Summary of “Exclusive: Daniel Day-Lewis Opens Up About Giving Up Acting After Phantom Thread”

Around two years ago, as part of his preparation to play the couturier ­Reynolds Woodcock in Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest film, Phantom Thread, Daniel Day-Lewis re-created a Balenciaga dress.
To become Woodcock, Day-Lewis, who is 60, watched archival footage of fashion shows from the 1940s and ’50s, studied the lives of designers, and most important, learned to sew.
To get into the mind-set of Reynolds Woodcock, Day-Lewis not only learned the couturier’s trade but also meticulously invented every aspect of Woodcock’s personal wardrobe, from the wool and cashmere fabrics he selected from Savile Row tailor Anderson & Sheppard to the bishop purple socks he ordered from an ecclesiastical shop in Rome to the shoes he had custom made at George Cleverley, in London, which, Day-Lewis said, “Has the allure of being slightly less well known than John Lobb.” He also considered Woodcock’s surroundings-how his house should be decorated, the pens and sketch pads he used, the items on his nightstand.
For years, Day-Lewis, who is the son of Cecil Day-Lewis, a poet laureate of England, and Jill Balcon, an actress who was the daughter of Sir Michael Balcon, the head of one of England’s predominant film studios, was not the least bit interested in stories about his home country.
“I don’t know why, but suddenly I had a strong wish to tell an English story,” Day-Lewis said about Phantom Thread. “England is deep in me. I’m made of that stuff. For a long time, a film set in England was too close to the world that I’d escaped from-drawing rooms, classic Shakespeare, Downton Abbey did not interest me. But I was fascinated by London after the war. My parents told stories about living through the Blitz, and I felt like I ingested that. I am sentimental about that world. And my dad was very much like Reynolds Woodcock. If a poet is not self-absorbed, what else is he?”.
Day-Lewis has not seen Phantom Thread. He has viewed many of his other films, but has no plans to see this one.
In the past, he always took extended breaks between films-blue periods and times of decompression that prompted Jim Sheridan, the director of My Left Foot and two other Day-Lewis films, to remark that “Daniel hates acting.” But after a break, he would be seduced anew by a fascinating character, a compelling story, an exciting director.
Although there have been rumors that Day-Lewis is going to become a fashion designer, he laughed when I suggested that career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Awards Extra: Jordan Peele and Greta Gerwig Flip the Script”

At the foot of a sweeping staircase in a stately Bel Air mansion, Greta Gerwig leaned in to adjust Jordan Peele’s bow tie as a camera shutter snapped.
In an industry where women directors and directors of color are shockingly rare, Gerwig and Peele have broken through and made two of this year’s best-reviewed films.
Now, in 2017, Gerwig and Peele have arrived with their first films as solo directors just when Hollywood and the Academy are taking a hard look at who gets the opportunities to tell his or her stories in this town, and who often gets left out.
Peele dropped out of Sarah Lawrence College after two years to perform sketch and improv comedy at Second City and Boom Chicago, before joining the cast of MADtv at the same time as another bi-racial performer, who was as outgoing as Peele was introverted, Keegan-Michael Key.
In January of 2015, after writing her Lady Bird script, which at one point ballooned to 350 pages, Gerwig checked herself into a bed-and-breakfast in Cold Spring, New York, to finish it.
In the last two years, both Gerwig and Peele were invited to join the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
Back at the photo shoot, Gerwig and Peele assumed another pose, mock-arguing behind a desk like a couple in a screwball comedy.
In the classic Hollywood version of this scene, Gerwig would be played by Katharine Hepburn and Peele by Cary Grant.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s Next for Marvel’s Cinematic Universe?”

This is the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a world where every somewhere is always connected to an elsewhere.
DC Entertainment’s steroidal cinematic universe, quick-started with 2013’s Man of Steel, is the go-to cautionary tale for how poorly Marvel’s model fits other worlds, and its problems are legion.
Trekkies, jealous of all this world-building, have pined for a new universe to replace the neglected Star Trek universe of the ’90s. Hasbro, bummed by Paramount’s hefty take of that fat Transformers cut, wants to append its G.I. Joe franchise to the other toys in the toy box.
It’s hard to credit Marvel comics themselves for the rise of the cinematic universe model.
In the summer of 2008, a mere two movies into the MCU, Kevin Feige described the universe as essentially a proprietary Christmas miracle.
A universe as a model allows Marvel to keep the factory running while also insulating itself from the whims of the market via a rotating stock of characters.
“Moving forward, you’ll see the DC movie universe being a universe, but one that comes from the heart of the filmmaker who’s creating them.” Similarly, Universal has begun to walk back from its so-called Dark Universe, which was kick-started with The Mummy with plans to eventually link in Frankenstein, Dracula, and the Phantom of the Opera.
What’s a universe but a brand by another name? Disney recently announced the gestation of another Star Wars universe in the form of another trilogy, with another accompanying TV series, and it’s hard to envision Marvel adopting a radically different approach.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Denis Villeneuve Is the Sci-Fi Remake Master with Blade Runner 2049 and the Upcoming Dune”

When Arrival made the awards-season rounds last year, director Denis Villeneuve was already eyebrows-deep into making Blade Runner 2049, the Ryan Gosling-led sequel to Ridley Scott’s 1982 cult favorite, Blade Runner.
Instead he’s still fielding questions about Blade Runner 2049.
With Blade Runner, you inherited a pre-existing visual world.
On Blade Runner, I needed the dialogue and to bounce ideas quickly.
Some critics accused the “World” in Blade Runner 2049 of being hostile to women.
The first Blade Runner was quite rough on the women; something about the film noir aesthetic.
Blade Runner is not about tomorrow; it’s about today.
The first Blade Runner is the biggest dystopian statement of the last half century.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cover Story: Inside Marvel’s Universe with Kevin Feige, Thor, Black Widow, Iron Man, Hulk, and More”

Marvel Studios, which kicked things off with Iron Man in 2008, has released 17 films that collectively have grossed more than $13 billion at the global box office; 5 more movies are due out in the next two years.
They came for Kevin Feige, the unassuming man in a black baseball cap who took Marvel Studios from an underdog endeavor with a roster of B-list characters to a cinematic empire that is the envy of every other studio in town.
On the wall of one of those early, drab offices hung a 1988 Technicolor poster by Marvel artists Ed Hannigan and Joe Rubinstein, crowded to the margins with hundreds of characters from all different story lines with the words MARVEL UNIVERSE emblazoned across the top.
Jackson signed an unheard-of nine-picture deal with Marvel shortly after Iron Man came out, ensuring his participation in the subsequent Avengers movies and other Marvel properties.
Feige doesn’t deny that directors need to play by a set of rules when they join Team Marvel, especially now that the concept of a single cinematic universe is non-negotiable.
Director Ryan Coogler’s upcoming Black Panther movie marks another major shift for Marvel: in February, the studio will launch its first movie with a black actor, Chadwick Boseman, in the lead. Captain Marvel, starring Brie Larson in the title role of a female air-force captain with superpowers, opens in 2019.
Critics sometimes forget that Feige announced Captain Marvel and Black Panther in 2014-during the Perlmutter era.
Feige has no worries about Marvel’s longevity, a point he illustrated by quoting one of his personal heroes: “On opening day, when people asked Mr. Walt Disney if Disneyland was finished, he said, as long as there’s imagination in the world, Disney will never be complete.” And as long as people are willing to watch superheroes save the world, Marvel-and Kevin Feige-won’t be done, either.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ten Long Years Of Trying To Make Armie Hammer Happen”

Paired with his performance in an Oscar-bound film, these undertones, largely organically surfaced by the internet, have the potential to finally Make Armie Hammer Happen.
There were, essentially, no more attempts to Make Armie Hammer Happen.
It also helped launch what has since coalesced into a sort of Cult of Hammer – a new, if unexpected, route to Making Armie Hammer Happen.
Take the Vulture post, published just days later, entitled “11 Delectable Armie Hammer Stories.” It simply lists examples of how Hammer has narrativized himself in ways that are kooky or weird or simply non-Hollywood: “He insists he doesn’t have a trust fund,” “He was on the receiving end of nonconsensual knife play,” and the most delectable of all, “He once liked a bunch of bondage tweets,” referring to Hammer’s Twitter penchant, written up by Cosmopolitan in March 2017 under the headline “Armie Hammer keeps ‘liking’ BDSM Twitter Posts and Doesn’t Know Everyone Can See It.”.
It’s particularly true today: Traditional PR never Made Armie Hammer happen.
Here, Hammer is once again narrativizing his career: unjust Hollywood, that’s why Armie Hammer didn’t happen.
Armie Hammer didn’t happen for 10 long years because, according to his logic, the system was stacked against him.
In a moment ripe for holistic re-evaluation of the way careers are advanced and protected in Hollywood, it’s worth contemplating why, and how, Armie Hammer has been given the time and space to finally happen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Simple Art of Getting Anything You Want”

The Power of a Selection FilterThe average big movie star comes out with a new film every year or so.
If we imagine a career spanning the length of time in which Day-Lewis only released 6 new movies, then we can guess that most actors or actresses of similar acclaim would have put out something in the range of 15 to 20 films.
Selection filters protect you from wasting your time on anything but the important stuff.
Can You Really Have Anything?It would be naive to suggest that anyone can do absolutely anything they want.
Most of the things that hold people back from getting what they want are imagined.
You can’t have every movie you make be considered a masterpiece while also making a new one every year or so.
You can’t decide that you want to be someone who is open to every new project, while still hoping that you can make exponential progress in the one area that really matters.
Another way to put it is like this - the chances are that you can have anything you want, but that also means you can’t have everything you want.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Culture Caught Up With Spike Lee”

In 1992, Esquire ran a cover article with the incredible title “Spike Lee Hates Your Cracker Ass.” It contained many quotes like this from Lee: “We’ve been robbed of our names and robbed of our culture. When you’re told every single day for 400 years that you’re subhuman, when you rob people of their self-worth, knowledge, history, there’s nothing worse you can do. We got told that if we could ride in a bus next to a white person, take a leak next to a white man, everything would be fine. Well, we got those things.”
His mother went to Spelman, and so did her mother, Zimmie Shelton, the granddaughter of a slave, who went on to teach art, and, Lee says, “Saved the Social Security checks” so that she was able to put him through both college and N.Y.U. film school, where his contemporaries included Jim Jarmusch and Ang Lee.
Claude Grunitzky, an entrepreneur and the founder of the pioneering urban-culture magazine Trace, has known Lee and collaborated on commercial and editorial projects with him since the ’90s. He explained to me that Lee was always aware of his own value, and that as a result, he made significantly more money from his films than a typical independent director.
Lee also brought in lucrative advertising deals through his company Spike DDB. The eight black-and-white Air Jordan commercials he directed for Nike in the early ’90s – and in which he co-starred as his character Mars Blackmon – were nearly as pivotal in embedding the product within the culture as the young M.V.P.’s offense.
In “The Spike Lee Reader,” the film scholar Paula J. Massood noted that “Lee’s production and advertising companies provide the financial foundations” for him to pursue deeply original work without caving to market imperatives.
“You have to recreate the genre, otherwise you don’t survive. Stevie Wonder is not a pop musician; Stevie Wonder is a genre. Michael Jackson is a genre to himself. Spike Lee has moved into that territory. Spike Lee is not short on talent. What Spike Lee is short on is friends in the industry, and the kind of space to fail. He has no room to fail.” Rosie Perez, a longtime collaborator of Lee’s, echoed McBride’s sentiments over the phone.
There were numerous other paintings and pictures of icons of black culture, like Joe Louis and Lee himself, as well as those thank-you notes from Jordan.
“Oh, [expletive], there’s my wife,” Lee exclaimed, leading me over to Tonya Lewis Lee, a statuesque, green-eyed blonde whose hair was sheared shorter on the sides than on top.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Superhero Movie Generation”

Five of the 10 highest-grossing movies released in the United States in 2017 are superhero stories.
If the number holds at five-and with Justice League just days away, it could easily rise to six-it will be the largest preponderance of superhero movies at the top of the box office in the history of the movies.
There is something complicating the inevitable feeling of the superhero crescendo, if it is that: Four of the year’s 10 best reviewed films are also superhero movies, according to the aggregators at Rotten Tomatoes.
More and more, when we say “Movies,” we mean “Superhero movies.” It’s difficult to know which has come at the expense of which: Are superhero movies getting better, or is everything else getting worse? As the number of feature films from major studios dwindles every year, and the willingness to produce original stories shrinks in equal measure, the imbalance is beginning to blot out everything else, with a few rare exceptions.
“Hollywood only makes movies for 14-year-olds” has become an old saw among cranky movie lovers, but scan the listings: What else is Hollywood even offering these 14-year-olds?
Next summer will mark a decade since the twin offerings of Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight, our pick for the best superhero movie ever, and Jon Favreau’s Iron Man, the film that officially announced “The Marvel Cinematic Universe.” That canny phrase-high-level corporate marketing argot-became the catchall terminology a generation of moviegoers uses to situate its favorite movies.
Next year, the new X-Men flick is a horror movie and the Spider-Man movie is a Venom movie.
Is this a good thing? Are more footloose Ragnaroks what the superhero industrial complex, and the movie industry writ large, is in need of? Maybe.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Justice League Is a Big, Ugly Mess”

Dear Justice League, I must say that no, the lighting is not good.
To be fair, the DC movies preceding Justice League-particularly Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Suicide Squad-have gotten their share of criticism already.
What a nice few months that was! But now, with cracking whiplash, arrives Justice League, the culmination of the three non-Suicide Squad DC films to come before it-a hurried and slapdash heroes-assemble affair that clatters loudly and senselessly, tossed together out of loose screws and scrap metal.
Justice League awkwardly tries to move away from much of the forbidding tone of Man of Steel or B v S, a perhaps studio-mandated attempt to lighten things up, to add some effervescence like the kind Tony Stark and friends enjoy together.
Justice League is such a misguided mess-often feeling entirely unguided-that you want to intervene, softly saying, “Stop, stop, you don’t have to do this, stop.” But you can’t talk to the movie screen, so I’ll say it here.
His human side is warring with, and often loses to, the burgeoning artificial consciousness placed inside him by his grieving father, an interesting conflict that Justice League introduces and then does very little with.
Perhaps the Justice League franchise really has been rotten from the start, experiencing not evolution but entropy, with Wonder Woman standing as an anomalous glimmer of false hope.
I could be projecting, but boy does poor Gal Gadot look so sad in Justice League, watching this lumbering and witless movie lay waste to the nice thing she just got finished making.

The orginal article.