Summary of “”Coco” Is the Definitive Movie for This Moment”

One weekend last fall, my boyfriend, Andrew, whose favorite movies include “Deliverance” and the original “Texas Chain Saw Massacre,” went off to go see the Pixar movie “Coco,” by himself, and came back in a delirium of happy, wistful tears.
“It’s the best movie of all time.”
Eventually, Miguel realizes that Héctor is his real ancestor, and the movie sprints to a conclusion that’s as skillfully engineered to produce waterworks as the montage at the beginning of “Up.” But until the end, “Coco” is mostly, wonderfully, a mess of conflict and disappointment and sadness.
Before “Coco” hit theaters, it was easy to doubt that the movie would present Mexican culture as expansively and gorgeously as it does, with such natural familiarity and respect.
“Coco” is the first movie to have both an all-Latino cast and a nine-figure budget.
“Coco” is also a definitive movie for this moment: an image of all the things that we aren’t, an exploration of values that feel increasingly difficult to practice in the actual world.
“Coco” is a movie about borders more than anything-the beauty in their porousness, the absolute pain produced when a border locks you away from your family.
The thesis of the movie is that families belong together.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Overcome A Legacy Of Pain”

How An Alaskan Family – And Their Teenage Son – Overcome A Legacy Of Pain : Goats and Soda More than 50 years after the federal government forced hundreds of Alaska Natives into boarding schools, their descendants are haunted by – and trying to overcome -residual trauma.
The effects of Sam’s elementary school years didn’t go away.
In sixth grade, Sam’s parents transferred him to Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences, a private independent day school that gave him a scholarship.
At least once, Sam caught a pigeon and set it loose in the teacher’s lounge at school, but he didn’t get in big trouble.
As Sam made his way through middle school into high school, Jeremy saw new skills emerging in his son.
“In a lot of ways, Sam is a unicorn,” says Stacie Cone, an adviser at Sam’s school who has worked with him throughout high school.
Sam is spending the summer in Alaska, guiding with his dad. Sam traces his mother’s pain back to the same forces that his cousins are dealing with today in Alaska: cultural isolation and intergenerational trauma.
“Her parents’ generation were all sent off to boarding schools,” Sam explains.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My mom was on welfare, my dad was a hippie, and my grandparents were two of the richest people in Toronto”

My dad was doing primal therapy while my mother worked two jobs, as a representative for AAA and a department store clerk.
We moved into a one-bedroom apartment above a Chinese restaurant in Parkdale, where the air smelled of stale frying oil and my mother had to shove ­towels under the doors to keep the mice out.
The tension of balancing social expectations, racism, classism and family history grew stronger over the years as I became more aware of the opportunities I had that my mother didn’t.
Even with our newfound stability, I would often catch my mother sitting at the kitchen table late at night, trying to figure out which bills she could pay and which ones would have to wait.
My mom was smart and funny, and in those moments we were able to just enjoy being mother and daughter.
“Make sure those crazy white people don’t touch you,” my mother warned.
When my mother and I returned home to Toronto at the end of the summer, our cozy apartment seemed empty and isolated.
My mother now lives and works on an apple farm in Ohio surrounded by family.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Does the American Dream require a big American home?”

One of the most deeply-embedded pieces of the “American Dream” is the desire for a large, spacious home with lots of sitting rooms, corners, nooks, and crannies.
A research team affiliated with the University of California studied American families and where they hung out the most inside their homes, how clutter builds, and the general stress level associated with living big.
Families hardly used their yards, devoted money to renovating little-used areas of the home instead of fixing obvious problems, and relied on heating up frozen meals instead of using large and luxurious kitchens to cook.
It’s all too common to feel like our big homes represent our success or status in life.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median single-family home built in 2016 was over 2400 square feet.
In general, the larger the home the bigger the risk.
If owners of big homes lose their jobs, their homes don’t suddenly get cheaper.
Here’s the truth: The American Dream shouldn’t compel you to buy a home that you cannot afford or maintain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The cluttered lives of middle-class Americans ~ Get Rich Slowly”

Long-time readers are familiar with my decade-long war on Stuff.
While I still bring new Stuff into the house – Kim would tell you I bring too much Stuff home – I’m not nearly so acquisitive as I used to be.
Graesch continues: “We have lots of Stuff. We have many mechanisms by which we accumulate possessions in our home, but we have few rituals or mechanisms or processes for unloading these objects, for getting rid of them.” All of this stuff causes stress.
The push to become consumers, to value Stuff, starts at an early age.
There’s more Stuff available for kids than there was fifty years ago, and that Stuff costs less.
We’re guilty of stockpiling some stuff too.
Says Arnold, “There seems to be a kind of a correlation between how much Stuff is on the refrigerator panel door and how much stuff is in the broader home.”
Do you struggle with clutter? Is your home packed to the gills with Stuff? What steps have you taken to get rid of some of this crap? Or have you?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cleveland Cavaliers Kyle Korver plays through family tragedy”

PELLA, IOWA – ON a mid-March day in Central Iowa, Kyle Korver and his three brothers were watching the NCAA tournament together in the same room.
The dynamic two-man game from Kevin Love and Kyle Korver is flummoxing playoff opponents and reigniting Cleveland’s offense.
Kyle Korver was the surprise star of Game 4 for the Cavs, scoring 14 points off the bench and blocking a game-high three shots.
The family felt fortunate that Kyle had been in Portland so he could travel with Kaleb.
At the funeral, Kyle gave a moving eulogy at the church his family helped build, the oldest brother speaking about the youngest.
“Today is a day of harvest where we see the seed you have planted all these years,” Kyle said to his parents, fighting through tears.
ESPN Forecast: Can Celtics, Rockets hold on? Can Rockets beat Warriors without CP3? Trevor Ariza is easy to miss but shouldn’t be Answering the big questions in East finals The grief behind Kyle Korver’s playoff run 13 moments that help shape LeBron’s story NBA offseason guides for eliminated teams Tickets on Vivid Seats.
Kyle relies on his wife, Juliet, and the rest of the family for support.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The World’s Youngest Billionaires Are Shadowed by a WWII Weapons Fortune”

Enough remained for Viktoria-Katharina Flick and twin brother Karl-Friedrich Flick to lay claim, at 19, to being the world’s youngest billionaires.
The Flicks’ wealth traces its roots to Friedrich Flick, who spent three years in prison after he was convicted by the Nuremberg war crimes tribunal of using slave labor to produce armaments for the Nazis, among other crimes.
“Leaving aside all moral standards, Friedrich Flick had the genius ability to become the richest person in Germany-twice,” said Thomas Ramge, author of “The Flicks,” a family history.
Friedrich Flick and his youngest son, who became sole owner of the conglomerate, never did.
“Although there was still plenty to leave to the twins and his two other daughters.” When Flick died, he left behind $1 billion for each child, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.
Today the twins’ fortune is overseen by the Flick Privatstiftung, a Vienna- and Velden am Woerthersee, Austria-based family office.
Ingrid Flick once said she withheld a credit card from her teenage daughter, telling Germany’s Bunte magazine: “The kids have to learn that they’re nothing special, but that the name Flick obliges.
Even in death, Friedrich Karl Flick couldn’t escape the family’s notoriety.

The orginal article.

Summary of “America’s Elderly Are Losing $37 Billion a Year to Fraud”

Her family didn’t realize something was wrong until she started asking to borrow money, a first for a woman they admired for her financial independence.
One financial services firm estimates seniors lose as much as $36.5 billion a year.
Now co-chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Lachs says elder abuse victims-including those who suffer financial exploitation-die at a rate three times faster than those who haven’t been abused.
“Financial exploitation causes large economic losses for businesses, families, elders and government programs, and increases reliance on federal health care programs,” warned a 2014 elder justice report Connolly helped prepare.
In February, the Justice Department announced “The largest coordinated sweep of elder fraud cases in history,” charging more than 250 defendants with schemes that caused 1 million mostly elderly Americans to lose more than $500 million.
Thirty-nine of them and the District of Columbia addressed financial exploitation of the elderly in last year’s legislative sessions, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.
The dirty little secret about elder exploitation is that almost 60 percent of cases involve a perpetrator who is a family member, according to a 2014 study by Lachs and others, an especially fraught situation where victims are often unwilling, or unable, to seek justice.
While many families don’t intervene when they suspect a family member is abusing an elderly relative, Philip Marshall did, in a famous example of elder exploitation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Famous Soccer Player Hiding in Plain Sight in a California Bakery”

“Like LeBron James – he speaks about the president, the government,” Sukur said.
Sukur said recently he had a conversation with a friend, a Turkish television personality, and they agreed on how bad things were in Turkey.
“There are thousands and thousands of people living in this situation,” Sukur said.
“Last Friday my father says to my son, ‘I miss you,'” Sukur said in English, before turning to Turkish to finish the story.
Sukur sees himself as an immigrant, trying to build his own American dream for his family.
“At the moment there are a couple of investors,” Sukur said.
Like most of Sukur’s customers, not all the neighbors know who he is – or was.
“One of my neighbors came here to my bakery, and people were taking pictures with me,” Sukur said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cover Story: Janelle Monae on Prince, New LP, Her Sexuality”

As she sings on a song from her new album, Dirty Computer, “Let the rumors be true.” Janelle Monáe is not, she finally admits, the immaculate android, the “Alien from outer space/The cybergirl without a face” she’s claimed to be over a decade’s worth of albums, videos, concerts and even interviews – she is, instead, a flawed, messy, flesh-and-blood 32-year-old human being.
“I created her, so I got to make her be whatever I wanted her to be. I didn’t have to talk about the Janelle Monáe who was in therapy. It’s Cindi Mayweather. She is who I aspire to be.”
Janelle Monáe Robinson was born here on December 1st, 1985, to a mom who worked as a janitor and a dad who was in the middle of a 21-year battle with crack addiction.
Monáe soon passed a bigger audition, for the American Musical and Dramatic Academy, and headed to New York.
Simultaneously, Chuck Lightning, seemingly the more extroverted half of two-man funk act Deep Cotton, who make their own music as well as work with Monáe, grabs a bowl of quinoa from the kitchen as Monáe doles out decisions on which version of the “Pynk” video will be released.
Monáe recorded most of Dirty Computer here, in a small studio with Havana-inspired decor.
Monáe’s America is the one on the fringes; it accepts the outsiders and the computers with viruses, like the ones she thought she had. She understands the significance of now making her personal life a bigger, louder part of her art.
Still, Dirty Computer is meant to be a celebration, and if she loses a few people along the way, Monáe seems OK with that risk.

The orginal article.