Summary of “Ditch the almond milk: why everything you know about sustainable eating is probably wrong”

“But what people don’t know is the environmental damage almond plantations are doing in California, and the water cost. It takes a bonkers 1,611 US gallons to produce 1 litre of almond milk,” says the Sustainable Restaurant Association’s Pete Hemingway.
According to Crystal Market Research, the US reusable water bottle market will be worth $9.62bn by 2023, up $3bn in a decade.
Phone, purse/wallet, water bottle – make it part of your daily routine.
In reality, says Friends of the Earth’s Emma Priestland, weirdly designed or coloured bottles are likely to be sifted out at recycling sites and will end up in landfill: “Robinson’s Fruit Shoot bottles are made of easily recycled Pet, but because is solid purple, it’s difficult to recycle. If separated, opaque colours can be recycled by chemical recycling, but that increases the cost, effort and energy required,” she says.
The European Pet Bottle Platform, which advises the bottling industry on design, recommends the use of clear Pet if possible.
One Water is no ordinary bottled water: the company is carbon neutral and its profits fund clean-water projects in the developing world.
As for the plastic waste, there is a robust market in recycled Pet bottles.
An earlier version quoted Pete Hemingway as saying to make 1 litre of almond milk, it takes 1,611 litres of water.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Amazonization of Whole Foods, one year in – TechCrunch”

At the time, Amazon said the goal was to make “High-quality, natural and organic food affordable for everyone.” Bananas, avocados and even tilapia was going to be cheaper than before.
A bunch of other Amazon offerings involving delivery options were also mentioned, including the getting of Whole Food groceries through a then new Amazon Fresh grocery delivery program and Whole Foods private label products would be made available through Prime Now and Prime Pantry.
Further, Amazon lockers would be showing up at select stores to make pick ups and returns easier for Amazon customers.
Walking into my local Whole Foods, the Amazon branding is everywhere from the deep orange lockers off to the side, the large, green Amazon Fresh coolers greeting me at the entrance to the parking lot and rows of bags ready for pickup and delivery via Amazon workers.
You want to do one better, just download the Amazon app to your smartphone, use the code given and then purchase with Apple pay using your Amazon Prime credit card for maximum benefits.
I’ve also enjoyed using the integrated partnership to order Whole Foods items straight from my Amazon Fresh account.
With Amazon, I can order from various stores, including Whole Foods through my Amazon Fresh account all in one order and then choose a time for delivery.
There’s still some bumps with that process – you can’t order every item available in Whole Foods, just what Fresh offers that week through the Amazon platform.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Fast Food Worth Making at Home”

I have three children and, like all other American kids, they harbor a deep and abiding love of fast food.
I could spend all day preparing a lovely dinner of braised short ribs, scalloped potatoes, and six different kinds of perfectly roasted vegetable, and yet these kids would gladly dump all that food in the toilet if I gave them the option of heading to a Five Guys instead. Fast food is their ideal.
You walk up to a counter, plunk down a few dollars, and are rewarded instantly with fattiest, saltiest, sweetest possible food imaginable.
The idea is that I can make “Fast food” healthier for my kids if I make it myself, since I’m in charge of the ingredients and the preparation.
How do you make one? Blend together some vanilla ice cream, milk, green food coloring, one single drop of peppermint extract and literally no more than that unless you want to feel like you just drank a cup of Flouride.
The reason fast food shakes are so good is because those places have industrial strength blenders that can turn a live horse into lumpless gravy in six seconds flat.
Should you make it? Yes, because pizza is an unassailable family meal AND it’s one of the foods that kids genuinely love to help prepare.
I loved making homemade pizza with my mom when I was a kid, and my kids do likewise with me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The End of an Epidemic”

A treatment for food allergies has eluded researchers for the 100-plus years that the diseases have been recognized.
My 20-month-old son, William, was diagnosed with a food allergy as an infant after a pebbly red rash spread across his chin the first and only time he licked peanut butter from my fingertip.
In any given year, one in five kids with a food allergy ends up in the emergency room.
Chicago is home to experts at the forefront of almost every area: epidemiologists crunching numbers to help us understand prevalence and severity, doctors conducting clinical trials for the first Food and Drug Administrat ion-approved food allergy drugs, and scientists like Nagler and her partners at the University of Chicago who seek to alter food-allergic bodies from deep within the digestive tract.
The epidemic of food allergies has been very recent, one that first became apparent in the mid-’80s. Between 2007 and 2016 alone, the number of reported anaphylactic reactions increased nearly 400 percent in the United States, according to James Baker, who retired in June as CEO of the advocacy organization Food Allergy Research & Education, which has an office in Skokie.
Roughly 8 percent of children – or two in every average-sized classroom – and 13 percent of adults have at least one food allergy, according to Gupta’s research.
The rise in food allergies mirrors that of other modern diseases – namely, type 2 diabetes, obesity, autism, inflammatory bowel syndrome, and asthma, which have all been linked by researchers to a depleted microbiome.
If the two aforementioned food allergy drugs – the AR101 pill by the California-based company Aimmune and the Viaskin patch from the French company DBV – are approved, they will bring immunotherapy for food allergies into the mainstream.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Indian Filmmaker Who Made His Dad’s Village Cooking a YouTube Sensation”

That’s about sixteen times the population of the Theni district, a bucolic part of Tamil Nadu where the man, Jaymukh Gopinath, cooks huge meals en plein air, filmed by his son Arumugam, an amateur filmmaker.
Arumugam has fond childhood memories of his dad’s cooking.
“I remember coming home from school and my dad had made pepper crabs,” Arumugam said.
Arumugam and Jaymukh’s first video, which was posted to YouTube on July 24, 2016, shows Jaymukh simmering crabs in a stew over a fire while a waterfall roars behind him.
The pair have since made hundreds of such videos, featuring Jaymukh making everything from stewed lamb head to fast-food-style burgers.
In just two years, according to Arumugam, his channel, Village Food Factory, has attracted close to two million YouTube subscribers and has earned the family more than seven million rupees, or close to a hundred thousand dollars, in advertising revenue-a small fortune in India.
With Village Food Factory releasing a new video every three to four days, the project has become a family affair: Arumugam’s mother as well as his wife, Pragathi, prep the ingredients, and his younger brother, Manikandan, assists with cooking.
The most unexpected part for Arumugam has been watching his dad become a celebrity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Crying in H-Mart”

The “H” stands for han ah reum, a Korean phrase that roughly translates to “One arm full of groceries.” H Mart is where parachute kids go to get the exact brand of instant noodles that reminds them of home.
Growing up mixed-race in America, with a Caucasian father and a Korean mother, my mom was my access point for our Korean heritage.
I can hardly speak Korean, but in H Mart I feel like I’m fluent.
I’ll wonder what my Mom would have looked like in her seventies-if she would have the same perm that every Korean grandma gets as though it were a part of our race’s evolution.
There’s a stall for Korean street food, which serves up Korean ramen; giant steamed dumplings full of pork and glass noodles, housed in a thick, cake-like dough; and tteokbokki, chewy, bite-sized cylindrical rice cakes boiled in a stock with fishcakes, red pepper, and gochujang, a sweet-and-spicy paste that’s one of the three mother sauces used in pretty much all Korean dishes.
I wonder how many people at H Mart miss their families.
At another table, there are three generations of Korean women eating three different types of stews: daughter, mom, and grandmother dipping their spoons into each other’s dolsots, reaching over one another’s trays, arms in one another’s faces, pinching at their different banchan with chopsticks.
Woman, let me eat in peace! But, most days, I knew it was the ultimate display of a Korean woman’s tenderness, and I cherished that love.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Obesity in America 2018: 7 charts that explain why it’s so easy to gain weight”

“The food environment is a strong predictor of how we eat,” says Scott Kahan, director of the National Center for Weight and Wellness and a faculty member at both Johns Hopkins and George Washington University.
“And in America, the unhealthiest foods are the tastiest foods, the cheapest foods, the largest-portion foods, the most available foods, the most fun foods.”
We’re told to eat nutrient-dense foods like broccoli and Brussels sprouts instead of energy-dense foods like soda and french fries, yet there aren’t enough nutrient-dense foods to go around.
7) We’re bombarded with ads for unhealthy food Sugary, oily foods are engineered to be consumed often and in big portions.
A 2006 report by the Institute of Medicine helped establish how the rise in obesity among kids corresponds to increasing marketing of unhealthy food and drinks to them.
The UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity found that in 2014, food companies spent $1.28 billion to advertise snack foods on television, in magazines, in coupons, and, increasingly, on the internet and mobile devices.
How the food environment could support healthful eating instead With the expansion of our waistlines over the past 30 years, the factors in our environment that promote obesity – some of them outlined here – have come into focus.
There’s ample evidence that many people can’t make sense of the traditional food labels on the back of food packages: they too often require math, and some knowledge of nutrition.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Not just a fad: the surprising, gut-wrenching truth about gluten”

While the notion that some forms of gluten could be a potential source of the digestive difficulties, growing numbers of people report suffering has circulated in complementary medicine circles for decades, the gluten avoidance trend has really taken off in the past decade.
Statistically, women are more likely than men to be gluten sensitive: two to three times as many women as men suffer from coeliac disease, going up to six times more for non-coeliac gluten sensitivity.
In one recent study, researchers concluded: “Participants’ reasons for gluten avoidance in the absence of a medical diagnosis of coeliac disease were, for the most part, reasoned and logical. The vast majority of participants believed that adhering to a gluten-free diet led to improvements.”
Although all the additives used to make modern bread and processed food products are “Generally recognised as safe”, in the circumspect language of the US Food and Drug Administration, some researchers have associated a number of food additives with some of the gut alterations seen in both coeliac and non-coeliac gluten sensitivity, as well as in inflammatory bowel disease.
For the past 20-30 years, industrial bakeries have also been adding extra gluten to their products, known as “Vital gluten” in the trade, but often labelled innocuously as “Wheat protein”.
While gluten need not be a digestive disruptor, per se, it could perhaps become so when encountered in its inadequately fermented forms, particularly when it is mixed with pesticide residues, food additives and processing aids that could be troublemakers in their own right.
Stepping away from the daily misery of people with digestive issues, there is no ignoring the statistical discrepancy between the growing numbers of people in the UK who can be tagged as gluten-sensitive and the 15% of British households now avoiding gluten and wheat.
Part of the I-don’t-believe-you resistance to the concept of gluten sensitivity is the fact that many people latch on to gluten-free as a way to lose weight.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The world’s first “high-tech eco village” will reinvent suburbs”

A half-hour commute from Amsterdam, a piece of farmland is slated to become a new kind of neighborhood.
A “Village OS” tech platform will use AI to simultaneously manage systems for renewable energy, food production, water supply, and waste.
The 50-acre neighborhood, which will be nearly self-sufficient as it collects and stores water and energy, grows food, and processes much of its own waste, was initially planned for construction in 2017.
“We can connect a neighborhood the way it’s supposed to be connected, which is around natural resources,” says James Ehrlich, founder of ReGen Villages.
Electric cars, for example, which will be parked on the perimeter of the neighborhood to keep streets walkable, can store some of the extra power from the neighborhood’s solar panels and other renewable energy.
Because of the expected arrival of self-driving cars in coming years, and to encourage walking and biking, the houses aren’t designed with parking; a new bus line along the edge of the neighborhood, with a dedicated bus lane, can take residents to the town of Almere or into Amsterdam.
A “Living machine,” a system that uses plants and trees to filter sewage, and a separate anaerobic digester, can handle the neighborhood’s sewage and provide irrigation or water reused in energy systems.
The company has plans to build future developments near cities like Lund, Sweden, and Lejre-Hvalso, Denmark, and it ultimately hopes to bring a low-cost version of the neighborhoods to developing countries.

The orginal article.