Summary of “Here Are the Cold and Flu Remedies That Actually Work”

Cold weather doesn’t literally make you sick, but the winter season does indeed make you more prone to catching a bad cold.
If you had time to rest, dammit, you wouldn’t be Googling around for quick cold remedies.
If you’re exposing innocent bystanders to your cold or flu, the least you can do is give yourself a good Purell rubdown after any contact between your hands and your mucus-y bits.
A glass shouldn’t make your cold symptoms any worse.
Speaking of Hot, Liquid Comfort: Soup Can’t Hurt There isn’t exactly concrete evidence that a bowl of chicken soup can make your cold shorter or less severe, but some studies do support its healing powers.
There’s no harm in a sinus rinse either, though you should make sure you’re using filtered water to avoid replacing your cold viruses with brain-eating amoebas.
Chances are good you have a cold or flu, which can’t be treated with antibiotics.
If your symptoms feel like a typical cold or flu, give yourself a few days to fight it off.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Guide to Strong Boundaries”

PSA: Setting strong personal boundaries are not a cure-all for your relationship woes.
People with high self-esteem have strong personal boundaries.
Practicing strong personal boundaries is one way to build self-esteem.
It’s a hallmark of a codependent relationship and usually represents two people incapable of strong personal boundaries.
It’s like an addiction they fulfill in one another, and when presented with emotionally healthy people to date, they usually feel bored or a lack of “Chemistry.” They’ll pass on healthy, secure individuals because the secure partner’s solid boundaries will not excite the loose emotional boundaries of the needy person.
A person with strong boundaries understands that it’s unreasonable to expect two people to accommodate each other 100% and fulfill every need the other has.
A person with strong boundaries understands that they may hurt someone’s feelings sometimes, but ultimately they can’t determine how other people feel.
A person with strong boundaries understands that a healthy relationship is not controlling one another’s emotions, but rather each partner supporting each other in their growth and path to self-actualization.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My land of make believe: life after The Sims”

The game’s creator, EA Games, has slowly expanded the series, from The Sims to The Sims II to The Sims 4 Deluxe Party Edition.
You are rewarded with points when your Sims thrive; the healthier and wealthier your Sims become, the more enjoyable the game.
Your Sims might reach the top of their career ladders, retire with a healthy pension, and die, but the game goes on.
In 2017, the video games journalist Andy Kelly pulled together a list of “PC’s most relaxing games” for PC Gamer.
Kelly’s article, and its focus on how much games can help us, reminded me of an episode of the tech-focused Reply All podcast called Autumn, in which a teenage girl who is experiencing difficulties in her life turns to The Sims to create a character of her recently deceased grandmother so she could visit her, build a beautiful garden for her, and interact with her.
“Video games place you at the centre of the story – you are an active participant, instead of a passive observer. They offer us a safe place to interrogate and test the emotional consequences of our actions. Far from being a meaningless waste of time games help us explore what it means to be human, to explore notions of love and loss, and to allow us to travel to far-off incredible places, to become incredible people – all from the comfort of our own home.”
The game information on its website is as tantalising as the blurb on the back of an appealing holiday read: “The year is 1989. You are a man named Henry who has retreated from your messy life to work as a fire lookout in the Wyoming wilderness. Perched atop a mountain, it’s your job to find smoke and keep the wilderness safe.” What you’re saying is I have to walk around a beautiful forest on my own and “Keep the wilderness safe”? Sign me up.
I’m excited about the future and about starting a new relationship with gaming; loosening my grip on The Sims 2 and experimenting with something new.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Science of How Our Minds and Our Bodies Converge in the Healing of Trauma”

Art by Simona Ciraolo from Hug Me.”A purely disembodied human emotion is a nonentity,” William James asserted in his revolutionary 1884 theory of how our bodies affect our feelings.
In The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma, he explores “The extreme disconnection from the body that so many people with histories of trauma and neglect experience” and the most fertile paths to recovery by drawing on his own work and a wealth of other research in three main areas of study: neuroscience, which deals with how mental processes function within the brain; developmental psychopathology, concerned with how painful experiences impact the development of mind and brain; and interpersonal neurobiology, which examines how our own behavior affects the psychoemotional and neurobiological states of those close to us.
You don’t need a history of trauma to feel self-conscious and even panicked at a party with strangers – but trauma can turn the whole world into a gathering of aliens.
Their bodies are constantly bombarded by visceral warning signs, and, in an attempt to control these processes, they often become expert at ignoring their gut feelings and in numbing awareness of what is played out inside.
The bodies of child-abuse victims are tense and defensive until they find a way to relax and feel safe.
Securely attached children learn what makes them feel good; they discover what makes them feel bad, and they acquire a sense of agency: that their actions can change how they feel and how others respond.
Avoiding feeling these sensations in our bodies increases our vulnerability to being overwhelmed by them.
Even though the trauma is a thing of the past, the emotional brain keeps generating sensations that make the sufferer feel scared and helpless.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Makes People So Gullible?”

Think car wrecks, plane crashes, people being scammed out of their life savings.
For one, seeing other people’s pain helps reassure us of our own safety.
While science may have an easy explanation for why people can’t turn away from tragedy, the real question for me is, why are some people so gullible in the first place?
Named after showman and notorious huckster P.T. Barnum, the effect describes how people are often willing to believe personality descriptions as specific to them, when in fact, they are quite generic and can apply to anyone.
Not surprisingly, the effect works best with positive or complimentary statements, since people don’t generally like to admit negative qualities about themselves.
To get a sense of how many people have fallen victim to fake news, just look at the results of the 2016 election.
Why some people are more vulnerable to scams may be connected to their personal histories.
This is because people who constantly face difficulty start to associate these negative consequences with their own actions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Cancel Plans Without Losing Friends and Feeling Like a Jerk”

How are you actually feeling right now? What is it that’s making you want to cancel?
If you don’t cancel how would you feel during and after the get-together?
Note who the plans were with, what feelings made you want to opt out, and how you felt after the fact.
If you find that you’re breaking more plans than you’re keeping or you feel drained all the time, it might be time to talk to a health-care provider or therapist.
“Hey, friend, I’m completely exhausted and broke right now, and am honestly feeling very stressed about our plans for tomorrow night. I really want to catch up with you, though-would you be up for coming to my place and letting me cook you dinner instead of us going all the way to New Jersey? And we could still plan to go to Medieval Times next month, once I’ve finished this big project and my bonus paycheck has hit.”
I’m also realizing that a lot can change in a few weeks! The giddy optimism you felt when texting all your friends to make happy-hour plans on a gorgeous day in late October can feel foreign come mid-November when, suddenly, Thanksgiving is apparently??? next week???? and it’s been raining for 10 days straight.
The more time that passes between making plans and doing the thing, the more time you have to dread the hangout-which is a bummer, even if you ultimately go and enjoy yourself!
While making impromptu plans won’t always work out, there’s something to be said for occasionally reaching out to friends a day or two in advance to do something fairly low-key.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s not your fault? That doesn’t mean you’re off the hook”

The person adopting the strategy is usually a chronic complainer.
If they can “Win” the game – dismissing every suggestion until their interlocutor gives up in exasperation – they get to feel pleasurably righteous in their resentments and excused from any obligation to change.
When you’re feeling hard done by – taken for granted by your partner, say, or obliged to work for a knucklehead boss – it’s easy to become vehemently attached to the position that it’s not your job to address the matter, and that doing so would be an admission of fault.
The psychotherapist Lori Gottlieb describes this as “Over-validation”.
As Gottlieb notes, people confronted with over-validation often hear their complaints afresh and start arguing back.
Sometimes, something magical might happen,” Gottlieb writes.
The other person “Might realise she’s not as trapped as you are saying she is, or as she feels.” Which illustrates the irony of the responsibility/fault fallacy: evading responsibility feels comfortable, but turns out to be a prison; whereas assuming responsibility feels unpleasant, but ends up being freeing.
Psychiatrist Eric Berne’s book Games People Play was a 60s bestseller, but its analysis of our everyday agendas is as relevant as ever.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Signs You Need to Rethink Your Career”

Even people who love their jobs may find themselves bored or feeling dissatisfied from time to time.
Boredom is the top reason that people leave their jobs, according to a 2018 survey by Korn Ferry.
Roughly one-third said that they were looking for a new job to find a new challenge.
The data analysis and visualization company Flowing Data analyzed data from the 2015 American Community Survey to find jobs with the highest rates of divorce.
The analysis found that those people with low-paying jobs and jobs in materials movement and transportation had among the highest divorce rates.
Of course, the site notes, correlation is not causation, but it’s not a surprise that low-pay, high-stress jobs may have an affect on other areas of life.2.
A May 2018 study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health found that ostracism, incivility, harassment, and bullying have direct negative effects on job productivity.
Another study from the University of Manchester found that being in a job you hate is worse for your health than being unemployed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Ode to Running in the City”

Here’s the thing: occasionally, and unexpectedly, I’m hit with a bout of nostalgia for a run through the city.
Most of the time, I specifically long for nighttime city runs.
Before I moved to D.C., I lived in Boston-a city overflowing with running culture and history.
On those inevitable rough days when the miles inched by and I forgot what it meant to be fast, it felt like I was out running with the rest of the city.
Because of the crowds and inherent busy nature of the city, living in one also often means returning to a small roster of reliable running routes.
Every morning, as I passed the same piers, tennis courts, and grassy parks, I was confronted by the same thoughts I’d had while running the identical route the day before-and I could watch as my thoughts slowly evolved for the better.
The banality of running the same route over and over turned my attention back toward myself; my surroundings acted as bookmarks for what I’d been thinking at that spot on the previous day’s run.
The nature of city running also makes any opportunity for a trail run-where you can find it-feel even more precious.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Break the Dangerous Cycle of Loneliness”

Perhaps one reason the piece made so many internet rounds is just how many people could relate: Last year Surgeon General Vivek Murthy warned that Americans are “Facing an epidemic of loneliness and social isolation.”
Though “I’m going to die alone” is the common grumble among single people, scientifically, it’s more like, “I’m going to die if I’m alone.” A lack of social connections can spark inflammation and changes in the immune system, so lonely people are far more likely to die prematurely.
People in marriages tend to feel less lonely than people not in marriages.
If you look at online dating, there you’re using it to meet other people, so not surprisingly, that tends to be associated with lower levels of loneliness.
Social interaction is sometimes called social engagement, basically the idea there is that loneliness can be cured by putting people together.
How would you do therapy to try to help people who think they’re lonely but are nonetheless wary of connecting with people?
What we teach is a whole set of skills: How do you read the face, the voice, the posture of people? And we showed them how incorrect those readings can be.
Lots of people want to be their friend, but how would you feel if all the people who want to be your friend, you had the alternative interpretation that they want material or social benefits that you could give them.

The orginal article.