Summary of “The rapper Dessa scanned her brain to fall out of love”

Scientists like Fisher have used brain scans to find the so-called neural correlates of love or the places in the brain where the love “Lives.” The experiment that followed would mark her foray into science and influence her new album Chime, which comes out today.
She began a study of one, to see if brain imaging and a technique called neurofeedback could help her, finally, fall out of love.
Cheryl Olman, a professor and brain imaging expert at the university, agreed to wheel Dessa inside a huge machine that uses magnetic fields to measure blood flow in different parts of the brain and show them in pictures.
You could think about a brain scan like a playlist of music, one where the activated regions, or brain waves, represent the songs and moods you play over and over.
If brain scans function like a visual playlist, explains Gracefire, the specific shape of these waves tell you whether your brain is always playing the blues station or a hyper-neurotic dubstep channel.
To get rid of something like obsessive love, where the brain is stuck in a loop, you have to train the brain to work differently.
There, Gracefire took EEG readings of the rapper’s brain and compared them to existing studies showing the typical range of brain activity involved in the cognitive and emotional parts of romantic love.
“To be able to 3D-print the structure of my brain responsible for these feelings for the past 10 years and hold it in my hand” – Dessa holds her left hand up in front of her, palm out – “Well, what a different kind of investigation to feel like than any I’d been able to do before,” she says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Lisa Simpson Matters”

“Oh, my holy fuck,” she says at the mention of an episode from 2000 that envisages Lisa Simpson succeeding Donald Trump as president.
“The word came down: ‘Yeardley, you’re not allowed to be in the crowd unless Lisa Simpson is in the crowd. The timbre of your voice is too specific, and you always bleed through, and we can’t have it.'”.
If your identity has to be inextricably intertwined with that of a single cartoon character, you could do worse than Lisa Simpson.
“She cares and feels so deeply about things,” says David X. Cohen, writer of key Lisa episodes “Lisa the Vegetarian” and “Lisa the Skeptic.” “It’s great for developing dramatic story lines. If you believe Lisa truly cares about something, then you will, too.”
“Contrast this to Martin Prince, whose personality is that he can’t help rubbing it in your face how smart he is. With Lisa, you just feel like hugging her. She just wants what’s right, a world ruled by logic and justice. It’s a tricky performance Yeardley pulls off. She makes Lisa into the type of nerd that every nerd aspires to be. The kind that doesn’t get punched in the face.”
If Lisa Simpson has endured a disproportionate amount of suffering and strife over the years, Yeardley Smith has spent much of her life grappling with troubles of her own.
As difficult a time as Lisa Simpson has on The Simpsons, Smith points out that there’s also something inspiring about the character’s dogged determination in the face of that hardship.
For Smith, Lisa Simpson has clearly been the role of a lifetime.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Evolutionary Anatomy of Affect: Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio on How and Why We Feel What We Feel – Brain Pickings”

“A purely disembodied human emotion is a nonentity,” William James wrote in his pioneering 1884 theory of how our bodies affect our feelings.
That tessellated relationship is what neuroscientist Antonio Damasio examines in The Strange Order of Things: Life, Feeling, and the Making of Cultures – a title inspired by the disorienting fact that several billion years ago, single-cell organisms began exhibiting behaviors strikingly analogous to certain human social behaviors and 100 million years ago insects developed interactions, instruments, and cooperative strategies that we might call cultural.
At the heart of his inquiry is his lifelong interest in the nature of human affect – why we feel what we feel, how we use emotions to construct selfhood, what makes our intentions and our feelings so frequently contradictory, how the body and the mind conspire in the inception of emotional reality.
How and what we create culturally and how we react to cultural phenomena depend on the tricks of our imperfect memories as manipulated by feelings.
The ground zero of being corresponds to a deceptively continuous and endless feeling state, a more or less intense mental choir underscoring everything else mental The complete absence of feelings would spell a suspension of being, but even a less radical removal of feeling would compromise human nature.
Although “Human emotions are recognizable pieces of a standard repertoire” which stretches all the way back to single-cell organisms and which evolved in order to produce the possibility of sociality and cooperation between organisms, something does make human feelings unique – something philosopher Simone Weil touched on in her poignant meditation on how to make use of our suffering.
If there is no distance between body and brain, if body and brain interact and form an organismic single unit, then feeling is not a perception of the body state in the conventional sense of the term.
In the remainder of the thoroughly fascinating The Strange Order of Things, Damasio goes on to examine the relationship between feeling and intellect, how advances in medicine and artificial intelligence transfigure the problem of immortality, the origin of mind along the arrow of evolution, the dialogue between image-making and memory in how we construct and experience emotion, and how feelings illuminate various other aspects of the evolution of culture and consciousness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Promise of Self-Compassion for Stressed-Out Teens”

Late last year, Imogen Marsh, Stella Chan and Angus Macbeth at the University of Edinburgh published a meta-analysis of research on self-compassion in young people in the journal Mindfulness.
Self-compassion encourages mindfulness, or noticing your feelings without judgment; self-kindness, or talking to yourself in a soothing way; and common humanity, or thinking about how others might be suffering similarly.
For them, the mindfulness step of self-compassion – which asks them to zero in on a feeling instead of an imagined, exaggerated outcome – is especially grounding.
In a public high school auditorium in Hopewell Valley, N.J., in November, I led more than 600 juniors and seniors through a self-compassion meditation.
At a local elementary school in Northampton, Mass., I volunteer teaching self-compassion to children as young as 5.
Late last year the first self-compassion curriculum for teens, “Making Friends With Yourself: A Mindful Self-Compassion Program for Teens and Young Adults,” was developed by Karen Bluth, assistant professor at the University of North Carolina’s School of Medicine, and Lorraine Hobbs, director of the youth and family programs at the University of California San Diego Center for Mindfulness.
As schools scramble to handle it, they might consider training peer educators and professional staff members in self-compassion.
If more students use self-compassion to reframe their failures, they may discover more nourishing sources of motivation and healthier strategies to pursue their goals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Case for the “Self-Driven Child””

For one, kids play much less than they did even a decade ago, as their time is taken up by more school hours, more scheduled activities, and more screen time than ever before.
More kids are reliant on social media, and there may be nothing more externalizing or control-lowering than posting a photo of yourself on the internet and waiting for people to judge you.
Kids who are addicted to things often tell themselves, “I know I shouldn’t be doing this but I can’t stop,” which is a pretty clear indictor that they lack a sense of control.
According to one of the best supported theories in psychology, self-determination theory, humans have three basic needs: a sense of autonomy, a sense of competence, and a sense of relatedness.
Can you please explain the idea of home as a “Safe base”? Johnson: Just as in baseball, when you reach home base, you’re in a place where you can catch your breath and not have to worry about being pegged with the ball or being called out, home should be a place for kids to rest and recover.
That’s why we tell parents that one of the most important things they can say to their kids is, “I love you too much to fight with you about your homework,” and why we want them to move in the direction of being a non-anxious presence for their kids.
What else can we do to give children more of a sense of self control? Johnson: We can give kids opportunities to learn to handle as much as they can, without being overwhelmed.
In life, kids want to feel that their successes were earned.

The orginal article.

Summary of “12 of The Best Books on Psychology, Philosophy, and How to Live Meaningfully”

How do I make everyday decisions better? How do I live in the moment? How can I let myself be happy? Why in the world did I do that? How can I do better?
To understand how your mind works, why you behave the way you do and how you can improve your decision-making, explore these psychology, philosophy, and behavioral economics books.
The easiest way for us to gain happiness is to learn how to want the things we already have.
How to Find Fulfilling Work by Roman Krznaric”A first step is to humanize our imaginations by developing an awareness of all those individuals hidden behind the surface of our daily lives, on whom we might depend in some way.
The Examined Life: How We Lose and Find Ourselves by Stephen Grosz”Being present, whether with children, with friends, or even with oneself, is hard work.
You”.”Going nowhere, as Leonard Cohen would later emphasize for me, isn’t about turning your back on the world; it’s about stepping away now and then so that you can see the world more clearly and love it more deeply.
How Will You Measure Your Life? by Clayton Christensen”If you defer investing your time and energy until you see that you need to, chances are it will already be too late.”
“In order to really find happiness, you need to continue looking for opportunities that you believe are meaningful, in which you will be able to learn new things, to succeed, and be given more and more responsibility to shoulder.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Strange Order of Things by Antonio Damasio review”

Antonio Damasio, a professor of neuroscience, psychology and philosophy, sets out to investigate “Why and how we emote, feel, use feelings to construct our selves and how brains interact with the body to support such functions”.
From the very start, among the earliest primitive life forms, affect – “The world of emotions and feelings” – was the force that drove unstoppably towards the flowering of human consciousness and the creation of cultures, Damasio insists.
The idea on which he bases his book is, he tells us, simple: “Feelings have not been given the credit they deserve as motives, monitors, and negotiators of human cultural endeavours.” In claiming simplicity, it is possible the author is being a mite disingenuous.
“Feelings, and more generally affect of any sort and strength,” Damasio writes, “Are the unrecognised presences at the cultural conference table.” According to him, the conference began among the bacteria, which – who? – even in their “Unminded existence assume what can only be called a sort of ‘moral attitude'”.
Damasio, whose books include The Feeling of What Happens and Self Comes to Mind, is a scientist but also a convinced, one might say a crusading, humanist.
Also called to the table is Spinoza – on whom Damasio has written at length – and his emphasis on conatus, the essential force by which all things strive to persevere, and which had for Spinoza the same significance that homeostasis has for Damasio.
There are echoes here too of William James, that most endearing of philosophers, as when Damasio pauses for a brief, Jamesian consideration of the anomalous fact that for all the hi-tech sophistication of modern life, we still cling to the primitive pleasure and reassurance of the domestic fireplace.
While ever ready to salute his predecessors and peers, is wholly his own man, and The Strange Order of Things is a fresh and daring effort to identify the true spring and source of human being – of the being of all living things – namely feeling.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Look at me: why attention-seeking is the defining need of our times”

If we could keep in mind that people need attention, it would change the way we see almost everything they do, from art to crime, from romance to terrorism.
We can’t know what to make of it until we understand what people need attention for.
Attention is other people thinking about you, and if there were ever humans who didn’t need it, they are now extinct.
Specifically, people have been shown to need a type of attention that psychologists call belonging.
So why don’t they ask for more? Because attention can be harvested only from the minds of other people, and high-quality attention won’t come by force.
Some lonely people themselves conclude that they aren’t worthy of attention, and withdraw from the world still further.
Ideas like the Big Lunch, or the MHF’s “Tea and Talk” events may improve access to high-quality attention by helping people get to know each other better.
When we talk more freely about our attention-seeking, maybe then at last we’ll get the attention we need.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google Spent years studying effective teams- this is what they found”

Google studied their best teams in hopes of pinpointing what made them great.
“Psychological safety,” or trust among teammates, was the factor the most effective teams shared.
That’s why not too long ago, Google set out on a quest to figure out what makes a team successful.
Executive evaluation of the team; team leader evaluation of the team; team member evaluation of the team; and sales performance against quarterly quota.
The researchers found that what really mattered was less about who is on the team, and more about how the team worked together.
In a team with high psychological safety, teammates feel safe to take risks around their team members.
That’s why it’s so important to practice what you preach and set the example: You can preach respect and integrity all you want; it won’t mean a thing when you curse out a member of your team.
As Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos explains, to “Disagree and commit” doesn’t mean “Thinking your team is wrong and missing the point,” which will prevent you from offering true support.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Shadow of the Colossus review”

What do we call Shadow of the Colossus, the soup-to-nuts update of Fumito Ueda’s 2005 masterpiece of the same name: a reboot, a remaster, a remake? The project from Austin, Texas-based Bluepoint Games warrants all of those labels on paper, at least.
As a result, the Shadow of the Colossus of 2018 makes a statement on what its creators deem fundamental, even foundational, to a video game.
There’s a conflict between what’s seen and what’s felt This belief, that better graphics make better games, has for decades been central to big video game publishers; it’s a belief that Sony itself extolled alongside the announcement of the PS4. Naturally, the company brass would assume a classic could be improved upon, or at least made more accessible, with a flashy paint job.
Are games disposable? Are they drafts that will be revised and revised, fulfilling some trend established by creators like George Lucas, who believe a story is timeless, but visuals, not so much? Is there a right way to preserve games? In recent years, we’ve seen high-definition re-releases, full remakes and backward compatibility on new consoles.
Even the latter, for all its purity, is imperfect: As Microsoft boasts about backward-compatible games on Xbox One, your favorite Xbox and Xbox 360 games will run better than they did before.
On the other hand, Shadow of the Colossus’ focus – you have one goal: slay the beasts – stands in contrast with how modern games have changed, distancing themselves from their predecessors.
As wonderful a game as this is, the lesson mustn’t be that we need more games that look like this Colossus – rather, that we need games that feel like it: a decade later, pushing against what we expect from games, warts and all.
All screenshots in this review were captured on a PS4 Pro, using the game’s Performance setting.

The orginal article.