Summary of “Outrage at the family making $350,000 but “struggling” doesn’t help anyone.”

If you live in a house, your children likely go to a better school than the public school available to the children who live here.
So the question is, at $1.4 million, how much should a family earn, in salary, to afford this home? This smallish home, zoned for a below-average school, in a neighborhood that is not unsafe but is much less safe than other neighborhoods in the city.
70 for food PER DAY$400 for clothes PER MONTH$650 for vacation PER MONTH$500 for entertainment PER MONTH. These people aren’t struggling.
Take the food budget: $70 per day for a family of four works out to less than $6 per meal per person.
Try living on $14k/yr SSDI!- Rachel Wolf October 1, 2019 It should be noted that there is no actual family chronicled here.
The source is a blogger named Sam Dogen who constructed a supposed ledger as “An example budget of a dual-income household with two kids.” Dogen, who blogs at a site called Financial Samurai, told me he modeled it after “An aspirational budget that I would consider having if I have two kids and stayed in San Francisco, where I’ve lived since 2001.” He came up with the $350,000 family salary based on a recent report indicating that the median home in San Francisco would require a minimum salary of $343,420.
No amount of real anger at a fake budget will change the reality that housing prices in many places are so high that, yes, if you’re not making what seems to be an obscene amount of money, you can’t afford to live what has long been the definition of a middle-class existence.
Could our fictional family move to Muskegon, Michigan, instead of living in an expensive city? Sure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Forensic Scientists at the Falfurrias, Texas Border Help Families Find Answers and Closure”

Ever since the family had come to the United States from Mexico in 1997, when Christian was eight, Zaira was three, and their younger brother, Gustavo, was only eleven months, the Gonzalezes had worked to build a life in Texas that was more solid than the one they had on a chicken farm outside Monterrey.
On weekends, Christian four-wheeled through the piney woods of east Texas or watched romantic comedies with Lizz, who never complained when he wanted to see Sweet Home Alabama for the hundredth time.
Christian signed the forms necessary to get himself out of jail and onto a bus headed for Reynosa, Mexico, just across the border.
Still, Christian told Zaira he found it difficult to fit in.
Christian had found a coyote to help him swim across the Rio Grande.
The coyote had warned Christian’s parents not to call the police, or they too might be arrested, according to Zaira.
Bolstered by the security of a new program called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, which temporarily protected her and her younger brother from deportation, Zaira vowed to keep searching for Christian and asking others for help.
She arranged with Kate Spradley for the funeral home to pick up the small box of Christian’s remains and organized a small fundraiser to help pay for the funeral costs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mortal Remains”

The first week of April 2005 was dominated by images of Pope John Paul II’s dead body vested in red, mitred and laid out among his people with bells and books and candles, blessed with water and incense, borne from one station to the next in what began to take shape as a final journey.
In the past 50 years, cremation in North America has become synonymous with disappearance, not so much an alternative to burial or entombment, rather an alternative to having to bother with the dead body.
The biggest change, Mr Duffey said, is that as more families choose cremation – close to 70 per cent in some parts of the West – services have become less sombre because there is not a dead body present.
With no practical obligations to deal with around her mother’s dead body, O’Rourke has spent the intervening year searching out metaphors and resources and do-it-yourself ceremonials – the ubiquitous ‘celebration of life’.
Whereas in England, cremation is now the norm and the living can accompany their dead to the crematorium, in North America where the tendency is to separate the disposition of the body from commemorative rituals, the cremation is accomplished often out-of-sight, off-site, with convenience, cost containment, and industrial efficiency, while the living gather later and elsewhere for their own purposes.
While the dead can be pictured and imagined and conjured by symbol and metaphor, photo and recording, our allegiance and our primary obligations ought to be to the real rather than to the virtual dead. Thus, on my short list of the essential elements of the good funeral, the presence of the dead is the first and definitive element.
Memorial services, celebrations of life, or variations on these commemorative events – whether held sooner or later or at intervals or anniversaries, in a variety of locales – while useful socially for commemorating the dead and paying tribute to their memories, lack an essential manifest and function: the disposition of the dead. The option to dispose of the dead privately, through the agency of hirelings, however professional they might be, and however moving the memorial that follows, is an abdication of an essential undertaking and fundamental humanity.
If no one cares, if there is no one to mark the change that has happened, if there is no one to name and claim the loss and the memory of the dead, then the dead assume the status of Bishop Berkeley’s tree falling noiselessly in the forest: if no one hears it, it did not fall, it never was.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Pepe Aguilar’s ‘Rodeo Without Borders’ evokes old Mexico, with touches of L.A.”

In a city that loves rags-to-riches stories, few can match the saga of Pepe Aguilar and his family.
The Aguilar family toured from New York City to Puerto Rico to Idaho but found their most devoted fans in L.A., where Mexican Americans saw themselves in the U.S.-born Pepe, who adopted his father’s stage act and expanded it into his own.
Non-Latino workers at Staples Center looked on in bemusement in June at the arrival of Jaripeo Sin Fronteras, Pepe’s update of his family’s road show, now also starring his brother, Antonio Aguilar Jr.; a son, Leonardo; and a daughter, Ángela.
The wholesome nature of the show – there’s enough corny banter between Pepe and his family to pat out a tortilla – is not as hip as the output of Los Tigres del Norte or Vicente Fernández, who command larger followings and mainstream attention that has largely eluded the Aguilars.
Born in San Antonio in 1968 while his parents were on tour, Pepe has sold more than 15 million records and won four Grammys for his music, which skews toward romantic ballads but also incorporates Mexican classics, cumbias, and even rock en español.
Pepe Aguilar riffs on the guitar with his son, Leonardo Aguilar, as they get ready to work on Leonardo’s upcoming album.
Though the Aguilars maintained a ranch in Zacatecas, Pepe said he has “Always looked at L.A. as a home.” He relocated to Los Angeles 13 years ago to give his family not just easier access to the entertainment industry but, more important, a “Mixed multicultural experience every second, every minute on every street and restaurant.”
Ranchera superstar Pepe Aguilar walks backstage at Staples Center as he prepares to perform.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Original New Orleans Diva”

As a girl Adelaide attended Catholic school at the famous Our Mother of Perpetual Help Chapel, a now-deconsecrated residence better known today as the former home of other larger-than-life New Orleanians, including Nicolas Cage and Anne Rice.
Adelaide was a striking redhead, widely lauded as one of the most beautiful women in New Orleans.
Adelaide dancing with William E. Bergman, an architect who designed the City Hall in New Orleans.
She still tended the books for quite some time, but as the family business continued its upward swing, a new accountant was hired, and Adelaide briefly dated him.
Everyone from “Perry Mason” star Raymond Burr to Jim Nabors of “The Andy Griffith Show” celebrated the spirit of the city in Adelaide’s Garden District abode and let that ebullience overflow to Mardi Gras parades, when they’d regally sit atop floats rolling down St. Charles Ave.A party in Adelaide’s Garden District home.
Even among New Orleans standards, Adelaide was known as a bon vivant of the highest order.
As she got older, Ti was frequently tasked with helping Adelaide run errands for the restaurants because Adelaide did not drive, despite being one of the most independent women in New Orleans.
According to Ti and Lally, a doctor had called the home asking for Adelaide, and when Ella answered the phone,he told her of Adelaide’s terminal diagnosis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Crown Jewel: How Olivia Colman Is Reinventing Superstardom”

Colman and Sinclair met as young actors in Cambridge: He was at the university, and she was living in the town, working as a house cleaner, a job she loved.
Cleaning houses let her stay in town, crashing lectures, and, on a whim, auditioning for student-theater productions.
Colman worked as a temp and cleaner in London while Sinclair finished his Cambridge degree; when he went on to the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, she followed him, still smitten, assuming that she wasn’t drama-school material herself.
As he brought friends by for dinner Colman found she loved hearing about their work at school.
It has become an irresistible irony that Colman, the house cleaner who tagged along to Bristol with her drama-school boyfriend, is now the family’s star actor and its lead breadwinner, too.
In a notoriously peripatetic profession, Colman has remained close to home; Them That Follow, filmed in Ohio, was her first production in America, and her two weeks on set was the longest she has spent away from her family.
It’s partly on account of her family that Colman does less theater than she used to-a loss in the eyes of many.
A theatrical run, which provides off-time during the day, is great when there’s a baby in the house, Colman explains, but now that her kids span between kindergarten age and the early teens, it keeps her from tucking them into bed-a ritual she cherishes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Family’s Slave”

“Maybe your Mom and Dad won’t let me go home.”
The leap across the ocean brought about a leap in consciousness that Mom and Dad couldn’t, or wouldn’t, make.
My mom kept herself together enough to go to work, but at night she’d crumble in self-pity and despair.
Doods veered northwest on the Romulo Highway, then took a sharp left at Camiling, the town Mom and Lieutenant Tom came from.
The day before Mom died, a Catholic priest came to the house to perform last rites.
The priest asked Mom whether there was anything she wanted to forgive or be forgiven for.
Some of what I learned: She was mad at Mom for being so cruel all those years, but she nevertheless missed her.
A couple of hours later at the hospital, before I could grasp what was happening, she was gone-10:56 p.m. All the kids and grandkids noted, but were unsure how to take, that she died on November 7, the same day as Mom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Is the Cost of College Doing to Families?”

Caitlin Zaloom: College used to be a lot cheaper for families, because there was more funding from the government.
So middle-class families didn’t always have to pay for college with debt.
President Ronald Reagan’s budget director, David Stockman, said in 1981, “If people want to go to college bad enough, then there is opportunity and responsibility on their part to finance their way through the best way they can.” When those who argued that college is a private benefit framed it like that, it became logical to say that education should be paid for by the people that it benefits.
Pinsker: Many of the parents and children you interviewed about their college-related debt feared that they were being financially burdensome to their family members.
Across all of my interviews, it was so important to parents to enable their kids to move into open futures, not limited by the parents’ economic background.
Parents understand something profound about living in a powerfully unequal society.
Pinsker: The middle-class parents in your book generally didn’t talk with their kids about the financial strain of paying for college.
Why do you think parents so often avoid conversations about money with their kids?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a Chinatown-by-the-Sea Popped Up on the Jersey Shore”

Ng Shee went for a stroll in Bradley Beach, New Jersey.
“Two thousand dollars later, Lee B. Lok and family were ensconced in a summer bungalow of their very own in the village where twenty years before they would have been lucky to be able to rent some rooms over a store,” wrote Bruce Edward Hall in his Chinatown memoir Tea That Burns.
Lee’s lucky break paved the way for more Chinatown families.
Others bought along the same street, and soon, Newark Avenue became an equivalent to Mott Street in Manhattan; a mini, parallel Chinatown on the Jersey Shore.
While the Lees blazed the path of home ownership, the story of how Chinatown families started renting in Bradley goes much farther back.
The church owned a summer home named Cliff Villa in Bradley Beach, a tiny, mile-long town on the New Jersey shore.
Fresh Air families from Chinatown loved the experience so much-especially in the years before air conditioning-that they began to rent there on their own.
John Mok estimates that there are perhaps 15 to 20 families with roots in Chinatown who still own homes in Bradley Beach, a town just 11 by 7 blocks wide.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Amazing Resiliency of White Wealth”

White families quickly recuperated financial losses after the Civil War, and then created a Jim Crow credit system to bring more white families into money.
“Jim Crow Credit” The 1940s were also the period when white families were able to further enhance their wealth prospects through new credit and finance instruments created as part of the New Deal.
African American farmers and families were unable to establish the wealth that former slaveholding families were re-establishing, nor were they able to access the FHA and FSA loans at the same rates as whites.
White families had 40 years of unmitigated access to credit to build wealth through homes and to purchase luxuries on top of that.
“First, you legally segregate, and then you let the market do it for you” So just to run back the score: Southern slaveholding families were able to recuperate post-Civil War wealth losses within one generation, and by 1940 even those families’ grandchildren were doing better than their Southern peers.
Low-income and working-class white families are ushered into wealth via federally backed housing and farming loans and derivative lines of credit.
In order to create, lose, and then re-create wealth-and then create new forms of wealth for other low-income white families-white families leveraged social networks and credit.
Even if some white families lose some wealth in this exchange, that doesn’t mean that they couldn’t bounce back tomorrow.

The orginal article.