Summary of “Norway’s hidden scandal”

The family says Leen was never physically punished – and they believe the allegation of violence was taken particularly seriously because they were immigrants to Norway.
One journalist has calculated that children with a foreign mother are four times more likely than other children in Norway to be forcibly taken from their families.
Reidar Hjermann, the former Children’s Ombudsman, says no-one should be judged to be violent without evidence.
He also says: “When a family comes to Norway with a mother and father who have themselves been brought up with violence, then I think we should assume that we need to go to help this family to understand that where they come from, physical punishment is rather common, but in Norway it is absolutely forbidden.”
Katrin Koch, the head of the Child Expert Commission which the disgraced psychiatrist was a member of, says one reason for the disproportionately high number of immigrant families affected by care orders might be that Norway is “Quite a conformist country in many ways.”
“Another point would be that Norway is a rich country – and the richer you are, the less consideration you have to give to survival issues, and the more consideration you can give to an optimalisation of how children are to be raised.”
The Ministry of Children says it’s bringing in legal changes that will strengthen children’s and family rights.
“I’m at a loss for words, for the outrage,” she says, “Knowing other parents who have had lesser allegations and have lost children.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the shared family computer protected us from our worst selves”

Now, I’m almost 30, and during my childhood in the ’90s and early 2000s, the family computer was accepted as a beloved fixture, a pleasant epicenter of activity.
The dominion of the shared family desktop began to crumble sometime in the late 1990s, first with the rise of the affordable laptop that could be used in the comfort of your own bedroom, then in 2007, with the launch of the iPhone and the subsequent rollout of tablets.
While about half of us say we couldn’t live without our phones, a quick Google search will tell you that teens and parents are at war, and we need to make a family tech plan ASAP otherwise our kids will start school not knowing how to speak in full sentences.
Many of the digital anxieties we have today could, at least in theory, be addressed by returning to a single, shared family device.
The shared family desktop was vital to our lives, yet at the same time, it remained quiet and unobtrusive, serving the family unit proudly whenever called upon.
While the personal nature of devices today makes it easier to isolate and keep our online habits private, the shared family desktop offered a transparent and communal, albeit old-fashioned, approach to keeping parents more actively engaged in their child’s screen time by being around while their child used the internet.
Now, we find them glomming on to our routines: joining us for dinner or family strolls, going on vacations or out on dates with us, waking us up in the morning and tucking us in at night.
Though it was harder to come by, the computer time you ended up with on the shared family desktop was cherished and, maybe as a result, that much sweeter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Caucher Birkar, Who Fled War and Found Asylum, Wins Fields Medal”

This spring, not long after Caucher Birkar learned that he would be receiving the Fields Medal, the highest honor in mathematics, he shared a memory from his undergraduate years.
No two equations are exactly alike, but Birkar has helped reveal that many can be neatly categorized into a small number of families.
When Birkar was very young, he liked to be near his mother, Sakina, while she baked bread. She remembers a scene from when Birkar was about three.
Caucher Birkar was born in 1978, the third of six children.
The family was self-sufficient in a way that helped shelter Birkar from the worst of the tumult that engulfed the region during his childhood – the Islamic Revolution of 1979 and the brutal eight-year war with Iraq that soon followed.
Around fifth grade, Birkar started to notice mathematics.
Even in his first brushes with professional mathematics, Birkar wanted to do more than just admire other people’s discoveries.
During the year it took for the government to process his case, Birkar met faculty members at the University of Nottingham, where he enrolled after his asylum request was granted.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Where is Braves legend Dale Murphy now?”

IN THE YEARS after baseball, the Murphy kids don’t remember Dale bringing up the Hall of Fame, and with his next window of eligibility coming soon, it remains other people who talk about it most often.
Induct cheaters but also celebrate Dale Murphy for his 398 home runs and for the dozens he did not hit.
Dale says opening the email and seeing the attached drawing remains one of the great milestones of his life, like his wedding day or the birth of his children.
On a family vacation to Disney World, his kids spotted a man wearing a Braves No. 3 jersey and goaded Dale into introducing himself.
“It has been interesting to see him learn how to manage the Dale Murphy Persona,” Chad says.
Turns out, Dale liked those records he bought to find a common interest with Chad. Today he is a huge indie-rock nut, which surprises no one more than his own children.
Bassist Mike Mills wrote a song about Murphy’s failure to get into Cooperstown: “Forget all the liars, all the Sosas and McGwires … I wanna see Dale Murphy in the Hall of Fame.”.
“That’s because I’m just a kid,” Dale says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Refinery29, Kylie Jenner, and the Denial Underlying Millennial Financial Resentment”

Tweets and articles about money-about, say, how Kylie Jenner is a self-made billionaire, or how two rich college graduates chose their expensive apartment in Kips Bay, or how one young woman lives in New York on an intern’s salary and a generous parental allowance-have extended themselves, like steel rods, into our atmosphere of extreme inequality.
Forbes had published its Kylie Jenner cover, which featured a photo of the twenty-year-old in a suit jacket next to a tagline that announced her net worth-nine hundred million dollars-and proclaimed that she was on her way to becoming the youngest-ever self-made billionaire.
The column aims, very transparently, to turn financial voyeurism into ad revenue-it’s not a column about interesting people or about how to live on a tight budget-and the work-your-way-through-school plan went extinct in the nineties.
The problem is that these financial privileges are shrouded in such heavy dissembling, in an instinctive denial of what American wealth really is and what it really means.
According to new research, summed up in a recent Atlantic piece, by Adam Harris, forty-one per cent of white, college-educated families receive a significant inheritance; in contrast, just thirteen per cent of black, college-educated families do.
White families with an inheritance receive an average of more than a hundred and fifty thousand dollars, where for black families with an inheritance the average is less than forty thousand.
Underlying these outrage-bait money articles is another dismal generational reality that fuels our culture’s delusions about work and wealth.
These are young people who have grown up under such intense capitalist acceleration, such a swift erosion of the public safety net, that even those who have inherited wealth or remain on an I.V. drip of it will be able to genuinely feel that they are “Hustling.” People my age-even if they are lucky enough to receive chunks of family money that allow them to build up investments, or to put a down payment on an apartment in a major city-are still tied to a world in which work is increasingly unstable and incredibly demanding, a world in which basic expenses like health care grow more expensive every year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “6 things the happiest families all have in common”

Aren’t there some legit answers out there about what creates the happiest families? Yes, there are.
To get the facts I called Bruce Feiler, author of the New York Times bestseller, The Secrets of Happy Families.
Here’s what’s really interesting: recounting your family history is not just telling kids, “Our family is awesome.”
Bruce’s wife says it’s one of the best things they’ve done to make their own family life happier.
What can one of the best negotiators teach families about resolving those inevitable everyday squabbles of life?
A recent wave of research shows that children who eat dinner with their families are less likely to drink, smoke, do drugs, get pregnant, commit suicide, and develop eating disorders.
If we work with our families and take small steps to try and make them better, we actually can make our families happier.
Families come in all different shapes and sizes these days and the world moves a lot faster than it once did.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What the Royal Family Really Costs British Taxpayers”

Buckingham Palace has released its annual accounts, revealing just how much money is being spent to maintain royal residences and lifting the lid on the royal family’s biggest spenders.
The royal family cost each British taxpayer 69 pence last year, with courtiers insisting the royal family is “Excellent value for money.” The royal family’s independent commercial property arm, the Crown Estate, also returned £329.4 million to the public Treasury in the last year, a £12.7 million increase from the year before.
The accounts also reveal that the Prince of Wales, who carries out the lion’s share of overseas travel and more engagements than any other senior member of the royal family apart from Princess Anne, is the costliest royal.
Charles spent £362,149 visiting India, Malaysia, Brunei, and Singapore aboard the RAF Voyager, the royal family’s jet.
He also used the royal train, the most expensive mode of transport, on seven occasions, with each journey costing in the region of £20k. Courtiers insisted both modes of transport were “Appropriate” given the nature of the trips where the Prince of Wales was representing the royal family overseas.
The couple carried out a number of official engagements around the country ahead of the royal wedding, funded by the Prince of Wales.
One of the biggest feats will be relocating 10,000 pieces of art from the Royal Collection.
Some of the paintings and wall tapestries will be loaned to museums and art galleries, while others will be re-housed in other royal residences or kept in storage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sky-High Deductibles Broke the U.S. Health Insurance System”

When Carla Jordan and her husband were hit with a cascade of serious medical issues, she knew that at least her family had health insurance through her job.
Health plans similar to the Jordans’ that put patients on the hook for many thousands of dollars are widespread and growing, but some employers are beginning to have second thoughts.
“Why did we design a health plan that has the ability to deliver a $1,000 surprise to employees?” Shawn Leavitt, a senior human resources executive at Comcast Corp., said at a conference in May. “That’s kind of stupid.” A handful of companies, including JPMorgan Chase & Co. and CVS Health Corp., have recently announced plans to reduce deductibles or cover more care before workers are exposed to the cost.
Half of all workers now have health insurance with a deductible of at least $1,000 for an individual, up from 22 percent in 2009, according to data from the Kaiser Family Foundation.
Carla’s job teaching computer science classes at a local high school gave them steady income and health benefits.
“I had one friend who was bankrupted with a health plan,” Gawande said at the Spotlight Health event in Aspen, Colorado, on Saturday.
About five years ago, CVS switched all of its 200,000 employees and their families to health-insurance plans with high deductibles.
She pointed out that health insurance companies’ stock prices, not to mention industry executive salaries, were both soaring, while the thousands of dollars in premiums she paid protected neither her family’s health nor its finances.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Coco” Is the Definitive Movie for This Moment”

One weekend last fall, my boyfriend, Andrew, whose favorite movies include “Deliverance” and the original “Texas Chain Saw Massacre,” went off to go see the Pixar movie “Coco,” by himself, and came back in a delirium of happy, wistful tears.
“It’s the best movie of all time.”
Eventually, Miguel realizes that Héctor is his real ancestor, and the movie sprints to a conclusion that’s as skillfully engineered to produce waterworks as the montage at the beginning of “Up.” But until the end, “Coco” is mostly, wonderfully, a mess of conflict and disappointment and sadness.
Before “Coco” hit theaters, it was easy to doubt that the movie would present Mexican culture as expansively and gorgeously as it does, with such natural familiarity and respect.
“Coco” is the first movie to have both an all-Latino cast and a nine-figure budget.
“Coco” is also a definitive movie for this moment: an image of all the things that we aren’t, an exploration of values that feel increasingly difficult to practice in the actual world.
“Coco” is a movie about borders more than anything-the beauty in their porousness, the absolute pain produced when a border locks you away from your family.
The thesis of the movie is that families belong together.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Overcome A Legacy Of Pain”

How An Alaskan Family – And Their Teenage Son – Overcome A Legacy Of Pain : Goats and Soda More than 50 years after the federal government forced hundreds of Alaska Natives into boarding schools, their descendants are haunted by – and trying to overcome -residual trauma.
The effects of Sam’s elementary school years didn’t go away.
In sixth grade, Sam’s parents transferred him to Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences, a private independent day school that gave him a scholarship.
At least once, Sam caught a pigeon and set it loose in the teacher’s lounge at school, but he didn’t get in big trouble.
As Sam made his way through middle school into high school, Jeremy saw new skills emerging in his son.
“In a lot of ways, Sam is a unicorn,” says Stacie Cone, an adviser at Sam’s school who has worked with him throughout high school.
Sam is spending the summer in Alaska, guiding with his dad. Sam traces his mother’s pain back to the same forces that his cousins are dealing with today in Alaska: cultural isolation and intergenerational trauma.
“Her parents’ generation were all sent off to boarding schools,” Sam explains.

The orginal article.