Summary of “What’s the biggest food delivery service in each city?”

Chances are DoorDash will fork over your food in San Jose and Fort Worth.
The takeout food delivery market is a fractured one, according to data from Second Measure, a company that analyzes billions of dollars worth of anonymized debit and credit card purchases.
GrubHub, which includes Seamless, has the greatest overall market share and is the most popular takeout delivery platform in nine major cities, according to August data for the 22 most populous cities in the U.S. Grubhub’s marketshare is likely to increase after GrubHub’s recent acquisition of Eat24, Yelp’s delivery platform.
In these cities DoorDash has the second overall markets share, while UberEATS is third.
UberEATS, which launched in several cities last year and is now profitable in 27 of 108 cities worldwide, has the benefit of existing driver networks around the country from its parent company Uber.
Amazon – which only leads food delivery in its hometown of Seattle – has huge organizational and delivery chops from its retail business that it could leverage to grow its food delivery business.
Prepared food delivery makes up the vast majority of Postmates’ sales, but the service does deliver groceries and non-food items as well – a useful fallback from food delivery.
Caviar has the biggest market share in the highly competitive and tech-forward San Francisco.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Brain Has A Hunger Off Switch, And It May Be Possible To Switch It Off Faster”

A new study has located a set of brain cells that control appetite, and activating them by eating more of certain foods could be a key to losing weight.
The brain cells are called tanycytes and they’re found in a brain region called the hypothalamus, which plays a crucial role in how our bodies process what we eat into usable or storable energy.
The presence of these brain cells was already known, but this study shows for the first time that it may be possible to activate them by eating higher levels of particular nutrients.
The nutrients that appear to flick the hunger switch are two essential amino acids: lysine and arginine.
“Amino acid levels in blood and brain following a meal are a very important signal that imparts the sensation of feeling full,” says Nicholas Dale, a professor of neuroscience at the University of Warwick and lead study author.
“Finding that tanycytes, located at the center of the brain region that controls body weight, directly sense amino acids has very significant implications for coming up with new ways to help people to control their body weight within healthy bounds.”
The researchers believe the findings could help stem the obesity epidemic by pointing to new ways of triggering appetite suppression.
Quoting from the study: “A more detailed understanding of how food intake and energy expenditure are determined in the brain may lead to the development of new strategies for overcoming the obesity epidemic and other metabolic disorders.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Brain Has A Hunger Off Switch, And It May Be Possible To Switch It Off Faster”

A new study has located a set of brain cells that control appetite, and activating them by eating more of certain foods could be a key to losing weight.
The brain cells are called tanycytes and they’re found in a brain region called the hypothalamus, which plays a crucial role in how our bodies process what we eat into usable or storable energy.
The presence of these brain cells was already known, but this study shows for the first time that it may be possible to activate them by eating higher levels of particular nutrients.
The nutrients that appear to flick the hunger switch are two essential amino acids: lysine and arginine.
“Amino acid levels in blood and brain following a meal are a very important signal that imparts the sensation of feeling full,” says Nicholas Dale, a professor of neuroscience at the University of Warwick and lead study author.
“Finding that tanycytes, located at the center of the brain region that controls body weight, directly sense amino acids has very significant implications for coming up with new ways to help people to control their body weight within healthy bounds.”
The researchers believe the findings could help stem the obesity epidemic by pointing to new ways of triggering appetite suppression.
Quoting from the study: “A more detailed understanding of how food intake and energy expenditure are determined in the brain may lead to the development of new strategies for overcoming the obesity epidemic and other metabolic disorders.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Brain Has A Hunger Off Switch, And It May Be Possible To Switch It Off Faster”

A new study has located a set of brain cells that control appetite, and activating them by eating more of certain foods could be a key to losing weight.
The brain cells are called tanycytes and they’re found in a brain region called the hypothalamus, which plays a crucial role in how our bodies process what we eat into usable or storable energy.
The presence of these brain cells was already known, but this study shows for the first time that it may be possible to activate them by eating higher levels of particular nutrients.
The nutrients that appear to flick the hunger switch are two essential amino acids: lysine and arginine.
“Amino acid levels in blood and brain following a meal are a very important signal that imparts the sensation of feeling full,” says Nicholas Dale, a professor of neuroscience at the University of Warwick and lead study author.
“Finding that tanycytes, located at the center of the brain region that controls body weight, directly sense amino acids has very significant implications for coming up with new ways to help people to control their body weight within healthy bounds.”
The researchers believe the findings could help stem the obesity epidemic by pointing to new ways of triggering appetite suppression.
Quoting from the study: “A more detailed understanding of how food intake and energy expenditure are determined in the brain may lead to the development of new strategies for overcoming the obesity epidemic and other metabolic disorders.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How supermarkets choose where to open and where to close”

The Waitrose in question – where everyone who holds a MyWaitrose card gets a cup of coffee – is a Little Waitrose, one of the convenience outlets so many supermarkets are opening in cities across the UK. Five minutes’ walk away, Sainsbury’s plans to open one of its Local convenience stores, on an old cinema site.
The pattern repeats throughout Newcastle: supermarkets stacked two or three deep in affluent or student areas, while other areas of the same city are neglected.
Tesco’s recent announcement that it will close 43 stores can tell us a lot about where supermarkets choose to operate in cities.
From Kensington in Liverpool to South Tottenham in London, Tesco’s decision about where to close stores isn’t random – it’s a reminder that, ultimately, it is sales-per-square foot, not local community need, that dictate where supermarket chains choose to locate.
Supermarkets can rely on loyalty card data for insights into who their customers are, where they live, what they buy and when.
Twenty years ago campaigners worried about “Food deserts”, as supermarkets abandoned city centres for hypermarkets on the edge of town.
Now cities and towns are experiencing a recolonisation, as the supermarkets return to hollowed-out high streets to open convenience stores, which are typically under 3,000 sq ft.
That might mean setting rules for where supermarkets can open, like in San Francisco, where chain stores must provide evidence they are appropriate for the neighbourhood.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Obesity Was Rising as Ghana Embraced Fast Food. Then Came KFC.”

KFC alone, he said, is only one factor in the country’s obesity epidemic, but it represents the embrace of western foods.
KFC executives see a major opportunity here to be part of people’s regular routines, a goal they are advancing through a creative marketing campaign and use of social media.
For now KFC customers in Ghana have fewer healthy options than in Western countries.
KFC emphasizes its focus on food sanitation and cleanliness.
“We wouldn’t go into a market unless we are comfortable that we can deliver the same food safety standards that we deliver around the world and people see that,” Greg Creed, the chief executive of YUM!, said in an interview last year on CNN. “They actually trust us that it’s so much safer to eat at a KFC in Ghana, than it is to eat obviously, you know, pretty much anywhere else.”
“Ghanaians would be better off eating less KFC. But that is the way of the world I’m afraid.”
“People march their sons and daughters to buy KFC and buy pizza and they like to show them what we can afford,” said Matilda Laar, who lectures about family and consumer sciences at the University of Ghana.
Mr. Awaitey, who celebrated his 27th birthday at a KFC, was raised eating local dishes like soup and banku, a mix of fermented corn and cassava dough.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Exactly Is Vegan-Mayonnaise Company Hampton Creek Selling?”

Peter Thiel instructs start-up entrepreneurs to take inspiration from cults, advice that came to mind when Tetrick told me, after the job interview, that he screens for employees who “Really believe” in his company’s “Higher purpose,” because “I trust them more.” But buying into the mission has become a more complicated proposition, as Hampton Creek has recently been besieged by federal investigations, product withdrawals, and an exodus of top leadership.
Tetrick founded Hampton Creek, as he has recounted it on numerous conference stages, shows his instinct for a good narrative.
Despite his current emphasis on Hampton Creek’s technical chops, Tetrick says he never expressly founded Hampton Creek as a tech start-up.
Tetrick launched Hampton Creek in an era when investors were reaching beyond traditional tech companies, and businesses that might otherwise have been merely, say, specialty-food purveyors could leverage software-and grand mission statements tapping into Silicon Valley’s do-gooder ethos-to cast themselves as paradigm-breaking forces.
Bloomberg also reported on claims by a Hampton Creek investor named Ali Partovi-an early backer of Facebook and Dropbox who lasted nine days as Tetrick’s chief strategy officer before leaving the company and severing all ties-that the company was exaggerating profit projections to deceive investors.
Tetrick told me that Hampton Creek will debut both a liquid version of Just Scramble and the Scramble Patty early next year, to be followed shortly by a new category of plant-based foods-possibly the butter, or ice cream.
As for the three recently fired executives, Tetrick said their desired changes would have given more control to investors, whose incentive to go public or accept an acquisition offer might undermine Hampton Creek’s “Higher purpose.” When I asked him about the board departures, which were made public after my visit, Tetrick told me that some members had been asked to step down; others “Chose to remain members of the advisory board and help the company achieve its mission.”
Tetrick led the two Chinese men through a spacious room housing Hampton Creek’s team of designers and settled them in a windowless office with a large TV. Tetrick’s filmmaker, one of his longest-serving employees, cued up footage with a Kinfolk vibe: a farmer lovingly cradling a white chicken, a Hampton Creek employee in a field contemplating a single feather as wind rustled his curls.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One Surprise Standout for Uber: Food Delivery”

There is also the threat of Amazon, which has tried food delivery in a few markets.
The Seattle retail giant’s recent acquisition of Whole Foods provides hundreds of potential bases for drivers to pick up prepared food for delivery in major urban areas, where takeout orders are popular.
“The number-one concern for all of these delivery companies is Amazon,” said James Cakmak, an analyst at the equity research firm Monness, Crespi, Hardt & Company who follows the food delivery space.
“Uber has built a great company focused on black car service and human transportation, but succeeding in food delivery is a different game,” Mr. Maloney said in a statement.
Uber first dabbled in food delivery in Los Angeles in 2014 under the name UberFresh, offering prepackaged lunches and dinners from restaurants.
For one, Uber has a network of more than two million drivers who can also deliver food.
The ideal UberEats delivery has the driver arrive at the restaurant just as the food has finished cooking, and has it delivered to the customer while still warm.
Uber struck a deal with McDonald’s this year to offer delivery from thousands of its restaurants.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Grocery Industry Confronts a New Problem: Only 10% of Americans Love Cooking”

Although many people don’t realize it yet, grocery shopping and cooking are in a long-term decline.
This research found that consumers fell into one of three groups: people who love to cook, and cook often, people who hate to cook, and avoid that activity by heating up convenience food or outsourcing their meals, and, finally, people who like to cook sometimes, and do a mix of cooking and outsourcing, depending on the situation.
At the time, the sizes of the three respective groups were about 15% who love to cook, 50% who hate to cook, and 35% who are so-so on the idea.
In part, Food TV has raised our standards to discouragingly high levels: How many of us really feel confident in our cooking skills after watching Iron Chef? This may be one reason why consumers now spend more on food in restaurants than on groceries.
Despite all the buzz about the growth of pre-prepped meal kits like Blue Apron, or the promise of Whole Foods under Amazon’s management, cooking itself is on a long, slow, steady decline.
I’ve come to think of cooking as being similar to sewing.
If that’s the kind of shift coming to the food industry, change leaders and corporate strategists will have their hands full.
The industry must stop trying to live in the past, when most households cooked most meals from scratch.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The great nutrient collapse”

Rep. Lamar Smith, a Republican who chairs the House Committee on Science, recently argued that people shouldn’t be so worried about rising CO2 levels because it’s good for plants, and what’s good for plants is good for us.
How does rising atmospheric CO2 change how plants grow? How much of the long-term nutrient drop is caused by the atmosphere, and how much by other factors, like breeding?
The current gold standard for this type of research is called a FACE experiment, in which researchers create large open-air structures that blow CO2 onto the plants in a given area.
Within the category of plants known as “C3″―which includes approximately 95 percent of plant species on earth, including ones we eat like wheat, rice, barley and potatoes―elevated CO2 has been shown to drive down important minerals like calcium, potassium, zinc and iron.
The data we have, which look at how plants would respond to the kind of CO2 concentrations we may see in our lifetimes, show these important minerals drop by 8 percent, on average.
There aren’t any projections for the United States, where we for the most part enjoy a diverse diet with no shortage of protein, but some researchers look at the growing proportion of sugars in plants and hypothesize that a systemic shift in plants could further contribute to our already alarming rates of obesity and cardiovascular disease.
Ziska worries we’re not studying all the ways CO2 affects the plants we depend on with enough urgency, especially considering the fact that retooling crops takes a long time.
There are plenty of plant physiologists researching crops, but most are dedicated to studying factors like yield and pest resistance-qualities that have nothing to do with nutrition.

The orginal article.