Summary of “How To Play Video Games Without Messing Up Your Body”

Here’s how to do it without messing up your body.
Dr. Caitlin McGee, a physical therapist that works with esports players, said to think of your body like a heat meter in a video game.
“Over time, as you continue to play, your heat meter builds up-muscles fatigue, tendons move over the same surfaces again and again, alertness and attention decrease,” she said over email.
Dr. McGee recommended setting a timer for every 45 minutes to an hour and taking a one to two minute break, “To stretch, get up, do breathing exercises, get your blood pumping.” Taking breaks can also help prevent eye strain.
Just like you need to be aware of the heat meter that is your body rising, you can also do things that slow the rate of that rise, like warming up your body.
It might not seem like it, but sitting down for hours of a time does but tension and strain on your body in the same way working out does, and stretching can help alleviate that strain.
I like to do a quick Sun Salutation whenever I need to stretch my body out, and Dr. McGee has a routine of stretches that she recommends for warm up and cool down on her website.
Repeatedly pushing your body to the limit can result in injury.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Good Game Well Played: The Story of the Staying Power of ‘StarCraft'”

Two decades after the day when StarCraft players first flooded onto Blizzard’s online gaming platform, Battle.net, in force, the game remains one of the finest examples of the real-time-strategy style that made the bones of Blizzard, its renowned developer.
StarCraft may be one of gaming’s best examples of “Order out of chaos.” It’s fairly rare for any reminiscing designer to say that a seminal project went off without a hitch; in game development, delays and midstream reconceptions are standard-occupational hazards of the inexact art of creating collections of code that feel fun.
The first StarCraft design that the public saw, Sigaty says, was “a quickly turned-around version that we put out there, built on top of Warcraft II.” Blizzard brought that alpha version of the game to the industry’s annual hypefest, E3, in May 1996, where it underwhelmed gamers who were expecting to see something more than a reskinning of the same old design.
“When you got into an argument with a kid at school, instead of ‘Hey, meet me after school in the playground and we’ll settle this,’ it [was] like, ‘Meet me in the game room and we’re going to settle this over a game of StarCraft,'” Morhaime says.
In Warcraft II, Wyatt says, “You’d create a game, and then you would join, and you’d all sort of argue over what the parameters of the game should be, which led to a lot of people dropping out and then you’d have to go and get more players together again.” In StarCraft, the creator would simply pick preset parameters, and players could join if those parameters appealed to them.
“Starcraft revolutionized the way that people thought about online game networks, and it basically crushed the possibility to charge hourly fees for games,” Wyatt says, adding, “In some ways, I think that eventually led to the whole free-to-play genre.” Because Battle.net had no barrier to entry, Starcraft drew a giant pool of players, making finding games easy-which, in turn, made the prospect of playing even more appealing.
“Even though we knew we had a good player-vs.-player game on our hands, the level and the stature it got to was beyond all our wildest expectations,” Sigaty says.
Although the game was intended to exceed the typical title’s shelf life, it went well beyond what Blizzard believed the limit to be.

The orginal article.

Summary of “HQ: Inside the Game Show App Phenomenon”

HQ has several regular presenters in its rotation, but by far the most beloved is Rogowsky, a stand-up comic whose massive popularity has become inextricable from that of the app itself.
Rogowsky’s punny, slightly manic between-question patter is rife with pop culture references, including “Let’s get down to the nitty-gritty, let’s get this show on the road,” the repurposed Phish lyrics with which he opens every game.
Sharon Carpenter, the broadcast journalist who presents the UK edition of the game, arrives, taking Rogowsky’s place in hair and makeup.
By 3:14 p.m., the afternoon’s work is done, and he changes into a pair of trousers that match his jacket before leaving HQ HQ. Rogowsky’s credits include the ABC hidden-camera reality show Would You Fall for That? with future Saturday Night Live cast member Sasheer Zamata, as well as a series of popular videos in which he reads books with ridiculous fake covers on the subway.
Once he’d given up on proceeding with the game, Rogowsky bravely ad-libbed through the five endless minutes left until the clock struck midnight.
“I can’t comment on the specifics of what we’re doing with NBC or what happened there – but yeah, we got a free Super Bowl ad.” On the day of my visit, after he wraps the afternoon’s game, Rogowsky asks Teitel, “Was NBC watching?”.
The first of these, Ready Player One, was energetically pitched by Rogowsky throughout the $250,000 game on Wednesday, the day of the movie’s premiere.
Rogowsky had aspired to host his own talk show on TV, or to serve as a correspondent on a comedy news outfit like The Daily Show.

The orginal article.

Summary of “On ‘The Palace,’ you can be anyone you want to be”

The Palace, as envisioned by creator Jim Bumgardner, was a place where users could create avatars and chat semi-anonymously.
Bumgardner had been dreaming up a chat server like The Palace since the mid ’80s, though at that time, it was more of a text-based bulletin board called “The Mansion.” He finally created The Palace while working at Time-Warner as a lead programmer in 1994, and after a year in development, The Palace’s main server opened in 1995.
Clothing varied – users edited avatars using The Palace’s prop editor – but one thing was always the same: you rarely saw the eyes.
The Palace avatars became known as “Dollz,” or digital paper dolls, in the next evolution of avatars.
A user looking to save slots, perhaps, for accessories, could manipulate pixels atop the naked body to save space – a move that would become very important in The Palace’s avatar editing contests, which propelled the servers’ growing traffic.
Most avatars stood naked on their boxes awaiting the judge’s theme, revealing what was often banned on The Palace’s servers – a naked body.
Some tried to challenge cultural standards of beauty within The Palace’s dollz rooms: an improv performance group, Desktop Theater, tested norms by entering doll spaces with a crudely drawn avatar, challenging users to consider fat bodies or queer expression.
Non-white avatars, like fat bodies on The Palace, were rare, though Greenwood acknowledged there was a demand for them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Teachers and Parents Share Stories From Inside the ‘Fortnite’ Phenomenon”

Having played Fortnite herself, she could speak their language, and made a proposal: if everyone finished their work without a single interruption, they’d hold a big discussion about Fortnite.
It’s hard to tell when something moves from popular to cultural phenomenon, but it seems similar to the Ernest Hemingway quote about going bankrupt: “Gradually, and then suddenly.” I knew Fortnite was officially big when my wife’s younger sister, who’s not into games, asked me if I could explain this “Fortnite” thing and why all her guy friends were playing it.
How long Fortnite remains the talk of the playground is impossible to know, but the students, teachers, and parents I’ve talked to the past week said they haven’t seen something grip the children around them since Minecraft.
A number of teachers echoed this, observing how some of the biggest introverts are also some of the best Fortnite players in their class, and their expertise has transformed them into bonafide extroverts because everyone’s coming to them looking for advice on how to play.
Maybe we already have the best metric to know whether Fortnite is a phenomenon, and it has nothing to do with Twitch concurrents or YouTube views.
I heard from plenty of parents and teachers who said their daughters were into it, and in some cases, Fortnite became the first time they’d bonded over a shared interest in games.
Fortnite is still a game that involves players running around with guns-assault rifles, shotguns, sniper rifles-and it’s a point that hasn’t been lost on parents like Keith Krepcho, whose nine-year-old just started playing Fortnite.
Fortnite Gatsby, a student re-imagining of The Great Gatsby, became a tale of Tom and Daisy living in Snobby Shores, a notable location in Fortnite’s Battle Royale map, while Gatsby watches as 100 new “Dreamers” are brought to his island by bus.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Our Favorite Board Games for Adults: Reviews by Wirecutter”

Sheriff of Nottingham: Recommended by several staffers, this bluffing party game is a lot of fun once you get the hang of it, but it takes longer to master than our picks.
It took us far longer to play than the estimated time on the box, and players can “Die” with zero points and then have to wait out the rest of the game.
King of Tokyo: Wirecutter writer Liz Thomas loves this game, which has a host of wacky characters, from zombies to aliens, that battle players to become the King of Tokyo.
Kingdom Builder: We dismissed this tile-laying, settlement-building game because our experts said there were better games in this genre, and it has a weaker Board Game Geek rating-7.0 out of 10, across 15,000 ratings-than similar games like Carcassonne and Catan.
Betrayal at House on the Hill: We think Betrayal at House on the Hill is too complex for beginners, and we’ve seen better advanced cooperative games.
Mysterium is a cooperative deduction game that Wirecutter staffers like, but compared with our party-game picks, it has a drawn-out playing time and low replay value.
We like Qwixx a lot, but dismissed it in favor of party games that could accommodate more players.
Azul typically costs $80, making it one of the most expensive games we found.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Ready Player One backlash, explained”

When Ready Player One came out, it felt like an escapist fantasy for gamers Back in 2011, it was almost impossible not to think about Ready Player One as harmless fun.
Ready Player One is there to serve that pleasure to its readers on a silver platter – assuming its readers are also gamers obsessed with the bits of ’80s pop culture that were built with teenage boys in mind.
The main thing Ready Player One is doing is telling those ’80s-boy-culture-obsessed gamers that they matter, that in fact they are the most important people in the universe.
Over the course of the book’s first act, 18-year-old Zack Lightman goes from nerdy high school gamer to a captain in the Earth Defense Alliance, adored by all for his video game prowess and provided with not only his favorite snacks and gaming music but also a specially bred strain of weed designed specifically for gaming.
The aesthetic pleasure here is the same as it was in Ready Player One – “I get that reference!” – and so is the central idea: that gamers have the potential to be the most important people in the universe.
What’s important for the Ready Player One conversation is what Gamergate had evolved into by 2015, and that is: angry gamers hurling abuse at their targets in the name of a kind of nerd purity.
How Gamergate killed Ready Player One Both Wade and Zack follow Alexander’s imperatives like they’re checking them off a list: They start off poor but then make millions from their video games.
The moment reads as lip service, because Ready Player One’s heart has no time for the world outside of video games, not really.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Teens And Teachers Say Fortnite Mobile Is Destroying Some Schools”

For months now, teachers everywhere have heard students talk about Fortnite, the world’s latest obsession, nonstop.
Everyone is playing it, teens say, so schools have tried to ban it.
What makes Fortnite different is that it is a meaty and intense game that everyone is playing, because it’s free.
Plus, if you’re bad at Fortnite, you can still just watch others play and have a blast.
According to Nick Fisher, the teacher with the Fortnite mobile confiscation bin Tweet, part of what makes Fornite so viral for kids is that its culture is tied to social media.
Players feel compelled to talk about Fortnite with other people, to make their prowess public.
Phones are enough of a neccesity that students can use them during designated times, like lunch breaks, but there’s still some marvel over how much Fortnite is taking over student’s lives.
Fortnite isn’t the only shooter occupying student’s minds right now, as PUBG also released on mobile earlier this month.

The orginal article.

Summary of “UConn coach Geno Auriemma is only pretending to be okay”

He’s mad at his team for lots of things, like not keeping their hands up on defense, which is really just a symptom of a larger disease.
He’s mad at himself for not making them play like some of his other great teams, who walked into opposing arenas like wolves.
While the team stretches, Auriemma talks to the television crew who’ll broadcast tonight’s game, complaining with his wry sense of humor about his team’s lack of basketball sense and fundamentals.
No team in the history of sports has faced the UConn Huskies’ ongoing problem.
Nine years ago, Auriemma took USA Basketball to play in Russia against teams with international stars.
“Everyone else thinks you have a flawless team,” he says, “And you’re the only one who’s miserable. Before you know it, the season is over and you didn’t have any fun. I have to keep reminding everybody, myself included, we have to celebrate every little thing we do.” He’s given the Huskies three specific goals for their final three regular season games against Tulane, SMU and South Florida.
Auriemma wears his emotions – particularly anger at his team’s mistakes – on his sleeve.
Yeah, he’s won 1,000 games … but part of him internalizes the common criticism that he’s not coaching D-1 men or in the NBA. It’s a criticism he levels at himself from time to time, as he fights the urge to diminish his own accomplishments.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Had One Shot”

If you had to choose one current NBA player to take one shot, who would you pick? What about to play in just one game? One season? One series? We asked our NBA staff to make a pick for each, with one catch: You can’t choose the same player twice.
Shea Serrano: Let’s say the Spurs are in the NBA Finals, and let’s also say that it’s Game 7, and let’s also say that they’re playing on the road, and let’s also say that the score is 101-99, and let’s also say that there are 14 seconds left, and let’s also say that the Spurs are in possession of the ball, and let’s also say that they have just used their final timeout, and let’s also say that we’re playing against a suddenly unstoppable Cavs team, and let’s also say that in addition to the title being at stake my life is also at stake.
The gravity of the moment, the symbolism of the two best players in the game brought together in a single frame, the unique talents that Durant can leverage over every player in the NBA-it all culminated in a perfect late-game shot.
Give me the player who has a standing reach of 9-foot-2 who can ably shoot from anywhere on the floor without any chance of getting his shot blocked.
If we’re narrowing it down to the player who is actually pulling the trigger, give me Curry, who is literally the most likely non-center to make a shot, of any kind, in NBA history.
In addition to playing 57 of 68 possible games-all those people who said he’d never even play half a season sure have been quiet lately-averaging a double-double and making his first All-Star team, no one in the league has had more fun than JoJo.
Now he has a 3-point shot and the bulk to play center full-time and play through the various minor injuries and uncalled fouls that have stalled his ascension.
The league’s best player has a supercomputer mind and has played in four playoff series in each of the past seven seasons-an unfathomable advantage in game data over every other player in the NBA. He knows exactly how the league has changed over the past five seasons.

The orginal article.