Summary of “To Rinse Or Not To Rinse: How Washing Some Foods Can Help You Avoid Illness”

To Rinse Or Not To Rinse: How Washing Some Foods Can Help You Avoid Illness : The Salt Rinsing foods doesn’t always prevent foodborne illness and can sometimes make the risks worse.
Here’s what the science says about which foods you should run water over and why.
Would rinsing lettuce have prevented the outbreak? Likely not, because the E. coli organism that caused the outbreak is so hardy that only a few bacteria are necessary to cause illness.
Rinsing does help prevent other illnesses associated with food.
As summer and outdoor eating events beckon, here are some tips on what foods to rinse, how to rinse, and why.
Keep in mind that rinsing rice may reduce the levels of folate, iron, niacin and thiamin, by 50 to 70 percent, according to the Food and Drug Administration, and that the largest risk for arsenic exposure from rice is for those who eat it several times a day.
As NPR reported five years ago, rinsing raw chicken before cooking it is a “Bad idea, because it raises the risk of spreading dangerous bacteria found on raw poultry all over your kitchen” Back then, the advice provoked a “Small #chickensh*tstorm,” since chicken washing was so common – even Julia Child recommended it, saying she thought it was safer.
The advice not to rinse your chicken still holds today, according to Cleveland Clinic dietitian Laura Jeffers, who writes in a list of food prep do’s and don’t’s: “Any bacteria will be killed during the cooking process.” Cooking the bird to an internal temperature of 165 degrees is sufficient.

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Summary of “I Went On A Hunt For The Best Pakistani Food In The U.S.”

With each new phase of my life, I’ve found community in Pakistani halal hole-in-the-wall restaurants, where the service and ambiance are mere functions to the food.
Soon after calling Furrokh Uncle, I decided to reach out to a few of my favorite Pakistani hole-in-the-walls and ask them about their story, their community, and what it means to serve Pakistani food in the United States.
In her 1973 cookbook An Invitation to Indian Cooking, Madhur Jaffrey, the queen of American Indian cuisine, writes about how Indian restaurants at the time “Serve[d] a generalized Indian food from no specific area whatsoever.” Though things have certainly moved forward slightly in this regard for Indian food, with the rise of “Hipster Indian” cuisine, Pakistani food is, with some exceptions, generally relegated to humble locations in places with a high concentration of folks from the country, in Texas, New York, Massachusetts, Chicago, the Bay Area, New Jersey, and elsewhere.
As Fatima Ali, a professional chef and Top Chef Season 15 contestant who specializes in “Modern, eclectic Pakistani food,” told me, there’s some hesitancy from restaurant owners to identify as solely as Pakistani.
Pakistani food takes an exceptionally long time to prepare and the specials, like the stewed meat shank dish nihari, can take hours to cook.
Chef Fati suggested that the best Pakistani food isn’t served in restaurants; it’s served in homes and sometimes passed through generations of family recipes.
At first, I considered that my decadelong obsession with American dhabas was a search for the “Authentic” Pakistani food I ate at home, but the truth is, I know I’ll never again taste the piquant, rich, and aromatic Panipati food my late mother cooked, not even in the kitchen of her younger sister, who prefers a more masala-packed punch.
Pakistani food is marked by the particularity of the chef and the family, and while the mainstream may not have an appetite for it yet, I do.

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Summary of “Amazon is challenging LaCroix with 365 sparkling water at Whole Foods”

Amazon and Whole Foods are about to shake up the US seltzer market.
Whole Foods is currently offering steep discounts on 12-packs of flavored sparkling water by 365 Everyday Value, its private label, at stores in the San Francisco area.
The deal highlights how Amazon is using Whole Foods, which it bought for $13.7 billion in June 2017, to go after some of the hottest brands in consumer-packaged goods.
Whole Foods introduced 365-branded canned sparkling water in September 2017, a month after Amazon closed the acquisition.
Amazon and Whole Foods aren’t the only ones challenging LaCroix.
Pepsi in February introduced Bubly, a zero-calorie sparkling water in eight flavors that, with its brightly colored cans and modish slogans, is an obvious play for the LaCroix consumer.
Whole Foods’ 365 seltzer line was in the works before the Amazon acquisition, a spokesman told Quartz.
Late last year, Whole Foods named sparkling water as a “Top food trend” for 2018.

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Summary of “Remembering Anthony Bourdain”

For more than two decades, Bourdain wrote books - including the notorious Kitchen Confidential - about the restaurant industry, and he hosted TV shows about food as business, as craft, as human history, as sensory delight.
A wisecracking bad boy otherwise, Bourdain traveled the world, exploring cuisines and regional histories, interrogating not just the quality of food, but the quality of life.
Bourdain ranted - in episodes, in his books, in interviews, on Twitter - against vegetarians, against Henry Kissinger.
In the early minutes of his No Reservations episode about Nicaragua, Bourdain trained his cameras on a landfill.
“The very notion of food television - what I do - seems somehow obscene,” Bourdain said, addressing the camera.
Bourdain did not present food and travel as the stuff of summer vacations, though he certainly popularized a few, far-flung joints along the way.
Some of his adventures were reckonings, such his excursions to Cambodia and Vietnam, which culminated with the Parts Unknown episode in which Bourdain interviewed Barack Obama at a restaurant in Hanoi.
The very best Bourdain television, however relaxing or perilous, was often about friendship - Bourdain and his crew, Bourdain and his guests, Bourdain and his hosts.

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Summary of “Is America Ready for the Next Superstorm?”

The market vendors scooped up the goods at Manhattan piers and hauled them the final few blocks to the market with hand trucks.
Not long after Washington Market was destined for the Bronx, the City Planning Commission began eyeing the aging Fulton Fish Market on the Lower East Side, hoping to reimagine the area as an “Old New York” neighborhood, where shops, a museum, and restored historic buildings could greet visitors who’d just finished their tour of the nineteenth- century ships docked permanently along the pier.
The plan consists of two major components: The first is the physical hardware to keep the electricity flowing to the market; the second is what the EDC, which leads the team, refers to as the plan’s “Human capital,” or protocols for how market vendors and city agencies should respond to various disaster scenarios.
As of today, temporary stacks of sandbags serve to protect the refrigeration for the meat market alone-leaving the produce and fish markets as exposed as they were more than five years ago during Hurricane Sandy.
Just as, 50 years ago, Washington Market needed to relocate from lower Manhattan in order to address the challenges of the time, today, the best way to ensure that Hunts Point Market continues to operate smoothly would be to move it somewhere other than Hunts Point.
Where could Hunts Point Market potentially go? Even before Sandy, the vendors at the market were being courted by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s office to move to new facilities in Newark and the Meadowlands.
In Charleston, where floods have increased more than 400 percent since the 1960s, with a record 50 days of flooding in 2016, the real estate market continues to grow, with Forbes recently ranking the city as one of the hottest markets to watch in the country.
So far removed from Sandy, the city has chosen inadequate protection, a decision that depends on the naïve hope that the market will once again be spared by the next disaster.

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Summary of “Avoiding meat and dairy is ‘single biggest way’ to reduce your impact on Earth”

Avoiding meat and dairy products is the single biggest way to reduce your environmental impact on the planet, according to the scientists behind the most comprehensive analysis to date of the damage farming does to the planet.
The scientists also found that even the very lowest impact meat and dairy products still cause much more environmental harm than the least sustainable vegetable and cereal growing.
“A vegan diet is probably the single biggest way to reduce your impact on planet Earth, not just greenhouse gases, but global acidification, eutrophication, land use and water use,” said Joseph Poore, at the University of Oxford, UK, who led the research.
The comparison of beef with plant protein such as peas is stark, with even the lowest impact beef responsible for six times more greenhouse gases and 36 times more land.
If the most harmful half of meat and dairy production was replaced by plant-based food, this still delivers about two-thirds of the benefits of getting rid of all meat and dairy production.
Cutting the environmental impact of farming is not easy, Poore warned: “There are over 570m farms all of which need slightly different ways to reduce their impact. It is an challenge like no other sector of the economy.” But he said at least $500bn is spent every year on agricultural subsidies, and probably much more: “There is a lot of money there to do something really good with.”
Labels that reveal the impact of products would be a good start, so consumers could choose the least damaging options, he said, but subsidies for sustainable and healthy foods and taxes on meat and dairy will probably also be necessary.
Poore said: “The reason I started this project was to understand if there were sustainable animal producers out there. But I have stopped consuming animal products over the last four years of this project. These impacts are not necessary to sustain our current way of life. The question is how much can we reduce them and the answer is a lot.”

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Summary of “How Amazon Plans To Use Whole Foods to Dominate the Retail Industry”

As a sign of how critical the sector is to ­Amazon’s future, Steve Kessel, part of CEO Jeff Bezos’s inner circle and a key figure on the Kindle team, has been brought in to run not only Whole Foods but also Amazon’s grocery delivery business, ­AmazonFresh, and Prime Now, its two-hour delivery offering.
For Amazon watchers, the company’s purchase of Whole Foods and its physical footprint-for more money than it had spent on all of its previous acquisitions combined-is a reflection of Bezos’s broader ambitions.
Amazon couldn’t just put products into a national fulfillment network and then turn on the web experience for the entire U.S. “That’s how traditional Amazon categories get an advantage,” says Clarkson.
Whole Foods supplied it-as well as providing Amazon shoppers with a more appealing story about where their food originated.
According to 1010data, at the time of the acquisition, 81% of Whole Foods customers were already Amazon shoppers.
So rather than capturing a new base, adding Whole Foods to the portfolio served as a tool to further ingrain Amazon customers within its ecosystem-offering Whole Foods’ popular 365 private label online, selling products like the Amazon Echo in its stores, and setting up Amazon lockers within Whole Foods for customers to pick up packages.
Since the deal closed, quick visits to Whole Foods were up 11% in stores with Amazon lockers.
Might Amazon have something similar planned for Whole Foods stores? Perhaps in its lower-priced 365 locations, but experts are skeptical that the “Just walk out” experience is coming to flagship outposts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Food delivery’s untapped opportunity – TechCrunch”

Investors may have already placed their orders in the consumer food delivery space, but there’s still a missing recipe for solving the more than $250 billion business-to-business foodservice distribution problem.
The two largest food distributors, are up by more than 20 percent since last summer, when Amazon bought Whole Foods.
By comparison, food and ingredient delivery for businesses is vastly underserved.
Food-preparation facilities often face a number of difficulties getting the ingredients to cook the food we all enjoy.
Who are these food-preparation facilities? They range from your local restaurants, hotels, school and business cafeterias, catering companies, and many other facilities that supply to grocery markets, food trucks and so on.
As a food business operator, you may be ordering quality ingredients at the right price, but if the delivery doesn’t show up on time, you’re outta luck.
You won’t be able to prepare the food in time, all the while paying for staff who are sitting around waiting for ingredients to arrive.
I’m aware of startups that have tried to become the dominant B2B platform for food service distribution.

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Summary of “How India’s Welfare Revolution Is Starving Citizens”

Aadhaar, which is the largest biometric identification database in existence, has lately been the subject of intense debate in India.
The linking of Aadhaar to welfare benefits has proved especially controversial.
In parliamentary records from the eighties and nineties, ministers ask how food meant for one district ended up in Bangladesh, whether officers subverting welfare would be punished, and if the whole system should be shut down “To dismantle a huge chain of vested interests.” In one instance, a minister wondered why New Delhi had more recipients of welfare than actual residents.
In 2018, India set aside $24.9 billion, just over one percent of the country’s G.D.P., to buy and deliver this food, aware that a significant portion would vanish.
She told me that had been keeping a spreadsheet tracking “a wave of deaths” that came after welfare recipients were told to link their benefits to Aadhaar.
For the past two years, food campaigners have watched in alarm as Aadhaar has taken hold in India’s bureaucracy.
In Jharkhand, it’s now mandatory to link rations to Aadhaar, which campaigners say has led to people’s removal from ration lists.
In October, just outside Ranchi, the local government announced that it would conduct a limited experiment: instead of giving people food, it would deposit money directly into accounts linked to Aadhaar.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Food apartheid: the root of the problem with America’s groceries”

America’s sustainable food movement has been steadily growing, challenging consumers to truly consider where our food comes from, and inspiring people to farm, eat local, and rethink our approaches to food policy.
Karen Washington: I was just in Pennsylvania and North Carolina talking about food deserts, and the topic of food justice and food sovereignty, and putting it out there that it means nothing to me.
Who in in my actual neighborhood has deemed that we live in a food desert? Number one, people will tell you that they do have food.
Food sovereignty is being coopted in the same way that food justice is, because “Food sovereignty” was a term that was really founded by indigenous people in Central and South America when they were fighting for governance.
We do have a food bank and other programs that provide access to fresh food, and it’s easy for people to write a check to a food bank or buy a couple cans of food to donate, but it feels like a Band-Aid on a larger problem.
Even as a farmer, I have to deal with the fact that when I come down to the farmers’ market and sell my produce I have to educate people about the value and cost of food, because I am surrounded by a food system – a subsidized food system – that skews the cost and value of food.
It’s not a food pantry where you’re giving out free plastic bags of food.
That’s what’s going to happen to the food movement if we don’t think about planting seeds of diversity, of new young blood, into the food system.

The orginal article.