Summary of “The Emotionally Intelligent Way for Introverts to Meet New People and Make a Great First Impression”

Stick me on a stage in front of people I don’t know and I’m nervous, but only at first.
Stick me in a room with a bunch of people I don’t know and expect me to mingle and I’m shy and insecure.
“How do you walk up to complete strangers and make small talk? I’m terrible at it. I always feel like I’m forcing myself on people. I think I’m being presumptuous. I think, ‘Who wants to talk to me?’ Somehow you made it seem really easy.”
“Do you think it’s presumptuous when people walk over to speak to you? Does that make you uncomfortable?”.
“Then go talk to them. Make it your goal to make that one person feel more comfortable, and then you’ll feel more comfortable, too.”
If you’re like me and you find it’s hard to mingle, and awkward to make small talk, use those feelings in a positive way.
You don’t need to be a conversational genius, because the people you rescue won’t notice.
They’ll be too busy feeling less like wallflowers and more like people who belong – and they will always remember that you made them feel that way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Powerful Mental Benefits of a Daily Morning Run, and How to Start the Habit”

For whatever reason, at about age 27, I decided to start running.
Way more important than all that were the mental benefits that I received from running.
Running clarifies your thinking by changing your mental environmentThere have been very few times where I have gone out running and spent the rest of the day feeling mentally clouded and overwhelmed.
Running builds mental toughnessThis is probably the most Malcolm Gladwell-ish thing I’ll write, but the one trait that seems to display the most return on investment in helping people “Make it” is perseverance.
Maybe you’re not sold on running yet as a habit, and that’s fine; you can’t start a habit.
How to Form The HabitObviously, you have to get out there and run the first day, in order to make it a habit.
Put Your Clothes and Shoes by the Door the Night BeforeIf I had to pick the easiest but most effective way to get a regular morning run going, it’d be this one.
Check your email, make your to-do list - do whatever puts your mind relatively at ease, so that you can at least start out your run with a relatively calm mind.

The orginal article.

Summary of “JK Rowling’s 8 Rules of Writing”

Last month, I brought to your attention Neil Gaiman’s rules of writing.
He’s not the only accomplished writer who ascribes to a set of rules.
Today, I want to introduce you to JK Rowling’s rules of writing.
She’s shared a lot of terrific writing wisdom, but in my opinion, these are her eight best rules.
The funny thing is that, although writing has been my actual job for several years now, I still seem to have to fight for time in which to do it.
Write what you know: your own interests, feelings, beliefs, friends, family and even pets will be your raw materials when you start writing.
Your writing clarifies, corrects, and often reveals your beliefs, experiences, and feelings.
There are things you know that you have no idea you know-but your subconscious does, and that stuff will filter into your writing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Americans Are Officially Freaking Out”

Almost two-thirds of Americans, or 63 percent, report being stressed about the future of the nation, according to the American Psychological Association’s Eleventh Stress in America survey, conducted in August and released on Wednesday.
A significantly larger proportion of Democrats reported feeling stress than independents and Republicans.
When the APA surveyed Americans a year ago, 52 percent said they were stressed by the presidential campaign.
A majority of the more than 3,400 Americans polled, 59 percent, said “They consider this to to be the lowest point in our nation’s history that they can remember.” That sentiment spanned generations, including those that lived through World War II, the Vietnam War, and the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11.
“Policymakers need to understand that this is an issue that is important to people, that the uncertainty is having an impact on stress levels, and that stress has an impact on health status,” Evans said, pointing out that the relationship between stress and health is well-established.
Most Americans-56 percent-said they want to stay informed, but the news causes them stress.
Women normally report higher levels of stress than men, though worries among both genders tend to rise or fall in tandem.
The report also notes that many Americans are finding at least one healthy way to feel better: 53 percent reported exercising or doing other physical activity to cope.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Win With A Narcissist: 5 Secrets Backed By Research”

So how do you deal with a narcissist when saying “MEEP-MEEP” and sprinting away Road-Runner-style isn’t an option?
A growing body of recent research concludes that a little narcissism, in adolescence, helps the young survive the Sturm und Drang of youth; moderate teenage narcissists are less anxious and depressed and have far better relationships than their low and high narcissism peers.
More than a dozen studies exploring whether or not narcissists can change have now been conducted and they all point to the same conclusion: encouraging narcissists to feel more caring and compassionate reduces their narcissism If narcissists are approached in a gentler way, many seem to soften emotionally.
Affirming: “You’re my best friend, too. I don’t want you to feel bad.” Clarifying: “How long have you been feeling sad around me?” Apologizing: “I’m sorry- I don’t want you to feel like a failure.” Validating: “I know my sarcasm hurts you.”
Feeling statements use the word I liberally, as in I’m feeling uncomfortable, uneasy, unhappy.
Let’s round it up and learn how we can always feel special and not turn into a narcissist.
In your personal life, use “Empathy prompts”: Music doesn’t soothe the savage beast, but reminding them about relationships and your feelings can.
Narcissists come in many flavors but they all share one thing in common: they need to feel special.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Connect with Yourself in a World Designed to Distract You”

A thought is planted in us so carefully that suppressing it feels like denying our most basic instincts.
If, on occasion, we do look inward, we feel a sense of emptiness and fear.
A good sign of having lost connection with yourself is that your true instincts feel like distractions, and distractions feel like true instincts.
Is there a way to rediscover that connection with ourselves? To feel centered, and confident about who we are; to understand our emotions, feelings, and desires clearly; to know our strengths and acknowledge our limitations?
Sometimes we are at peace with the world, but also feel a longing for something better.
The reason is, our mind is telling the body what to feel, based on what the mind is thinking.
Quick exercise: Close your eyes and try to discern the shape of your hand by feeling the electrical impulses on the skin, and the gentle blood flow in the veins.
If you are able to discern only the index finger, or just the thumb, then become more sensitive to what you are feeling, until you can feel your entire hand.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Deeply Intelligent People Don’t Try to Think Themselves Out of Unhappiness”

His masterful ability maintain a laser-like focus on evolving goals-the thing that makes him successful-also is the mechanism that prevents his happiness.
Genuine happiness emerges when you stop creating your own unhappiness.
By the time you started avoiding uncomfortable emotions by trying to think your way out of them, the plan was already set in motion.
To discover happiness means that you need to get out of your own way.
You need to recognize that your thinking-your search for a solution to your pain, your seeking of external happiness, and your contemplation of all things outside of the present moment-creates unhappiness.
These clouds fill with rain the more that you think through your emotional discomfort, the more that you remove yourself from the here-and-now, the more that you dilute your experience of now with thoughts of then.
To work through unhappiness, George first had to reduce his habits of unhappiness.
Admitting what you don’t know, embracing the present moment, and simply witnessing life’s journey as it unfolds is not only the highest form of intelligence-it’s how you discover real happiness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 signs you’re more successful than you think”

There are a few questions you can ask to remind yourself you’re more successful than you think.
No matter how successful you feel, there is always someone who seems more successful.
Then look for these signs that show you’re more successful than you might think – and, in all likelihood, that you’re happier than you think, too.
If the people around you are the people you want to be around you… you’re successful.
If you make enough money, and don’t spend so much money, that you can make positive choices about what to do with some of it – whether it’s investing, or taking a vacation, or taking classes… anything you want to do instead of have to do – then you’re successful, both because you’ve escaped the paycheck-to-paycheck grind and because you can leverage that extra money to become even more successful.
If you embrace every failure – if you own it, learn from it, and take full responsibility for making sure that next time things will turn out differently-then you’re already successful.
In time, you’ll be even more successful, because you’ll never stop trying to be better than you are today.
If you’re found a purpose – if you’ve found something that inspires you, fuels you, makes you excited to get up, get out, and achieve – then you’re successful, regardless of how much money you make or what other people think.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Science Says These Are the 12 Most Satisfying Jobs. They All Share 1 Key Characteristic”

Everybody wants a good job, but here’s an important question for you – what makes a job good? There are tons of surveys to consult if your metrics are the size of your paycheck or the security that comes from seeking an in-demand profession.
Most of us know a truly good job isn’t just one that pays the rent and doesn’t unduly raise your stress levels.
So where do you find a job like that? Soul-searching is no doubt required as one person’s dream job is another’s personal nightmare, but according to one huge national survey of 27,000 people, there’s one particular characteristic that’s far and away the most likely to make a gig satisfying.
According to Tom W. Smith, director of the General Social Survey at the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago and the study’s author, despite the obvious differences in the day-to-day routines of office supervisors and sculptors, ministers and salespeople, there is one characteristic that unites almost all the jobs on this list.
“The most satisfying jobs are mostly professions, especially those involving caring for, teaching, and protecting others,” he commented, according to PsyBlog.
Or to put it, even more succinctly, the happiest jobs are those that involve giving to others.
They cite studies showing “Volunteer work is associated with greater happiness and less depression,” research demonstrating “That performing five random acts of kindness one day a week can increase your happiness,” and findings showing that “If you more strongly feel that your work made a positive difference in other people’s lives, you feel more positively at bedtime,” among other research results.
So if you’re looking for a satisfying job, go ahead and weigh all the practical concerns as well as the quirks of your own personality, but don’t forget this essential truth – if you don’t feel your work is helping others in some way, chances are good it won’t make you truly happy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Confessions Of An Impostor”

Simply put, impostor syndrome is the feeling of being a fraud, despite all evidence to the contrary.
There is a difference between impostor syndrome and a simple feeling of insecurity.
Someone with impostor syndrome, on the other hand, feels compelled to constantly take action and to be better at whatever they are doing.
How can Stanford students, passing such an intensive admissions process, being selected from among thousands of applicants, with a long list of documented achievements and accomplishments behind them, possibly feel that somehow they don’t belong there? The answer is impostor syndrome.
We probably agree by now – especially if you suffer from it – that impostor syndrome is a rather uncomfortable feeling.
Reading Twitter can make things even worse: Seeing a lot of talented people bragging about their achievements does not soothe impostor syndrome at all.
The funny thing is that most people who experience impostor syndrome are unaware that others around them feel inadequate as well.
Communicating these feelings made a big difference to him: “And I felt a bit better. Because if Neil Armstrong felt like an impostor, maybe everyone did.”

The orginal article.