Summary of “And That Could Be Dangerous For The Democrats”

Another 20 or so prominent Democrats are still considering a presidential bid, which could eventually send the number of candidates into the teens or even 20s – perhaps eclipsing the 17 major candidates who ran for the Republican nomination in 2016.
Which other Democrats might run for president? Chance that potential Democratic presidential candidates might run, based on PredictIt evaluations,* The New York Times and Nate’s guesses.
If you assume that each candidate’s decision is independent, the 95 percent confidence interval runs from seven additional candidates to 14.
In primaries since 1972 that haven’t featured an incumbent president, parties have averaged about 10 major candidates for president.
How many ‘major’ candidates ran in previous primaries? Number of major candidates in presidential primaries since 1972, excluding primaries for parties with an incumbent president running for re-election.
Then there are in-between cases such as the 2008 Democratic primary, in which party elites didn’t necessarily get their first choice, but the candidate who emerged was broadly acceptable to multiple major factions of the party.
Bigger primary fields mean more uncertainty Number of “Major” candidates in presidential primaries since 1972* and whether the eventual nominee was favored by party elites.
Year Party Nominee No. of Candidates Did party elites get what they wanted? Nominee’s share of pop.

The orginal article.

Summary of “UCLA’s Katelyn Ohashi rediscovers her joy of gymnastics and becomes an internet sensation”

UCLA’s Katelyn Ohashi rediscovers her joy of gymnastics and becomes an internet sensation – Los Angeles Times.
“The first thing I was practically told was, you might not ever do gymnastics again,” Ohashi said.
“How I’ve always felt is that the fun in gymnastics got taken away from me too soon,” Ohashi said.
With Olympic aspirations no longer possible because her injuries, Ohashi decided to pursue collegiate gymnastics instead, and began considering UCLA. Kondos Field was sitting in a hotel room on a recruiting trip in Texas, deciding what to eat for dinner, when her phone rang.
The half-hour conversation began a recruitment process that eventually ended with Ohashi committing to UCLA. Kondos Field made a promise, too: to help Ohashi rediscover joy in gymnastics.
The gymnastics team’s Meet the Bruins exhibition meet Dec. 9 became a fundraiser for the Bruin Shelter, which provides housing to students who are homeless, after a year of organizing by Ohashi.
Ohashi is writing a poetry book that she plans to self-publish by the end of gymnastics season, focused on activism.
A gender studies major, Ohashi said her gymnastics days will be done once she graduates from UCLA, but she plans to keep writing, and will intern for The Player’s Tribune as she explores photography in her free time and works on projects with several non-profit organizations, helping survivors of domestic violence.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Anthropologist Investigates How We Think About How We Think”

Martin wanted to understand how this research is done and whether the scope of experiments was changing with the advent of cheap and bountiful behavioral data, which we all shed, often unknowingly, in every one of our interactions online.
While she’s in field-work mode, Martin is always alert to what she calls these “Ethnographic moments.” Even the smallest action or fragment of speech, she believes, can be a useful clue to the mostly invisible wider cultural assumptions that shape how research is done in any specialized field.
Every few months, she and a fledgling group-Susan Harding, who was studying Jerry Falwell’s megachurch in Lynchburg, Virginia; Harriet Whitehead, who was doing research on Scientology; Lorna Rhodes, who was writing about the psychiatric clinic in which she worked-met at Martin’s Baltimore row house, “Trying to figure out how in the world you do anthropological field work in your own culture.” At childbirth classes, Martin tentatively interviewed other pregnant women; she scoured textbooks on obstetrics and gynecology.
Martin wrote an article, “The Egg and the Sperm: How science has constructed a romance based on stereotypical male-female roles,” which was published in 1991 and became a cult feminist classic.
In the book, Martin observes how people wield the labels handed down to them from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual as a “Cloak against further scrutiny,” a means of using standardized categories to avoid sharing more intimate or divergent psychic experiences.
The C.E.O. of one ad agency told her that, after Bill Clinton became President, two companies, with two different drugs, decided that they wanted their drug to be like Hillary Clinton: strong, tough, knows what she wants, but with “That feminine sort of feeling to it.” Martin also observed how marketers made appeals to psychiatrists’ artistic sides: a Lithium-P campaign featured a portrait of Beethoven and an offer for doctors of a free CD of the Ninth Symphony, taking for granted “Cultural associations between manic depression and creative energy.”
People either see it as the most “Natural” of the drugs, Martin writes, or they fiercely resist taking it, “Loath to have the pleasures of a rising mood taken away from them.” Some psychiatrists believe lithium is now under-prescribed because both doctors and patients are attracted to newer, supposedly “Technologized” medicines, and, at the conference, Martin was accused of contributing to this problem.
Exactly how illuminating it is to match digital data with psychometric profiles is up for debate: the app wrongly identified Martin, based on her answers, as a thirty-five-year-old male-though it did correctly describe her as “Introspective.” Some of the researchers’ findings are intriguingly absurd: Facebook likes of “Thunderstorms” and “Curly fries” supposedly correlated with high intelligence, for instance.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Life as a Farmworker in Yuma’s Lettuce Fields”

On an early morning in February, the couple picked me up at my motel at 4 a.m. to show me one of their lettuce crews, where I met Manuel, at work.
Life in general is not easy for these workers, and their aches don’t stop when they leave the fields.
The Association of Farmworker Opportunity Programs describes farm work as “Extremely low-wage work Most farmworkers earn less than $10,000 per year from what is often backbreaking and dangerous labor.”
Originally from Guanajuato, Mexico, she moved to San Luis Río Colorado, Sonora, when she was 12, and started working as a farm worker in California’s Salinas Valley that same year.
The Yuma Fresh Vegetable Association, a multifaceted nonprofit that promotes, protects, and lobbies for Yuma vegetables, also runs Labor of Love, a program that occasionally delivers breakfast to workers out in the fields, or gives them surprise shopping sprees at Target.
I asked Pablo Francisco Delgado, originally from Guanajuato, Mexico, and a planter at JV Farms, how many Americans work in the fields in the Yuma Valley.
Bill Scott, of Amigo farms, put it bluntly: “Growers are at the shippers’ whim.” The brunt of the instability in the agricultural sector is borne by the men and women who work in the fields.
She gave me an example: Hairnets and gloves seen in the fields aren’t meant to protect the worker, she said; they are “Meant to protect the food from the worker.” For her, the priority is clear, and the priority of big ag is not the worker.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Generalists Are Better Than Specialists, and Vice Versa”

In these fields, it might be harder for specialists to come up with new ideas and identify new opportunities, while generalists may be able to find inspiration from other areas.
Theoretical mathematics is also a field that allowed us to distinguish between specialists and generalists.
We defined specialists as researchers who published in only one domain of theoretical mathematics and generalists as researchers who published in several domains.
Of course, theoretical mathematics is a unique setting, but it allowed us to precisely measure how an increase in the pace of change impacts the creative performance of specialists and generalists.
More specifically, our regression estimates that specialists ended up publishing 83% more citation-weighted papers than generalists in the 10 years after the collapse, relative to the 10 years before.
Not only did generalists in faster-paced areas perform worse than specialists, but they also performed worse than generalists in slower-paced areas.
Generalists in faster-paced areas decreased their productivity and published 37% fewer citation-weighted papers than generalists in slower-paced areas.
Our study suggests that leaders should assess how many specialists and generalists they have on their teams.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Spiders Use Earth’s Electric Field to Fly Hundreds of Miles”

The duo, who work at the University of Bristol, has shown that spiders can sense the Earth’s electric field, and use it to launch themselves into the air.
Ballooning spiders operate within this planetary electric field.
Spiders can increase those forces by climbing onto twigs, leaves, or blades of grass.
This creates substantial electric fields between the air around them and the tips of their leaves and branches-and the spiders ballooning from those tips.
First, they showed that spiders can detect electric fields.
They put the arachnids on vertical strips of cardboard in the center of a plastic box, and then generated electric fields between the floor and ceiling of similar strengths to what the spiders would experience outdoors.
In response, the spiders performed a set of movements called tiptoeing-they stood on the ends of their legs and stuck their abdomens in the air.
When Morley turned off the electric fields inside the boxes, the ballooning spiders dropped.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Yoshua Bengio’s Deep Thoughts on Deep Thinking”

One of the things that surprised me when researching Deep Work was how rare it was to find examples of smart people talking coherently about the process of effective thinking.
This is why I was pleased when a reader recently pointed me toward a video interview with computer scientist Yoshua Bengio – one of the big names in machine learning.
“There is also something to be said about concentrationto really make big progress in science you also need times when I can be very focused and where the ideas about a problem, and different points of view, and all the elements sort of fill my mind. I’m completely filled with thisthat’s when I can be really productive.”
“It might take a really long time before you reach that state”.
The best researchers in my field of theoretical computer science, for example, tend to be those who have the drive, brain power and flexibility to read other peoples’ papers constantly to spark a new recombination or extension that advances the field – an exhausting process.
” when you can really start seeing through things and getting things to stand together and solvingnow you can extend science, now when things are solid in your mind you can move forward.
Our culture likes to emphasize eureka moments, but we often miss the hard, patient work that goes into preparing the mind to generate breakthroughs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Magnetic Field Is Shifting. The Poles May Flip. This Could Get Bad.”

When he analyzed their magnetic properties, he was astonished at what they showed: Millions of years ago, the Earth’s magnetic poles had been on the opposite sides of the planet.
They have figured out how to peer deep inside the Earth, to the edge of the molten, metallic core where the magnetic field is continually being generated.
It turns out that the dipole – the orderly two-pole magnetic field our compasses respond to – is under attack from within.
If these magnetic blocs gain enough strength and weaken the dipole even more, they will force the north and south poles to switch places as they strive to regain supremacy.
The Earth’s magnetic field protects our planet from dangerous solar and cosmic rays, like a giant shield.
Already, changes within the Earth have weakened the field over the South Atlantic so much that satellites exposed to the resulting radiation have experienced memory failure.
At some point, when the magnetic field has dwindled enough, it could be a different story.
We have blithely built our civilization’s critical infrastructure during a time when the planet’s magnetic field was relatively strong, not accounting for the field’s bent for anarchy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Winners and Losers From the NFL’s Divisional Round”

There were four lead changes in the final 3:01, one of which was the play that will live forever in Vikings history, Saints infamy, and I guess Falcons history, too.
You may remember them from the last NFL team to play in St. Louis.
You know, maybe he’s a coaching genius who saw excellence in Keenum and Foles and taught them everything they know about quarterback play.
The Saints lost in heartbreaking fashion, and left the field after allowing a touchdown on the final play of the game.
The players who took the field for that PAT had no hope of helping the Saints win.
Jaguar players yelling for Mike mitchell as they entered the locker room.
Winner: Calais Campbell After erasing Buffalo’s offense last week, Jacksonville’s defense didn’t play exceptionally well Sunday against the Steelers.
Jacksonville kicked a field goal on the ensuing possession, and while the Steelers scored a touchdown in the game’s closing seconds, they would have needed to convert an onside kick to make up for the 10-point deficit they created with the first failed onside kick.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lightwear: Introducing Magic Leap’s Mixed Reality Goggles”

Magic Leap today revealed a mixed reality headset that it believes reinvents the way people will interact with computers and reality.
Unlike the opaque diver’s masks of virtual reality – which replace the real world with a virtual one – Magic Leap’s device, called Lightwear, resembles goggles, which you can see through as if you’re wearing a special pair of glasses.
Where virtual reality recreates everything you see, and augmented reality can inject images into your world, mixed reality adds the images into the real world but is also aware of you and the world you inhabit.
The MagicIn the catacombs of Magic Leap’s massive complex, tucked away in underground clean rooms, robotic arms and bunny-suited humans quietly collaborate, assembling a steady stream of the photonic chips that empower the company’s new, perhaps better reality.
There’s not a lot that anyone at Magic Leap will tell me about the wafers being manufactured on site, likely because they seem to be what puts the magic in Magic Leap.
One of the fundamental problems that Abovitz and his team at Magic Leap were hoping to solve was the discomfort that some experience while using virtual reality headsets and nearly everyone finds in the prolonged use of screens of any type.
The Salvador Dali print is entitled “Spectacles with Holograms and Computers for Seeing Imagined Objects,” and Abovitz says he thinks it represents the work Magic Leap has been doing in recreating light fields.
It is Magic Leap by Dali – Magic Realism seen through the eye of a surrealist.

The orginal article.