Summary of “Acres of saltwater pools in the desert are growing an algae food revolution”

She isn’t offering snacks filled with algae just to show people that the mossy greens can be added to food without making it taste or smell like pond water.
The US government recognized algae as a crop for the first time in the 2018 farm bill, and the agricultural know-how that exists for growing other crops is still in the making for this ocean dwelling plant.
Algae farming is so new that there are no pesticides, insecticides or herbicides developed to protect algae.
“We have figured out how to grow the algae in such a way that the ponds are an optimized environment for the algae to grow, and not much else,” White says.
Which has to be sustainable and energy efficient for algae to be considered an attractive food alternative.
Touted as a breakthrough for the algae industry, this filtration-based system extracts algae from the water using low energy and no chemicals.
Every time the density of the algae reaches a certain point, about 25 percent of the pond water is run through filtration to extract the algae.
With the inclusion of algae in the farm bill, White and other algae farmers hope that federal grants will fuel progress in algae technology and elevate algae to a mainstream crop.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Plant-based diet can fight climate change”

Switching to a plant-based diet can help fight climate change, UN experts have said.
A major report on land use and climate change says the West’s high consumption of meat and dairy produce is fuelling global warming.
Twelve years to save Earth? Make that 18 months…. Meat, veg, nuts – a diet designed to feed 10bn. What is climate change?
“We’re not telling people to stop eating meat. In some places people have no other choice. But it’s obvious that in the West we’re eating far too much,” said Prof Pete Smith, an environmental scientist from Aberdeen University, UK. The report calls for vigorous action to halt soil damage and desertification – both of which contribute to climate change.
How the land responds to human-induced climate change is a vital concern for the future.
Climate change poses a threat to the security of our food supply.
Climate change food calculator: What’s your diet’s carbon footprint?
“It’s really clear that the land’s being degraded through over-exploitation – and that’s making climate change worse,” said Prof Smith.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Illegal Ramen Vendors of Postwar Tokyo”

In this bustling environment, vendors announced their presence with the distinctive sound of charumera flutes and sold ramen from a yatai, a wheeled food cart filled with drawers containing noodles, pork slices and garnishes, alongside pots of boiling soup and water.
So flour for ramen was secretly diverted from flour milling companies into the black markets, where nearly 90 percent of street stalls were under the control of the yakuza, who extorted the vendors for protection money.
Thousands of ramen vendors were arrested during the occupation.
The government started to loosen its restrictions on food vending and removed controls on the exchange of wheat flour, which further boosted the number of ramen vendors.
According to Jonathan Garcia, a ramen class instructor at Osakana in Brooklyn, New York, ramen during this time was a shoyu based soup, made from a combination of pork, chicken, and niboshi.
Foods rich in fat and strong flavors became known as “Stamina food,” according to Professor George Solt, author of The Untold History of Ramen.
Ramen is arguably Japan’s most popular food today, with Tokyo alone containing around 5,000 ramen shops.
The past combination of economic necessity, American wheat, and Chinese culinary influence propelled ramen into the mainstream, and in turn, forever changed the way Japan ate.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Parents Are Turning to a Controversial Treatment for Food Allergies”

With food allergies, micro-managing daily life to avoid accidentally consuming the wrong food can be a huge burden.
With many researchers dismissing the science as thin and the treatment unnecessary, the schism over oral immunotherapy – among both physicians and food allergy families – may not easily resolve.
Families dealing with food allergies also report feeling misunderstood because people tend to lump their life-threatening condition in with a slew of other diets, health concerns, and ethical reasons for restricting certain foods.
To help others understand, food allergy patients may stress that they have a “Life-threatening” food allergy, Ciaccio said.
“They’re navigating aunts and uncles, sometimes even grandparents, who don’t get it – or they get it and choose not to respect the guidelines. And so that’s another source of potential anxiety,” said Tamara Hubbard, a licensed counselor in the Chicago area who works with food allergy families and maintains a website that includes a directory of nationwide food allergy counselors.
Sturner, who started the Facebook group Food Allergy Treatment Talk, said that these voices have gotten louder over time.
An even bigger obstacle, he noted, is the need to produce food-based products “To essentially pharmaceutical-grade levels.” Most allergists are waiting for an FDA-approved food allergy treatment before offering the therapy in their clinics.
At any given moment, OIT conversation on Food Allergy Treatment Talk, the Facebook group Sturner started, might highlight successes, discuss challenges, or raise questions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why We Fell for Clean Eating”

At its simplest, clean eating is about ingesting nothing but “Whole” or “Unprocessed” foods.
At first, clean eating sounded modest and even homespun: rather than counting calories, you would eat as many nutritious home-cooked substances as possible.
Clean eating has been attacked by critics such as the baker and cookbook author Ruby Tandoh for being an incitement to eating disorders.
Why has clean eating proved so difficult to kill off? Hadley Freeman, in this paper, identified clean eating as part of a post-truth culture, whose adherents are impervious, or even hostile, to facts and experts.
To understand how clean eating took hold with such tenacity, it’s necessary first to consider just what a terrifying thing food has become for millions of people in the modern world.
A second version of clean eating was spearheaded by a former cardiologist from Uruguay called Alejandro Junger, the author of Clean: The Revolutionary Program to Restore the Body’s Natural Ability to Heal Itself, which was published in 2009 after Junger’s clean detox system had been praised by Gwyneth Paltrow on her Goop website.
Alice Liveing, a 23-year-old personal trainer who writes as Clean Eating Alice, argued in her 2016 book Eat Well Every Day that she was “Championing what I feel is a much-needed breath of fresh air in what I think is an incredibly saturated market”.
McGregor’s main concern about clean eating, she added, was that as a professional treating young people with eating disorders, she had seen first-hand how the rules and restrictions of clean eating often segued into debilitating anorexia or orthorexia.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Illegal Ramen Vendors of Postwar Tokyo”

In this bustling environment, vendors announced their presence with the distinctive sound of charumera flutes and sold ramen from a yatai, a wheeled food cart filled with drawers containing noodles, pork slices and garnishes, alongside pots of boiling soup and water.
So flour for ramen was secretly diverted from flour milling companies into the black markets, where nearly 90 percent of street stalls were under the control of the yakuza, who extorted the vendors for protection money.
Thousands of ramen vendors were arrested during the occupation.
The government started to loosen its restrictions on food vending and removed controls on the exchange of wheat flour, which further boosted the number of ramen vendors.
According to Jonathan Garcia, a ramen class instructor at Osakana in Brooklyn, New York, ramen during this time was a shoyu based soup, made from a combination of pork, chicken, and niboshi.
Foods rich in fat and strong flavors became known as “Stamina food,” according to Professor George Solt, author of The Untold History of Ramen.
Ramen is arguably Japan’s most popular food today, with Tokyo alone containing around 5,000 ramen shops.
The past combination of economic necessity, American wheat, and Chinese culinary influence propelled ramen into the mainstream, and in turn, forever changed the way Japan ate.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Toothpaste is Our New Favorite Souvenir”

Why is there black eggplant toothpaste in Japan and not here? Does the idea of oral health correspond to a sweet or salty flavor? To what degree does packaging design change the way we taste different products? Is there a measurable spectrum of quality in toothpaste, and how much does price correspond to deliciousness? It’s also notable that many foreign toothpastes don’t contain fluoride, which is a central ingredient in standard American blends.
It’s my deeply held opinion that toothpaste is as interesting a window into other the taste buds of other cultures as food and drink.
Used as a breath freshener since antiquity, cardamom is a no-brainer of a toothpaste flavor.
Finally, we’re taking a step towards that dream: part of Marvis’ “Wonders of the World” special edition toothpaste line, Karakum promises “The thrill of an imaginary journey across the Black Sea to Persia, Mongolian deserts and Eastern China” Having never undertaken such an imaginary journey, I have no reference point for comparison, but this is a toothpaste that I hope sticks around for a very long time.
Now a stylish, high-end apothecary brand, Buly produces some of the most fantastic tasting toothpaste I’ve ever had. The formula relies on natural spring water from southwestern France long prized for its beneficial periodontal properties and comes in three flavors: apple, orange-ginger-clove, and my favorite, cucumber-coriander-mint.
To my delight, it lived on a toothpaste box that promised fresh mint with a hint of tea tree oil.
Certain flavors of Arm & Hammer toothpaste are similar to this, but don’t foreground the sodium chloride in quite the same way.
Buy Mastic Dental Gel.Right up there with cardamom, mastic is one of those beguilingly refreshing flavors that makes total sense as a toothpaste.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Toothpaste is Our New Favorite Souvenir”

Why is there black eggplant toothpaste in Japan and not here? Does the idea of oral health correspond to a sweet or salty flavor? To what degree does packaging design change the way we taste different products? Is there a measurable spectrum of quality in toothpaste, and how much does price correspond to deliciousness? It’s also notable that many foreign toothpastes don’t contain fluoride, which is a central ingredient in standard American blends.
It’s my deeply held opinion that toothpaste is as interesting a window into other the taste buds of other cultures as food and drink.
Used as a breath freshener since antiquity, cardamom is a no-brainer of a toothpaste flavor.
Finally, we’re taking a step towards that dream: part of Marvis’ “Wonders of the World” special edition toothpaste line, Karakum promises “The thrill of an imaginary journey across the Black Sea to Persia, Mongolian deserts and Eastern China” Having never undertaken such an imaginary journey, I have no reference point for comparison, but this is a toothpaste that I hope sticks around for a very long time.
Now a stylish, high-end apothecary brand, Buly produces some of the most fantastic tasting toothpaste I’ve ever had. The formula relies on natural spring water from southwestern France long prized for its beneficial periodontal properties and comes in three flavors: apple, orange-ginger-clove, and my favorite, cucumber-coriander-mint.
To my delight, it lived on a toothpaste box that promised fresh mint with a hint of tea tree oil.
Certain flavors of Arm & Hammer toothpaste are similar to this, but don’t foreground the sodium chloride in quite the same way.
Buy Mastic Dental Gel.Right up there with cardamom, mastic is one of those beguilingly refreshing flavors that makes total sense as a toothpaste.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nearly 30% Of Food Delivery Drivers Admit To Stealing Food, Study Finds”

Nearly 30% Of Food Delivery Drivers Admit To Stealing Food, Study Finds A study conducted by US Foods found that nearly 30% of drivers for food delivery services admitted to stealing a bite of food from their customer’s order.
At least that’s the suggestion of a recent study that found nearly 30% of drivers are snacking from the food they’re responsible for delivering.
The survey conducted by US Foods, which supplies food to restaurants, gathered information from about 500 food delivery drivers and more than 1,500 customers in America who order through apps such as DoorDash, Postmates, Grubhub and UberEats.
Drivers who reported working for at least one food delivery app had a median age of 30.
The delivery service still requires “Each person who completes a delivery using Postmates to expressly agree that all food and goods delivered will arrive in a tamper-free form and in compliance with all applicable food health and safety laws.”
In its delivery guidelines, UberEats said it will deactivate any account with fraudulent activity or misuse, including “Claiming to complete a delivery without ever picking up the delivery item; and picking up a delivery item but not delivering it in full.”
Doordash directs its drivers to not open food containers or tamper with the order in any way.
In 2018, UBS found that on average, food delivery platforms were in the top 40 most-downloaded apps in major markets.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Magical Microbes: How to Feed Your Gut”

“The [former] are moving through the body, but they can have an effect on your existing microbes and we also know they produce substances that are beneficial. So, in a way, they’re energising your gut microbes as they go through, producing some chemicals that look as if they’re good for weight loss as well.” However, he reserves the title of “Super yoghurt” for kefir.
In her book Gut, gastroenterologist Giulia Enders writes that, as they cool, some of the starch crystallises, making it more resistant to human digestion, “So your potato salad or sushi rice reaches your microbes untouched”.
“When you’re not eating,” says Spector, “a whole different set of microbes comes and cleans up your gut wall, eating the sugars and things there, and that’s important in keeping a good immune balance.” We are not talking extreme abstention.
Animal studies have shown microbes nibbling through the gut’s protective lining if starved for too long.
Intermittent fasting with low-calorie days, or simply leaving long gaps between meals, is beneficial for your gut microbes.
In the introduction to a new book, The Healthy Gut Handbook, by Justine Pattison, Spector writes that after he put his student son on a fast food diet for 10 days, the boy had lost 40% of his microbe species and felt sick and lethargic.
Emulsifiers, which keep texture consistent, are rife in heavily processed foods and, warns Spector, “It has been shown in a couple of studies in rodents that they cause disruption of the gut microbes, which react differently and produce funny chemicals, in a similar way to sweeteners. If you give animals lots of sweeteners, you get a reduction in diversity of the microbes and they produce abnormal chemicals – different metabolic signals which have been shown to be more likely to give you diabetes and make you put on weight.” There’s no hard evidence yet in humans, but Spector has seen enough to make him wary of regularly eating these additives.
One simple answer, he suggests, could be: “If you’re eating junk food, you’re having a surge of fat and sugar that are absorbed before they reach the gut microbes, so you’re starving the guys of fibre lower down. Then they send out signals that promote obesity.”

The orginal article.