Summary of “The world’s first “high-tech eco village” will reinvent suburbs”

A half-hour commute from Amsterdam, a piece of farmland is slated to become a new kind of neighborhood.
A “Village OS” tech platform will use AI to simultaneously manage systems for renewable energy, food production, water supply, and waste.
The 50-acre neighborhood, which will be nearly self-sufficient as it collects and stores water and energy, grows food, and processes much of its own waste, was initially planned for construction in 2017.
“We can connect a neighborhood the way it’s supposed to be connected, which is around natural resources,” says James Ehrlich, founder of ReGen Villages.
Electric cars, for example, which will be parked on the perimeter of the neighborhood to keep streets walkable, can store some of the extra power from the neighborhood’s solar panels and other renewable energy.
Because of the expected arrival of self-driving cars in coming years, and to encourage walking and biking, the houses aren’t designed with parking; a new bus line along the edge of the neighborhood, with a dedicated bus lane, can take residents to the town of Almere or into Amsterdam.
A “Living machine,” a system that uses plants and trees to filter sewage, and a separate anaerobic digester, can handle the neighborhood’s sewage and provide irrigation or water reused in energy systems.
The company has plans to build future developments near cities like Lund, Sweden, and Lejre-Hvalso, Denmark, and it ultimately hopes to bring a low-cost version of the neighborhoods to developing countries.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carne Asada, Hold The Meat: Why Latinos Are Embracing Vegan-Mexican Cuisine”

Hundreds of people waited in line at stalls for vegan food, but few people looked like the Los Angeles resident.
Vegan by Victoria’s, the host of the event, hawked dairy-free Mexican and Salvadoran pan dulce.
“[I’m] happy to not have white hipster vegans run all the vegan stuff,” he finally said, tongue only somewhat in cheek.
Vegan Latino cuisine has received some mainstream attention this decade, from New York City to Colombian-American cookbook author Carolyn Scott-Hamilton in Miami.
The movement’s hype is such that vegan caterer La Venganza won L.A. Taco’s annual Taco Madness competition for best taco in Southern California, beating far-more-established competitors.
“I wanted to find a good vegan taco de carnitas,” he said, “And I couldn’t find an affordable one. They were only at affluent vegan hipster spots.”
The family tried to go vegan to support the young Loreta but found that a lot of the vegan food at the time was processed “And didn’t even taste good.” So Ruiz experimented in her kitchen until friends suggested she sell food to the public.
Ruiz’s daughter, Loreta Sierra, isn’t surprised that Latinos of her generation seem more open to going vegan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Discovery of 14,000-Year-Old Toast Suggests Bread Can Be Added to Paleo Diet”

Dating back some 14,400 years, the discovery shows that ancient hunter-gatherers were making and eating bread 4,000 years before the Neolithic era and the introduction of agriculture.
What’s more, the new paper shows that bread had already become an established food staple prior to the Neolithic period and the Agricultural Revolution.
The bread found at Shubayqa 1 pre-dates the Çatalhöyük bread by around 5,000 years, and it’s now the oldest example of bread-making in the archaeological record.
For the study, the researchers analyzed 24 charred fragments of bread from the Shubayqa 1 excavation site using a Scanning Electron Microscope.
SEM analysis is quite time consuming, and the researchers only managed to analyze 24 fragments out of a total of 600 pieces that appear to be bread or bread-like remains.
“Second, that the bread was of high quality, since it was made using quite fine flour. We didn’t expect to find such high-quality flour this early on in human history. Third, the hunter-gatherer bread we have does not only contain flour from wild barley, wheat and oats, but also from tubers, namely tubers from water plants. The bread was therefore more of a multi-grain-tuber bread, rather than a white loaf.”
Richter said the method used for identifying the bread fragments is new, and that other researchers should use the technique to re-analyze older archaeological collections to search for even earlier examples of bread production.
Dorian Fuller, an archaeobotanist at the University College London and a co-author of the new study, said it’s highly plausible that hunter-gatherers were able to make bread without the benefit of agriculture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Costco Polish hot dog removal sparks backlash”

The retailer is taking the Polish hot dog off the menu to make way for new items, The Seattle Times reported.
Locations will be deeply discounting the Polish dog so they can add healthier options such as acai fruit bowls and organic burgers.
Many customers are not pleased that the Polish hot dog – a variation on Costco’s wildly popular classic hot dog, which will remain on the menu – will no longer be available.
“Please, PLEASE reconsider putting the polish dogs back on the menu!! They have way more flavor and are better than the hot dogs and are the only thing that makes the idea of an hour shopping with toddlers seem bearable!!” one person commented on Costco’s Facebook page.
“Bring back the polish dog, please,” another said.
The loss of the Polish dog has been some time coming.
Months ago, Costco shoppers in Hawaii started a Change.org petition to bring back the Polish dog.
“LET THE DOGS OUT OF THE FREEZER – make the Polish Dog again part of the Costco Food Court selection in Hawai’i,” the petition says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can an apple cider vinegar a day keep the doctor away?”

It’s a new twist on “An apple a day” which has caught the imagination of health-conscious millennials, celebrity food bloggers and A-listers such as Jennifer Aniston, Katy Perry and Victoria Beckham.
Apple cider vinegar is enjoying a huge revival in the UK as a kitchen cupboard staple, hailed by the “Clean-eating” generation as the latest wonder ingredient which can be knocked back daily as a general tonic.
Already a cult product in the US, its new-found popularity on this side of the Atlantic is giving an unexpected boost to the UK apple industry, where reliance on imported fruit has led to hundreds of traditional varieties gradually disappearing.
Practising what he preaches is entrepreneur William Chase, who describes his own apple cider vinegar as “a modern take on a legendary product”.
The founder of Tyrrells crisps and Chase Vodka has now moved into a sphere that he calls “Fit foods”, launching his own Willy’s apple cider vinegar – manufactured on his Herefordshire farm – last year.
“We are using tiny crab apples which would otherwise have been wasted, and among 48 apple varieties from our 300-year-old orchards. We have 50 acres but we need to make more cider to meet demand, so we are looking for other farms with older orchards to help provide us with the apples we need.” Chase, who was criticised by trading standards for the health claims he made on his launch labelling, says he has lost two stone and reduced his own cholesterol as a result of regular consumption.
The grocery chain Waitrose reports that sales of the products are up more than 60% year-on-year, with Willy’s ACV and Aspall’s Apple Cyder Vinegar leading the charge.
Mel Leyshon, editor of the Healthy Food Guide, admitted there were many unsubstantiated claims for apple cider vinegar, “One of them being that it can help you lose weight, but there are no studies to prove this. But drinking a glass of diluted apple cider vinegar before a meal may help fill you up so you eat less. A better idea is to get into the habit of eating more salads with a light dressing made using apple cider vinegar – that way you can get your five a day, too”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Does Intermittent Fasting Work?”

Proponents of intermittent fasting say it’s less of a diet than a lifestyle.
“What makes intermittent fasting different from dieting is that you are regulating when you eat, not what you eat,” said Dr. Luiza Petre, a board-certified cardiologist and weight management specialist who follows the principles herself.
The 5:2 Diet: Also known as the “Fast Diet,” this type of intermittent fasting includes two nonconsecutive days of a strict 500-calorie diet and five days of normal, healthy food.
The potential outcomes can be beneficial for some…. According to Perlman, the potential benefits of intermittent fasting include weight loss and increased muscle mass.
Intermittent fasting can also enhance metabolism, he said, allowing you to more efficiently utilize food for energy.
“These women may benefit from intermittent fasting only a few days a week, rather than every day, and by paying close attention to how their body responds.” He also emphasized that pregnant and nursing women should avoid intermittent fasting.
If intermittent fasting is incorporated, it should be included as part of a healthy, balanced diet and lifestyle change and under the supervision of a health care provider.
The bottom line, Cooper said, is that “If intermittent fasting is incorporated, it should be included as part of a healthy, balanced diet and lifestyle change and under the supervision of a health care provider.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “30 Top Restaurants of the Last 30 Years to Impact the Food Scene – Robb Report”

As we celebrate our 30th anniversary of our Best of the Best awards, where we recognize the top places, products, and people from the past year across everything Robb Report covers, we wanted to step back and see which restaurants have left the most indelible mark on the food scene.
“Alinea has really pushed and changed the food scene to a whole different level. It’s technical, it’s whimsical, it’s super tasty, and it’s so creative. Look at its balloon-it’s magnificent. It floats, but you can eat it. There’s so much fun and emotion behind it, but it’s just one of the dishes. They keep on changing their menu; they keep on pushing for creativity. It’s one of the most influential restaurants in the world.” -Dominique Ansel.
By realizing our food system is largely created to grow food that’s meant to be more shelf-stable than delicious, he’s been working to create seeds and growing conditions that optimize the flavor of food.
“The core of its food philosophy combines the most social and economically responsible methods with the highest-quality ingredients, and nothing less. Even the most modern chefs should always look at them so they can remember what food is and where it comes from.” -Genevieve Gergis.
“Highlands paved the way for new Southern cooking. Frank Stitt had studied in France for a long time and basically brought back all his knowledge and sensibilities and his passion for French food and applied it to Southern cooking. He then created a great experience-both food and service-that hadn’t been achieved of yet in the South. It’s around 35 years old, and it’s still recognized today as being a restaurant that has changed so many people’s outlooks on what was possible with Southern food.” -Mike Lata.
For years the pinnacle of food had been the grand palaces of gastronomy: the three-Michelin-star fine-dining restaurants.
“Momofuku put Asian food on the map. It shaped what Asian food is today by breaking it down into a language we can all understand. And like with the pork belly bao, he was the first to do that, and all around the States, restaurants have it on their menus now. There’s even a chef in Hong Kong who serves bao, and she credits David Chang for that.” -Mei Lin.
As the New York dining scene the last two decades has been littered with the bones of failed restaurants, she’s shown that this personal-and sometimes eclectic-style of food can endure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How your age affects your appetite”

Do you eat to live or live to eat? We have a complicated relationship with food, influenced by cost, availability and even peer pressure.
Something we all share is appetite – our desire to eat.
There are growing calls for governments to protect young children from targeted junk food advertising – not just on television but in apps, social media and video blogs – since food advertising increases food consumption, which can contribute to children becoming overweight.
How a teenager approaches food during this critical period will shape their lifestyle choices in later years.
The body sends strong appetite signals to eat when we consume less than our energy needs, but the signals to prevent overeating are weaker, which can lead to a circle of over-consumption.
Adult working life brings other challenges beyond a rumbling stomach, but also the effects of stress, which has been shown to prompt changes in appetite and eating habits in 80% of the population, equally divided between those that gorge and those that lose their appetite.
These different coping strategies are intriguing: the phenomena of “Food addiction” – an irresistible urge to consume specific, often high-calorie foods – is not well understood.
So we should strive to treat every opportunity to eat as an opportunity to enjoy our food and to enjoy the positive effects eating the right foods can have on our health.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Calories and macros and BMI don’t count. Here are the numbers that really matter.”

What’s your blood-sugar level? How many calories are you eating? And are you getting the right percentage of macros? The problem is that sometimes we track, count and obsess over numbers that don’t matter very much for our overall health.
If you have diabetes, lifestyle changes can actually help you reverse the diagnosis – but first you need to know your number.
Size 8: Too many people have a diet goal to be a specific size, but the numbers on clothes are inconsistent and arbitrary.
You don’t need to count every calorie you eat – it’s tedious, often flawed, and it doesn’t help you choose nutrient-dense foods.
If you had the choice between 100 calories of broccoli or fries, you’d probably choose the fries, right? But that wouldn’t provide much nourishment and oversimplifies eating into one silly number.
If you are a lifelong calorie counter, there’s no need to give it up, but remember that it’s not the most vital number for your overall health.
Keeping track of macros is a popular diet, and if it works for you, fantastic! But some dietitians warn that it’s difficult to know the precise macro content of every food you eat, which leads to obsessive use of food diaries and macro-counting apps.
BMI doesn’t take age, gender or bone structure into account, and athletes are often classified as overweight because BMI doesn’t distinguish between muscle and fat! So, don’t rely on this number as your primary measure of health.

The orginal article.

Summary of “He Cooks, She Cooks. He Elevates, She Relates.”

Are great chefs also great artists? They could be-if being “Great” is taken as read. Food has appeared in art since time immemorial.
The program defines the “Great” chef on these terms, just as the canon of fine art defines the great artist.
Greatness even becomes pedigree; male chefs can even call their own work great while knocking women’s down.
Réne Redzepi reclaiming Nordic ingredients and identity is great; Alex Atala reclaiming Brazilian food as elevated is great; Christina Tosi reclaiming childhood nostalgia is relatable.
Whether a great male chef, a great male author, or a great male filmmaker, Kennedy is certain that greatness breeds premature forgiveness: “The idea of greatness, of course, is so deeply tied to white, patriarchal, capitalist notions of worth. I suspect that’s what makes it so difficult for us to let go of the heroes we’ve built up, such as Batali. If he was a great chef, someone who succeeded in all the ways we are taught are significant, then surely there must be some way to forgive him his trespasses?”.
Cooking together is radical; eating together is revolutionary; the chefs and restaurateurs who support the communities around them are great; the people who ask if everyone is OK before service are great; white chefs can still be great.
First, asking whether “Great” chefs can be “Great” artists perpetuates the public reproducibility of one kind of greatness.
Perhaps great chefs can be great artists, and perhaps food can be nourishment and art, without cleaving a distinction that alienates entire demographics and cultures.

The orginal article.