Summary of “Nearly 7 in 10 in U.S. feel worn out from too much news”

If you feel like there is too much news and you can’t keep up, you are not alone.
Almost seven-in-ten Americans feel worn out by the amount of news there is these days, compared with only three-in-ten who say they like the amount of news they get.
Roughly three-quarters of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents feel worn out over how much news there is, compared with about six-in-ten Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents.
Feeling overwhelmed by the news is more common among those who follow the news less closely than among those who are avid consumers.
While a majority of those who follow the news most of the time are feeling worn out by the news, a substantially higher portion of those who less frequently get news say they are fatigued by the amount of it that they see.
This is somewhat higher than among those who say the news media do “Fairly well”, and much higher than for those who think news organizations do “Very well” – of whom 48% say they are worn out by the news and 51% say they like the amount they see.
Some demographic groups – most notably white Americans – are more likely than others to feel exhausted by the news.
Nearly three-quarters of white Americans express fatigue with the amount of news, much higher than among both Hispanic and black Americans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the Best Things in Life Are All Backwards”

The second lesson of drown-proofing is a bit more obvious, but also paradoxical: the more you panic, the more oxygen you will burn and the more likely you are to fall unconscious and drown.
All give back less the more you do them, the more you try, or the more you have.
Control – The more we strive to control our own feelings and impulses, the more powerless we will feel.
Conversely, the more we accept our feelings and impulses, the more we’re able to direct them and process them.
Love – The more we try to make others love and accept us, the less they will, and more importantly, the less we will love and accept ourselves.
Confidence – The more we try to feel confident, the more insecurity and anxiety we will create.
The more we accept our faults, the more comfortable we will feel in our own skin.
The more we try to add meaning to others’ lives, the more profound impact we will feel.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Does Buddhist detachment allow for a healthier togetherness?”

In a healthy relationship, you feel good when your partner is around.
So what makes for a healthy or unhealthy relationship, and how do you maintain one? Buddhism offers a set of guidelines for how to treat your partner to minimise suffering.
Have you ever heard a friend complain about his partner, saying: ‘He isn’t the man I thought he was,’ or ‘She’s a different person now’? In Buddhist terms, your friend is suffering because he reified his partner in the service of reifying himself.
Relationship science suggests that romantic relationships are healthier when you and your partner see each other in an unrealistically positive light.
What if you and your partner’s problems are more serious than a battle over fridge space? What if your partner utters snide remarks intended to cause you pain, or even takes a swing at your head? First and foremost, you have to make sure that you’re physically safe.
The second Buddhism-inspired suggestion for a healthy relationship is don’t see your partner only in terms of yourself.
If you received an offer of a new job, your partner might push you to negotiate a higher salary not for your own happiness, but because you are your partner’s meal ticket.
In a healthier relationship, your partner would see you as a person with your own thoughts, feelings, experiences and needs that are important to you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to discover your sense of purpose at work? |”

Purpose boosts our capacity to make the greatest impact in the work we do and to connect with other people across cultures and contexts.
We feel energized, motivated and expanded when we have a sense of purpose.
According to Yale School of Management researcher Amy Wrzesniewski, people who consider their work to be a calling – in other words, they felt their work had purpose – tend to be more satisfied than those who think of their work as “Just” a job.
Having a purpose can help us overcome obstacles, a benefit that makes a difference at work.
The study’s goal was to identify the correlation between a student’s sense of purpose and the degree of difficulty with which he or she regarded the climb, to understand why some students make it up the Slope while others don’t.
What was interesting was that for people with either higher dispositional purpose – who perceived themselves as high in purpose in general – or who were asked to reflect on purpose briefly, the link between effort and slope overestimation was diminished.
Pay attention to how a shift in your perspective impacts your sense of joy and purpose.
Do you see any pattern to your sense of purpose? Does it tend to come with certain categories of things? Can you make any generalizations about your purpose from these specific instances?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Get Over a Breakup, According to Science”

The person was asked to mull over the unfavorable aspects of their lover, like a particularly annoying habit.
In another prompt, called love reappraisal, people were told to read and believe statements of acceptance, like “It’s ok to love someone I’m not longer with.” Instead of fighting how they feel, they were told to accept their feelings of love as perfectly normal without judgment.
The researchers measured how positive or negative the people felt and how much love they felt for the ex using a scale and questionnaire.
Only people who looked at their lover in a negative light also had a decrease in feelings of love toward their ex.
Distraction, on the other hand, made people feel better overall, but had no effect on how much they still loved their ex-partner.
Love reappraisal showed no effect on either love or mood, but still dulled the emotional response to the photo.
Classifying love as a motivation is controversial in the field; other experts believe that love is an emotion, like anger, or a script, like riding a bike.
The endurance of love feelings, the complexity of these feelings and the intensity of infatuation all signal a motivation, the authors write.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Make A Counter-Proposal?”

Whether responding using text communication or verbally, there are 3 things you always want to keep top of mind.
You want the other side to feel compelled to respond to you.
You don’t want them responding because they feel they must, just falling into the social norm of “They said something, so I should speak now.” Entering the interaction with the intention of verbalizing positives or negatives that will make them want to add their two cents is a good strategy.
One beautiful thing about silence and fundamental human nature is the power of the unspoken word.
Too much silence can be dangerous in text communication.
Weeks on end holding out to respond can be detrimental to relationship quality across the board.
Explaining how you have a better idea is a poor way to start that interaction.
Be careful not to disguise the things you hope they say yes to as a label, such as “It seems like you are interested.” If they haven’t agreed, a more appropriate verbalization is, “There seems to be something in the way that you don’t feel comfortable sharing.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Interview: Pusha-T”

You can hear the change in tracks like “Take One for the Team” and Cruel Summer’s “New God Flow.” You can feel West and his collective being pulled back to rap’s coarse, streetwise essence.
Seven’s very much enough, and I also like the fact that I feel like the trend in rap is like put a whole bunch of songs on your album, and get your streaming numbers up.
Does the flak feel different this year than it has before?It definitely feels different because sometimes it’s just music flak and music flak is just great.
You were talking about finding ways to brag differently, and I feel like that’s something you talk about a lot, in “More Famous Than Rich” and “Games We Play.” People posting up the image of wealth but not actually having it.
Do you feel like the division between fans who listen for bars and fans who listen to the party stuff is stupid?Yeah, man.
“I’m too rare in a world full of pink hair” means “I feel like there’s more of you guys than there are of us.”
Feels good to be able to just make music that I feel.
Yeah, people like that energy and it was cheapened, I feel like it was cheapened after we did it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Two Crucial Filmmaking Elements Causing All Your Movie Feuds”

The nuance of a performance can make us feel, and when we feel, we connect to memories of our own, but not to a memory within the movie itself.
A shot will always communicate a very specific thing to feel and these are the proverbial filmmaking ABC’s.
Let me use two weird examples from the same filmmaker in the same movie.
Maybe they’ve learned a couple of things about cinematic language and now they can “See the strings” of his work so clearly and it suddenly prevents them from “Falling into” the movie the way they used to, and others still do.
Case in point, there are some people who may like comedies, or may like horror movies, but there are people who absolutely do not like bouncing between two tones within a single movie.
There are a surprising number of moviegoers who are afraid to have a movie bounce about and make them feel different things.
There are a lot of things a movie has to do right to be good.
Maybe “Falling into” a movie should not be the end goal and we should be engaging with movies every single damn way we can, because they will always be engaging with us in equal measure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Challenges of Anxious-Avoidant Relationships”

There are so many ways to be unhappy in love, but one kind which modern psychology has given particular attention to are relationships, very high in number, in which one of the parties is defined as avoidant in their attachment patterns – and the other as anxious.
What makes things even more complicated and very combustible is that Avoidant and Anxious people are frequently drawn to forming couples where their varied emotional quirks contribute to an especially fraught combination.
Tragically, this avoidant party triggers every insecurity known to their anxious lover.
Under pressure to be warmer and more connected, the avoidant partner instinctively withdraws and feels overwhelmed and hounded.
Underneath their silence, the avoidant one resents feeling, as they put it, ‘controlled’; they have the impression of being got at, unfairly persecuted and disturbed by the other’s ‘neediness’.
There is an immense difference between acting out on one’s avoidant or anxious impulses – and, as would be preferable, understanding that one has them, grasping where they came from and explaining to ourselves and others why they make us do what we do.
There are few things more romantic, in the true sense, than a couple who have learnt to tell one another with wit and composure that they have been triggered in an avoidant or an anxious direction, but are doing everything they can to get on top of things – and hope to be normal again in a little while.
To help dispel the slight taboo which sometimes surrounds it, we have created a welcoming home for psychotherapy for when you feel stuck in a rut, anxious about your relationships or simply unsure about what’s going on in your life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Next Time You Want to Complain at Work, Do This Instead”

I had been on the phone for over an hour, almost all of that time listening to Frank*, a senior manager at Jambo, a technology company, complain about his boss, Brandon.
I added up all the time I’d spent listening to people at Jambo complain about each other that week: 3 hours and 45 minutes.
My friend, the legendary executive coach Marshall Goldsmith, interviewed more than 200 of his clients and what he discovered matched previous research he read, but found hard to believe: “a majority of employees spend 10 or more hours per month complaining – or listening to others complain – about their bosses or upper management. Even more amazing, almost a third spend 20 hours or more per month doing so.”
When we complain about someone else, the uncomfortable feelings begin to dissipate because complaining releases the pent up energy.
When we complain to people who seem to agree with us – and we almost always complain to people who seem to agree with us – we solicit comfort, camaraderie, connection, support, and justification, which counteracts the bad feelings with some fresh, new good ones.
We almost never complain directly to the person who is catalyzing our complaints, we complain to our friends and families.
Then you go to the next meeting and you complain about the person who just yelled.
Let complaining – and the feeling that leads to complaining – be the red flag that it should be: something wrong is happening and you are probably not powerless to do something about it.

The orginal article.