time spent on Facebook means that’s attention not spent on Twitter, Snapchat, or anyone else who dares to compete with them.
I don’t think this change of heart on the part of Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg is not altruistic.
The VPN data also allows Facebook to better target its ads – much like how Google Mail and Google Chrome allows Google to better target what ads you see.
Facebook needs to find more high-value customers in the hordes of users in Asia, Africa, and LatAm.
Facebook’s ultimate goal is to make it expensive to buy hyper-personalized advertising – which is the Mount Olympus of advertising – and I am not surprised that Facebook is thinking about releasing touch screen smart speakers.
Facebook is about making money by keeping us addicted to Facebook.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Aggregator Paradox – Stratechery by Ben Thompson”

The implication of Facebook and Google effectively taking all digital ad growth is that publishers increasingly can’t breathe, and while that is neither company’s responsibility on an individual publisher basis, it is a problem in aggregate, as Instant Articles is demonstrating.
A core idea of Aggregation Theory is that suppliers – in the case of Google and Facebook, that is publishers – commoditize themselves to fit into the modular framework that is their only route to end users owned by the aggregator.
For all of the criticism Facebook has received for its approach to publishers generally and around Instant Articles specifically, it seems likely that the company’s biggest mistake was that it did not leverage its power in the way that Google was more than willing to.
Beginning Thursday, Google Chrome, the world’s most popular web browser, will begin flagging advertising formats that fail to meet standards adopted by the Coalition for Better Ads, a group of advertising, tech and publishing companies, including Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc. Sites with unacceptable ad formats-annoying ads like pop-ups, auto-playing video ads with sound and flashing animated ads-will receive a warning that they’re in violation of the standards.
Nothing quite captures the relationship between suppliers and their aggregator like the expression of optimism that one of the companies actually destroying the viability of digital advertising for publishers will actually save it; then again, that is why Google’s carrots, while perhaps less effective than its sticks, are critical to making an ecosystem work.
There is no better example than Google’s actions with AMP and Chrome ad-blocking: Google is quite explicitly dictating exactly how it is its suppliers will access its customers, and it is hard to argue that the experience is not significantly better because of it.
At the same time, what Google is doing seems nakedly uncompetitive – thus the paradox.
Yes, consumers are giving up their data, but even there Google has the user experience advantage: consumer data is far safer with Google than it is with random third party ad networks desperate to make their quarterly numbers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why A.I. Researchers at Google Got Desks Next to the Boss”

A growing number of tech companies are pushing research labs and other far-reaching engineering efforts closer to the boss.
A year ago, the Google Brain team of mathematicians, coders and hardware engineers sat in a small office building on the other side of the company’s campus.
“Any C.E.O. thinks a lot about where people are sitting – who they can walk around and have casual conversations with,” said Diane Greene, who oversees Google’s cloud computing team and sits on the board of Alphabet, Google’s parent company.
Google is placing big bets on the A.I. being explored by researchers like Mr. Goodfellow.
These big companies are trying to duplicate the vibe of a Silicon Valley start-up, where the boss is next to everyone.
Ms. Greene, who was the chief executive of the software company VMware, said she had always made a point of sitting beside the top engineers because they saw the company’s future.
After Facebook went public and started a big push for revenue, important members of the ad team moved next to the boss, said Antonio García Martínez, who wrote a book about his experiences inside Facebook.
The boss is also showing them how important they are to the company.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook has a Big Tobacco Problem”

Facebook’s problems are more than a temporary bad PR issue.
Today, things unfold much more quickly, with a cohort of people publicly denouncing the effects of tech to our children.
Nearly every week, we see Silicon Valley execs or funders voicing their concerns about the toxicity of our tech-dominated society - especially our addiction to social media, and Facebook in particular.
“The short-term, dopamine-driven feedback loops we’ve created are destroying how society works. No civil discourse, no cooperation; misinformation, mistruth. And it’s not an American problem - this is not about Russians ads. This is a global problem.”Even Sean Parker, who played a major role in the creation of Facebook, had his epiphany.
That’s going to get you to contribute more content, and that’s going to get you more likes and comments.
The threat, according to McNamee, actually involves the entire tech world, and he referred to an open letter to Apple from the investment firm Jana Partners and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System saying Apple must do more to help children fight addiction to its devices.
One of the latest initiatives involves a bunch of Facebook and Google alums who joined the Center for Humane Technology.
True to the company’s hyper-centralized culture, its top management hired a full-time pollster to assess damages inflicted on the image of Mark Zuckerberg himself, and the other, more human face of the company, COO Sheryl Sandberg.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Facebook for old people? Over-55s flock in as the young leave”

In 2018, 2.2 million 12- to 17-year-olds and 4.5 million 18- to 24-year-olds will regularly use Facebook in the UK, 700,000 fewer than in 2017, as younger users defect to services such as Snapchat, according to eMarketer.
A surge in older users means over-55s will become the second-biggest demographic of Facebook users this year.
The report says that while Facebook has so far been successful in keeping hold of younger users shifting to services such as Instagram, which it bought in 2012 for $1bn, defectors are now increasingly heading to upstart Snapchat.
The largest growth will be among older users, with 500,000 new over-55s expected to join Facebook this year.
There will be 6.4 million 55- to 65-year-old-plus regular Facebook users this year, the biggest demographic save for 16- to 34-year-olds.
Last month, Facebook announced a major overhaul of its news feed algorithm to prioritise what friends and family share, while reducing the amount of non-advertising content from publishers and brands.
Last month, Facebook revealed a $4.3bn profit for the final quarter of last year, a 61% year-on-year rise.
Overall, Facebook remains the most popular social networking site in the UK by some distance with 32.6 million total regular users this year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Social networks are broken. This man wants to fix them.”

Ethan Zuckerman studies how people change the world, or attempt to, by using social media or other technological means.
Zuckerman spoke with MIT Technology Review about how social media started controlling us rather than the other way around.
The point in all of these is that if you can’t get social change done through the traditional model of civics, there is a whole new set of tools, and people are starting to learn how to use these things.
Social networks like Facebook and Twitter control, or at least direct, the information we see by using algorithms to filter what we see in our feed.
We’re trying to make the case that you want those different social networks because you want more control over your filters about what you see and what you don’t see.
A growing chorus of former Facebook executives and investors have been speaking out against Facebook-saying, for example, that social media is “Ripping apart the fabric of how society works.”
You wrote a piece in the Atlantic that suggested a publicly supported social network as a potential solution to social media’s echo-chamber effect.
I could imagine an innovative European public broadcaster saying, “Maybe we build a social network that’s compatible with other social networks, has algorithms designed to help you tune whether you’re getting news about the world, news about your community, and makes those levers visible and controllable.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook hired a full-time pollster to monitor Zuckerberg’s approval ratings”

Part way through the interview process at Facebook, the recruiter told McGinn the company had something else in mind for him.
“Not just him in the abstract, but do people like Mark’s speeches? Do they like his interviews with the press? Do people like his posts on Facebook? It’s a bit like a political campaign, in the sense that you’re constantly measuring how every piece of communication lands. If Mark’s doing a barbecue in his backyard and he hops on Facebook Live, how do people respond to that?”.
The company declined to comment on McGinn’s role, but the polling was not designed to influence Facebook products or policies, a spokesman said, and no specific changes have resulted from it.
“Mark has 60 percent voting rights for Facebook. So you have one individual, 33 years old, who has basically full control of the experience of 2 billion people around the world. That’s unprecedented. Even the president of the United States has checks and balances. At Facebook, it’s really this one person.”
The poll, which surveyed 2,000 Americans using Google Consumer Surveys, asked respondents to evaluate a list of companies and mark which ones “Are having a negative impact on society.” Among tech companies, 32 percent of Americans said Facebook is harmful.
“Is it because of fake news? It is because Facebook isn’t taking accountability? Is it because they’re addicted to Facebook? I’m interested in digging deeper, and seeing if that trust can be rebuilt. Everyone makes mistakes, but if you break trust and someone says, ‘I’m confident you will make this mistake again because you don’t share my values,’ that’s a harder thing for a company to overcome.”
McGinn says there are “Plenty of good people at Facebook trying to make a difference.” He doesn’t believe the company has acted with bad intentions.
“From a business perspective, Facebook has done phenomenally well. Facebook is a cash cow. But from a social perspective, those metrics could be inversely related. The more Facebook builds profit, the more it’s at the expense of the American people.”

The orginal article.