Summary of “How Michael Vick’s dogfighting case changed animal welfare”

These dogs are reminders that even now, 12 years later, survivors of former NFL quarterback Michael Vick’s dogfighting operation live on in pockets throughout the country, including here at Best Friends Animal Society’s 3,700-acre sanctuary.
For 47 dogs pulled from Bad Newz Kennels, there was another, less publicized development that helped change how dogs taken in large-scale dogfighting busts are treated.
Because Vick’s fame turned the dogfighting bust into a national story, not just a conversation in the animal welfare community, many watched with curiosity or skepticism, wondering whether a dog from a traumatic past could ever live normally in society.
Best Friends said a dog escaped its run and broke into the run of Vick dog Tug, who broke into Denzel’s run.
When her dog died, she reached out to BADRAP. Only then did she learn the dog she had fallen in love with came from the Vick case.
Until her recent death, Mya lived with Curly, another Vick dog, in the same run where the dogs from this case were first housed.
Leaders from across animal welfare met to confront the issue, and it prompted the Humane Society to adjust its stance on dogs seized from fight busts.
Uba, a Vick dog who lives with Letti de Little in northern Virginia, has a housemate named Jamie, a dog from a 2013 multistate fight bust in which 367 dogs were seized.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lonely? Short of Friends? Try Looking at It Differently”

At first glance, it’s tempting to respond that way to a study from the University of British Columbia, explaining why people tend to assume that their friends have more friends, and lead less solitary lives, than they do.
Can you guess? That’s right: because every single time we see our friends, they’re socializing.
Assuming you don’t spy on your friends via telescope from treetops, you never see them at home alone in their pajamas, eating pickled onion Monster Munch while watching The X Factor and feeling sorry for themselves.
Or consider those happy throngs you glimpse through the windows of the bar you pass each day on your way home from work: doesn’t it seem like they’re always meeting friends at the bar?
It’s a mathematical oddity that your friends do have slightly more friends than you do, on average.
The more instances of something we encounter, the more significant we naturally assume it to be – and though we encounter our own solitude frequently, we never encounter other people’s.
Blindingly obvious in an almost literal sense: it’s so self-evident, we barely ever see it.
It’s also probably why other people’s problems seem so much easier to solve than our own: we see only the main features of theirs, in outline, whereas we see every tiny complicated detail of our own, so they seem more unique and therefore challenging.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Make the Right Connections When You Don’t Already Have an “In””

What if you don’t know the right people who can help you?
Perhaps you’re new to your field, or you’ve changed locations – but regardless of the reason, the problem is the same: if you’re starting with the wrong connections, how can you hope to work your way into the right ones? That’s a challenge I discuss in my new book Entrepreneurial You, and here are four strategies to consider.
Your existing contacts likely want to help you – they just don’t know how, especially if your new realm is outside their area of expertise.
You could say, “I’d love to consult for Google one day. Do you know anyone who works there that you might be able to introduce me to?” Or you could sort by title and tell your friends, “I’m interested in making connections with anyone you know who is a vice president of human resources. Do you know anyone with that role?”.
People’s level of closeness to their LinkedIn contacts varies; be prepared for them to say they don’t actually know the person well, or at all.
Next, be willing to accept “Six degrees of separation.” Of course, it’s much easier when your friends know the right people and can introduce you directly.
Finally, you can create content to attract the right people to you.
I didn’t know those people, and I didn’t even know the people who knew them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Millennial loneliness poll: 22 percent say they have “no friends””

22 percent of millennials in the poll said they had zero friends.
Twenty-seven percent said they had “No close friends,” 30 percent said they have “No best friends,” and 25 percent said they have no acquaintances.
In comparison, just 16 percent of Gen Xers and 9 percent of baby boomers say they have no friends.
While there may be something particular happening with millennials, it’s also possible loneliness naturally ebbs and flows throughout life.
More recently, in a 2016 paper, researchers in Germany found a peak of loneliness in a sample of 16,000 Germans at around age 30, another around age 50, and then increasing again at age 80.
“So most of the previous research has focused on old age, and for good reason, because it’s when loneliness levels are high.”
A 2015 meta-review of 70 studies showed that loneliness increases the risk of dying by 26 percent.
It’s also important to recognize that loneliness isn’t the same as having few friends.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Surefire Ways to Make Friends While Traveling”

Saying yes to every opportunity is one way to meet new people and experience adventures you never imagined.
If you’re like me, one of the scariest things is making friends and connecting with locals.
I’ve gone sailing in Greece with people I met in a cafĂ© after asking them to share their favorite local haunts and admitting I was traveling alone.
Not only will you likely make a few friends, but you’ll also get to know the city you flew halfway around the world to explore.
Take Your Time One of the best ways to make friends with locals is simply to slow down.
Say Yes to Every Opportunity It may seem obvious, but when I moved to Wanaka and went in search of new friends, my personal philosophy was to say yes to everything, whether it was an adventure in the mountains or simply hanging out by the lake.
Five years later, I’ve yet to get back on a mountain bike due to sheer trauma, but I now count some of the strangers I met on that ride as my best friends.
Let me tell you, while asking questions is a great way to start a conversation, I find myself engaging more with the travelers who treat me like a human instead of a walking guidebook.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Personal essay about the Moms, the mothers of my friends growing up.”

These are the Moms, the matriarchs of the families that surrounded us throughout my childhood, the genial fixtures of picnics, hikes, cocktail parties, sledding, and swimming.
The Moms, many of whom were teachers and had the summers “Off,” sat on shore in beach chairs, armed with carafes of water, copies of the New York Times, and bottles of Coppertone SPF 4.
It was a standard joke that if a kid yelled “Mom!,” seven women would turn their heads, but it was also true that we learned to see each of these mothers as resources.
Because the Moms were other people’s moms, and they weren’t the boss of me, it was easier for me to notice all the small things they did that decorated our lives.
I realized the Moms could be funny, with extremely dry senses of humor.
A few of them could be “Cool Moms” in the Amy-Poehler-in-Mean-Girls sense-my sister, who went through a brief cigarette phase in college, remembers one who winked at her at a summer cookout and told her to just go ahead and smoke: “They all know you do it, anyway”-but mostly, their coolness wasn’t wrapped up in permissiveness.
Of course eventually I realized that all along, my own mom had been a Mom to my friends-a character in their childhoods, the way theirs were in mine.
Now, when I go back to New Hampshire to visit, there are fewer and fewer of the original Moms still in town.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Michael Reichert on How to Redefine Masculinity”

Beck: Once boys get to school, there is a lot more about their lives that parents can’t control, and friends are one of those things.
Obviously kids’ friends can be a positive or negative influence on them regardless of gender, but do you think that works in a different way for boys than for girls?
Reichert: Friendship is a critical influence on what boys are learning about cultural norms and permission to be yourself.
Because of the way children are separated by gender beginning in elementary school, boys’ first friendships are often with other boys.
Boys will say, “Without my friends I think I’d die.”
So there’s a very positive side to male friendships that unfortunately becomes harder to maintain as boys get older and pick up cultural messages that they shouldn’t be close to another boy because of homophobia.
A lot of boys lose their friends in later adolescence, to their detriment.
Beck: In the book, you talk about how a bad reaction when boys act up or test authority can make them even more disconnected from their caretakers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The backstory of Netflix’s $100 million ‘Friends’ deal”

Which is what Netflix is going to pay AT&T* for the right to stream “Friends” next year.
As the Wall Street Journal’s Joe Flint reported yesterday, AT&T’s WarnerMedia, which owns “Friends,” has extended a deal that gives Netflix exclusive streaming rights to all 10 seasons of the show through 2019.
As the New York Times’ Edmund Lee reported today, Netflix is paying $100 million to stream the show next year.
Netflix wasn’t the only streamer interested in “Friends.” Other bidders for the show included Hulu, the streaming service currently owned by Disney, Fox, NBCU and WarnerMedia, as well as Apple, which doesn’t have a streaming service yet, but also plans on launching one next year.
I’m also told that Hulu, which is very likely to end up solely owned by Disney/Fox once those two companies consummate their merger, tried hard to land “Friends.” At the very least, Hulu’s interest in the show ended up pushing the price up well beyond the $30 million a year Netflix was already paying for it.
So here’s the hedge WarnerMedia has ended up with**: After 2019, WarnerMedia has the ability to pull “Friends” from Netflix altogether and keep the show as an exclusive.
Which means there’s a scenario where WarnerMedia can get another $75 million a year from Netflix and still use the show as a key part of its own streaming service.
NBCU execs say Netflix has told them “The Office” generates more viewing hours than anything else on the service.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Dinner Party Flex: Cooking in the Age of Social Media”

An interesting thing began to happen as I looked for harder proof, interviewing non-food people their 20s and 30s who post frequently about home cooking and collecting data to attempt to back it up.
Yes, my peers are bragging about home cooking on social media, but their motivations are largely not about performing some rite of adulthood or aspiring to show off a hashtag-blessed lifestyle.
I don’t think it’s a stretch to suggest that these converging behaviors, combined with the overwhelming amount of digital cooking content available, has encouraged younger audiences to both cook and post about it more frequently.
Audrey Schield, a 22-year-old recent college graduate working in advertising in Chicago, told me that cooking with her friends is a way of socializing that doesn’t revolve around “Doing homework or drinking”-two group activities that defined the majority of her social life in college.
Samantha Garfield, a brand impact strategist in New York, who at 30 is older than Schield, enjoys a level of personal and professional independence that makes cooking feel special.
Alanna Bass, 29, who works at a startup, recently relocated from Atlanta to New York and likes the “Intimate experience” you get cooking with friends rather than going out.
Several people mentioned posting about cooking on Instagram Stories or Snapchat as a way to showcase their more mundane going-ons.
“Snapchat is all about personalized one-to-one communications, so you feel like you can let someone in on more everyday moments,” says Schield, who sends friends and family step-by-step videos of what she’s cooking at home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are You Ready to Have Friends with Kids?”

Before you decide if having friends with kids is right for you, it’s important to ask yourselves a few questions.
If having kids is a full-time job, then having friends with kids is a part-time job where you listen to your friends talk about how having kids is a full-time job.
Before you commit to friends with kids, decide: will you have a traditional relationship in which the woman talks to the mom about the baby while the man talks to the dad about work? Or will you take a more balanced approach in which you’re both talking about the baby while constantly checking your phone to see if you can leave yet?
Will you have one set of friends with kids, or more?
As a childless couple, you’ll be told that you can’t fully relate to your friends with kids, so you’ll never be able to fulfill all their social needs.
As they’ll constantly remind you, “You’ll never understand until you have kids of your own.” You may end up deciding that the healthiest thing is to have multiple sets of friends with kids so they can keep each other entertained.
Are you having friends with kids to save your own relationship?
All in all, having friends with kids might seem like more trouble than it’s worth-but it can also be a very rewarding experience.

The orginal article.