Summary of “Kojima: Star Wars in the Era of Disney”

In 1977, George Lucas revolutionized not only film but the entire entertainment industry with Star Wars.
Fueled by the SF craze, Japanese Star Wars-like movies such as The War In Space and Message from Space were rushed into production so that they could be released before Star Wars in Japan.
Lucas’ Star Wars movie revolution gave rise to a creative process mimicked by all films since, and established the current movie business model.
For each new Star Wars movie, the world setting, characters, mechanical creations and other designs must fit within the Star Wars framework, which of course makes it difficult to deliver an experience as all together new and fresh as the original.
The Last JediDespite coming in at a new Star Wars record running time of roughly 152 min.
The film is conscious of gender and minorities in a way that could surely not have been seen in the era of Lucas’ Star Wars.
The Last Jedi may be the first attempt to free Star Wars from its era of mythology, and propel it into the present.
This is what it means for Disney, not George Lucas, to helm the Star Wars franchise.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Free for all: How to find free books and movies”

Don’t take your chances that they’re correct – do a little research instead. PublicDomainSherpa.com is a great resource for finding not only lists of freely available works, but also how to discern if something is truly in the public domain.
Google.com houses Google’s scans of all sorts of books, and public domain ones are downloadable.
There you can find public domain books in plain text, EPUB or web browser versions, or even preformatted for the Amazon Kindle.
Authorama.comBrowser-based public domain books.
Gutenberg.orgPublic domain books in a variety of formats.
Archive.orgEverything from films and television to music, some of the works in the public domain, some not.
Google.com Scanned books, including the most notable public domain works.
Librivox.org Volunteers read public domain books to create free audiobook versions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Ridley Scott Saved ‘All the Money in the World'”

The real-life narrative depicted in All the Money in the World is quite the yarn – after his grandson is kidnapped, oil baron J. Paul Getty blithely refuses to pay the ransom, spurring his daughter-in-law Gail and former CIA operative Fletcher Chase to take matters into their own hands – and yet, the story behind the making of the film is just as dramatic.
Director Ridley Scott originally cast Kevin Spacey as the 80-year-old Getty and covered him in prosthetics, but after the actor was the subject of numerous sexual-assault allegations in October, Sony pulled All the Money in the World from its planned premiere at AFI Fest.
That’s when Scott settled on an unprecedented gambit: He would cast 88-year-old Oscar winner Christopher Plummer to take over the Getty role, convince Williams and Wahlberg to come back for reshoots over the Thanksgiving holiday, and quickly integrate the new footage into the movie so it could still hit a 2017 release date.
It’s hard to imagine that anyone could have pulled it off besides Scott, who puts out a big-budget film nearly every year, and at 80 years old, is somehow more prolific than he’s ever been.
How do you do it?You plan, you know exactly what it will look like, and I think it helps me enormously that I still do something as basic as storyboard my own stuff.
There’s all this implication, all these little things are happening, right? And then, near the end, if you watch her very closely, she’s standing there melting when she says to Chase, “We always think of you as family.” How far can you go to let me think that maybe there’s something you wish could have happened?
If you can film things that fast, then why do movies take so long to make?They shouldn’t, that’s why I do two a year.
How did you get involved with All the Money in the World to begin with?This came to me off the shelf.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”A Whole Ocean of Oil Under Our Feet”: ‘There Will Be Blood’ at 10″

The mine shaft, the same one that Daniel Plainview plummets down into a lonely silver deposit in New Mexico in 1898, is the only verifiable truth that There Will Be Blood needs.
Erson’s film, which tracks Plainview’s rise to great wealth and self-imposed isolation, is best remembered for the extraordinary performance of Daniel Day-Lewis, who won his second Oscar for his portrayal of the monomaniacal oilman.
Ross is not Plainview and Oil! is not There Will Be Blood, but the first 150 pages of Sinclair’s novel bear a striking resemblance to Anderson’s film.
Plainview’s performative streak, the introduction of his “Son and partner H.W. Plainview” position him as an insurgent ready to work for the common folk lucky enough to be born upon the proverbial black gold underneath their feet.
Plainview’s primary adversary, the faith healer Eli Sunday, is a fitting stand-in for the obvious theme sitting on the surface of the movie, like the earthquake oil Plainview and H.W. stumble upon on the Sunday ranch.
Everytime Plainview grumbles, “Yes, I do!” and “Give me the blood, Lord!” during Sunday’s slapping fit in church, I lose it.
In There Will Be Blood, he endlessly studied 19th-century drilling technologies while plunging into Plainview’s dark recesses.
Plainview’s “Drainage” speech has become an iconic, much mimicked, oft-memed bit of movie coinage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Women Who Run the ‘Star Wars’ Universe”

Early on, the story group fought for the character Ahsoka Tano, a 14-year-old girl created by George Lucas and further developed by the director, producer and writer Dave Filoni.
Characters like Ashoka Tano are gaining prominence in the “Star Wars” universe.
Even more promising, in “Rogue One” nonwhite characters accounted for 44.7 percent of all dialogue, a marked increase from zero in the 1977 original.
Where his research distinguishes the “Star Wars” saga is not in its lines of dialogue, but in the centrality of its female characters.
The laboratory’s character network visualization software is able to tease out each individual character interaction.
The more interactions characters have, the more vital they are to the plot.
The team found that in the vast majority of Hollywood scripts, women play mere accessory roles, their characters inessential to plot development.
Ms. Hart credits Mr. Johnson with the decision to introduce diverse characters for “The Last Jedi.” Of the new cast members, several are women, including Rose Tico, played by Kelly Marie Tran, the first Asian-American women to star in the saga.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Netflix is trying to rewrite movie marketing with Bright”

The company gobbles up acquisitions at film festivals like Sundance and Toronto, but its insistence on debuting new films on the streaming service and in theaters simultaneously have made theater chains reluctant to screen Netflix films.
“And what we found was, frankly, the enthusiasm that came from Netflix, and their ability to really support us, and make the right version of the movie with resources, far surpassed anywhere else we were looking.”
In Los Angeles, a few billboards for Bright have popped up among the sea of artwork for Star Wars: The Last Jedi, but Jaffe says the service has found that the best venue to promote its new titles is actually Netflix itself.
Netflix creates different sets of visual assets for a title like Bright, with the system algorithmically determining what artwork is best suited for a given user.
Netflix uses trailers the same way, creating different clips themed around a given genre that are then served to users based on their interests – some even automatically playing after watching a different film or show.
It’s the same smart algorithmic process my colleague Ben Popper detailed last year: as people watch Bright, Netflix will get a better sense of what kind of viewers are drawn to the film, and the system will hone the film’s profile appropriately.
New potential audience members will likely be revealed, activating the promotional cycle all over again, but now targeting the people Netflix didn’t know would be interested in the movie in the first place.
Like the intelligent, algorithm-based systems Netflix is using to promote and surface Bright, that strategy represents an entirely new playing field.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Theater chains are terrified of MoviePass because of subscribers like me”

MoviePass still pays theater chains full price for the tickets it passes on to its own customers.
Problem is, AMC and other chains have to worry about MoviePass going belly-up.
MoviePass is banking on some subscribers seeing only one movie per month, or none at all.
MoviePass changes almost everything about the theater experience, when the cost of entry is virtually zero.
I can imagine other subscribers writing off theaters until something similar to MoviePass pops up again – especially with so many other, cheaper entertainment options available.
So MoviePass poses a kind of existential threat to theater owners, because its model devalues access to the theater experience.
MoviePass is harming how much studios and exhibitors can control their own destiny There is a silver lining in MoviePass’ risky gamble.
So friends and family members can share a MoviePass card just as they do with a Netflix or HBO Go login, spoiling the usage data MoviePass is banking on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How ‘Broadcast News’ Predicted Journalism As We Know It”

Broadcast News, the romantic comedy-drama released on December 16, 1987, is among the best movies ever made about journalism.
In the present, the film gets going when Jane gives a disastrous speech at a conference for local television news broadcasters, talking about the pervasive influence of entertainment-driven ideas of news.
Broadcast News is a movie that is right about journalism, and right about ambition, and there are three major sequences that show how Brooks captured the technical and emotional realities of both.
Jack Nicholson, as anchor Bill Rorish, James Brooks recalls, spent an intensive day with Zirinsky, learning how to speak and read the news like a real anchor.
“In Broadcast News, when [Jane] won’t go with [Tom] on the plane, he keeps saying, ‘It’s a big deal.’ I remember Jim just kept saying to me, ‘It’s a big deal if you leave.”” They shared an open and generous idea of what love can be and even the recollections of their fights show just how much they respected each other.
The 2017 blockbuster Girls Trip was, as New York Times Magazine editor Jazmine Hughes pointed out, a film about ethics in journalism.
“It’s nuts what it saw coming. [Network] saw reality TV. stone-cold saw the future.” He does not believe that Broadcast News predicted the future in the same way; he thinks the timing was right, and the research was solid, and it is as simple as “The future was beginning to happen.” When I asked Zirinsky if she thinks Broadcast News is the best movie ever made about journalists, she said she wasn’t sure; she liked Good Night, and Good Luck a lot.
Broadcast News predicted that the way we feel about the news would become the news itself, and that there was real drama to be found in how much the people who make the news care about it – let’s not forget one of Aaron’s lines, delivered with sarcasm, which proves truer than he’d like to admit: Journalists are the real story.

The orginal article.

Summary of “2017 was a phenomenal year for movies. Here are the 21 best.”

In the introduction to her review anthology For Keeps: 30 Years at the Movies, the legendary film critic Pauline Kael wrote, “I’m frequently asked why I don’t write my memoirs. I think I have.” She meant what most movie critics realize at some point: that reading your past reviews and revisiting the lists of films you liked most during the year reveals not just something about a particular year in cinema, but something about you as well.
That’s the feeling I get constructing my list of the best films of 2017, a year that overflowed with great films in every genre, from horror and romantic comedy to documentary and arthouse drama.
Here are my top 21 films of 2017, with 14 honorable mentions.
The movie’s best details are in the strong bonds that develop between characters, and I left the film with the realization that for the first time in my life, I loved a Star Wars movie.
14) A Ghost Story Director David Lowery filmed A Ghost Story in secret, then premiered it at the Sundance Film Festival to critical acclaim.
11) Rat Film Rat Film is about rats, yes – and rat poison experts and rat hunters and people who keep rats as pets.
It’s a perplexing and challenging film, crafted without the traditional guardrails that guide most biographical movies – dates, times, major accomplishments, and so on.
Writer-director Greta Gerwig made the film as an act of love, not just toward her hometown of Sacramento but also toward girlhood, and toward the feeling of always being on the outside of wherever real life is happening.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ Solves the Modern Movie Villain Problem”

Where once there was Vader, now there is his grandson, Ben Solo, reborn as the self-styled heavy-in-waiting Kylo Ren.
Driver’s clambering gait and shaved-ape bearing gave Kylo Ren a quality of being not-quite-evolved, as if he hadn’t finished growing into his cowl and mask.
Throughout The Force Awakens, Kylo Ren take a star tour across pop psychology’s greatest hits: He mocks the graceful heartthrob Dameron like a nerd turning the tides on the high school quarterback; he mewls at his mentor, the shadowy Snoke, desperate for his approval but unyielding in his arrogance; and in an Oedipal twist, he murders his own father, a show of faith to the dark side and also real stakes in the film.
The big-top movie franchises, upon which so much of the scaffolding of the film industry is hanging, have one big problem: The villains suck.
At the end of a simmering, balletic battle, Kylo turns toward Rey and reaches out to her: Join me, he says.
We still don’t quite know what happened between Luke and Kylo, not really.
Through much of The Force Awakens, Kylo Ren wears a mask that is one part downhill racer and one part paintball fetishist.
The kind that make us ask, Who hurt you? Kylo Ren may be a boy at heart, but he’s a villain in full.

The orginal article.