Summary of “Snubs, Surprises, and a Staring Contest: The Academy Awards Nominations”

Phantom Thread’s six nominations, including shockers for Best Picture and Best Director, was the loudest possible indicator of a shift in how the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences votes.
Just four of 32 experts at the predictive awards site Gold Derby tapped Phantom Thread for a Best Picture nomination and not a single one predicted Anderson.
It’s an unlikely Academy movie and proof that there is still a great unknowable in the Oscars, a chance for the truly strange.
The oldest, born just one week prior, is Faces Places director Agnès Varda, whose film was named among the five Best Documentary entries.
Hell, Kobe Bryant became the first NBA player to be nominated, for his short film, Dear Basketball.
The nine films nominated for Best Picture combined to earn more than $566 million in the United States-less than Star Wars: The Last Jedi’s domestic box office.
During her four-year reign as Academy president, Cheryl Boone Isaacs added more than 1,500 new members to the organization, widening the scope, including more women, minorities, and international members than ever before.
For director Barry Jenkins and the dozens of people who made that film, that Oscars must have felt like a dream.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Phantom Thread” Is the Best Food Movie in Ages”

When it comes to the dramatic core of the film, the romantic struggle of Reynolds and Alma, “Phantom Thread” isn’t a movie about fashion any more than “American Psycho” is a movie about banking.
In a brief scene early in the film, Reynolds’s cook offhandedly tells Alma that her employer hates his mushrooms cooked in anything more than a whisper of butter.
It’s yet another illustration of the suffocating precision of his desires, which Alma, if she wants to be with Reynolds, must learn to accommodate.
As a dress designer, Reynolds can effortlessly take charge of Alma’s body.
He pauses, ominously: “If I choose to.” But, in the realm of food, Alma sees a chance to seize the advantage.
Alma has elbowed her way into cooking Reynolds a special meal for his birthday-he does not like surprises, Cyril tries to warn her, but she is undeterred.
Alma’s voice-over fills the film, low and hypnotic with her steady love and determination.
It comes at the very end of the movie, when Alma makes Reynolds a mushroom omelette in the kitchen of their country home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Most rewatchable movies ever made”

Some were even made to purposely reward repeat viewings with in-jokes and nods that are reflected in reveals later in the film.
The filmmaking team of Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg, and Nick Frost first made waves with their TV series Spaced, but it was the trio’s 2004 feature film Shaun of the Dead that made them household names.
Like many of Miyazaki films, Spirited Away is a melty, mind-bending riff on a classic fairy tale, but his gorgeous and deliciously eerie take on Alice in Wonderland marks his most compellingly rewatchable.
Elf is no masterpiece-it’s silly!-but a film need not be perfect to qualify as rewatchable.
It wouldn’t be a rewatchable movies list without Groundhog Day, as the time-loop film’s entire conceit involves watching the same events play out over and over again.
The film is delightfully charming and, thanks to Murray, dryly funny, but it’s also surprisingly dark, and it’s that willingness to go to uncomfortable places that I think has made the film endure so long.
I think park of why it never hit at the box office is because they marketed it purely to the ladies when XXL is really one of the most bro films about dude bonding ever made.
There’s no doubt that this holiday film from National Lampoon is a Christmas classic, but it shouldn’t be a hard sell to convince you that it’s one of the most rewatchable movies ever made.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Prison Film Made in Prison”

When Carter’s mother died, in 2001, of complications related to AIDS, Carter was serving a couple of years on a drug conviction at the Pendleton Correctional Facility, a maximum-security state prison near Indianapolis.
As preparations for the film inched along, Carter’s probationary period ended, and he got a chance to read for two small roles.
By last summer, Carter had a new nickname in the prison yard: Movie Star.
Then Holbrook led Carter through a routine of breathing, stretching, and vocal exercise: “This is going to be your ritual every day. Get the instrument loosened up and ready to go.” They made nonsense noises and funny faces.
Discussing a scene in which Carter’s character is about to get into a fight with Murray’s, Holbrook asked Carter about his mind-set.
Mike Rains, Mo’s husband, told me, “Shit, we had to teach the white boys in here to fight.” He told the story of a black inmate, Christopher Anderson, one of Theothus Carter’s mentors, who had a small part in the film.
Three weeks after filming wrapped, Wright and Sackler set up a call with Carter, to discuss a few things.
“I could never understand why they would allow us to make a film in prison if all they were gonna do was punish some of us for being able to participate in it.” Nonetheless, Carter deemed the experience to have been more than worthwhile-the best time of his life, “Second only to the birth of my one and only son.” He was determined to continue to improve as an actor.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Emotional Legacy of ‘The Breakfast Club’, Now on Criterion”

Six years later, Singleton made Boyz n the Hood, a teen drama about growing up in South Central Los Angeles; he cites the Breakfast Club writer-director John Hughes as a major influence.
The Breakfast Club undeniably laid the foundation for a whole new kind of teen drama-one motivated less by plot, and more by mood.
The Breakfast Club strips most of that excess away, locking five kids-a jock, a nerd, a princess, an outcast, and a delinquent in detention together and seeing what happens.
The Breakfast Club was unique because of how Hughes achieves his story goals: through long, drawn-out conversations that built to teary emotional realizations.
The Breakfast Club made $45 million and inspired a wave of more angsty films about growing up, including Pretty in Pink and Some Kind of Wonderful, Stand by Me, For Keeps, Dead Poets Society, Say Anything, and School Ties.
Even the more arty hits of the early ’90s-like Whit Stillman’s Metropolitan, Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused and, yes, Boyz n the Hood-feel loosely connected to the character-driven origins of The Breakfast Club.
Compared to many of the newer works it influenced, The Breakfast Club can feel almost embarrassingly clichéd.
Still, the emotions being worked through in The Breakfast Club are often uncomfortably raw.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 50 Greatest Moments From a Shockingly Great Year at the Movies”

If you found me after a Tuesday evening screening of Baywatch back in May, you’d have found a dejected, hopeless person incapable of imagining a turkey sandwich, let alone a great movie moment.
The business of movies crumbles around itself with stunning regularity, but the magic of movies still burns hot.
Two movies expertly integrated that feeling of a closed-off life lived on a device.
In the opening moments of Muschietti’s movie, young Georgie follows the paper boat he’s designed with his brother Bill all the way through the rain-strewn streets of Derry and down into a sewer, where we meet Pennywise.
Rooney Mara Devours a Pie-Her First Pie-in A Ghost Story / the Big Breakfast in The Florida Project Great year for fruit, great for pastry at the movies.
Most kids’ movies take their audiences for granted.
Drunken Emma Thompson Crashing Her Car on the Lawn in The Meyerowitz Stories In a movie that delicately and specifically chooses every word, phrase, and look with great care, the funniest moment in Noah Baumbach’s latest is pure slapstick.
It’s one of his gentlest, breeziest movies, and that’s never more clear than when all of the film’s main characters find themselves huddled together on a northbound train to deliver the dead son of one of the men to a proper burial in his hometown.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A new featurette for Netflix’s Bright reveals the backstory that should have been in the film”

The action film is set in a modern fantasy world where elves, humans, and orcs live alongside one another, but it only alluded to the larger world that drives much of the story.
To help fill in those gaps, Netflix released a short video that highlights all of the history of the world that would have made the story a bit more comprehensible.
Bright might not have been great film, but it did introduce viewers to an intriguing fantasy world; it just didn’t explain any of it.
In short, magic was once prevalent throughout the world – ancient villages each had a wizard, and used for good.
This backstory is also plagued with some of the same flaws that accompanied the film: incongruities with an alternate world and the familiar history of our own.
It doesn’t all make sense in explaining the fantastical world with the more modern version we saw.
The answers that the short video provides are really useful if you watched the film – it provides some context for the world building that was frustratingly glossed over as Will Smith and Joel Edgerton raced from gunfight to gunfight.
Hopefully, whatever future Netflix has envisioned for this franchise will take a bit more time to explore the world a bit more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kojima: Star Wars in the Era of Disney”

In 1977, George Lucas revolutionized not only film but the entire entertainment industry with Star Wars.
Fueled by the SF craze, Japanese Star Wars-like movies such as The War In Space and Message from Space were rushed into production so that they could be released before Star Wars in Japan.
Lucas’ Star Wars movie revolution gave rise to a creative process mimicked by all films since, and established the current movie business model.
For each new Star Wars movie, the world setting, characters, mechanical creations and other designs must fit within the Star Wars framework, which of course makes it difficult to deliver an experience as all together new and fresh as the original.
The Last JediDespite coming in at a new Star Wars record running time of roughly 152 min.
The film is conscious of gender and minorities in a way that could surely not have been seen in the era of Lucas’ Star Wars.
The Last Jedi may be the first attempt to free Star Wars from its era of mythology, and propel it into the present.
This is what it means for Disney, not George Lucas, to helm the Star Wars franchise.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Free for all: How to find free books and movies”

Don’t take your chances that they’re correct – do a little research instead. PublicDomainSherpa.com is a great resource for finding not only lists of freely available works, but also how to discern if something is truly in the public domain.
Google.com houses Google’s scans of all sorts of books, and public domain ones are downloadable.
There you can find public domain books in plain text, EPUB or web browser versions, or even preformatted for the Amazon Kindle.
Authorama.comBrowser-based public domain books.
Gutenberg.orgPublic domain books in a variety of formats.
Archive.orgEverything from films and television to music, some of the works in the public domain, some not.
Google.com Scanned books, including the most notable public domain works.
Librivox.org Volunteers read public domain books to create free audiobook versions.

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Summary of “How Ridley Scott Saved ‘All the Money in the World'”

The real-life narrative depicted in All the Money in the World is quite the yarn – after his grandson is kidnapped, oil baron J. Paul Getty blithely refuses to pay the ransom, spurring his daughter-in-law Gail and former CIA operative Fletcher Chase to take matters into their own hands – and yet, the story behind the making of the film is just as dramatic.
Director Ridley Scott originally cast Kevin Spacey as the 80-year-old Getty and covered him in prosthetics, but after the actor was the subject of numerous sexual-assault allegations in October, Sony pulled All the Money in the World from its planned premiere at AFI Fest.
That’s when Scott settled on an unprecedented gambit: He would cast 88-year-old Oscar winner Christopher Plummer to take over the Getty role, convince Williams and Wahlberg to come back for reshoots over the Thanksgiving holiday, and quickly integrate the new footage into the movie so it could still hit a 2017 release date.
It’s hard to imagine that anyone could have pulled it off besides Scott, who puts out a big-budget film nearly every year, and at 80 years old, is somehow more prolific than he’s ever been.
How do you do it?You plan, you know exactly what it will look like, and I think it helps me enormously that I still do something as basic as storyboard my own stuff.
There’s all this implication, all these little things are happening, right? And then, near the end, if you watch her very closely, she’s standing there melting when she says to Chase, “We always think of you as family.” How far can you go to let me think that maybe there’s something you wish could have happened?
If you can film things that fast, then why do movies take so long to make?They shouldn’t, that’s why I do two a year.
How did you get involved with All the Money in the World to begin with?This came to me off the shelf.

The orginal article.