Summary of “Return of weasel-like fishers finally gives Washington State all its carnivores back”

Niffler, Kendra, Neville, and Katie-all named after characters from the Harry Potter universe-are the last fishers to be released into Washington State’s North Cascades National Park.
“The West Coast has more carnivores than the East Coast because it was less heavily developed,” says Mitchell Parsons, a wildlife ecologist who wrote his doctoral thesis on fishers.
In Washington state, some 260 fishers have been reintroduced since 2008.
So far so good-the fishers have been surviving and reproducing: “The ecosystem’s here, the food’s here, there’s plenty of room for them,” Ransom says.
The national parks also worked with the Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Alberta, and the First Nations tribes there, to capture and transport healthy young fishers.
Mark Neutzmann, a wildlife biologist for the Yakama Nation, says they support the return of the fishers and are committed ensuring the safety of any pregnant fishers that may end up on the reservation.
The absence of wolves and fishers for so long, for example, left an open niche for coyotes, who have proliferated and moved into territories new to them.
After being eradicated from the state by the 1930s, there are now 126 wolves in 27 packs, including 15 successful breeding pairs, according to the most recent data from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

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Summary of “Rethink Your Whole Fish Strategy”

In his recently published The Whole Fish Cookbook Niland-who applies a whole-animal philosophy to fish-lays out some of the techniques and recipes featured at his restaurant and retail shop, including dry-aging and curing.
I talked to Niland about some of the ways home cooks and chefs can rethink our approach to cooking the whole fish, from the way we buy it to the plate we serve it on.
Look for fish with bright red gills and clear eyes that are raised up, not sunken into the fish.
“Wild fish always offer up something different, and it’s often seasonal,” says Niland.
“We try to get people to eat fish with the skin on,” Niland says.
If you cook your fish until it’s just barely cooked through, then serve it on a warm plate, the warmth from the plate will help finish the fish and keep it at a pleasing temperature.
“It’s so much better than getting a dry, overcooked piece of fish on a cold plate,” says Niland.
Small fish are stored in perforated trays, and large fish are hung on hooks so that moisture never accumulates on one side.

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Summary of “The Shipwrecked Sailors & the Wandering Cod”

Larsen fusses with a pair of dry, graying display cod, takes calls on his ancient flip phone, chats with a fisherman on the quay, and explains the minutiae of stockfisk-the dried cod that is this far flung archipelago’s lifeblood-to curious visitors.
Seafood is one of Norway’s biggest exports, with cod as the fishing industry’s highest valued catch.
The choice ration for ancient Norse long-distance sailors dehydrated cod maintains its nutrition and protein for years.
He’s adopted Lofoten’s rhythm, memorizing the islands’ lunar and solar calendars, and getting to know the kids who sell him cod tongues as their after-school job.
Many of Haaland’s ceramic pieces are layered with cod tails printed from fish she’s personally caught.
Here, the story of the beloved cod stretches across centuries, like a spine-ragged, flayed tail at one end, glassy saucer eye at the other-linking generations of wild, wandering fish and the people who chase and wait for them for a lifetime.
Local cooks sometimes swap out cod for other seasonal fish, such as salmon, or add accents like red pepper, chunks of bacon, or chive oil.
Cod with Potatoes and Sundried Tomato PestoIn Norway, most cod-based dishes are served with fresh fillets during the fishing season and stockfish or boknafish the remainder of the year.

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Summary of “Thanks for all the fish: a wild salmon story”

Hundreds of local people in this town of 5,000 are commercial salmon fishermen, scores more fish for themselves or work in an industry tied to salmon.
When we’re not talking in code, when we talk about salmon we’re talking about fish from two different genera: the Atlantic salmon, a single species – Salmo salar, and Pacific salmon, whose genus name is Oncorhynchus and includes six salmon species each with multiple names.
In most of the world, Atlantic salmon is synonymous with farmed salmon – domestic fish reared in pens from Chile to Norway.
We revile them not just because farmed salmon fillets undercut wild Alaska salmon in markets all over the world.
We revile the industry because the millions of farmed salmon that have escaped over the years put wild salmon populations at risk from interbreeding, which reduces the fitness of wild fish to survive in the natural environment.
With a recent thumbs-up from the US Food and Drug Administration, “Frankenfish” – farmed Atlantic salmon modified with genes from other species to grow about twice as fast – are headed to American markets, yet another blow to wild salmon.
Salmon bring marine nutrients far inland, nourishing the very habitat on which they depend, fertilising the bankside trees that will eventually topple into rivers, creating deep pools that salmon love and feeding the insect populations that, in turn, are grub for the young fish.
In Southwestern Alaska’s Bristol Bay, you’ll find the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery where last year more than 56m red salmon returned, a run more than 100 times that of all the wild salmon returning to Norway.

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Summary of “The Poke Paradox”

I was curious: Does poke drive an overharvest of certain fish species like yellowfin tuna? Does it enable the accidental bycatch of more charismatic marine life like turtles, dolphins, and sharks that get accidentally tangled in nets or hooked on long lines? Simply put, is poke a threat to the delicate ecology of the ocean, not to mention the ever-competitive commercial fishing industry? These are the issues that keep Bushman up at night, and she invited me to a long lunch at Pacific Catch in the Corte Madera Town Center to wrestle with them.
“Imagine a chef in a single restaurant who’s super busy. The fish comes in and it looks good. The eyes are clear, the gills are bright red, it’s nice and firm and the scales look good. He’s like, great, I’m good to go, but seafood changes hands more times than any other food and beverage commodity in the world. On average eight to nine times. So I’m saying to my distributor partner, what the heck? Where does it come from? How was it caught? Where are the certificates? Imagine a chef needing to do that?” Or, say, the owner of a fast-casual poke bar where a bowl of raw fish and rice costs about 10 bucks.
Simply put, is poke a threat to the delicate ecology of the ocean, not to mention the ever-competitive commercial fishing industry?
“Super early days, it was made with the scrap pieces of reef fish, and the poke was really simple. It was Hawaiian salt, which dried naturally on the rocks, roasted kukui nuts, and seaweed, all different kinds of seaweed.”
It’s still morning, the place is closed, but staff and Pabre’s cousin Mike are in the kitchen breaking down fresh fish, and between urgent calls and texts, Pabre talks story and mixes poke.
Almost all the produce and 100 percent of the beef and fish are sourced locally – a difference you can taste in his poke.
“I’ve tried many of them. With some of the bigger chains, the cubes are all the same cut because they are machine cut. We’re cutting the fish, sometimes gathering the fish, so there’s a lot going into it, knowing the measures it took to get to your bowl. I think that’s why mainland poke is mainland poke. They get in this frozen product, and just have to cut open the bag and top it off with all kine stuff.”
So if you crave poke and aren’t in Hawaii during peak yellowfin season, ask questions, and if the server or chef has a clear read on where the fish is coming from and how it’s caught, thank them, says Ryan Bigelow of Seafood Watch.

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Summary of “Seven Things You’re Paying Too Much for in a Restaurant”

Here’s a list of things he would never order from a restaurant menu.
Oftentimes, the restaurant breaks even when they sell them-but that’s to your benefit.
With something like steak frites, or what’s called the ‘bar steak’, restaurants don’t always specify the cut of meat.
It’s not the same meat I’m serving at Bowery Meat Company, I’ll tell you that much.
So if I’m going out for a steak, I go for a prime, possibly dry-aged steak that I know I’m really going to enjoy and not a questionable cut.
A $76 Dover Sole A fish like Dover sole-often sold as Sole Meunière-is a high ticket item.
Let’s say you’re a group of six people out to dinner, and the captain comes over and says, “The scampi is so good. Why don’t we order this for the table?” There’s nothing wrong with saying to him, “You know what? That’s great, but can we do those scampi for five people?” This strategy for ordering less than your group size goes for anything from bread to sides to a raw bar to steak, because there’s always someone who won’t eat as much as the others.
Mystery Maki Rolls At my restaurant Lure, all of the chopped fish in our spicy tuna and yellowtail scallion rolls come from fresh fish delivered to us every day.

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Summary of “Is This Swim Stroke the Fastest Yet?”

It’s lap swim on a Monday afternoon at my local YMCA, and I’m going to attempt the fish kick.
We have to learn how to swim, and it is up to us to find the fastest way to do so.
In the last few decades, stroke mechanic experts have discovered that swimming under the surface is faster than swimming on the surface.
“Nobody is going to come up with a new way of running that is going to be faster than anything else. Yet we just did that in swimming.” And the fish kick may be the fastest subsurface form yet.
We head over to a swim lane, but before we jump in, she offers some tips.
A few decades later, Europeans learned a faster stroke when two Native Americans visiting London demonstrated a way of swimming they had learned growing up: the front crawl.
The bow wave increases with swim speed until, in theory, it stretches along the whole length of the swimmer’s body.
Luc Collard, a professor of sports science who has experimented with many different ways of swimming underwater-including swimming the fish kick with the arms down, along the swimmer’s side-says it may just be the fastest.

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Summary of “How Fish and Chips Migrated to Great Britain”

Dubbed “The undisputed national dish of Great Britain” by the National Federation of Fish Friers, it’s been enjoyed on the island for over a century, with an estimated 35,000 chip shops in business by 1935.
As religious violence worsened, many fled Portugal and resettled in England, bringing with them culinary treasures founded in Sephardic cuisine-including fish.
Allegedly, the batter preserved the fish so it could be eaten cold, and without sacrificing too much flavor, the following day.
Fish prepared “In the Jewish manner” was sold on the streets of London on any given day.
At the end of the week, eating fish on Friday was a part of religious observance for Jews and Catholics alike-as “Fish fasting” to avoid consuming warm-blooded animals has been a part of the Catholic tradition for centuries.
Though both groups were religious minorities at the time, fried fish became a popular secular dish, too.
There are also competing theories about who created the pairing of, as Churchill called them, “Good companions.” Most trace it back to the early 1860s, when Joseph Malins, a Jewish immigrant, opened up a fish and chips shop in London.
Industrialization in the 19th and early 20th centuries launched the fish dish to even greater heights, as it became a favorite for factory and mill workers in London and beyond.

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Summary of “This Cape Porpoise Fish House Is an Icon. But of What, Exactly?”

Ben theorized it was some kind of “Party pad.” In the months that followed, he and I noticed it appearing more regularly in our Instagram feeds, where it was referred to as a “Stilt house,” a “Barn on the water,” and a “Love shack.” Then, as shots of it became even more ubiquitous, Instagram posters took to calling it “The Cape Porpoise fish house,” “The often-photographed fish shack,” or simply, “That building.”
A former Boston-area financial advisor, Dennis has lived since 2011 on Langsford Road, a dead-end street overlooking Porpoise Cove and, on the cove’s far side, the Cape Porpoise municipal pier, where the daily catch of the year-round fishing fleet has been the town’s economic lifeblood for most of its 350ish years.
Of the Instagrammers I talked to, more than half said they came to Cape Porpoise to shoot the fish house after seeing one of Dennis’s shots.
It’s “Nutty,” he said, to imagine someone driving to Cape Porpoise in the middle of the night just to photograph this fish house at dawn.
It didn’t seem nutty to Steven Perlmutter, of North Andover, Massachusetts, to get up in the dark and drive to Cape Porpoise to shoot the Zuke fish house at sunrise.
“It’s like Portland Head Light – that lighthouse was built for taking pictures. I didn’t know the fish house was new when I saw the photos. I thought they must have done some work to it, but in my head, when I saw it, it evoked these older pictures of fish houses on stilts. It was like they built this as the quintessential building, like they were honoring all those old ones people get nostalgic about.”
Eaton is the Zukes’ neighbor on Langsford Road. He owns that striking red former fish house that Robert Dennis – and swarms of Instagrammers since – used to frame shots of the Zukes’ building.
Like the Zukes, he laments a loss of cohesion on Langsford Road and around Cape Porpoise – but he sees the permitting of their fish house as a symptom of a heedlessness that’s driving it.

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Summary of “Wait, So How Much of the Ocean Is Actually Fished?”

How much of the world’s oceans are affected by fishing? In February 2018, a team of scientists led by David Kroodsma from the Global Fishing Watch published a paper that put the figure at 55 percent-an area four times larger than that covered by land-based agriculture.
In their own paper, published in September 2018, they claim that industrial fishing occurs over just 4 percent of the ocean.
It’s also a more subtle debate that hinges on how we think about the act of fishing, and how to measure humanity’s influence on the planet.
The problem is that they divided the ocean into such large squares that if a single boat drops a net in an area the size of Rhode Island, that area would count as “Fished” in a given year.
How much of that fishing is sustainable? Which species are being targeted? How are they faring? Can they bounce back? And there are much better ways of directly answering those questions, from stock counts to ecosystem models, than just looking at the whereabouts of boats.
On the flipside, claiming that just 4 percent of the ocean is fished could lure people into thinking that fish stocks are in good health, and the seas are largely untouched.
“If only 4 percent of the ocean is fished, you should be able to make 96 percent of it into a marine protected area without anyone complaining,” says Kroodsma.
The GFW’s partners are also looking at how fishing activity overlaps with shark habitats, how longline fleets affect albatrosses, and more.

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