Summary of “Tracking Down the $7.6 Million Teardrop Talbot-Lago”

Joe lives in a development a few miles west of the $15 million mansions lining the sea, on the workaday side of the Intracoastal Waterway.
Joe worked with his heirs to gain part ownership and traveled the U. S., interviewing past owners and authorities and tracking the car’s provenance.
Calling Joe a “South Florida hustler and con man,” they said they had only received $150,000 apiece from the sale of the Ferrari, while Joe took $2.4 million.
For two years, Joe went to work crafting a history of the Teardrop.
Somehow the stolen Teardrop had ended up in the hands of Joe’s friend turned enemy, who had sold it for more than $7 million to the novice collector.
Motor-­vehicle authorities contacted the Milwaukee police, who called Mueller-its rightful owner-and the FBI. Mueller, who was then working with Joe to find the car, demanded the return of the Teardrop.
After his arrest, he became cooperative, giving them the motor as well as his computers and files, which contained information tying him to what Joe believes is a $60 million network of international car thieves-all run by his former friend.
“I’ve been coming here for years,” Joe says, sucking down an oyster.

The orginal article.

Summary of “FBI Bigfoot file: He asked them to analyze hair 40 years ago and never heard back. Until now.”

Cue Byrne, who at the time was director of the Bigfoot Information Center and Exhibition in The Dalles, Ore.
Byrne didn’t know it then, but the FBI took his request seriously.
A man named Jay Cochran Jr., the assistant director of the FBI’s scientific and technical services division, agreed to test the hair and skin, granting Byrne’s request a special exception to department policy.
In the Bigfoot research community, Byrne is a living legend, a pioneer of the field, what fellow travelers call one of the Four Horsemen of Sasquatchery.
So it’s not that surprising that the FBI didn’t sneer at Byrne’s request and toss his letter into the trash, Krantz said.
In the mid-1970s, an erroneous entry in an Army Corps of Engineers atlas sparked rumors that the FBI had previously analyzed “Alleged sasquatch hair samples” and found that “No such hair exists on any human or presently-known animal for which such data are available.”
In his letters, Byrne asked the FBI to set the record straight.
Krantz said it’s possible the FBI had received so many questions about the Army Corps atlas entry that they acquiesced to Byrne’s request for testing to put an end to the theorizing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Spy Case That Made Adam Schiff a Russia Hawk”

The man who would finally secure Miller’s conviction in 1990-after three trials over the course of six years-was a young U.S. attorney in Los Angeles: Adam Schiff.
John Libby, a former federal prosecutor who worked with Schiff on the 1990 conviction, called Miller “a complete mess.” He was a “Goofball” and an “Idiot,” says a former FBI counterintelligence agent who worked the Miller case.
According to Sleeping With The FBI, a 1993 book about the Miller case by Russell Warren Howe, Ogorodonikov’s husband, Nikolay, was Jewish, and the family used an exemption allowing Jews to leave the Soviet Union permanently to re-settle in Los Angeles.
In August 1984, Ogorodnikov made her pitch, telling Miller that she worked for the Soviet government, and that it would pay him for classified FBI documents he could provide, given his position on the Soviet counterintelligence squad. Miller asked for $50,000 in gold and $15,000 in cash, put in three separate safety-deposit boxes in different banks as payment, according to the L.A. Times.
Schiff had never found Miller’s double-agent story convincing.
The case was a “Mammoth undertaking,” recalls Schiff, and “Certainly the most important one for the FBI at the time.” During preparations for the trial, he says, he came in contact with “Dozens and dozens” of FBI agents who had investigated Miller or worked alongside him, as part of what became, in essence, a crash course for Schiff in the Bureau’s counterintelligence mission and Russian espionage more broadly.
Schiff has thought back to the Miller case over the past two and a half years.
“Just like in the 1980s with Miller, the Russians looked for people with access to information, and they used a variety of different modalities to entangle them,” Schiff says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One Of The Biggest At-Home DNA Testing Companies Is Working With The FBI”

Family Tree DNA, one of the largest private genetic testing companies whose home-testing kits enable people to trace their ancestry and locate relatives, is working with the FBI and allowing agents to search its vast genealogy database in an effort to solve violent crime cases, BuzzFeed News has learned.
Federal and local law enforcement have used public genealogy databases for more than two years to solve cold cases, including the landmark capture of the suspected Golden State Killer, but the cooperation with Family Tree DNA and the FBI marks the first time a private firm has agreed to voluntarily allow law enforcement access to its database.
While the FBI does not have the ability to freely browse genetic profiles in the library, the move is sure to raise privacy concerns about law enforcement gaining the ability to look for DNA matches, or more likely, relatives linked by uploaded user data.
The Houston-based company, which touts itself as a pioneer in the genetic testing industry and the first to offer a direct-to-consumer test kit, disclosed its relationship with the FBI to BuzzFeed News on Thursday, saying in a statement that allowing access “Would help law enforcement agencies solve violent crimes faster than ever.”
While Family Tree does not have a contract with the FBI, the firm has agreed to test DNA samples and upload the profiles to its database on a case-by-case basis since last fall, a company spokesperson told BuzzFeed News.
Now, under the previously undisclosed cooperation with Family Tree, the FBI has gained access to more than a million DNA profiles from the company, most of which were uploaded before the company’s customers had any knowledge of its relationship with the FBI. Despite the concerns over privacy, officials at Family Tree touted their work with the FBI. “Without realizing it had inadvertently created a platform that, nearly two decades later, would help law enforcement agencies solve violent crimes faster than ever,” the company said in a statement.
Officials at Family Tree said customers could decide to opt out of any familial matching, which would prevent their profiles from being searchable by the FBI. But by doing so, customers would also be unable to use one of the key features of the service: finding possible relatives through DNA testing.
Under the arrangement, the company has also agreed to test DNA evidence for the FBI in its private laboratory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What if the Obstruction Was the Collusion? On ‘s Latest Bombshell”

Observers of the Russia investigation have generally understood Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s work as focusing on at least two separate tracks: collusion between the Russian government and the Trump campaign, on the one hand, and potential obstruction of justice by the president, on the other.
The investigation the F.B.I. opened into Mr. Trump also had a criminal aspect, which has long been publicly known: whether his firing of Mr. Comey constituted obstruction of justice.
Here’s the bottom line: I believe that between today’s New York Times story and some other earlier material I have been sifting through and thinking about, we might be in a position to revisit the relationship between the “Collusion” and obstruction components of the Mueller investigation.
The first is the sharp line between the investigation of “Collusion” and the investigation of obstruction of justice.
Third, against the backdrop of a hybrid investigation which was “Always about Russia,” let’s now revisit the sharp line between the collusion and obstruction investigations.
The theory goes that this pattern of conduct predicated a separate criminal investigation of obstruction.
Second, if it is correct that the FBI’s principal interest in obstruction was not as a discrete criminal fact pattern but as a national security threat, this significantly blurs the distinction between the obstruction and collusion aspects of the investigation.
The obstruction of justice statutes become, in this understanding, merely one set of statutes investigators might think about using to deal with a national security risk-specifically, the risk of a person on the U.S. side coordinating with or supporting Russian activity by shutting down the investigation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to be a Hacker? Go to Dallas.”

“Okay, what’s the first rule of this place?” he asks the crowd before answering his own question: “Don’t hack the venue!” This is the monthly meeting of the Dallas Hackers Association, the largest of the local groups-for there are many more than you would expect.
MoeBius has a cool handle, but she’s not a hacker.
Her lock-picking hobby quickly became a specialty and a draw, not just at DHA but at larger hacker conferences and local cybersecurity camps for kids that are run by local colleges and the Girl Scouts.
Like pickers, a skilled hacker can either safeguard people’s belongings or gain unwanted access to something they shouldn’t.
On the main stage, an anonymous hacker describes a recent exploit he discovered.
For its part, the Dallas FBI office says that the FBI doesn’t conduct any official outreach with groups like DHA. Which is interesting phrasing, considering the number of DHA hackers who say FBI agents have quietly approached them to either help with an investigation or to build a case on someone else.
There’s now a new generation that will continue to grow Dallas’s hacker culture: “We’ve seen parents who come to learn about information security so they can get their kids into it,” Wirefall says.
“Parents who actually want their kids to become hackers? That’s awesome.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How 1960s Film Pirates Sold Movies Before the FBI Came Knocking”

Even the FBI couldn’t kill his obsessive love for collecting movies.
In 1974 and 1975, at the behest of the Motion Picture Association of America, the FBI was knocking down doors to shut down the film collectors who sold movies from New York to Los Angeles.
“I ended up being an usher, then a manager, then I ran a theater of my own,” Wise said, explaining how he came to fall in love with movies in his small Virginia town Franconia, right outside of Alexandria.
Wise would travel about an hour to the major movie studios’ offices in Washington, D.C., twice a week to pick up new movies.
The FBI had been tracking a number of film collectors, dealers, and pirates during that period and From Russia With Love just happened to be one of the movies that were being traded.
The file also includes an interview with one of the film collectors that Wise sold movies to through listings in the movie magazines of the 1960s.
The demand for movies in the US and Britain was enormous, so filmmakers were constantly stealing ideas, and sometimes just making a physical film copy of a flick.
Most people are familiar with the controversies that surrounded the emergence of VHS-it was quite the scandal in the early 1980s that Americans might be able to record TV programs and movies right off their own TVs. The movies studios insisted that if VCRs had a record button, people would never pay for content anymore.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside Mueller’s FBI team”

Jennifer Edwards Submitted affidavit last October urging that the Papadopoulos case be kept under seal so FBI could interview “Certain individuals who may have knowledge of contacts between Russian nationalsand the [Trump] campaign.” Edwards added that she is assigned to the “Russian interference” part of Mueller probe.
Mueller has remained mum about the FBI contingent supporting his work.
Mueller’s spokesperson won’t even give an overall number of FBI agents on the case, though Mueller’s office willingly confirmed the new attorney hires and the transfers from other Justice Department offices, putting the team of prosecutors on full-time duty at 16.
Many of the FBI agents assigned to Mueller’s team have never been publicly identified, although some names have emerged in legal filings or been mentioned by prosecutors in court.
Members of Mueller’s FBI team have resumes as exotic and high-powered as the prosecutors who capture the limelight.
The team Omer Meisel Now the lead FBI agent on the Paul Manafort case, he came to the FBI in 1999 after stints as an investigator for the Securities and Exchange Commission and the National Association of Securities Dealers and was assigned to the FBI’s San Francisco office, where Mueller was then U.S. attorney.
“The two FBI agents were like Joe Friday, just the facts,” said another recent Mueller witness, who said an agent picked him up at a hotel a couple blocks from Mueller’s office and whisked him in through a garage.
Having FBI agents on hand obviates the need for any prosecutor to testify about what was said, but in the current probe also serves a second purpose: providing someone who could testify even if Mueller’s whole prosecution team was removed and replaced.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Did Two All-Americans Fall In With ISIS?”

How did these two gifted and hardworking young people come to their decision? Family, close friends, and acquaintances remain bewildered.
To some, their story is a cautionary tale of how social media and online recruitment methods could sway seemingly grounded young people toward dark sympathies.
In the fall of 2013, as a freshman at Mississippi State, Young went on a mission trip to Memphis sponsored by the Wesley Foundation, the college arm of the United Methodist Church.
The following fall, Young and Smith continued seeing each other.
As fall turned to winter, and things continued to deteriorate between Young and Smith, she shifted all her attention to Dakhlalla.
From behind bars, Young tried to convince Dakhlalla to corroborate her story that the two were traveling to Syria to do an expose on ISIS. Instead, he turned her letters over to the FBI and Homeland Security, who then shared them with prosecutors.
Over the course of a handful of phone conversations with Dakhlalla, a picture gradually emerged of two young people, both adrift, one fierce and assertive, the other impressionable and besotted.
The feeling of spiritual urgency-the beginning of the end of the world, according to the apocalyptic timeline-helps explain how Dakhlalla and Young were seduced by extremism so rapidly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Did Two All-Americans Fall In With ISIS?”

How did these two gifted and hardworking young people come to their decision? Family, close friends, and acquaintances remain bewildered.
To some, their story is a cautionary tale of how social media and online recruitment methods could sway seemingly grounded young people toward dark sympathies.
In the fall of 2013, as a freshman at Mississippi State, Young went on a mission trip to Memphis sponsored by the Wesley Foundation, the college arm of the United Methodist Church.
The following fall, Young and Smith continued seeing each other.
As fall turned to winter, and things continued to deteriorate between Young and Smith, she shifted all her attention to Dakhlalla.
From behind bars, Young tried to convince Dakhlalla to corroborate her story that the two were traveling to Syria to do an expose on ISIS. Instead, he turned her letters over to the FBI and Homeland Security, who then shared them with prosecutors.
Over the course of a handful of phone conversations with Dakhlalla, a picture gradually emerged of two young people, both adrift, one fierce and assertive, the other impressionable and besotted.
The feeling of spiritual urgency-the beginning of the end of the world, according to the apocalyptic timeline-helps explain how Dakhlalla and Young were seduced by extremism so rapidly.

The orginal article.