Summary of “The Dos and Don’ts of Gift-Giving Around the World”

If you think the art of giving gifts is tricky at home, try making it work abroad. While you must carefully choose the item itself, the gift’s wrapping is surprisingly important, too, as is the timing.
In East Asia, always offer or accept a gift with both hands, palms up.
Throughout Asia, gifts are given to show gratitude after receiving a gift and as a thank-you for hospitality.
In Russia, thank-you cards are thought of as impractical; send a small gift to your hosts after a dinner or overnight stay instead.Leave Sharp Objects at Home.East Asia, Brazil, Italy, Peru, and Switzerland.
Etiquette experts from around the world agree that gifts should always be wrapped.
Avoid white, black, and blue gift wrap throughout Asia, as they’re associated with mourning.
In these countries, receiving a gift from anyone but the closest of friends is considered embarrassing.
If you do happen to have a best buddy from this part of the world, expect to have any gift you give thoroughly examined-it’s a sign of appreciation and respect for the gift and giver, who’s expected to carefully select the best quality available.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A reverse gift guide of the best money we’ve ever spent”

At the very end of 2018, we started publishing an essay series called The Best Money I Ever Spent.
Instead, we asked writers to tell us about the best money they’ve spent on someone else, or that someone else has spent on them.
The result is something like a reverse gift guide – while you probably won’t spend $12,000 on someone’s rent this holiday season, the spirit might move you to buy them a plant.
A $12 plant I looked at the plant with some apprehension.
His gift to me was trust: that I could take care, that I could make room for beauty in my life.
As a going away gift, my best friend Kenny gave me a $30 Missha toner.
The thought of her not being able to find anywhere else to live – not having the money for a down payment or first-and-last-month’s rent – became scarier to me than losing the only home I’d ever lived in.
The real gift was someone changing for the better because I’d asked him to.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask a Boss: Should I Get Holiday Gifts for My Co-workers?”

Do you have to give your boss a gift? How much should you spend? What about your co-workers? Find those answers, and more, below.
Otherwise, an employee might feel pressured to purchase gifts for a manager, and it’s not okay for managers to benefit from the relationship in that way.
I’d like to preemptively tell people “No gifts” this year, but I’m afraid of seeming presumptuous, or making people feel bad about the gifts they gave me last year.
Try saying something like, “I know some people like to exchange gifts with colleagues at this time of year, so I want to say preemptively that doing your jobs well is the best gift you could give me. I don’t believe anyone should have to give gifts to their boss, so please put any gift-giving impulses toward family and friends instead.”.
Gifts for co-workers are often fairly impersonal – food items, coffee, candles, and gift cards are all pretty safe choices, as are items that relate to your colleague’s hobbies or interests.
The biggest thing is to keep in mind that gifts that might be appropriate for family or friends can be inappropriate at work.
People don’t expect extravagant gifts from their managers, even if the company itself goes a more luxe route.
Frankly, managers don’t need to give their staff gifts at all, although it’s a thoughtful gesture if you choose to.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One-Click Spending and the Money Misery Hangover”

What happens when the party winds down? The aftermath of holiday spending can feel a lot like the morning after a New Year’s Eve gala-except a money misery hangover doesn’t go away with two ibuprofen tablets.
If you happen to have a kind of Pavlovian response to holiday bells and carols, subconsciously hearing the words “Spend, spend, spend,” you should know that your response is the result of a learned attitude about money-what I call your money mindset.
Your situation might be different,and extravagant spending might just not be possible or prudent.
You can avoid uncontrolled spending by getting a grip on your money mindset and aligning it with your values and financial resources.
Draw up a spending plan that you can sustain on your income.
Decide on your spending allotment for holiday gift giving before you shop.
There are enough online resources to help you make wise spending choices.
Commit yourself to making incremental improvements in your spending habits, and celebrate each success without spending more money.

The orginal article.

Summary of “16 People You Should Tip for the Holidays”

Read through to find out who might expect a tip and how much green you should tuck into each card – as well as who might be unable, unhappy or unwilling to accept the cash.
Mitchell herself once gave a lesson in dining etiquette instead of a tip or gift.
For service providers you don’t see every day, such as taxi drivers and restaurant servers, bumping up your tip on holidays such as Christmas or New Year’s Eve is encouraged, says Jodi R.R. Smith, president of etiquette consultant Mannersmith.
Suggested Tip: $10 to $30. If you tip regularly throughout the year, give your newsie just a few dollars.
You could cut it for someone you tip throughout the year or whose services haven’t been outstanding.
If you don’t regularly visit your salon or barbershop throughout the year, you may prefer to give about $20 as a tip during your December visit.
If you tip generously throughout the year, it’s okay to forgo the year-end tip, says etiquette expert Mary M. Mitchell.
Suggested Tip: $20 to $100. For a handyman in your building who makes repairs for you regularly, a tip is a nice gesture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The curse of genius”

One day his parents took him to Milton Keynes to have his intelligence assessed by an organisation called Potential Plus, formerly the National Association for Gifted Children.
Like many gifted children, Tom’s childhood has often been unhappy.
A consultant on gifted children at Mensa – who was herself a gifted child in a working-class family – insists that reading Nietzsche to your five-year-old, or forcing them to do three hours of extra homework, cannot “Make” a genius.
A third characteristic of gifted children is that their interests often seem near-obsessive.
The definition of a gifted child has fragmented over time, says Deborah Eyre, founder of High Performance Learning, an organisation that works with schools and teachers in Britain to try to help large numbers of children become “High performers”.
Gifted children often experience what psychologists call “Asynchronous development”: exceptional abilities in some areas may be associated with, or come at the cost of other aspects of maturity.
People look for gifted children to fail, says Rebecca, “I’ve learned to cover for Lizzie.” Rebecca teaches children with special needs, but says that for her daughter’s particular needs “There’s nothing”.
Selected children get “Personalised education plans” that include teaching on particular topics in greater depth and breadth, access to additional self-taught online courses, placement in higher classes for specific subjects, and early admission to primary school for very young children.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Child holiday anxiety: how to prevent behavior problems at Christmas, Hanukkah, and New Year’s.”

Think about ways you can work routines into your holiday traditions, too-maybe every night before bed your kids get to add a new ornament to the tree or sing a holiday carol together.
The more ways you can incorporate consistency into the holiday season, the more grounded your kids will feel.
Another reason kids act out around the holidays is because we have expectations for their behavior that we haven’t communicated to them.
We expect they won’t make fart jokes at Aunt Gertrude’s and then scold them when they do, but did we ever actually tell them that Aunt Gertrude doesn’t like fart jokes? The holidays are full of strange situations and rituals-“We’re throwing kids into situations that they might not have had a lot of practice for,” says Stephanie Lee, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute’s ADHD and Behavior Disorders Center in New York-so talk with your kids about them beforehand.
Many kids experience a kind of anticipatory anxiety before big events, in which they feel excited but also nervous about what to expect.
Speaking of gifts, how should parents deal with them? Klein says fewer presents are better than more, because kids can get overwhelmed by so much stuff and the anticipation of opening it all.
By getting involved, kids learn how meaningful it is to give gifts and can also imagine how much it would sting if someone rejected a gift they spent time and effort on.
Our kids feel this stress and respond to it-and it shapes how we engage with our kids, too.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Gifts We Want to Give in 2018: Reviews by Wirecutter”

Last year, inspired by Tejal Rao’s great story for The New York Times on the new wave of panettone in the US, I ordered this loaf to share with my family over the holidays.
It’s no wonder the series took four years and 125 expeditions to make.
I received Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat as a gift from my partner last year, and it’s proven to be one of the most informative books I’ve read in years.
Whenever we go to REI, my husband can’t help but test out all the camp chairs on display, and we’ve ended up owning more than a reasonable number of them over the years.
It’s some of the best television I’ve seen in years.
My husband gave me a box of the Pearl version a couple of years ago, and they’ve been my go-to pencils ever since.
For some reason, it took me nearly 10 years of living on my own to finally realize one of these was missing from my own serving bowl collection.
A few years ago I decided I wanted to make pinback buttons, and I researched the sturdiest, easiest-to-use machines.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Charities fear tax bill could turn philanthropy into a pursuit only for the rich”

Many U.S. charities are worried the tax overhaul bill signed by President Trump on Friday could spur a landmark shift in philanthropy, speeding along the decline of middle-class donors and transforming charitable gift-giving into a pursuit largely left to the wealthy.
The source of concern is how the tax bill is expected to sharply reduce the number of taxpayers who qualify for the charitable tax deduction – a big driver of gifts to nonprofits.
The tax bill’s treatment of charities led the Salvation Army to express serious concerns, and it’s why United Way opposed the legislation, as did the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.
Will your taxes go up or down in 2018 under the new tax bill?
Taylor worries the tax bill will force United Way to change whom it targets for fundraising.
President Trump signed $1.5 trillion tax bill into law on Dec. 22 in the Oval Office.
That’s because the new tax bill nearly doubles the standard deduction and limits the value of other deductions, such as for state and local taxes.
Sarah Caruso, president of the Greater Twin Cities United Way, said she also worries about the impact of the new tax bill but is not giving up on any donors just yet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Gift-Giving Tips From Scientists”

One major exception to the uselessness rule is gift giving in the form of philanthropy.
Second, “Regifting,” or giving away a gift someone else gave to you, though considered a social taboo, is not quite as ghastly as often thought.
Researchers showed in the journal Psychological Science in 2012 that we overestimate how offended people will be to learn that their gift was passed on to someone else.
Participants in the study reported that if they gave someone an unwanted gift, they would prefer it be given away than thrown away outright.
Scholars at Carnegie Mellon recently demonstrated that we’re more likely to give practical gifts that seem personal than sentimentally valuable ones.
Third, no matter how terrible your gift, wrap it up nicely.
As it happens, the appeal of well-wrapped, worthless gifts is nearly universal, and even goes beyond Homo sapiens.
Apparently for spiders, as for humans, it’s the wrapping that counts, because the worthlessness of the gift inside did not affect the receptivity of the female.

The orginal article.