Summary of “Chills and Thrills: Why Some People Love Music”

Importantly, these people are not “Amusic” – an affliction that often results from acquired or congenital damage to parts of the brain required to perceive or interpret music.
They simply don’t experience chills or similar responses to pleasurable music in the way that other people do.
It is possible that the pattern of brain regions specifically activated by music pleasure, including the connection from auditory regions which perceive music to the reward centres, are slightly different in these individuals than in other people.
While pleasure is a popular reason for music listening, we are also drawn to music for other reasons.
Insight into our uses of music is however being achieved via music psychology – a rapidly expanding field which draws on research across numerous domains including cognitive neuroscience, social psychology and affective computing.
In a study involving more than 1,000 people, Swedish music psychologist Alf Gabrielsson showed that only a little over half of strong experiences with music involve positive emotions.
It may be possible then for music anhedonics to still appreciate and enjoy music, even if their reward brain circuitry differs a little from those of us who can experience intense physical responses to music.
Of course, music anhedonics might still find music a useful way to express or regulate their own emotions, and to connect to others.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My priceless, worthless baseball cards”

I’d spent roughly $50,000 on those cards in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but I knew they weren’t worth that much now.
The mass overproduction and fraud that plagued the boom period for baseball cards of the late 1980s and early 1990s had doomed that sector of the industry.
I reached out to 10 dealers who advertised that they aggressively bought cards, and their responses were 10 different variations of “We buy cards but not those cards.” I called an auction house that required payment up front, then a cut of whatever sold, and even with virtually no risk, the company said it didn’t bother with any cards from that era.
Then we’d make trades, and we chuckle now because we’d trade so much that we’d end up with the same cards we started with.
We’d sprawl out on the floor of both houses, say a cordial hello to our stepmom or stepdad and then retreat into the cards.
Some 30 years later, staring at the remains of that collection, I was paralyzed by indecision: Drive the surviving cards to the nearest dumpster or cling to the remnants of my childhood?
The cards were so valuable to me that it didn’t matter that they were worthless.
I’d love to tell you that what she sent me was a heartwarming note about how moved she was, but what she actually wrote was: “It’s a really good story. I’m sure TikTok isn’t giving us what the cards gave you. Especially because we aren’t allowed to have it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happens If I Don’t Like Fiona Apple?”

Claustrophobia is the overarching theme, even if it isn’t, of the album that came out of Apple’s exile.
In between hangs the kind of Apple-isms that have always clanged in my ear – mouthfuls of the kind of poetry that was once limited to high school but now stalks us all on Instagram – not to mention the insufferable repetition of words and phrases and the obnoxious holding of never-ending notes like “Youuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu.” At the end of “I Want You to Love Me,” Apple discharges a lengthy, high-pitched throat warble that reminds me of Andie MacDowell’s dolphin-like vocalization.
Carrie Battan’s use of the term “Feral authenticity” to describe Apple’s oeuvre – based on her penchant for avoiding the public – recalled my mother’s duo-syllabic reaction to Apple but not much else.
Felt “Disproportionate” because of Apple’s absence for so long and because it is “Of the moment in its theme and feel.” That includes its lyrics on the sort of gender issues we are currently confronting – not to mention Apple’s transcendence of musical boundaries, mixing disparate genres from cabaret to hip-hop – and that raw home-recorded style that opposes today’s ubiquitous hyper-produced singles.
Wilson noticed the piano that Apple forefronted in the past melded into layers of rhythm and percussion and vocals, her monotonous deep bluesy voice fracturing into a wider range of pitches.
After all of that, Wilson’s final words could have very well been all he had written: “[M]aybe you just find Fiona Apple a bit much.
I’m less troubled after speaking to Wilson and researching Apple herself.
Profile from March, Apple continues to display a photograph of Graham on her piano, the one she played on Fetch the Bolt Cutters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Surprising Reason People Change Their Minds”

Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem recently gave people statements like “I believe the internet makes people more sociable” or “I believe the internet makes people more isolated”.
There hadn’t been time for people to change their behaviour to adjust to the practicalities of the ban.
Today, general consensus is that it makes sense not to allow smoking inside hospitals – but before that ban became commonplace, some people felt otherwise.
Laurin’s team found that just a couple of days after his inauguration, those same people felt more positively about him.
Even people who disliked Trump’s performance at the inauguration approved of him more after he was made president than they did before.
We do have to bear in mind that it wasn’t that people who couldn’t stand Trump decided they loved him when he took office – but they did start to dislike him a little less.
So it’s not that people simply become accustomed to a new situation.
We might rationalise the things that are hard to change, but once a critical mass gets behind a cause, people stop rationalising the status quo, feel they can make a difference because others are with them and begin campaigning for change.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Survive Isolation With Your Roommates, Your Partner, Your Kids”

‘Low-risk, symptom-free partners living in relative isolation together can certainly use this time to have more sex.
During that time, she learned several lessons applicable to anyone living with roommates.
What If It’s Just Me and the Kids? According to Joshua David Stein, editor-at-large of the parenting publication Fatherly, if you’re practicing social distancing with your kids, now is the time to readjust your rule structure.
Fatherly has compiled a list of at-home activities for bored kids, the internet abounds with kid-friendly podcasts, museum tours and educational videos, and Stein notes that it’s a good time to get outside and take advantage of local parks, too.
If your kids are worried about grandparents they’re unable to visit during the pandemic, Stein suggests: “Without lying, frame it in a way that will assuage their worries as much as possible. Like, ‘Grandma is doing fine, for her safety and our safety, we’re going to rely on FaceTime for now.'” It’s also to be expected that your patience will wear thin at times.
“It’s not the best thing in the world but it’s not the end of the world, don’t beat yourself up about it, try to do better next time.”
What If I’m Suddenly Spending a Lot More Time With My Live-In Partner? “This is a situation where you kind of know what is going to happen so you have time to come up with a gameplan,” says Erin Davidson, a couples and sex therapist.
While it may be a tricky time to date, low-risk, symptom-free partners living in relative isolation together can certainly use this time to have more sex.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Coronavirus: How to protect your mental health”

Coronavirus has plunged the world into uncertainty and the constant news about the pandemic can feel relentless.
All of this is taking its toll on people’s mental health, particularly those already living with conditions like anxiety and OCD. So how can we protect our mental health?
Being concerned about the news is understandable, but for many people it can make existing mental health problems worse.
When the World Health Organization released advice on protecting your mental health during the coronavirus outbreak, it was welcomed on social media.
“A lot of anxiety is rooted in worrying about the unknown and waiting for something to happen – coronavirus is that on a macro scale,” agrees Rosie Weatherley, spokesperson for mental health charity Mind.
Limit the news and be careful what you read. Reading lots of news about coronavirus has led to panic attacks for Nick, a father-of-two from Kent, who lives with anxiety.
Alison, 24, from Manchester, has health anxiety and feels compelled to stay informed and research the subject.
OCD Action has seen an increase in support requests from people whose fears have become focused on the coronavirus pandemic.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The ‘Untranslatable’ Emotions You Never Knew You Had”

We have already borrowed many emotion words from other languages, after all – think “Frisson”, from French, or “Schadenfreude”, from German – but there are many more that have not yet wormed their way into our vocabulary.
Studying these terms will not just be of scientific interest; Lomas suspects that familiarising ourselves with the words might actually change the way we feel ourselves, by drawing our attention to fleeting sensations we had long ignored.
“In our stream of consciousness – that wash of different sensations feelings and emotions – there’s so much to process that a lot passes us by,” Lomas says.
“The feelings we have learned to recognise and label are the ones we notice – but there’s a lot more that we may not be aware of. And so I think if we are given these new words, they can help us articulate whole areas of experience we’ve only dimly noticed.”
As evidence, Lomas points to the work of Lisa Feldman Barrett at Northeastern University, who has shown that our abilities to identify and label our emotions can have far-reaching effects.
“Some people use words like anxious, afraid, angry, disgusted to refer to a general affective state of feeling bad,” she explains.
If you are better able to pin down whether you are feeling despair or anxiety you might be better able to decide how to remedy those feelings: whether to talk to a friend, or watch a funny film.
Of all the words he has found so far, Lomas says that he most often finds himself pondering Japanese concepts such as wabi-sabi.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘I’m profoundly sad, I feel guilty’: scientists reveal their personal fears about the climate crisis”

In 2014, Joe Duggan started reaching out to climate scientists to ask them a question: how did climate change make them feel?
“It makes me feel sad. And it scares me,” Meissner wrote.
So Duggan has returned to his “Passion project” – Is This How You Feel – by asking the scientists to write again.
Does Meissner think there’s a risk in scientists lifting their veil of cool objectivity to show their personal feelings? Could it cause some to question their objectivity?
I feel tired, tired that in spite of bushfires, floods etc I still seem to be banging my head against a brick wall to convince people that the threat of climate change is severe.
I feel guilty that I am stepping back from the frontline, so even though I am retired I feel compelled to carry on working.
I feel relieved that when my grandchild grows up and asks me why we did nothing to stop climate change I can at least say that I did my best.
The full collection of letters is available at Is This How You Feel.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Truth Of What A Toothbrush Represents In Modern Dating”

In a nascent romantic relationship, a toothbrush can double as a flashlight; illuminating deeper feelings about a potential partner.
Starting to keep a toothbrush at another person’s home is, in most cases, a way of planting a flag and setting course for a blooming LTR. We’re well-versed in the levels of totally bullshit chill necessary in early courting; whoever shows interest first immediately loses the upper hand, etc.
The introduction of the toothbrush shows vulnerability-whether giving one to partner or BYO(T)Bing-because it shows interest, affection, and a desire to move forward.
A few weeks into seeing each other, my friend Meredith’s new boo said she could start leaving a toothbrush at his spot.
Even still, to some, a toothbrush isn’t an immediate symbol of commitment and is instead very literally a means of keeping cavity-free.
There’s an essential dash of grace and/or conversation before planting the toothbrush flag, though the exact science-as with its meaning or lack thereof-remains unknown.
Thinking ahead, assigning such weight to a toothbrush can make for more satisfying breakup rituals.
Nothing scrubs shower grime quite like the toothbrush of a former lover.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Minor Feelings” and the Possibilities of Asian-American Identity”

Early in the formidable new essay collection “Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning,” the poet Cathy Park Hong delivers a fatalistic state-of-the-race survey.
“In the popular imagination,” she writes, “Asian Americans inhabit a vague purgatorial status … distrusted by African Americans, ignored by whites, unless we’re being used by whites to keep the black man down.” Asians, she observes, are perceived to be emotionless functionaries, and yet she is always “Frantically paddling my feet underwater, always overcompensating to hide my devouring feelings of inadequacy.” Not enough has been said, Hong thinks, about the self-hatred that Asian-Americans experience.
“Minor Feelings” consists of seven essays; Hong explains the book’s title in an essay called “Stand Up” that centers on Richard Pryor’s “Live in Concert.” Minor feelings are “The racialized range of emotions that are negative, dysphoric, and therefore untelegenic.” One such minor feeling: the deadening sensation of seeing an Asian face on a movie screen and bracing for the ching-chong joke.
“If the indebted Asian immigrant thinks they owe their life to America, the child thinks they owe their livelihood to their parents for their suffering,” Hong writes.
“The indebted Asian American is therefore the ideal neoliberal subject.” She becomes a “Dog cone of shame,” a “Urinal cake of shame.” Hong’s metaphors are crafted with stinging care.
For a long time, Hong recounts in the book’s first essay, she did not want to write about her Asian identity.
Today, “Asian-American” mainly signifies people with East Asian ancestry: most Americans, Hong writes, think “Chinese is synecdoche for Asians the way Kleenex is for tissues.” The term, for many people-and for Hollywood-seems to conjure upper-middle-class images: doctors, bankers.
In his book “The Latinos of Asia,” the sociologist Anthony Christian Ocampo argues that Filipinos tend to manifest a sort of ethnic flexibility, feeling more at home, compared with members of other Asian ethnic groups, with whites, African-Americans, Latinos, and other Asians.

The orginal article.