Summary of “Minding the Gap’s Bing Liu on America’s Masculinity Crisis”

Liu filmed most of the footage over a five-year span between 2012 and 2017, but he also draws from a well of archival footage that captures the inexorable loss of childhood.
Whereas in the film I was like, Well, I had the confines and the structure and the purpose of making this film to latch onto, to keep plodding on.
There’s only so much we can fit into a 90-minute film.
So it’s not in the film, but I know that, and maybe other people will pick up on that.
Did filming and observing Zack give you insight into this crisis of masculinity white men seem to be experiencing? Absolutely.
In the climax of the film, Zack talks about why he feels like he has to hide his true self and he has to wear a mask.
You’d have to do another film to know what she thinks about it.
Now the scene where I confront my mom about my last film.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Movies to Win an Oscar, Ranked”

The film also played a special role in Oscars history: It received three nominations for Best Actor, which led to the creation of the Best Supporting Actor category the next year.
BraveheartWho says Oscar movies don’t come out during the summer? Mel Gibson’s three-hour popcorn period war film depicts how William Wallace rallied the Scottish people against the English in the 13th century.
The only film ever to win Best Picture without being nominated in any other category, that might be because every movie star from the era is in it, from John Barrymore to Joan Crawford to Jean Hersholt to Wallace Beery to Greta Garbo, who utters her famous “I want to be alone” line.
The trivia footnote about Midnight Cowboy – that it’s the only X-rated film to ever win Best Picture – says more about the weirdness of the ratings board at the time than the film itself, but Midnight Cowboy is still pretty edgy for an Oscar winner.
It’s unfair to limit the film to its point in history: The film is fair and smart and unwaveringly mature to all parties involved, and it’s well-acted across the board, most notably by Dustin Hoffman and Meryl Streep, who overcame Hoffman’s reported boorishness on set to win her first Oscar.
How Green Was My ValleyLike Oliver!, this film will forever be known less for its Best Picture win and more for the film it unjustly defeated, a small movie called Citizen Kane.
We don’t know if we’d consider this Billy Wilder’s best film – this and The Apartment both earned Best Picture – and an argument could be made that this is a happier ending for our hero than maybe he deserves but seriously, what a lunatic run Billy Wilder went on for two decades, right?
You wouldn’t find very many people who would call this anything close to Martin Scorsese’s best film, even though it is the one that finally got him his Oscar.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Spike Lee and Jordan Peele in Conversation: Inclusion, Influences and Bizarre Family Histories”

From the office of Focus Features chairman Peter Kujawski, directors Jordan Peele and Spike Lee can see a near-panoramic backdrop of Universal Studios extending before them.
Lee and Peele are talking about their best picture Oscar nominee BlacKkKlansman, for which Lee also is nominated for best director and adapted screenplay.
Peele, who served as a producer on BlacKkKlansman after being offered it as his directorial follow-up to Get Out, is here with Lee to talk about their first memories of each other, their thoughts on the “Next frontier” in inclusion in the industry and the way their ancestors influence their outlook on where they are now.
JORDAN PEELE You probably don’t remember, but I remember: You came out to Sarah Lawrence [College].
SPIKE LEE My wife, Tonya [Lewis Lee], was twisting my arm.
LEE Well, I’m not going to speak about it, but I’m not making a film in the theater next year.
PEELE Because we’re talking about awards somebody asked you, before we met, “What do you think about Jordan Peele’s chance to win an Oscar?” and you said, “Look, the impact that Get Out has made is so much is more” I don’t remember the exact word you used.
LEE Kevin Willmott and I. PEELE What you and Kevin brought to the script was revelatory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Disney Will Make 21st Century Fox Disappear”

Once Disney’s $71.3 billion acquisition of a wide swath of 21st Century Fox is complete – possibly by as early as the end of February – one of Hollywood’s most storied studios, the home of Shirley Temple movies, The Sound of Music and Avatar, will simply disappear.
As Disney absorbs much of Fox’s film and TV units – Fox Broadcasting, Fox News and TV stations will be spun off into New Fox, headed by Lachlan Murdoch – repercussions will be felt not only in Los Angeles but worldwide.
The number of employees working in TV, whether at 20th Century Fox Television, cable networks including FX and Nat Geo and Fox Sports’ international divisions, is difficult to pinpoint, with 21st Century Fox declining comment.
On Feb. 1, the HR department at 21st Century Fox sent a 12-page protocol guide, “What’s Changing, What’s Not: Countdown to Day One,” to 21st Century staff who won’t be moving to New Fox.
How much? Late last year, 21st Century Fox said employees without contracts will be entitled to “Generous” severance should Disney decide not to keep them beyond the first year after the merger closes.
When the dust settles, the iconic 20th Century Fox movie logo will remain only as a label within the Disney stable guided by Emma Watts, now vice chairman and president of 20th Century Fox Film.
Peter Rice, a protege of Rupert Murdoch who is now president of 21st Century Fox, will become chairman of Walt Disney Television and co-chair of Disney Media Networks, overseeing all of Disney’s TV assets sans ESPN. And Fox TV Group chairman and CEO Dana Walden will become chairman of Disney TV Studios and ABC Entertainment.
Disney employees from the old Fox sharing acreage, parking structures and a commissary with New Fox could get awkward.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 50 Best Sports Movies of All Time”

The best sports movies are independent of the sport they’re depicting, with universal stories that should appeal to anyone whether they love the sport or not.
This is to say: Our favorite sports movies tend to avoid the traditional “Meet hero, see hero overcome adversity, see hero win big game” sports movie structure, or at least deconstruct it enough to justify themselves.
For some reason, many sports movies insist on being predictable, adhering to the formula.
Those are not the sort of sports movies you will find on our list of the 50 best sports movies of all time.
The best sports surprise us: These great sports movies do the same.
At the same time Rush isn’t a sports movie where we’re meant to admire both men equally – these competitive, closed-off men both seem to be striving for something bigger than victory, and both seem incapable of finding it.
Tin Cup suggested that Shelton would make various versions of wonderfully grown-up, sexy sports movies for years to come.
Many sports movies are sad or touching, but few are as profoundly pathetic as Foxcatcher, which finds director Bennett Miller further exploring the role that sports has in people’s lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Oscars’ ‘Green Book’ and ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Controversy”

A musical love letter to classic Hollywood, a dark comedy about a woman’s rage, a civil-rights road movie, and a VH1-style rock biopic are not four films that you would immediately lump together – unless you follow the Oscars, in which case you know that La La Land, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Green Book, and Bohemian Rhapsody all hold the dubious distinction of becoming their respective seasons’ official villains to a certain segment of the awards-watching public.
Obviously, we won’t know if Green Book and Bohemian Rhapsody will follow in those same footsteps for a few more weeks.
With First Man floundering, Green Book became Universal’s lead horse in the Oscars race, and Variety and The Hollywood Reporter in particular have given plenty of column inches over to its defense.
Team Green Book has been working hard to combat allegations that it’s a film for white people: Producer Octavia Spencer introduced the film at the Globes, and icons like Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Quincy Jones, and Harry Belafonte have publicly co-signed Vallelonga’s efforts.
At the Golden Globes, the movie’s team, all of whom were perfectly fine making a movie with Bryan Singer as recently as a year-and-a-half ago, embraced the polite fiction that the movie was directed by no one.
All they want to do is enjoy a movie about an interracial friendship, or the band they loved as a teenager, and now people are saying that, as good-hearted progressives, they aren’t supposed to like them? It’s not as if Green Book and Bohemian Rhapsody are the works of Richard Wagner; these are big mainstream movies about how being gay is okay, and how lifelong friendships can result if we throw away our biases.
As with the president, all this controversy may have the unintended effect of pulling the movies’ fans in closer.
What the two disparate reactions to Green Book and Bohemian Rhapsody are really about is a dispute over the utility of pop-culture comfort food.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New York Review of Books”

Public broadcasting appealed to the minister in Rogers: he was concerned that profit-driven networks like NBC diluted arts programming, and he envisioned programming for young people with less slapstick, more meaning.
Coworkers remember Rogers as both zany-dancing across the set with an inflatable sex doll they had hid in his closet-and imperious, as when he reprimanded an actor who kindly suggested to Henrietta Pussycat that she not cry, something Rogers would never suggest to a child.
A new book, Maxwell King’s The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers, offers the almost wacky details of his life but only hints at the tension within Rogers, both the dutiful son of an industrialist and a sensitive composer devoted to the idea that the world children live in is fundamentally different from the world inhabited by adults.
King seems to almost reluctantly settle on “Androgynous” when he might have just left it with what Rogers told a friend: “Well, you know, I must be right smack in the middle. Because I have found women attractive, and I have found men attractive.” This would satisfy a preschooler but is too loose for King, who treats his subject’s sex life as if he were conducting a police investigation: “There was no double life. And without exception, close associates concluded that Fred Rogers was absolutely faithful to his marriage vows.”
Two years later, Rogers was featured in a Wall Street Journal profile under the headline “Loved by Kids for His TV ‘Neighborhood,’ Mr. Rogers is a Hit in Boardrooms, Too.” Rogers declined to discuss the strike but criticized the union’s existence.
In a series of tweets a few weeks after the film grossed $20 million-the highest-earning biographical documentary of all time-Aberlin listed the reasons she chose not to participate, chief among them a refusal first, she says, by Rogers and then by his production company after his death to allow the actors to continue with what Aberlin refers to as the Fred Rogers “Ministry,” Neighborhood-derived performances intended to reach children in meaningful ways, by staging the operas, for example.
Recently, the Fred Rogers Company, renamed for him after his death, sold the rights to one of his songs to be used in Google’s new Pixel 3 phone commercial, and a biopic starring Tom Hanks is now being filmed.
The film and book blur the distinction between art and commerce, and the new shows are born of the mercantilism of the Fred Rogers Company, not the art of its original artistic director.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cultural criticism matters”

The two years since the 2016 election have been disastrous for the continued employment of cultural critics and journalists The last two years have not been particularly great for cultural criticism and culture writing more generally.
If you look beyond publications that have intentionally reduced the number of culture writers on their staffs, you’ll find many that have curtailed hiring around culture writing – often in favor of expanding political coverage.
Kracauer’s methods can be applied to our current pop culture – and the most astute cultural critics often do so Kracauer, of course, was writing his book after the end of World War II. Nazism had been defeated, and German cinema was knocked back by the end of the war as much as everything else in the country.
Culture writing can help better explain a vast, sometimes contradictory society When I make the above argument in favor of cultural criticism to journalistic colleagues who deal in what might be dubbed the “Hard sciences” of journalism – data-driven, boots-on-the-ground reporting – I am always aware that it sounds just a little fantastical.
Few critics looked at the pop culture of the early 2010s and said, “Yep, a culture war’s brewing,” even if it seems blindingly obvious in hindsight.
7 great pieces of culture writing from 2018 If you’re excited to explore some great culture writing from the past year, here are seven of my favorite pieces digging into pop culture in all its forms.
“CBS’s toxic culture isn’t just behind the scenes. It’s in the shows that it makes,” Kathryn VanArendonk for Vulture VanArendonk uses deep knowledge of CBS crime procedurals to point to how a culture of sexual harassment was allowed to flourish not just at the company but in the shows it put on the air.
Correction: The writers who left Buzzfeed, though culture writers, weren’t primarily focused on writing criticism.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The inside story of Bandersnatch, the weirdest Black Mirror episode yet”

Only two people really understand how “Bandersnatch” – the latest episode of Black Mirror – actually works.
It is utterly unlike any episode that has gone before it and yet is unmistakably part of the Black Mirror universe.
Although most of the people behind the episode refer to it as a film, Weeks, who programmed computer games earlier in his career, likens it to a video game.
For Todd Yellin – the Netflix VP who first floated the idea of an interactive Black Mirror episode – getting the terminology around the episode right is of critical importance.
At the opposite end, Yellin says, indicating his right hand, you have a normal Black Mirror episode.
An episode that lets viewers pick their own route through an episode naturally subverts the idea that film-makers have the final say over how a film will be viewed or understood.
The huge file sizes involved in streaming multiple versions of the same scene, by the way, are why the film isn’t available for download.Brooker says the first time he watched the completed episode of “Bandersnatch” was as close to profundity as he ever gets.
If Netflix’s bet is right, and it also works for viewers, then this episode of Black Mirror might open the floodgates to a whole new era of film-making.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sci-Fi Movie Brainstorm”

The director-himself a three-time Oscar nominee-was Douglas Trumbull, a visual-effects genius who had already worked on some of the most monumental films of all time: as Stanley Kubrick’s special photographic effects supervisor on 2001: A Space Odyssey, and as visual effects supervisor on Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, and Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner.
Doing so would have presented a mechanical problem, for one thing: Physical film moved through a camera as sprockets caught holes along the side-there was a limit to how quickly the film could move.
George Feltenstein is a film historian and the senior vice president of catalog marketing at Warner Bros., which now owns Brainstorm.
A week before filming began, Trumbull gathered much of the cast and some crew at the famed Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California, a retreat where, according to its website, “Seekers” can “Explore deeper spiritual possibilities[and] forge new understandings of self and society.” The Brainstorm story has roots in the beliefs of Stanley Grof, a Czech psychiatrist who worked with Esalen and who was exploring the pursuit of altered mental states without the use of narcotics of pharmaceuticals.
Beyond Trumbull’s vision, beyond the charisma and ease of Walken and Wood, and Fletcher’s fierce and funny performance, there was the film’s other star: the fictional technology itself, the feverish Brainstorm/Showscan hybrid.
While filming one scene outside on the roof of the church, the sound of the 70mm film running through the camera was so loud it was difficult to hear what was going on.
” After depositions of Trumbull and other cast and crew members, including Louise Fletcher, the insurance company decided that abandonment wasn’t necessary and put more than $6 million of its own money toward the completion of the film, to pay for the new scenes and some special effects.
BRAINSTORM’S LEGACY”We needed a film that did what Brainstorm did when Brainstorm did it,” says Scott Bukatman, a professor of film and media studies at Stanford University.

The orginal article.