Summary of “When the Prescription Is a Recipe”

A perk of having a kitchen right next to her office, Dr. Fernando said, is that she can take patients right in and demonstrate something she wants them to try, such as how to grind flaxseed.
A five-day “Food adventure” camp for 7- to 12-year-olds costs $125. A popular class on how to make nutritious baby food costs $17.50.Claudia Castro of Stafford, Va., and her daughter Michelle, 14, began taking lessons in Dr. Fernando’s kitchen after a blood test showed that Michelle was prediabetic.
“Dr. Fernando took the time to tell us and then show us how to make the food she wants Michelle to eat to be healthy,” Mrs. Castro said.
Dr. Julie La Barba, CHEF’s medical director and also a pediatrician, said the program was formed out of the concept that “Food could be seen as medicine,” especially in children.
“What we teach here is how to have a discussion with one’s patient about food that can have a substantive impact,” Dr. Harlan said.
Dr. David M. Eisenberg, director of culinary nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, helped start a medical course called “Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives” to teach doctors to cook.
“There are a lot of conflicting impulses out there regarding food,” said Dr. Christine Pace, an internist at Boston Medical Center.
Doctors are on the front lines when it comes to helping patients change their eating habits, and they should take advantage of that at all levels of medical care, said Dr. Warren Ross, whose primary care practice in Ellicott City, Md., also has a teaching kitchen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why we fell for clean eating”

At its simplest, clean eating is about ingesting nothing but “Whole” or “Unprocessed” foods.
At first, clean eating sounded modest and even homespun: rather than counting calories, you would eat as many nutritious home-cooked substances as possible.
Clean eating has been attacked by critics such as the baker and cookbook author Ruby Tandoh for being an incitement to eating disorders.
A few weeks later, Anthony Warner – a food consultant with a background in science who blogs as The Angry Chef – published a book-length assault on the science of clean eating, calling it a world of “Quinoa bowls” and “Nutribollocks” fuelled by the modern information age.
Why has clean eating proved so difficult to kill off? Hadley Freeman, in this paper, identified clean eating as part of a post-truth culture, whose adherents are impervious, or even hostile, to facts and experts.
A second version of clean eating was spearheaded by a former cardiologist from Uruguay called Alejandro Junger, the author of Clean: The Revolutionary Program to Restore the Body’s Natural Ability to Heal Itself, which was published in 2009 after Junger’s clean detox system had been praised by Gwyneth Paltrow on her Goop website.
Alice Liveing, a 23-year-old personal trainer who writes as Clean Eating Alice, argued in her 2016 book Eat Well Every Day that she was “Championing what I feel is a much-needed breath of fresh air in what I think is an incredibly saturated market”.
McGregor’s main concern about clean eating, she added, was that as a professional treating young people with eating disorders, she had seen first-hand how the rules and restrictions of clean eating often segued into debilitating anorexia or orthorexia.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Falling In Love Meant Embracing A New Cuisine”

When Falling In Love Meant Embracing A New Cuisine : The Salt When a meat-and-potatoes white girl from the Midwest fell for an Indian vegetarian, it raised complicated questions about what it means to pass on our food cultures from one generation to the next.
It’s Part Two in The Sporkful’s new special series, Your Mom’s Food, about the complications that come up when we pass our cultures on from one generation to the next.
Sajan’s mom is an amazing cook, and I loved eating her food and learning her Punjabi recipes.
I’ve never really talked with my mom about the food tensions in our relationship.
I’ve been away from home for so long, I’ve become attached to lots of new foods.
After ten years of fighting upset stomachs with khichri and starting my days with chai, Indian food has also become my food.
There are so many different ways to show love through food – you can cook for someone, you can feed them.
Anne Noyes Saini produces the James Beard Award-nominated food podcast The Sporkful, which is available in Apple Podcasts, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Ice Cream Helped the U.S. Military at War”

Cartoon euphemized World War II through Bugs Bunny and ice cream.
What of our wounded and sick boys in France? Are they to lie in bed wishing for a dish of good old American ice cream? They are up to the present, for ice cream and ices are taboo in France.
Ice cream had become inseparable from the American way of life-and, from that point forward, from military tactics.
The cherry on top came a decade later during the Korean War, when General Lewis B. Puller tried to convince the Pentagon that ice cream was a “Sissy food” and that troops would be tougher if indulged with other products of American culture, namely beer and whiskey.
Beyond its military “Boom,” America’s comfortable connotation of ice cream goes back to its founding.
George Washington spent about $200 on ice cream in a single summer-more than $5,000 in today’s dollar-and Thomas Jefferson studied ice cream production in France before returning to Monticello with a sorbetière, four ice-cream molds, and a handwritten recipe for vanilla ice cream that’s still archived in the Library of Congress.
Immigrants to Ellis Island were traditionally fed ice cream as part of their first American meal-a gesture ordered by the island’s commissioner and preserved in a headline from the summer of 1921: “Ellis Island Authorities Gently Lead Immigrants to Appreciation of Good Points of America by Introducing Them to the Pleasures of Ice Cream Sandwiches.”
So why ice cream? In her book Much Depends on Dinner: The Extraordinary History and Mythology, Allure and Obsessions, Perils and Taboos of an Ordinary Meal, Margaret Visser suggests that there are two types of ice cream-induced nostalgia.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Secret World of Global Food Spies”

In demand by multinational retailers and food producers, Inscatech and its agents scour supply chains around the world hunting for evidence of food industry fraud and malpractice.
“It’s going to be important not just as a China play, but as a global play, because Chinese food companies are becoming part of the whole global supply chain.”
Some of the biggest food companies are backing technology that grew out of the anarchic world of crypto-currencies.
The planned blockchain project will involve the Chinese e-commerce behemoth working with food suppliers in Australia and New Zealand, as well as Australia Post and auditors PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP. “Food fraud is a serious global issue,” said Maggie Zhou, managing director for Alibaba in Australia and New Zealand.
Fraud costs the global food industry as much as $40 billion annually, according to John Spink, director of Michigan State University’s Food Fraud Initiative.
Counterfeiters and food tamperers face tougher penalties, including jail time in some cases, and more than $800 million has been spent hiring more food safety personnel and bolstering monitoring facilities, according to an April report from the Paulson Institute, a Washington-based think tank.
Blockchain is “Light years” away from the system used by the global food industry today, which relies heavily on paper records, said Yiannas, Wal-Mart’s food safety chief.
China’s Food and Drug Administration didn’t immediately respond to an email requesting comment on the country’s food safety efforts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Fast Food Chains Supersized Inequality”

It was Johnson who in 1964 began the Equal Opportunity Loan program that helped bring fast food to low-income areas.
Providing loans to restaurants promoted the wholesome mission of the program, but fast food was also industrialized food.
In a position statement released after he created the Office of Minority Business Enterprise in 1969, Nixon stated: “What we need is to get private enterprise into the ghetto, and get the people of the ghetto into private enterprise-not only as workers, but as managers and owners.” The program was allocated $65 million in the first year, although Nixon asked for three times as much, and fast food companies were some of the most eager participants.
The administration asserted that black-owned businesses serving fast food would help to cure urban unrest.
The growth of fast food franchises, like McDonald’s, into black neighborhoods with black owners was a highly visible step taken towards Nixon’s dream of a more robust Black Capitalism.
Just as fast food companies attempted to “Modernize” ghetto diets they also wanted to create a new black business class.
For fast food companies, the new black bourgeoisie would serve as their community liaisons, often doing business in places where white owners were distrusted.
Jou shows that under the guise of community empowerment, federal loan programs may have diversified who accessed capital, but they also redistributed money upward to fast food companies, which grew their businesses while bypassing riskier investments that didn’t involve government support.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Farm-To-Table May Feel Virtuous, But It’s Food Labor That’s Ripe For Change”

As farm-to-table has slipped further away from the food movement and into the realms of foodie-ism and corporate marketing, it is increasingly unhitched from the issues it is so often assumed to address.
Inequality does not affect our food system – our food system is built on inequality and requires it to function.
Our nearly 20-year obsession with food and chefs has neither expanded access to high-quality food nor improved nutrition in low-resource neighborhoods.
Food workers, as members of both the largest and lowest-paid U.S. workforce, are in a unique position to lead these conversations.
A simpler and maybe even more powerful way we can be catalysts for real change in the food system is to simply tell the stories of who we are.
There is a widespread disconnect on the critical role recent immigrants play in producing our food and an underlying empathy gap when it comes to the reality of daily life for these low-wage food workers and their families.
Nearly half of immigrant farmworkers and their families in North Carolina are food insecure.
The theater our audience sees – abundant grocery stores and farmers markets, absurdly cheap fast food and our farm-to-table dining rooms – resembles what Jean Baudrillard famously called the simulacrum, a kind of heightened parallel world that, like Disneyland, is an artifice with no meaningful connection to the real world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can sugar make you sad? A new study shows a link between sugar and depression”

In addition to being linked to conditions like obesity, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, eating high levels of sugar has been associated with mental illnesses like depression.
In a study published July 27 in Scientific Reports that followed over 8,000 adults over 22 years, researchers from University College London found that men who reported consuming foods that contained 67 grams of sugar per day or more were 23% more likely to be diagnosed with clinical depression after five years from when the study began.
After the first five-year follow up, men who ate the most sugar, which the authors categorize as 67 grams or more per day-almost twice the amount of sugar intake recommended by the American Heart Association, and roughly three and a half regular sized Snickers bars-had higher rates of mental health diagnoses than those who ate less sugar, regardless of whether or not they were overweight.
Even during years when participants reported eating less sugar, levels of mental illness stayed the same, which suggests that previous sugar habits had led to depression or anxiety and not the other way around.
In this study, the relationship between sugar and mental illness wasn’t well-defined among women.
The only thing that could would be a randomized controlled study, which would be unethical to perform knowing the links between sugar and other health consequences, Knuppel says.
James Gangwisch, a psychologist at Columbia University who found a link between sugar and depression in postmenopausal women, has postulated that foods high in sugar that are easy to break down may cause our blood sugar to immediately rise, and then plummet.
It’s worth considering how much added sugar is in your own diet beyond what’s found naturally in foods like fruits, which don’t give us the same blood sugar spike that foods like candy do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Food Lab: How to Organize Your Refrigerator for Better Food Storage”

Organizing your fridge for maximum efficiency-in terms of food shelf life, food safety, and easy access to the things you reach for most-should be a top priority.
A fridge is basically just a big, cold box with a few shelves in it, right? Well, that’s true, but where you store food in the fridge can have quite an impact on its shelf life.
How you organize your food in the fridge should be based on how cold it needs to be kept.
As soon as you transfer food into a smaller storage container, label the container, using permanent marker on masking tape, with the date of storage as well as what’s inside.
Fridges keep food fresh for longer, but that doesn’t mean that harmful bacteria can’t multiply to dangerous levels given enough time.
To minimize risk, here’s a rule of thumb: The more likely it is that a food could make you sick, and the higher the final temperature you intend to cook it to, the lower in the refrigerator it should be stored, both to keep it cooler and to prevent cross-contamination.
To give you an idea of good refrigerator storage organization, allow me to take you on a little tour of my fridge.
In emergencies, thinner foods can be rapidly defrosted by placing them in a bowl of cold water under a slowly running tap, or, better yet, placed on an aluminum tray or pan, which will very quickly transmit energy from the room to the food.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Our 2 Best Tips for Dealing With Picky Eaters”

First, you want your kid to eat a wide variety of foods, because that ups the chances they’ll consume healthier and more nutrient-rich fare, rather than just chicken nuggets and fries.
Kids who are adventurous eaters growing up, tend to be more adventurous eaters as adults.
Being an adventurous eater makes life easier, smoother, and more fun, allowing him or her to confidently dine in a variety of homes, in a variety of countries, without being the kind of priggish person who turns their nose up at unfamiliar dishes and orders the most Americanized item on the menu.
How can parents nip picky eating in the bud while their kids are still malleable?
Institute the “Try one bite of everything; eat as much as you’d like of what you like” rule.
Meal kit services like Blue Apron – in which you get a weekly box of ingredients to cook into meals at home – work against picky eating in a couple of ways.
When you have children that are picky eaters, you tend to keep cooking the same meals – the ones you know they like – over and over again.
So there you go: our 2 best tips for dealing with picky eaters, as field-tested in the McKay household.

The orginal article.