Summary of “The History of Soul Food in Department Stores”

In her discussion of Basic Black, Givhan confirms that soul food was indeed trendy in 1969; however, she cannot ignore the peculiarity of its placement in the throes of a fancy event held on Fifth Avenue.
Soul food is grounded in the ways black Americans have always fashioned a way out of no way, taking scraps and creating a food tradition that has stood the test of time.
The decade, ushered in by the civil rights movement and making way for the black power movement, had proven that department stores themselves were an opportune site of protest for black Americans.
In his book Soul Food: The Surprising Story of an American Cuisine, One Plate at a Time, Miller dedicates an entire chapter to the vegetable, tracing it from ancient times when the Romans began introducing greens into their diets through its evolution in becoming a staple in the black American food tradition.
The popularity of greens among enslaved Africans and them being regarded as a staple in soul food is reflective of the ways in which black Americans have asserted autonomy by being self-sufficient and entrepreneurial.
An article published on Highsnobiety exploring the gentrification of soul food asks, “How could someone cook these kinds of food and have such disdain for black people?” Drawing on examples such as Paula Deen’s racist comments toward her employees and the serving of soul food in white-owned restaurants, the author outlines the Columbus-ing of food and how doing so erases the contributions of black cooks and chefs.
The soul food at Basic Black did benefit some black entrepreneurs; in a New York magazine catering guide published in November 1971, a write-up for Lee Foods stated that the food was proven to be “An unqualified success” and so was the evening.
The profits went directly to the retailer, which did not use the opportunity to promote black chefs or restaurateurs and did not acknowledge the food item’s important place in black diasporic history.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How eating sugar affects your body and brain”

In the late 1960s, a food industry group called the Sugar Research Foundation paid three Harvard researchers $6,500 to discount research that increasingly showed links between sugar and heart disease and to point the blame at fat instead, according to an analysis of historical food industry documents that was published the fall of 2016.
The report those Harvard scientists published transformed the American diet, causing people to steer clear of fatty foods, which led many to sugar-packed snacks instead. But as a significant body of research now shows, excessive sugar consumption can be devastating for our health.
Even though we’re now more aware of the risks of too many sweets, there are still plenty of myths about sugar and what it actually does to us.
Sugar is just the name for a simple carbohydrate, and there’s always been some sugar in our diets.
The problem is that today the average American consumes more than twice what the US Food and Drug Administration – and four times what the World Health Organization – recommend as safe.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Americans have stopped eating leftovers”

Once the mainstay of weekday lunchboxes and thrifty home cooks, leftovers today constitute the single largest source of edible food waste in U.S. homes, according to a new study by the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental group.
While past efforts have focused on improving consumers’ food literacy and kitchen skills, converting them to leftovers will involve changing deep-seated food preferences.
In the report, published last week, NRDC sought to measure how much food Americans waste and what types of foods they tend to waste most.
Of the remaining, edible trashed food, bin digs found that 23 percent consisted of prepared leftovers, from any source – followed by fruits and vegetables, baked goods, and liquids and oils.
The food historian Helen Veit has observed that regard for leftovers plummeted in the 1960s, when refrigeration and cheap food became plentiful.
Gunders is hopeful that cultural influencers, led by the food media, can help convince people that it’s cool to eat leftovers.
Some have already tried: Ted Allen, the host of the popular Food Network show “Chopped,” declared that leftovers were not “a dirty word” during one of the show’s three episodes on the subject.
Veit sees one possible model in the government propaganda campaigns that got Americans to embrace leftovers during World War I and World War II. “They succeeded,” she said, “By pushing this idea that it was morally wrong to waste food.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Relax, You Don’t Need to ‘Eat Clean'”

Many of the doctors and nutritionists who recommend avoiding certain foods fail to properly explain the magnitude of their risks.
We’ve become more and more susceptible to arguments that we must avoid certain foods completely.
For some people in recent years, gluten has become the enemy, even though wheat accounts for about 20 percent of the calories consumed worldwide, more than pretty much any other food.
At least one in five Americans regularly chooses gluten-free foods, according to a 2015 poll.
We certainly don’t need MSG in our diet, but we also don’t need to waste effort avoiding it.
If people want to avoid foods, even if there’s no reason to, is that really a problem?
Being afraid of food with no real reason is unscientific – part of the dangerous trend of anti-intellectualism that we confront in many places today.
For most people, it’s entirely possible to eat more healthfully without living in terror or struggling to avoid certain foods altogether.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Concerned about inflammation? These foods may help.”

There’s a lot of talk about inflammation and anti-inflammatory diets – but there’s also a lot of misinformation and confusion surrounding these nutrition buzz words.
Many people aren’t quite clear on what inflammation is and why we should be concerned about it.
Then there are the plentiful myths about which foods affect inflammation.
Although many anti-inflammatory diets claim that whole grains and pulses – beans, peas and lentils – increase inflammation, research shows otherwise.
Pulses are high in fiber and magnesium, and magnesium has been shown to help reduce inflammation.
Foods and beverages that are high in sugar and white flour can spike your blood sugar, leading to inflammation.
In excess, saturated fat can increase inflammation, and fried foods contain high levels of highly inflammatory advanced glycation end products.
Not only is there no notable research linking nightshades to chronic inflammation, but nightshade vegetables are part of the traditional – and anti-inflammatory – Mediterranean diet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Action Bronson’s Expansive Appetites”

The best of the bunch is “F*ck, That’s Delicious,” a travel show hosted by the rapper and bon vivant Action Bronson, which will begin filming its third season next year.
Though Bronson has worked as a cook, and is familiar with the nuances and language of haute cuisine, he and his cronies refuse to acknowledge a chasm between high and low fare.
At a tasting, Bronson insists upon his own reading of a Georgian wine.
Bronson’s most obvious predecessor is Anthony Bourdain, the writer and former chef, whose latest series, “Parts Unknown,” airs on CNN. Bourdain jets off to exotic or otherwise underexplored sites, skulks about in a black leather jacket, pounds beers, and, as the show ends, delivers shrewd cultural commentary via voice-over.
Bronson takes his lasagna outside and stands on the sidewalk.
Batali seems vaguely disappointed by Bronson’s energy level.
A second Viceland series starring Bronson, “The Untitled Action Bronson Show,” premières this week.
The thirty-minute show-a kind of deranged “Emeril Live,” in which Bronson cooks and muses in the Munchies test kitchen, alongside special guests-will air Monday through Thursday at 11:30 P.M. I attended a recent taping in Brooklyn.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Radioactive wild boars in Sweden are eating nuclear mushrooms”

Radioactive wild boars currently roaming central and northern Sweden are proof positive that nuclear disasters have long-term environmental impacts, both near and far from where they occur.
No one told the wild boars about irradiated fruits and fungus, and three decades later these Swedish animals show exceptionally high levels of radioactivity because of mushrooms rooted deep in ground that remains radioactive.
Although flora and fauna in Sweden have been generally deemed safe, Frykman believes deeply-rooted, nuclear mushrooms in the country’s northern territories are to blame for the high traces of radiation in these wild boars.
Their population has exploded since then: “After being reintroduced and extinct a few times, the present wild boar population in Sweden descends from animals escaped from enclosures in the 1970s and probably from illegal releases,” posits a 2010 report by the Swedish University of Agricultural Studies.
Now, about a quarter million wild boars are estimated to live in the wilderness throughout the country, where they are hunted for food and sport.
The European pig-industry blog Pig Progress notes that a representative from the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Pål Andersson, reassured SVT that hunting and killing of wild boars can continue unabated with little risk to human health.
Of course, if you happen to be in Sweden and prefer not to mess with the cesium, your best bet is probably just avoiding wild boar meat altogether.
Read next: Radioactive wild boars have taken over towns near Fukushima.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kimbal Musk Wants to Feed America, Silicon Valley-Style”

Unlike some of his colleagues in the tech world, Mr. Musk is driven more by cooking than by the love of a good algorithm.
His mother, the model Maye Musk, worked as a dietitian to support the family after she divorced his father, Errol Musk, an engineer and pilot.
Set financially, Mr. Musk moved from Silicon Valley to New York and enrolled in the French Culinary Institute.
Mr. Musk became interested in school gardens.
Paired with instructions on how they can be used to teach subjects like science, the first gardens were installed in Denver schools in 2011.Mr. Musk has begun a chain of hyper-local restaurants called Next Door, which he and Mr. Matheson envision as the Applebee’s for a new generation.
The partners plan to add 50 more Next Door restaurants by the end of 2020.Mr. Musk also opened an outpost of his more upscale Kitchen restaurant inside a 4,500-acre urban park called Shelby Farms in the center of Memphis.
Whether food actually needs soil is one of the flash points between organic traditionalists and people like Mr. Musk.
Mr. Musk’s ascent has underscored a generational rift that pits old-liners who shun aspects of emerging food science against a new wave of food disrupters who haven’t embraced the roles that history, flavor and pleasure play, said Garrett Broad, an assistant professor at Fordham University who recently wrote about one aspect of the divide for the publication Civil Eats.”Somebody like Kimbal Musk could be an important bridge to bring some of these ideas together,” Dr. Broad said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The true cost of a plate of food: $1 in New York, $320 in South Sudan”

The world’s poorest pay more than a day’s wages for a single plate of food, according to a report from the World Food Programme, which reveals that the same bean stew can cost the average consumer in New York just $1.20, while the price tag is more than $320 in South Sudan.
The research, released to coincide with World Food Day on Monday, underlines the sheer discrepancy of consumers’ purchasing power around the world by measuring the relative cost of food in various countries against a single baseline.
Beasley points to the sheer unaffordability of food – rather than the absence of it – to explain why hunger rages on, particularly in the developing world.
“Nearly 800 million people went hungry on the planet last year because they simply could not afford to feed themselves, yet we have enough food to feed everyone worldwide: the food we waste could actually feed 2 billion people,” said Francis Mwanza, a London-based spokesperson for the WFP. “Unless we stop the conflicts, unless we stop the migration of people from their homelands into neighbouring states, unless people have the means to either grow their own food or be able to afford to buy it, people will continue going hungry.”
Even in relatively stable countries, food systems can still be subject to poor communications, transport and storage facilities, the report says.
In nations ravaged by war and instability, drought and famine, food systems can all too easily be at risk because of oppression and abuse of power.
Nearly 50% of Syria’s population needed food assistance in 2016, according to the report, with a basic bean stew estimated at $190.11.
“These are sobering figures, and I welcome the attempt at simple accountancy to allow such comparisons to be made – it highlights some crucial areas where there is very little resilience to shock,” said Chris Gilligan, co-chair of the Strategic Initiative in Global Food Security at Cambridge University, of the report.

The orginal article.

Summary of “how ‘nature’s multivitamin’ shook off the scare stories”

Eventually, after demonising eggs for a quarter of a century or more, the authors of our government’s egg script – that eggs could clog your arteries and poison you – are stealthily dismantling the flashing red lights they have put around this elemental food in the public mind.
Now, like offenders participating in restorative justice schemes, we need the civil servants and scientific advisers who unnerved us about eggs to say mea culpa, and reflect on how their adherence to bankrupt “Healthy eating” orthodoxy sent one of nature’s cleverest food packages into nutritional exile.
Now NHS Choices says: “There is no recommended limit on how many eggs people should eat.” But any diligent citizen who pays attention to the government’s “Eatwell plate”- its pictorial image of its recommended healthy diet, which is heavily weighted towards processed carbohydrate foods – might nevertheless conclude that a bowl of cornflakes is still nutritionally preferable to an egg.
Were eggs really ever a major, or even a minor, source of food poisoning in the UK? Edwina Currie started the whole salmonella enteritidis and eggs saga in 1988 with one sentence: “Most of the egg production in this country, sadly, is now affected with salmonella”, triggering either Britain’s first major food scare, or its first mass-media moral panic over food, depending on how you see it.
Contrary to the FSA’s line that vaccines dealt with a genuine problem, North maintains that the whole salmonella and eggs debacle was a classic food scare based on myths and dodgy science.
It’s worth noting that the fipronil egg scandal, which broke in August, where imported egg products were contaminated with an insecticide often used as flea killer – affected only pre-prepared eggs used in food manufacturing and catering.
Cake mixes used by industrial bakeries were withdrawn, along with liquid pasteurised eggs bought by chefs, and pre-cooked, factory-made supermarket convenience foods: certain salads from Asda and Sainsbury’s, some Morrisons egg sandwiches, and Waitrose deli filler were affected.
Over the past 12 months, retail egg sales have risen by 4%. In the current grim landscape, where more and more citizens need to use food banks just to put a meal on the table, eggs, which are so affordable and offer such unbeatable nutrition and sustenance, never more deserved a place on our plates.

The orginal article.