Summary of “The World’s Youngest Billionaires Are Shadowed by a WWII Weapons Fortune”

Enough remained for Viktoria-Katharina Flick and twin brother Karl-Friedrich Flick to lay claim, at 19, to being the world’s youngest billionaires.
The Flicks’ wealth traces its roots to Friedrich Flick, who spent three years in prison after he was convicted by the Nuremberg war crimes tribunal of using slave labor to produce armaments for the Nazis, among other crimes.
“Leaving aside all moral standards, Friedrich Flick had the genius ability to become the richest person in Germany-twice,” said Thomas Ramge, author of “The Flicks,” a family history.
Friedrich Flick and his youngest son, who became sole owner of the conglomerate, never did.
“Although there was still plenty to leave to the twins and his two other daughters.” When Flick died, he left behind $1 billion for each child, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.
Today the twins’ fortune is overseen by the Flick Privatstiftung, a Vienna- and Velden am Woerthersee, Austria-based family office.
Ingrid Flick once said she withheld a credit card from her teenage daughter, telling Germany’s Bunte magazine: “The kids have to learn that they’re nothing special, but that the name Flick obliges.
Even in death, Friedrich Karl Flick couldn’t escape the family’s notoriety.

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Summary of “America’s Elderly Are Losing $37 Billion a Year to Fraud”

Her family didn’t realize something was wrong until she started asking to borrow money, a first for a woman they admired for her financial independence.
One financial services firm estimates seniors lose as much as $36.5 billion a year.
Now co-chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Lachs says elder abuse victims-including those who suffer financial exploitation-die at a rate three times faster than those who haven’t been abused.
“Financial exploitation causes large economic losses for businesses, families, elders and government programs, and increases reliance on federal health care programs,” warned a 2014 elder justice report Connolly helped prepare.
In February, the Justice Department announced “The largest coordinated sweep of elder fraud cases in history,” charging more than 250 defendants with schemes that caused 1 million mostly elderly Americans to lose more than $500 million.
Thirty-nine of them and the District of Columbia addressed financial exploitation of the elderly in last year’s legislative sessions, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.
The dirty little secret about elder exploitation is that almost 60 percent of cases involve a perpetrator who is a family member, according to a 2014 study by Lachs and others, an especially fraught situation where victims are often unwilling, or unable, to seek justice.
While many families don’t intervene when they suspect a family member is abusing an elderly relative, Philip Marshall did, in a famous example of elder exploitation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Famous Soccer Player Hiding in Plain Sight in a California Bakery”

“Like LeBron James – he speaks about the president, the government,” Sukur said.
Sukur said recently he had a conversation with a friend, a Turkish television personality, and they agreed on how bad things were in Turkey.
“There are thousands and thousands of people living in this situation,” Sukur said.
“Last Friday my father says to my son, ‘I miss you,'” Sukur said in English, before turning to Turkish to finish the story.
Sukur sees himself as an immigrant, trying to build his own American dream for his family.
“At the moment there are a couple of investors,” Sukur said.
Like most of Sukur’s customers, not all the neighbors know who he is – or was.
“One of my neighbors came here to my bakery, and people were taking pictures with me,” Sukur said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cover Story: Janelle Monae on Prince, New LP, Her Sexuality”

As she sings on a song from her new album, Dirty Computer, “Let the rumors be true.” Janelle Monáe is not, she finally admits, the immaculate android, the “Alien from outer space/The cybergirl without a face” she’s claimed to be over a decade’s worth of albums, videos, concerts and even interviews – she is, instead, a flawed, messy, flesh-and-blood 32-year-old human being.
“I created her, so I got to make her be whatever I wanted her to be. I didn’t have to talk about the Janelle Monáe who was in therapy. It’s Cindi Mayweather. She is who I aspire to be.”
Janelle Monáe Robinson was born here on December 1st, 1985, to a mom who worked as a janitor and a dad who was in the middle of a 21-year battle with crack addiction.
Monáe soon passed a bigger audition, for the American Musical and Dramatic Academy, and headed to New York.
Simultaneously, Chuck Lightning, seemingly the more extroverted half of two-man funk act Deep Cotton, who make their own music as well as work with Monáe, grabs a bowl of quinoa from the kitchen as Monáe doles out decisions on which version of the “Pynk” video will be released.
Monáe recorded most of Dirty Computer here, in a small studio with Havana-inspired decor.
Monáe’s America is the one on the fringes; it accepts the outsiders and the computers with viruses, like the ones she thought she had. She understands the significance of now making her personal life a bigger, louder part of her art.
Still, Dirty Computer is meant to be a celebration, and if she loses a few people along the way, Monáe seems OK with that risk.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Japan’s Rent-a-Family Industry”

Nishida contacted Family Romance and placed an order for a wife and a daughter to join him for dinner.
Yūichi Ishii, the founder of Family Romance, told me that he and his “Cast” actively strategize in order to engineer outcomes like Nishida’s, in which the rental family makes itself redundant in the client’s life.
Ishii runs Family Romance alongside a talent agency and a tech consultancy, employing about twenty full-time staff members, seven or eight of whom work exclusively for Family Romance.
Of all the services offered by Family Romance, the most perplexing to me was “Rental Scolder.” Scolders are hired not, as I had assumed, by clients wishing to berate third parties but by people who “Made a mistake” and need help to “Atone.” One actor, Taishi, a mild-mannered forty-two-year-old fitness instructor, told me about his first such role.
The day before my departure, my real mother wrote me a wonderful e-mail, wishing me a good trip and alluding, as I knew she would, to one of our favorite books, “The Makioka Sisters,” a family novel written, in the nineteen-forties, by Junichiro Tanizaki.
In 1993, Misa Yamamura, a famous writer of detective fiction, published “Murder Incident of the Rental Family,” a mystery in which an elderly cancer patient avenges herself on a negligent son by mortgaging the family house and hiring a more attentive rental son, daughter-in-law, and grandson.
Thanks to Family Romance, someone like Kazushige Nishida, who loses his family, can rent a wife and a daughter, and, thereby, the comforts of home: varied pancakes, women’s voices saying “Welcome,” the occasional filial poke in the ribs.
Nine years ago, Reiko, a dental hygienist in her early thirties, contacted Family Romance to rent a part-time father for her ten-year-old daughter, Mana, who, like many children of single mothers in Japan, was experiencing bullying at school.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nothing Compares 2 U: the secrets of Prince’s original recording, unheard until today”

Thirty four years ago, when Paul “St Paul” Peterson was the singer in the Family, a band Prince had assembled, he was sitting in his mother’s house in Minneapolis when he received a tape containing Prince’s recording of a song he wanted Peterson to learn for the album he was producing for the group.
It was Nothing Compares 2 U. Prince’s recording went unreleased, the Family’s version became a barely heard album track, but Sinéad O’Connor’s smash 1990 reimagining let the world hear what is now acknowledged as one of Prince’s greatest songs.
Today, as Prince’s more electronic, rockier original is finally made public, Peterson – who has been married to Julie for 28 years – is back in his mother’s house.
Prince’s sound engineer, Susan Rogers, goes back further: she witnessed Nothing Compares 2 U’s birth.
In summer 1984, Prince was working in the Flying Cloud Drive Warehouse – his huge rehearsal space before creating Paisley Park – and was on “a creative roll, cranking out a song a day”.
“Simultaneously, his young housekeeper, Sandy Scipioni, had to leave suddenly to be with her family because her father died of a heart attack. Sandy ran Prince’s life. He kept asking, ‘When’s Sandy coming back?'”.
One day, he went into a room with a notebook and, within an hour, emerged with the lyrics to Nothing Compares 2 U. Rogers, who witnessed many such bursts of creativity, remembers, “The song came out like a sneeze.” As usual, she rolled the tapes as Prince laid down instrument after instrument, mixing and overdubbing in the same session.
A 7in picture disc is exclusively available via the Prince official store.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Some Said They’d Flee Trump’s America. These People Actually Did.”

Paul Kortman, who, with his wife, Becky Kortman, wrote “Family Freedom: A Guide to Becoming a Location Independent Family,” estimates that a family could travel indefinitely on $60,000 a year, a salary he says could be earned with a little ingenuity.
Mrs. Swenson, 34, a photographer, has an Instagram account and a YouTube channel called LetsAdventureSomeMore to document the whirlwind journey, and, perhaps, monetize it.
Mr. Swenson, 36, an accountant, bald with a full beard, wears a kilt.
Surprising EmotionsThe Swensons embarked on the trip as a sort of lemonade-from-lemons move after Mr. Swenson’s job relocated, his mother died and the family’s live-in child care moved out.
“We were like, ‘That removed all our obstacles,'” Mrs. Swenson said.
Even though social media is accessible from around the world, they were also relieved to escape what Mrs. Swenson describes as “a general feeling of anger and bitterness,” that had descended on the progressive Bay Area in the months since Mr. Trump became president.
Of course, sometimes people they meet abroad want to talk United States politics.
“We kind of put the kibosh on it,” Mrs. Swenson said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Last Scions of New York’s Basketball Family”

Bassy, as everyone in the family calls Sebastian, used to drive Eric around their neighborhood, showing off the same Maybach-borrowed from Jay-Z-that he would use on the spring day he graduated Lincoln High School and jumped straight to the pros.
One apartment over was Jamel Thomas, Ethan’s older brother and the first member of the Telfair branch of the family tree to break through on the court.
Eric, 21, and Ethan, 23, may represent the final generation of New York basketball royalty.
The message is clear: “The family is pushing the same dream on Ethan, and this kid is standing under a very big shadow,” Hock says.
The dream Eric and Ethan shared wasn’t the usual hoop dream, because the Marburys and Telfairs aren’t a regular family.
The older brother even dubbed Ethan “the best player in the family” in a New York magazine profile following the 2004 draft.
“He didn’t take basketball as seriously as Bassy when he was a child,” says Thomas, who would always tell Ethan to never compare himself to his brother.
Ethan’s first stop was at an unaccredited basketball factory in Las Vegas.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mormons’ Family Home Evening: An Antidote to Fast-Paced Living”

Vern Bengtson, a sociologist who ran a major study of at-home religious practices that spanned nearly four decades, called family home evening one of “The most successful [religious] programs fostering intergenerational connections and the nurturing of families.” This, at least, is the ideal.
Among some seasoned practitioners, family home evening has been called “The family fight that begins and ends with prayer.” The Mormon humorist Robert Kirby has referred to it as “Family home screaming.”
In 1915, the leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints recommended that church members arrange monthly “Home evenings” to strengthen family ties-a goal that many present-day Mormons consider to have been prescient, given the dramatic changes to family life that have come in the intervening century.
The leaders outlined a window of time “Devoted to prayer, singing hymns, songs, instrumental music, scripture reading, family topics, and specific instruction on the principles of the gospel and on the ethical problems of life, as well as the duties and obligations of children to parents, the home, the Church, society, and the nation.” As their vision suggests, family home evening wasn’t ever intended to be strictly religious.
One of family home evening’s best qualities is its ability to get each generation of a family involved, as one of us, David, can attest.
His late father lived with his family for 17 years and participated in more than 800 family evenings.
The central features of the family home evening are transferrable to families of other faiths or no faith at all.
Ultimately, what seems to matter most about family home evening is not the specific rituals, but that there are rituals at all-that a family decides to set aside a specific time of the week to gather and have a meaningful experience together.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The bottom line: One in three families can’t afford diapers. Why are they so expensive?”

Peel a diaper apart and you’ll find three inner layers.
A single dad in Chicago – an ex-convict trying to turn his life around for his young daughter – told news website ProPublica Illinois that the only diapers he could afford came from the dollar store.
The top manufacturers don’t publicly report profit margins on their diapers, and many insiders won’t discuss the bottom line.
Most families living below the poverty line rely on a patchwork of government assistance programs: Medicaid for health insurance; food stamps; and a program that provides healthy food to women, infants and children, known as WIC. Cash assistance is the only one that can go toward diapers, wipes and other essential baby supplies that aren’t food.
“People don’t talk about having enough diapers,” said Alison Weir, who oversees policy and research at the National Diaper Bank Network.
In a blog post, an advisor to then-President Barack Obama pointed out that families can be forced to choose between buying diapers and paying for food, rent or utilities.
In California, Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown recently approved $30 in monthly diaper benefits for families in the state’s cash welfare-to-work program.
Diaper banks are nonprofit organizations that provide free baby diapers and wipes to families in need.

The orginal article.