Summary of “”Female” Is Not a Musical Genre-It’s a Strength”

It’s an incredibly romantic declaration, but Mitski has admitted that most of her love songs are not about other people so much as they are about “Music and trying to pursue it and not feeling loved by it. A lot of the ‘yous’ in my songs are abstract ideas about music.” On “A Pearl,” she tells what seems this time like a human “You”: “Sorry I can’t take your touch.” The problem is that she’s been through a war that “Left a pearl in my hand and I roll it around every night, just to watch it glow.” And so our heroine rides solemnly into the sunset, away from the world of flesh and into the realm of creativity, art, and ideas.
Its lyrics are partially a collage of things disbelieving men have said to Camp Cope over the years, about how their success was the result of luck rather than hard work, about how they should book a smaller venue because they might not be able to fill up the room, about how promoters aren’t the ones at fault for booking all-male shows because there “Just aren’t that many girls in the music scene.” Drummer Sarah Thompson was astonished at the breadth of the song when Maq sent her the demo: “I was so impressed Georgia literally rhymed all these things.”
“The Face of God” is one of the most devastating songs the band has ever released, and although Maq wrote it before the #MeToo movement, the recent onslaught of similar stories gives the song a new power.
Nashville-born Allison had been playing guitar her “Whole life” and every summer attended the Southern Girls Rock Camp, where she was free to unleash her inner rockstar-“Every year I would get my hair done up in a mohawk, full-on teased and sprayed up”-she did not feel emboldened to share her songs with other people until college, because she “Didn’t feel like people would take it seriously.” But within a few years recording under the name Soccer Mommy, that has proved untrue.
At its most raging, Allison has said that the record is about “That feeling of wanting to be perfect but not being perfect.” Her songs are alive with the energy of a young woman realizing, after so many years of being constantly told otherwise, her faults are not her fault.
“Mary has a heart of cold, she’ll break you down and eat you whole,” Allison marvels, as friend-crush-struck as Kathleen Hanna is in “Rebel Girl.” “I saw her do it after school-she’s an animal.” Allison sings the song to a boy, but they’re linked in their mutual awe of Mary: “I wanna know her, like you.” It’s the most romantic song on the record.
The songs, she’s said, form “a nice mix of not giving a fuck and giving a fuck,” which feels like as good as any a description of what’s required for a girl who’s alive in the United States in 2018.
Decades of lazy “Women in Rock” articles have polluted the atmosphere so thoroughly that it seems impossible to talk about more than one female artist together without conjuring images of wind machines gently mussing tresses, leather pants, and god-awful adjectives like “Kick-ass.” I don’t want to suggest that all of these bands sound alike, or that they are the only exciting female artists making rock music, or that female is ever, under any circumstance, a genre.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Toastmasters public speaking champion Ramona Smith’s winning speech”

On Saturday, Ramona Smith was named the 2018 Toastmasters world champion of public speaking.
Smith, a 31-year-old high-school teacher from Houston, outlasted more than 30,000 other speakers from around the world over the six-month World Championship of Public Speaking competition, the largest of its kind.
Smith’s winning speech, titled “Still Standing,” explored how she found strength in the face of adversity throughout her life.
In an interview with Business Insider, Smith broke down the techniques she used in her speech and how they pushed her over the edge.
“Can you think of a time that life tried to knock you down?” Smith said in her speech, stopping for a beat and looking out into the crowd.
Asking questions draws the audience in and allows them to relate more to the speaker, Smith said.
Smith has absorbed lessons from countless public speakers on the professional circuit and in her local Toastmasters club.
Hettiarachchi recommends speakers open the palms of their hands to the audience to convey openness – something Smith did throughout her winning speech.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Suicide Survivors and How They Coped”

Some stories about suicide are hopeful: For every person who dies by suicide each year, another 280 people think seriously about suicide but do not kill themselves, according to data from the CDC and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
“People see stories all the time about those surviving breast cancer, heart disease and stroke, and we know what that recovery looks like-it helps people who are experiencing it, or someone whose mom just got diagnosed,” says Shelby Rowe, a youth suicide prevention program manager for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.
She often thought about how to turn ordinary scenarios, like waiting for the subway or crossing the street, into suicide attempts.
“It’s mind-bending how there’s such a gap between what works-suicide-specific treatments based on the best scientific support-and what’s actually done, which is to hospitalize and medicate,” says David Jobes, director of the Suicide Prevention Laboratory at Catholic University and a clinician for more than 30 years.
Another treatment, Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, is a 12-session talk therapy for those who attempted suicide that focuses on how they respond to stressful situations and manage their emotions.
Even though many mental health professionals would classify suicide as a public health crisis-it’s the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the CDC, and rates have risen in every single state except Nevada since 1999-studying it is not always a priority.
Last year, the National Institutes of Health spent more money researching asthma than suicide and suicide prevention.
She co-founded Prevent Suicide Pennsylvania, a statewide suicide prevention organization, and works as a suicide prevention trainer and speaker.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is What it Means if Slow Walkers Make You Furious”

Chances are you have felt it at least once in your life, if not every damned day: the bubbling rage working through your veins, filling your soul, consuming your being, as you find yourself trapped behind a slow walker.
While we often talk about sidewalk rage as an internal irk, or “Private mental venting that consists of irrational assumptions regarding other pedestrians,” the feelings can escalate through fantasies of “Violent acts against the inconsiderate sidewalk blockers” in some to “The overt expression of hostility and aggressiveness,” James notes.
For all most of us know about sidewalk rage, few understand where it comes from, or why some feel it more acutely-at times or always-than others.
Fast walkers often imply-if cheekily-that their rage stems from the fact that they are, in a cosmic sense, in the right.
They trot out studies that suggest faster walkers may be less likely to die of heart disease, develop Alzheimer’s disease, or see their prostate cancer worsen, and that slow walkers seem to die earlier than the fleeter footed.
Living in a city is hardly the only predictor of sidewalk rage, James says.
James seems to believe that sidewalk rage is a growing problem, which makes sense given the fact that modern life, especially in cities, is getting faster-and for many, more stressful.
It’s not too difficult to quell feelings of sidewalk rage in the moment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t worry about feeling sad: on the benefits of a blue period”

Negative moods correlated with low life satisfaction only in people who did not perceive adverse feelings as helpful or pleasant.
In a study published in 2017, Bastian and his colleagues conducted two experiments examining how this societal expectation to seek happiness affects people, especially when they face failure.
After completing the task, all the participants took a worry test that measured their responses to failing the anagram task, and filled out a questionnaire designed to evaluate whether societal expectations to be happy affected how they processed negative emotions.
‘The idea is that when people find themselves in a context where happiness is highly valued, it sets up a sense of pressure that they should feel that way,’ Bastian told me.
In the second experiment, 202 people filled out two questionnaires online.
The second – in which people were asked to rate sentences such as: ‘I think society accepts people who feel depressed or anxious’ – measured to what extent societal expectations to seek positive feelings and inhibit negative ones affected their emotional state.
As it turns out, people who thought that society expects them to always be cheerful and never sad experienced negative emotional states of stress, anxiety, depression and sadness more often.
‘The point is that when we try and avoid sadness, see it as a problem, and strive for endless happiness, we are in fact not very happy and cannot enjoy the benefits of true happiness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 10/10/10 Rule For Tough Decisions”

When people share the worst decisions they’ve made in life, they are often recalling choices made in the grip of visceral emotion: anger, lust, anxiety, greed.
How would you feel about that decision 10 minutes from now? “I think I’d be nervous but proud of myself for taking the risk and putting myself out there.”
How would you feel about it 10 months from now? “I don’t think I’ll regret this. I don’t. I mean, obviously, I really would like this to work. I think he’s great. Nothing ventured, nothing gained, right?”.
What we’re feeling now is intense and sharp, while the future feels fuzzier.
10/10/10 forces us to shift our spotlights, asking us to imagine a moment 10 months into the future with the same “Freshness” that we feel in the present.
Of course, we don’t check our emotions at the door of the office; the same emotion rebalancing is necessary at work.
If you’ve been avoiding a difficult conversation with a coworker, then you’re letting short-term emotion rule you.
If you’ve been chasing a hotshot job candidate, 10 minutes after you decide to extend an offer, you might feel nothing but excitement; 10 months from now will you regret the pay package you’re offering her if it makes other employees feel less appreciated? And 10 years from now, will today’s hotshot have been ?exible enough to change with your business?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cruel to be kind: should you sometimes be bad for another’s good?”

If positive encouragement doesn’t work, you might reverse strategy, making your friend feel so bad, so worried, so scared, that the only strategy left is that he starts studying like mad. Sometimes, the only way to help someone seems to be a cruel or nasty approach – a strategy that may leave the ‘helper’ feeling guilty and wrong.
Numerous studies of interpersonal emotion regulation – how one person can change or influence the emotions of another – emphasise the value of increasing positive emotions and decreasing negative ones.
Prior to play, participants were asked to read a personal statement ostensibly written by their opponent about a painful romantic breakup.
After practising alone for five minutes, participants were asked to decide how the game should be presented to their opponents.
Our study shows that the tendency to make another feel bad to help him succeed is far more prevalent when the provocateur feels empathy.
The participants’ actions were absolutely altruistic: they chose to induce emotions that they knew would be beneficial for their opponents to perform well in the games, while reducing their own chance of a prize.
Finally, what are the limits of affect-worsening – and can even the most well-meaning, altruistic person end up doing harm? It might be that being cruel is not necessary, and that we are mistaken to think that the other person needs to feel bad in order to achieve long-term wellbeing.
Even if cruelty is effective, is it really the most effective strategy of all? In our original study, participants did not have the option to induce positive emotions in the ostensible opponent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Recover from Romantic Heartbreak”

Yes, time helps, as does social support, but new studies are verifying that there are all kinds of other steps we can and should take to soothe the emotional pain we feel and expedite our recovery.
The premise of the study was that to recover from heartbreak we need to diminish our feelings of love for our ex-partner.
The goal of the study was to examine three kinds of emotional regulation strategies to see which of them would help heartbroken subjects reduce their love feelings.
In the second condition they were asked to reframe their loving feelings as less problematic.
The researchers found that only negative reappraisals were truly effective in reducing love feelings.
It is those very feelings of “Unpleasantness” that make it challenging to use negative reappraisals as a way to recover from heartbreak.
As a clinician, I’ve found that there are two things we can do to minimize these feelings of unpleasantness and thus feel freer to practice negative reappraisals of our ex.
To do so, we have to assert control and consciously and willfully prevent ourselves from making mistakes that will set us back and encourage ourselves to take steps that might feel unpleasant or counter-intuitive, but that will ultimately diminish our emotional pain and expedite our recovery.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Does Immersing Yourself in a Book Do To Your Brain?”

Drama makes more visible what each of us does when we pass over in our deepest, most immersive forms of reading.
These are the learned capacities that help us become more human over time, whether as a child when reading Frog and Toad and learning what Toad does when Frog is sick or as an adult when reading Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad, or James Baldwin’s I Am Not Your Negro, and experiencing the soul-stealing depravity of slavery and the desperation of those condemned to it or to its legacy.
What will happen to young readers who never meet and begin to understand the thoughts and feelings of someone totally different? What will happen to older readers who begin to lose touch with that feeling of empathy for people outside their ken or kin? It is a formula for unwitting ignorance, fear and misunderstanding, that can lead to the belligerent forms of intolerance that are the opposite of America’s original goals for its citizens of many cultures.
“What will happen to young readers who never meet and begin to understand the thoughts and feelings of someone totally different? What will happen to older readers who begin to lose touch with that feeling of empathy for people outside their ken or kin?”.
In what is surely one of the more intriguingly titled articles in this research, “Your Brain on Jane Austen,” the scholar of 18th-century literature Natalie Phillips teamed with Stanford neuroscientists to study what happens when we read fiction in different ways: that is, with and without “Close attention.” Phillips and her colleagues found that when we read a piece of fiction “Closely,” we activate regions of the brain that are aligned to what the characters are both feeling and doing.
In related work, neuroscientists from Emory University and from York University have shown how networks in the areas responsible for touch, called the somatosensory cortex, are activated when we read metaphors about texture, and also how motor neurons are activated when we read about movement.
Oatley and his York University colleague Raymond Mar suggest that the process of taking on another’s consciousness in reading fiction and the nature of fiction’s content-where the great emotions and conflicts of life are regularly played out-not only contribute to our empathy, but represent what the social scientist Frank Hakemulder called our “Moral laboratory.” In this sense, when we read fiction, the brain actively simulates the consciousness of another person, including those whom we would never otherwise even imagine knowing.
This emerging work on empathy in the reading brain illustrates physiologically, cognitively, politically, and culturally how important it is that feeling and thought be connected in the reading circuit in every person.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is compassion fatigue inevitable in an age of 24-hour news?”

There’s a clinical name for what Apathetic Idealist and many of us are feeling: it’s called compassion fatigue.
Psychologist Charles Figley defines compassion fatigue as “a state of exhaustion and dysfunction, biologically, physiologically and emotionally, as a result of prolonged exposure to compassion stress”.
As historian Samuel Moyn recently put it: “Compassion fatigue is as old as compassion.” And the anxieties that come with our awareness of compassion fatigue go back just as far.
Not long after compassion fatigue emerged as a concept in healthcare, a similar concept began to appear in media studies – the idea that overexposure to horrific images, from news reports in particular, could cause viewers to shut down emotionally, rejecting information instead of responding to it.
“The troubles blur. Crises become one crisis.” The volume of bad news drives the public to “Collapse into a compassion fatigue stupor”.
There is no compassion fatigue without compassion: the caregivers at risk see somebody suffering, and they want to reduce that suffering.
Shouldn’t we fight compassion fatigue because we worry that paralysis and apathy will make the world worse? I don’t hope to increase my empathy for its own sake, especially by way of nearby tragedies.
For her part, believed fatigue was a reasonable response to a barrage of terrible images: “Someone who is perennially surprised that depravity exists, who continues to feel disillusioned when confronted with evidence of what humans are capable of inflicting in the way of gruesome, hands-on cruelties upon other humans, has not reached moral or psychological adulthood.” In this view, compassion fatigue is a coming of age.

The orginal article.