Summary of “America’s Defining Divide Isn’t Left vs. Right. It’s Old vs. Young.”

Older Americans are more likely to vote than millennials and Gen Xers, particularly.
Older voters have unique characteristics and specific interests that transcend the Democratic-Republican divide.
From their economic circumstances to their demographic makeup, the concerns of older voters are only going to become more prominent as the baby boom generation enters retirement.
Older voters have strikingly different wealth and income profiles than younger voters.
The widening gap between the economic realities of older and younger voters could become an even more prominent feature of American politics.
The largest gap between older and younger voters is on the issue of race.
From the existence of prejudice against whites to the necessity of affirmative action, older voters score higher on measures of racial resentment and are more likely to be persuaded by explicit appeals to whiteness.
“The baby boom generation is the most educated ever to reach old age. They lived through the civil rights movement and put more women into the workforce than any previous generation. If anyone can adjust to changing times, it’s them.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “I survived the Warsaw ghetto. Here are the lessons I’d like to pass on”

Germany’s chancellor Angela Merkel stated this summer that “When the generation that survived the war is no longer here, we’ll find out whether we have learned from history”.
As a Polish Jew born in 1925, who survived the Warsaw ghetto, lost my family in the Holocaust, served in a special operations unit of the Polish underground, the Home Army, and fought in the Warsaw uprising of 1944, I know what it means to be at the sharp end of European history – and I fear that the battle to draw the right lessons from that time is in danger of being lost.
Now 93 years old and living in Tel Aviv, I have watched from afar in recent years as armchair patriots in my native Poland have sought to exploit and manipulate the memories and experiences of my generation.
They may think they are promoting “National dignity” or instilling “Pride” in today’s young people, but in reality they are threatening to raise future generations in darkness, ignorant of the war’s complexity and doomed to repeat the mistakes for which we paid such a high price.
Given what I’ve learned over my lifetime I would, first, urge future generations of Europeans to remember my generation as we really were, not as they may wish us to have been.
It is nonetheless important to understand that we were a generation living in fear, and fear makes people do terrible things.
Second, just as there is no such thing as a “Heroic generation”, there is no such thing as a “Heroic nation” – or indeed an inherently malign or evil nation either.
Today’s generation doesn’t have the luxury of being able to argue that it was never warned or did not understand the consequences of where lies will take you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Generation Z: ‘We have more to do than drink and take drugs'”

Generation Z – one of several terms used to describe post-millennial youth born after 1996 – prefer juice bars to pub crawls, rank quality family time ahead of sex and prioritise good grades before friendship, at least according to a report published by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service last week.
“I’m not surprised those [statistics] show that’s the case: it makes sense. We have a lot more to distract us now.”
“We’re quite different because there’s more stuff to do at each other’s houses and we have more technology – like, we have video games.”
Owen Munro adds: “My generation feels bitter about all the things we won’t be able to do because of what the older generation chose.”
“People are more sexually experimental in my school, more than I thought,” says Owen Munro.
Generation Z-ers will, after all, be living longer and more healthily, and looking better for it.
Generation X. Invented: irony, McJobs and disaffected slackerism.
Generation Z. Invented: the ability to hold a conversation and simultaneously scroll through their phones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “America’s Millennials Are Waking Up to a Grim Financial Future”

While older Americans definitely want to look like younger folks, they certainly don’t want their finances.
The St. Louis Fed warned that, even when taking that into account, young Americans are slipping dangerously behind.
Fixing Social Security is hardly the only issue where younger Americans have different priorities than their elders.
U.S. President Donald Trump was elected on the votes of older Americans favoring tax cuts and less government, while young voters flocked to Senator Bernie Sanders, who supports rebuilding social programs and establishing national healthcare.
Alicia Munnell, the director of Boston College’s Center for Retirement Research, recently lamented that government inaction on Social Security means “That most baby boomers have escaped completely from contributing to a solution.” This month, she offered some depressing advice to younger Americans about what they can do to make up the difference: Work longer.
The retirement advice of “Just work longer” can sound pretty tone deaf to younger ears, especially when the old American promises-of advancement, financial security and home ownership for everyone who works hard-have faded into myth.
What about the booming economy of 2018? Won’t that help smooth the path for young savers? Perhaps, but Goldman Sachs Group Inc. economists recently said the current pace of the U.S. economy is “Probably as good as it gets.” That can only make young Americans more furious about the “Missed opportunity” mentioned by the St. Louis Fed.
Wide swaths of the country are getting sicker and dying younger than just a few years ago, with a widening health gap between educated, affluent Americans and everyone else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Millennials are struggling. Is it the fault of the baby boomers?”

“Intergenerational war doesn’t reflect how people feel about the issues or how they live their lives as families,” says Torsten Bell, director of the foundation.
A complex mix of reasons includes the financial crisis, austerity and reluctance by successive governments to radically tackle the challenges of housing, health, social care, employment and a woefully deregulated market at a time when people are living so much longer – but no baby-boomer banditry.
“We have people with degrees doing Mickey Mouse jobs and young people who will have no occupational pension and no house to sell to see them through old age. That’s not the fault of mum and dad. If we think that, we are tackling the wrong problems. It’s not about redistributing the crumbs from the rich man’s table but restoring fairness.”
Only a third of millennials own their own home, compared with almost two-thirds of baby boomers at the same age.
A third of millennials will, it is predicted, have a lifetime of renting with less space, poorer conditions, longer commutes and more insecurity than the baby boomers experienced.
Although precise definitions differ, broadly speaking millennials are those people born between the early 1980s and the late 1990s.
On current trends, given high rents, low wages, Brexit and, for some, the debt of university tuition fees, will millennials have sufficient funds in retirement? Under auto-enrolment, 5% of a wage by 2019 will go into a pension pot, but on a low income, will increasing numbers of millennials opt out? In several decades’ time, millions of older people may be dependent on housing benefit, living in rented accommodation, and surviving on a state pension, which currently at £7,000 a year, is already not fit for purpose.
Ed Lewis, 36, LondonLewis lives in a house-share with four other people while working fulltime for a campaigning organisation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the sufferings of one generation are passed on to the next”

While these epigenetic effects are uneven, the mode of transmission was surprisingly direct – stress from the mother impacted the gene expression of the developing foetus, greatly increasing the offspring’s disease risk.
Some of the most important work in the field comes from the neuroendocrinologist and stress expert Bruce McEwen at Rockefeller University in New York, who has been studying epigenetic change caused by poverty, addiction and family violence.
In an extraordinary and disturbing series of experiments conducted over the course of years, Skinner has shown just how devastating epigenetic damage can be.
By the second generation and every generation thereafter without further exposure, he reports, male descendants had tumours, kidney disease, prostate disease, testicular disease and immune disease in very high frequencies.
Without any further exposure, each toxin precipitated a unique biological fingerprint in the form of an altered epigenome, and a unique disease profile passed from one generation to the next.
Whether epigenetic changes last just the lifetime of the individual who lived through the trauma or are passed down like genes, ‘We can never roll back the clock and reverse the effects of experience,’ McEwen says.
Bradley Bernstein, an expert in cancer epigenetics at Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts, says that some glioblastoma brain tumours and leukaemias, in particular, emerge from epigenetic changes in the form of ‘hypermethylation’ in cells, and can be fought with drugs that reverse the methylation process.
Increased production of RNA, another epigenetic pathway, has been associated with acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease and heart failure, and these could be targets for therapies of the sort that might aid descendants of Kelm.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Where Millennials end and post-Millennials begin”

As we enter 2018, it’s become clear to us that it’s time to determine a cutoff point between Millennials and the next generation.
In order to keep the Millennial generation analytically meaningful, and to begin looking at what might be unique about the next cohort, Pew Research Center will use 1996 as the last birth year for Millennials for our future work.
At 16 years, our working definition of Millennials will be equivalent in age span to their preceding generation, Generation X. By this definition, both are shorter than the span of the Baby Boomers – the only generation officially designated by the U.S. Census Bureau, based on the famous surge in post-WWII births in 1946 and a significant decline in birthrates after 1964.
For analytical purposes, we believe 1996 is a meaningful cutoff between Millennials and post-Millennials for a number of reasons, including key political, economic and social factors that define the Millennial generation’s formative years.
Generation X grew up as the computer revolution was taking hold, and Millennials came of age during the internet explosion.
Pew Research Center is not the first to draw an analytical line between Millennials and the generation to follow them, and many have offered well-reasoned arguments for drawing that line a few years earlier or later than where we have.
As has been the case in the past, this means that the differences within generations can be just as great as the differences across generations, and the youngest and oldest within a commonly defined cohort may feel more in common with bordering generations than the one to which they are assigned.
In the coming weeks, we will be updating demographic analyses that compare Millennials to previous generations at the same stage in their life cycle to see if the demographic, economic and household dynamics of Millennials continue to stand apart from their predecessors.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wentz, Watson, Goff, and Garoppolo: Meet the New QB Generation”

The same good fortune applies to the so-called golden generation of quarterbacks who rewrote - and still are rewriting - the record books.
Since the game itself and the conditions surrounding it are so different, comparing the Manning generation to any future quarterbacks is nothing more than water-cooler talk - fun to chat about, but ultimately a pointless exercise with no real conclusion.
The next generation of Brady, Manning, Rodgers, and Brees quarterbacks is not coming.
It’s probably not a coincidence that a new era of young quarterbacks is emerging at the same time.
Keenum, at 29, is not young, but he’s a good example of how a good environment for a quarterback creates a good quarterback.
Because of the sheer talent of the previous generation of quarterbacks, it often looked like those things didn’t matter - Manning was his own coaching staff and threw the ball so quickly that he almost didn’t need an offensive line.
Since the conditions that created those quarterbacks no longer exist, the era when a quarterback masks all the problems is likely over.
Coaches want to huddle too often with a generation of quarterbacks who’ve never done that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Where Millennials Come From”

In “The Vanishing American Adult,” published in May, Senator Ben Sasse, Republican of Nebraska, insists that we live in a time of generalized “Affluenza,” in which “Much of our stress now flows not from deprivation but, oddly, from surplus.” Millennials have “Far too few problems,” he argues.
Sasse chastises parents for allowing their kids to succumb to the character-eroding temptations of contemporary abundance and offers suggestions for turning the school-age generation into the sort of hardworking, financially independent grownups that the millennials have yet to become.
The image of millennials has darkened since Strauss and Howe walked the beat: in their 2000 book, “Millennials Rising,” they claimed that the members of this surging generation were uniquely earnest, industrious, and positive.
Twenge’s term for millennials merely flips an older one, the “Me generation,” inspired by a 1976 New York cover story by Tom Wolfe about the baby boomers.
If for the baby boomers self-actualization was a conscious project, and if for Gen X-born in the sixties and seventies-it was a mandate to be undermined, then for millennials it’s more like an atmospheric condition: inescapable, ordinary, and, perhaps, increasingly toxic.
College, of course, is where the millennial lounges around on lush green quads, spends someone else’s money, insists on “Safe spaces,” protests her school’s heteronormative core curriculum, and wages war on her professors if she receives a grade below an A. I did the first two of those things, thanks to the Jefferson Scholars Foundation at the University of Virginia.
Many millennials grew up poor, went to crummy schools, and have been shuttled toward for-profit colleges and minimum-wage jobs, if not the prison system.
“The newfound popularity of socialism among millennials is an alarming trend,” Sasse writes in “The Vanishing American Adult.” He provides a syllabus that he hopes will steer people away from such thinking, and toward an intellectually mature adulthood, and he dutifully includes “The Communist Manifesto,” so that his hypothetical pupils can properly grasp how wrong it is.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Millennials may be history’s most competent parents. Here’s why.”

Some have called them “Generation me”, but as millennials have families they are shifting their attentions - and their identities-to parenting.
This generational shift is something we’re tracking very closely at Winnie - as a tech company, we’re more concerned with the future than with the past, and it’s clear that millennials are one powerful force shaping the future of parenting.
We recently surveyed over 500 parents, both on and off the Winnie platform, in an effort to better understand how parenthood is changing the way millennials think about themselves and the world around them.
Millennial parents are more likely to say that parenthood is a major part of their identity than previous generations.
Self-centered millennials become selfless parentsIn our survey, we asked millennials in their own words how they felt their life changed when they became parents.
Millennial moms & dads don’t just want to be parents; they are ready to be parents.
We asked millennial parents to rank statements that mapped to one of the following categories: values children, values relationship, or values individual growth.
Their parents will be older than previous generationsThey will grow up with more involved fathersThey are less likely to have a stay-at-home parentTheir parents are less likely to be married and much less likely to own a homeTheir parents will be better informed about best practices for health and childrearingBased on the above traits, we may not only be looking at a generation of great caregivers, but a generation of great kids.

The orginal article.