Summary of “The Legend of Phil Ivey, Poker’s Mystery Man”

Barring winning an event, they just hope they’ll get a chance to play across the table from Phil Ivey, maybe win a pot, maybe have a good tale to tell back home.
While the biggest games in casinos around the country were played in increments of $100 and $200, or sometimes as high as $400 and $800, the Flynt game was played as high as $4,000 and $8,000 per bet.
There were four players from the U.K., where Omaha was more popular than on the American West Coast, and Phil Hellmuth, the 1989 World Champion and the holder of six bracelets.
“If you’re coming into the game and you’re 21 years old now, you better be fundamentally sound. You better be theoretically solid. Because nowadays if you’re playing for 50 bucks, people, they care. They’re trying to beat you. They want to play their best game and beat you. Even at the smallest limits.”
According to Palansky, there were three events that sparked the boom in the mid-aughts: the advent of hole card cameras, which led to poker emerging as a compelling television property; the creation of software that allowed people to play for real money over the internet, which created global pools of players and fed thousands of new players into tournaments, pushing prize pools into the millions with tons of dead money; and an accountant from Tennessee entering the 2003 WSOP Main Event after winning a $40 online satellite and beating a field of 839 players to take home the World Championship and $2.5 million.
Phil Hellmuth, who currently leads the WSOP bracelet race with 14, is one of the most successful tournament players of all time.
Some players may be better at borrowing money than at playing poker, or they may be good at finding games full of weaker players or that otherwise suit their strengths.
One of those players was Phil Ivey.After three straight days of playing poker in the storied gambling hall, only seven players remained.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Bots Beat Us. Now What?”

In his correspondence, he criticized computer programs for making “Gross blunders” and called one of them “a piece of junk.” After his triumph over the program, Fischer disappeared again, and wouldn’t play another documented game for 15 years.
For decades, the best humans were better than any machine at marquee, blue-chip intellectual games like chess in the West and Go in the East.
Since at least 1950, the games have also played host to programmers who have tried to master them, enticed by besting the genius widely thought to be required of a chess or Go master.
These twin pillars of intellectual competition – chess and Go – aren’t the only games that have appeared in the crosshairs of the engineers, of course.
Among them: an encyclopedia of cognitive science and a volume titled “Robots Unlimited.” A cartoon pinned above his desk showed a man playing chess against a toaster: “I remember when you could only lose a chess game to a supercomputer.”
“StarCraft is way, way bigger than chess or Go or any of these games,” Churchill said.
Every single computer scientist who works on games whom I’ve ever spoken to has uttered to me, often with a twinge of contrition, the phrase “Test bed.” It’s not about the game, man, it’s about what comes next.
Maybe Bobby Fischer, whose whole life was devoted to playing a board game – and who some would argue was driven mad by a board game – got it right in his letters 40 years ago.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The $5,000 decision to get rid of my past”

Someone broke into my apartment and stole my video game collection exactly four days later.
The collection included most of the important Dreamcast games.
The tyranny of a collection I was never not collecting video games.
Part of me believed that if I recreated the collection carefully enough, one evening I would wake up and she would be there, playing games in front of the TV in one of my shirts.
If I owned enough of those same games, I could create a portal back to the past and never have to move forward.
You carry your past with you The replacement collection, about 450 games deep when I stopped looking for the classics, was carried from house to house as I grew older.
One day, short on money to buy a certain Nintendo Switch game, I took down a few Super Nintendo games hoping to trade them in.
If GameStop gives you $1 for a game, that means it’s worth at least $5. I began to price out that long-dormant collection.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NBA’s Treadmill of Mediocrity”

No Sixers player in Game 4 had more than 16 points, the team took 11 3-point shots, Turner did not look like a no.
Collins stepped down at the end of the 2012-13 season, Sam Hinkie fully took over the team, and the rest is the Process.
A player like LeBron James and a team like the Warriors asks us to look outside of the moment, I guess.
So a capped-out Sixers team that was paying Elton Brand $16 million tanked its way to multiple lottery picks, hoping at least one hit the jackpot.
Portland is good but not great; Toronto is great during the regular season and good during the playoffs, which is ultimately bad. There are already rumors about teams trying to pry Giannis Antetokounmpo from Milwaukee, and we’re already making preparations for Anthony Davis and DeMarcus Cousins’s exit from New Orleans.
The Thunder are a six- to 12-month experiment, LeBron could exit Cleveland next summer, leaving the team as it was before he returned.
Only five teams can look themselves in the mirror and say that the Finals are a realistic goal.
Such is our disdain for competence, for OK, for actually not bad that we are more enamored with a Phoenix roster, half of which is made up of people who can’t legally buy a beer, than we are a Wizards team that features one of the best backcourts in basketball - a Wizards team that will be screwed if it chooses to keep its third-best player.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 10 Best Teams in a Wild Western Conference”

Despite a commanding 2016-17 season that vaulted Golden State into the discussion of the greatest team of all time, the league isn’t bowing out.
The West has loaded up on weapons and teams are charging back at the Warriors in full force.
The West is going to be an 82-game joyride, and there are as many as 12 teams with a legitimate claim to one of the conference’s eight playoff slots.
San Antonio GM R.C. Buford saw Jimmy Butler, Chris Paul, and Paul George all switch teams, blinked once, and re-signed Patty Mills to a four-year, $50 million deal.
True to the way they’ve moved in the shadows as a team of the future over the past couple of seasons, they agreed to a deal with Paul Millsap, a star player so nondescript it’s fair to wonder if he even has a pulse.
The Millsap signing is significant; early last season, I asserted that, regardless of his on-court personality, “Millsap is just plain really good - LeBron, but cut from limestone instead of marble.” He fills all the holes the Nuggets had last season, immediately becomes the team’s best defender and most versatile offensive player with Danilo Gallinari gone to the Clippers.
The Nuggets will be in a rare situation where their two starting frontcourt players in Millsap and Nikola Jokic are the two best passers on the team, so you can expect a lot of high-low action and dribble handoffs to free up their excellent spot-up shooters in Jamal Murray and Gary Harris.
At least five of these teams would make it in the East.For what they are, I’m still bullish on the Clippers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chuck Todd Wants to Meet the Packers at Lambeau Field”

So I have a confession to make: I’m a lifelong Packers fan who has never been to Lambeau Field.
The most die-hard Packers fans believe you can’t claim fanatic status unless you’ve been to the holiest of football sights.
David Whitehurst, for being just obscure enough to help me prove true Packer fandom and thanks for being the link to one of my better friendships in D.C. Currently, I have a good excuse for not making it to many Packers games, either home or away.
I’ve seen them in the Meadowlands a few times and, of course, at RFK Stadium and FedEx Field here in D.C. The most vivid memory I have of an in-person Packers game was my first.
Even though we lost, what I loved most about my first Packers game was how-even though the game was in Miami, during the Dolphins’ heyday no less-I suddenly realized I wasn’t alone … Packers fans were everywhere that day in Little Havana.
If we can’t accept that someone from our favorite team doesn’t share our politics, then how can we expect the two political parties to ever work together to get things done? Republican Packers fans are not the enemy of Democratic Packers fans, and vice versa.
As a Packers fan, I sure hope the Cowboys or Panthers get stuck playing the Bucs in the playoffs before the Packers have to face them.
Peter, since NBC has the Super Bowl this year, I can promise this: If the Packers make it, I’m bringing Meet the Press and having you on the roundtable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Some Men Don’t Work: Video Games Have Gotten Really Good”

Mr. Hurst and his colleagues estimate that, since 2004, video games have been responsible for reducing the amount of work that young men do by 15 to 30 hours over the course of a year.
Likewise for older men and older women: Neither group reported having spent any meaningful extra free time playing video games.
In some ways, the increase in video game time for men makes sense: Median wages for men have been stagnant for decades.
These games are very different from more rudimentary games like Pong and Space Invaders that older men grew up playing.
These characteristics make video games attractive to many people, and 41 percent of the American game-playing population are women, according to the video gaming advocacy group Entertainment Software Association.
Time spent on those activities did not grow as much as time spent on video games.
Some economists are skeptical of the conclusions, pointing out that the labor force participation rates for young men in other countries where video games are popular, like Japan, have not fallen in similar fashion.
Young non-college-educated men – the group most likely to be home playing games – are more likely to say that they are happy than similar men a decade ago.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Pentagon Uses “Jeopardy” to Train Its Special Operations Forces”

U.S. Special Operations forces use special weapons and employ special tactics, of course.
U.S. Special Operations Command operates a school to teach courses that are germane to special operators.
The self-professed mission of Joint Special Operations University at MacDill Air Force base in Florida is “To prepare Special Operations Forces to shape the future strategic environment by providing specialized joint professional military education.”
To that end, JSOU offers courses like “Strategic Utility of Special Operations” and “Covert Action and SOF Sensitive Activities.” It also offers a course that is called “Introduction to Special Operations Forces.” Think of it as Special Ops 101.
Its goal, Special Operations Command spokesman Ken McGraw told me, “Is to educate the student about the core activities, primary functions, organizations, capabilities, and doctrinal employment of U.S. Special Operations forces along with key concepts and terms.” An online course, it runs continuously and, says McGraw, is geared toward those “Who have been identified to serve on a joint special operations staff, staff members at U.S. Special Operations Command, its subordinate commands and theater special operations commands.”
“Introduction to Special Operations Forces” offers five interactive lessons that guide the student through the basics of special ops.
The course then moves to a more advanced curriculum with lessons on everything from the composition of SOF to the concept of “Special Operations Forces Peculiar”.
In many ways the introductory course is more shadowy than the Special Operations forces themselves.

The orginal article.

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“Female players of D&D, AD&D and other role-playing games are finding it necessary to cope with discrimination and prejudice as they seek the satisfaction and fulfillment they are entitled to receive from playing a role in an adventure game”.
In the July 1980 issue of Dragon magazine, TSR’s official D&D publication, Jean Wells and her colleague Kim Mohan penned the editorial, “Women Want Equality. And Why Not?” Women from across the country had written in about the “Unfair and degrading treatment of women players,” who comprised, they wrote, about 10 percent of D&D’s fanbase.
“Female players of D&D, AD&D and other role-playing games are finding it necessary to cope with discrimination and prejudice as they seek the satisfaction and fulfillment they are entitled to receive from playing a role in an adventure game,” Wells and Mohan wrote.
On TSR’s third floor throughout the late ’70s and early ’80s, Wells or Williams would happily hop into one or another of their colleagues’ constant stream of D&D games.
Despite D&D’s constant presence in the office, playing the game held no interest for many of TSR’s early female employees.
Rose Estes, whom TSR hired in 1977, says D&D’s culture, or at least its manifestation on TSR’s third floor, did not appeal to her.
Women were the champions of TSR’s books department, a much-celebrated division that published novels inspired by D&D’s dragon-slaying, court intrigue and daredevil dungeon-crawling adventures.
Rose Estes, who had been a “Hippie, a student, a newspaper reporter and an advertising copy writer,” later struggled to help TSR’s growing books department catch D&D’s winds.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Players’ Tribune”

Pittsburgh had the third pick overall, but at the last minute, they made a trade with Florida to pick first.
Putting the mask on, diving around, stopping the puck, feeling the intensity of the game, feeling useful.
My first home game was against the Kings at the Igloo on Oct. 10, 2003.
First shot of the game, first shot I faced in the NHL, and it goes in.
Game 7 of the 2009 finals in Detroit is without a doubt one of my favorite moments as a Penguin.
We had just been on a road trip and it was our first game back home against Tampa Bay.
We ended up winning the game, things turned around for me, and I ended up having a great season.
We spent a lot of time together, always sat next to each other on the plane, behind one another on the bus, plus all the dinners before every game on the road. Thanks for helping me get through tough times and for being a good friend.

The orginal article.