Summary of “5 Things Only Serious Writers Do”

There are five fundamental things that set serious writers apart from the rest.
She reminded me that serious writers don’t wait for the muse to visit them before they start, and this is echoed by many famous writers I’ve spoken with over the years.
The power of simply starting is an incredible psychological tool for serious writers.
All serious writers know that small, incremental steps are the only path to achieving great work, and that you can’t edit a blank page.
All serious writers know that every inspired or brilliant page is typically preceded by a dozen shitty ones.
The award-winning creator, producer, and host of the megahit Lore podcast, TV show, and book series, Aaron Mahnke, came on the podcast to discuss his writing regimen and share some advice for serious writers.
All serious writers meet their deadlines with ease, and they don’t sweat it because they have the tools at hand to keep the cursor moving until the job is done.
Only serious writers have the ability to focus on what’s important and tune out what’s not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The age you feel means more than your actual birthdate”

Imagine, for a moment, that you had no birth certificate and your age was simply based on the way you feel inside.
Most people felt about eight years younger than their actual chronological age.
Feeling between 8 and 13 years older than your actual age resulted in an 18-25% greater risk of death over the study periods, and greater disease burden – even when you control for other demographic factors such as education, race or marital status.
It may be a direct result of those accompanying personality changes, with a lower subjective age meaning that you enjoy a greater range of activities as you age.
The result could be a vicious cycle, with psychological and physiological factors both contributing to a higher subjective age and worse health, which makes us feel even older and more vulnerable.
This switches at around 25, when the felt age drops behind the chronological age.
Some psychologists have speculated that a lower subjective age is a form of self-defence, protecting us from the negative age stereotypes – as seen in a nuanced study by Anna Kornadt at Bielefeld University in Germany.
Given its predictive power – beyond our actual chronological age – Stephan believes that doctors should be asking all their patients about their subjective age to identify the people who are most at risk of future health problems to plan their existing health care more effectively.

The orginal article.

Summary of “New research explains why sports fandom makes us less happy”

Millions of French soccer fans are feeling great right now.
Most sports fans will tell you that following their team is agony.
“Loss aversion,” a key theory in behavioral economics, may partly explain why being a sports fan stinks so much.
Data from a new study suggests that loss aversion also describes the life of a sports fan.
To examine the impact of sports, the researchers looked at the reported happiness of people they identified as soccer fans before and after matches during the British and Scottish seasons between 2011 and 2013.
As loss aversion predicts, losing makes you feel worse than winning makes you feel better.
So if it’s so hopeless, why do so many people still follow sports teams? The researchers don’t really have an answer.
As a sports fan myself, I would guess that, like most long-term relationships, fandom is not about happiness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Is the Most Nostalgic Song of All Time?”

Ever since he died, this odd thing has been happening in which a song will come on that reminds me of him – perhaps it’s even a song I don’t ever remember hearing – and I’m suddenly overwhelmed by such an intense wave of nostalgia, I literally have to stand still and catch myself.
I don’t even remember my father playing that song.
Again, I had to stop what I was doing and play the song twenty times.
As one of them, I posted it to my Twitter account, curious if any other people locked in their cells felt this way about nostalgic songs.
A simple question, posed at eight o’clock on a Saturday night: What is the most nostalgic song of all time? I suggested “Landslide” by Fleetwood Mac.
By the time we got onto “Wish You Were Here” by Pink Floyd and “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” by Roberta Flack, it was a raging discussion – people posting lyrics and memories and suggestions for new songs, new genres.
Someone even made a Spotify playlist inspired by the thread. So many people talked about the relief they felt to simply sit like teenagers in a room, listening to music and talking about what the songs meant to them – the connection, to the past, to the lost Atlantises, the buried treasures in our minds, to each other.
His current favorite song is “Burning Down the House” by Talking Heads.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can emotion-regulating tech translate across cultures?”

It’s a product of what the sociologist Eva Illouz calls emotional capitalism – a regime that considers feelings to be rationally manageable and subdued to the logic of marketed self-interest.
Alisa is a product of emotional socialism, a regime that, according to the sociologist Julia Lerner, accepts suffering as unavoidable, and thus better taken with a clenched jaw rather than with a soft embrace.
What’s in the emotional repertoire of a ‘good girl’ is obviously open to wide interpretation – yet such normative decisions get wired into new technologies without end users necessarily giving them a second thought.
With her poise and self-assertion, Sophia seems to fit into the emotional capitalism of the modern West more seamlessly than some humans.
AI technologies do not just pick out the boundaries of different emotional regimes; they also push the people that engage with them to prioritise certain values over others.
The emotional healing is mediated by the same device that embodies and transmits anxiety: the smartphone with its email, dating apps and social networks.
The emotional presumptions hidden within these technologies are likely to end up nudging us, subtly but profoundly, to behave in ways that serve the interests of the powerful.
If we regard emotional intelligence as a set of specific skills – recognising emotions, discerning between different feelings and labelling them, using emotional information to guide thinking and behaviour – then it’s worth reflecting on what could happen once we offload these skills on to our gadgets.

The orginal article.

Summary of “There’s only one way to truly understand another person’s mind”

It’s often said that we should put ourselves in another person’s shoes in order to better understand their point of view.
Their conclusion, as psychologist Tal Eyal tells Quartz: “We assume that another person thinks or feels about things as we do, when in fact they often do not. So we often use our own perspective to understand other people, but our perspective is often very different from the other person’s perspective.” This “Egocentric bias” leads to inaccurate predictions about other people’s feelings and preferences.
Imagining another person’s perspective doesn’t actually improve our ability to judge how another person thinks or feels.
“Our experiments found no evidence that the cognitive effort of imagining oneself in another person’s shoes, studied so widely in the psychological literature, increases a person’s ability to accurately understand another’s mind,” the researchers write.
“If anything, perspective taking decreased accuracy overall while occasionally increasing confidence in judgment.” Basically, imagining another person’s perspective may give us the impression that we’re making more accurate judgments.
It doesn’t actually improve our ability to judge how another person thinks or feels.
The final experiment confirmed that getting another person’s perspective directly, through conversation, increased the accuracy of subjects’ predictions, while simply “Taking” another’s perspective did not.
“Understanding the mind of another person,” as the researchers put it, is only possible when we actually probe them about what they think, rather than assuming we already know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You’re Having a Tough Day, Try the ‘1-2-3 Strategy'”

We’ve all been there-your day is going poorly and it feels like it will never end.
Worst of all, it feels like you can’t do anything to make it better.
Ever., shared a helpful tip for those of us struggling to get through the day.
Do something you have to do: You might feel a little better if you finally cross something off of your to-do list, especially if it doesn’t have anything to do with your normal workday.
What thing will make you feel better when it’s done?
Do something for somebody else: Helping others makes you feel good-it’s been proven.
No matter how crappy your day is, this strategy will ensure that you’re somewhat productive, that you’re practicing at least a little self-care, and that you’re making an effort to make the world a better place for somebody.
You’ll feel better, or at least make it through the rest of the day in one piece because you changed up your routine.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leaders Focus Too Much on Changing Policies, and Not Enough on Changing Minds”

Most organizations pay far more attention to strategy and execution than they do to what their people are feeling and thinking when they’re asked to embrace a transformation.
Some companies also focus on behaviors – defining new practices, training new skills, or asking employees for new deliverables.
Taking time to renew during work days made them feel as if they were slacking.
More recently, we worked with the senior team of a large consumer product company which had been severely disrupted by smaller, more agile online competitors selling their services directly to consumers.
Not surprisingly, the leaders found they were spreading themselves too thin, struggling to pull the trigger on new initiatives, and feeling exhausted.
We also developed an online site where leaders agreed to regularly share their progress on prioritizing, as well as any feelings of resistance that were arising, and how they managed them.
Their work is ongoing, but among the most common feelings people reported were liberation and relief.
Great strategy remains foundational to transformation, but successful execution also requires surfacing and continuously addressing the invisible reasons that people and cultures so often resist changing, even when the way they’re working isn’t working.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leaders Focus Too Much on Changing Policies, and Not Enough on Changing Minds”

Most organizations pay far more attention to strategy and execution than they do to what their people are feeling and thinking when they’re asked to embrace a transformation.
Some companies also focus on behaviors – defining new practices, training new skills, or asking employees for new deliverables.
Taking time to renew during work days made them feel as if they were slacking.
More recently, we worked with the senior team of a large consumer product company which had been severely disrupted by smaller, more agile online competitors selling their services directly to consumers.
Not surprisingly, the leaders found they were spreading themselves too thin, struggling to pull the trigger on new initiatives, and feeling exhausted.
We also developed an online site where leaders agreed to regularly share their progress on prioritizing, as well as any feelings of resistance that were arising, and how they managed them.
Their work is ongoing, but among the most common feelings people reported were liberation and relief.
Great strategy remains foundational to transformation, but successful execution also requires surfacing and continuously addressing the invisible reasons that people and cultures so often resist changing, even when the way they’re working isn’t working.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bo Burnham’s Age of Anxiety”

When Bo Burnham was in eighth grade, he starred in a middle-school production of “Footloose,” in the Kevin Bacon role.
“I did not set out to write a movie about eighth grade,” Burnham told me one afternoon in May. “I wanted to talk about anxiety-my own anxiety-and I was coming to grips with that.” Burnham speaks like a college bro, but at an amped-up pace; he rarely finishes one sentence before launching into another, and he often has a Red Bull in his hand.
Burnham has spent his short adult life trying to shake the label “Teen YouTube sensation.” His friend Aidy Bryant, a “Saturday Night Live” cast member-they both played comedians in “The Big Sick”-told me, “I feel like so much of his online tale is about being young, but he’s just such a cranky old man.” Still, because Burnham is a product of the Internet, and because his work deals with the tribulations of youth, he is sometimes asked to play generational pundit.
Pattie drove us to Miles River Middle School, where Burnham attended eighth grade.
An eighth grader with curly hair beelined to Burnham and introduced himself as Max.
In the movie, Kayla opens a time capsule that she made for herself in sixth grade; Pattie had found Burnham’s 2001 time capsule in the attic, addressed to the Bo of 2008.
Burnham corrected her again: “I have a lazy streak, and I would want to game the system to get good grades.”
In Burnham’s early days as a touring comedian, his parents would accompany him; Pattie recalled dropping him off for his first gig at the Improv, in Hollywood, with the apprehension of a mother leaving her child on the first day of school: “We drive off, I look at Scott, and I’m, like, ‘What in God’s name have we done?'” Life on the road was wearing, especially when Burnham talked to his friends from home.

The orginal article.