Summary of “The Day Treva Throneberry Disappeared”

Then there was that day when Treva’s young niece J’Lisha, who was staying at the Throneberry home, told people that Treva had shaken her awake the previous night and whispered that a man was outside their room with a gun-which turned out to be not true at all.
1985.It didn’t take long for the rumor to spread through town that Treva Throneberry had last been seen down at the police station, where she had given a statement claiming that her daddy, holding a gun in his hand, had raped her.
In court Carl and Patsy insisted that Treva had made up the entire story, and their attorney went so far as to demand that Treva be given a lie-detector test.
“Honey, you’ll be Treva Throneberry until the day you die,” Patsy said in a wobbly voice.
Why? Why had Treva Throneberry used at least eighteen teenage aliases since the early nineties, and why had she spun such gruesomely outlandish tales? Was she nothing more than a con artist, pretending to be a downtrodden teenager to receive free foster care and a free education? Was she afflicted with what doctors call psychiatric Munchausen syndrome, in which she intentionally feigned intense emotional distress to receive extra attention?
Although Clark County senior deputy prosecutor Michael Kinnie said that Treva needed to be treated as a common criminal-“What we are dealing with here is a woman who knows exactly what she’s doing,” he said-a writer for the Vancouver newspaper suggested that Treva’s behavior “Doesn’t suggest maliciousness so much as misery.” As for Kinnie’s contention that Treva was dangerous-after all, a Vancouver security guard went to jail because of her accusation of rape-the writer reminded his readers that the security guard pleaded guilty.
After a long silence Treva said, “This Treva in these pictures. What was she like?”.
“She enjoyed church. She enjoyed tennis. She had a wooden tennis racket. She was always very appropriate, very thankful. She always apologized if she hurt my feelings. There was another long silence. Treva stared down at her notebook, her eyes blinking. Was it possible that the past was returning-that she was remembering the girl she once was?”Was Treva smart?” Treva asked.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Mattel Is Releasing the First Gender-Neutral Doll”

The doll can be a boy, a girl, neither or both, and Mattel, which calls this the world’s first gender-neutral doll, is hoping its launch on Sept. 25 redefines who gets to play with a toy traditionally deemed taboo for half the world’s kids.
Mattel’s first promotional spot for the $29.99 product features a series of kids who go by various pronouns-him, her, them, xem-and the slogan “A doll line designed to keep labels out and invite everyone in.” With this overt nod to trans and nonbinary identities, the company is betting on where it thinks the country is going, even if it means alienating a substantial portion of the population.
Mattel tested the doll with 250 families across seven states, including 15 children who identify as trans, gender-nonbinary or gender-fluid and rarely see themselves reflected in the media, let alone their playthings.
Mattel currently has 19% market share in the $8 billion doll industry; gaining just 1 more point could translate into $80 million in revenue for the company.
It’s parents who are making the purchasing decisions, and no adult is going to have a neutral reaction to this doll.
Perhaps it’s surprising that nobody has beaten Mattel to creating a gender-neutral doll.
Nothing comes close to the Creatable World doll that Mattel has conjured up over the past two years.
In videos of those testing groups, many parents fumbled with the language to describe the dolls, confusing gender with sexuality, mixing up gender-neutral and trans and fretting about the mere idea of a boy playing with a doll.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Football League Was Built For Girls Who Love To Hit”

Her husband is a coach on the West Jordan boys high school football team and now her two daughters and three nieces are all signed up in the Utah Girls Tackle Football League.
The girls love football and they love the league, but when I ask them about playing sports at school, a lot of them look less happy.
That’s why the members of the Utah Girls Tackle Football League are suing their school districts.
If a school, for example, has one sport for boys and one sport for girls but 10 boys play that one sport and only two girls play, that school is not Title IX compliant.
There’s no other league of 500 girls playing tackle football in the entire country.
Football is a contact sport, and the girls’ tackle football league knows that.
“You always know who is going to stay in the sport after you start full hitting. Some girls thrive on that. They don’t just love to play football, they love to hit.”
All of the parents and all of the girls in this league say that they’ve faced criticism from people who don’t think girls should be playing football, and don’t like that they hit each other.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Heart and the Bottle: A Tender Illustrated Fable of What Happens When We Deny Our Difficult Emotions”

“Children are the most attentive, curious, eager, observant, sensitive, quick, and generally congenial readers on earth,” E.B. White famously asserted in an interview, admonishing: “Anyone who writes down to children is simply wasting his time. You have to write up, not down.” And yet down we write still, deaf to White’s wisdom and to Tolkien’s insistence that there is no such thing as writing “For children” and to Gaiman’s crusade against the spiritual disservice of shielding children from difficult emotions.
Nowhere is there more heartening an antidote than in The Heart and the Bottle by the inimitable Oliver Jeffers.
Jeffers tells the story of a little girl, “Much like any other,” whose expansive and exuberant curiosity her father fuels by reading to her all sorts of fascinating books about the sea and the stars and the wonders of our world.
If grief is so disorienting and crushing an emotion for adults, how are unprepared little hearts expected to handle its weight? The little girl cannot, and so she doesn’t.
Feeling unsure, the girl thought the best thing was to put her heart in a safe place.
One day, while walking on the beach where she had once strolled blissfully with her father, the “Girl” – now a grown woman – encounters another girl still little and still filled with the boundless and buoyant curiosity that had once been hers.
The front set celebrates the bond between a little girl and her paternal figure in its various permutations – a father, a grandfather, perhaps a kindly uncle – and the back set tickles the science-lover’s curiosity with a minimalist illustrated anatomy of the human heart.
The Heart and the Bottle is an immeasurable delight from endpaper to endpaper.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is ‘pink for girls and blue for boys’ biology or conditioning?”

From a fairly young age, possibly as young as 12 months, it appears that boys and girls show preferences for different kinds of toys.
If gendered toy preference is an expression of a biology, then the interpretation tends to be that it is inevitable and shouldn’t be interfered with, and that those who challenge it should be sent away with the mantra ‘Let boys be boys and girls be girls’ ringing in their ears.
Do children agree with these ratings? Do all boys choose boy toys, all girls choose girl toys? Brenda Todd, a psychologist from City, University of London, researches children’s play, and decided to study their behaviour with toys from dolls to cars.
The study revealed an element of self-fulfilling prophecy: boys played longer with the toys that had been labelled ‘boy toys’, and the girls with the ‘girl toys’.
Although the younger girls appeared to be more interested in girl toys than boys were in boy toys, this interest wasn’t sustained in the middle group, where there was actually a drop in the amount of time they spent with girl toys.
The overall conclusion was that boys played with male-typed toys more than girls, and girls with female-typed toys more than boys.
Girls were much more gender-label compliant at one level, quite strongly rejecting the blue boy toys and approving of the pink girl toys.
Why might the same not be true for boys – why would they not be equally enthused by a ‘girly’ melon baller if they could have it in blue? Could it be that, while girls are generally not discouraged from playing with boy toys, and might occasionally be given permission to pick up the odd hammer, the reverse is not the case, with evidence of active intervention, particularly from fathers, if boys appear to be choosing to play with girl toys?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Olive Oatman, the Pioneer Girl Abducted by Native Americans Who Returned a Marked Woman”

The girls seemingly considered themselves assimilated Mohaves, so much so that, in February of 1854, approximately 200 white railroad surveyors spent a week with the Mohaves as part of the Whipple Expedition, trading and socializing, and neither Olive nor Mary Ann revealed herself as an abductee or asked the men for help.
Her foster family opposed the idea, and Francisco and the Mohaves eventually hammered out an offer: Olive would be ransomed back to the U.S. government in exchange for a horse and some blankets and beads.
By the time Olive was sent to Fort Yuma, five years had passed since the murder of most of the Oatman family and the girls’ initial capture.
In 1857, a year after Olive’s return, a Methodist minister named Royal Stratton interviewed Olive at length and wrote a bestselling book, first titled Life Among the Indians and later rechristened Captivity of the Oatman Girls, chronicling the Oatman sisters’ half-decade with the natives.
Her best childhood friend, Susan Thompson-whom Olive later befriended again-believed that Olive had married a Mohave man and given birth to two boys, and that her depression upon returning to non-tribal society was actually grief.
Her time spent with the native tribes marred the rest of Olive Oatman’s life.
Despite her devout denial of having had any native husbands or lovers, the rumor stuck, thanks partially to a front-page story in the Los Angeles Star-which reported in 1856, a month before Olive’s return, that both Oatman girls were discovered alive and married to Mohave chiefs.
Although not mentioned too often these days, Olive Oatman is still occasionally paid homage, particularly via the character of Eva Toole on the AMC show Hell on Wheels, who sports a very similar backstory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Perfect Pictures and the Pain Behind Them”

“You’re a naughty girl,” he writes and says over the phone, his voice hissing like oil heated in a pan.
“You deserve to be punished. I can see you better than others can. You think you’re ‘Little Miss Perfect.’ The smile. The body. Perfect grades, too. Well, you need to make me happy then.”
Perhaps you see a lovely, young girl; I see a woman exposed, drowning in the slipstream of her husband’s shadow.
I’ve taken the world’s whippings for being born a girl as reason to believe I deserve only punishment and degradation, inflicted on myself, accepted toward myself.
Leave him, the coffin we call a home, the life of smallness I know as mine.
Initially, the news of my leaving acting and modeling to become a writer was met with resistance ranging from disbelief, worry, outrage, scorn, to laughter, from nearly every friend and relative, each unsolicited opinion preceded with the phrase we women know so well: “I love you, but”.
If all young girls and women committed such treason, patriarchy would collapse.
In addition to being a writer, I’m now a public speaker – in tonight’s performance I’ll be speaking purely as myself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Flagrant Foul: Benching Teen Moms Before Title IX”

After Christoffer got married, taking the last name Rubel, and gave birth to a daughter in 1970, the Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union denied her eligibility to play basketball her senior year.
As Rubel told the Des Moines Register soon after she filed her lawsuit, “A Russian girl who is married and the mother of three took gold medals at the last Olympics – that proves something.”
Ever since the sport took hold in Iowa in the early 1900s, the state has had a strong tradition of girls’ basketball – it was even once referred to as the “Capital of women’s basketball.” Prior to the passing of Title IX in 1972, of the nearly 300,000 American girls that played high school sports, 20 percent were Iowans, of whom almost half played basketball.
If Rubel – a married student with a 1-month-old at home – was allowed to play, the entire school would lose its athletic certification, which would effectively disquality all of Ruthven’s girls’ teams from being able to compete in any sports.
According to a story in the Register, “It’s hard to find anyone here who doesn’t think Jane Rubel should play basketball if she wants to.” Hackett – Rubel’s friend and teammate – told the paper that all the young people she’d talked to in surrounding towns supported Rubel’s desire to play, calling the lawsuit the topic of discussion at Friday night high school football game.
Cooley “Actually believed I would’ve been a really bad influence for the image of girls’ basketball,” Rubel says.
Ruthven led by nine points after the first quarter when, according to Rubel, “The refs just started calling fouls and just whatever else they could to even out the game. And there was like five out of the six of us in foul trouble before the game closed.” And though no Ruthven player fouled out, Everly still attempted 28 free throws to Ruthven’s 15, a glaring disparity.
Several players in northern Iowa had been waiting for a ruling on Rubel’s case before deciding whether to challenge the IGHSAU’s policy – Cooley specifically cited a “Girl in Gruver” named Kaylynn Reinhardt Anderson that “Was preparing to file a suit of her own” – and their eligibilities were reinstated.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One is Chinese. One is American. How a journalist discovered and reunited identical twins”

Shuangjie showed Esther a birthmark on her back, which Esther lacks.
The girls discovered they both suffered from nosebleeds, although Esther has allergies – to dust and soy, among others.
Marsha, from left, Victoria, Al and Esther Frederick about one year after Esther’s adoption.
One afternoon when she was napping, the 9-year-old Esther, always precocious, discovered an email that referred to a missing twin.
With few options for Chinese food near her house in the Fort Worth area, Esther makes food at home.
Zeng Shuangjie greets her sister Esther Frederick in China as the twins see each other in person for the first time since Esther was stolen as baby.
Marsha gave the speech that she had in effect practiced for nearly 10 years, ever since she found out Esther had been stolen from her family.
Yuan Zanhua, from left, and Zeng Youdong eating at home with their twin daughters Zeng Shuangjie and Esther Frederick, as well as Esther’s adoptive sister, Victoria, and adoptive mother, Marsha Frederick.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How LFO’s “Summer Girls” Explains the Weird, Wonderful Music of 1999″

“Summer Girls,” the group’s gently rapped and shockingly resilient 1999 hit, tells you quite a bit about Cronin, and about teenagers, and about America, and especially about the anarchic and delightful wonderland of pop music in 1999.
New Kids on the Block had a bunch of hitsChinese food makes me sickAnd I think it’s fly when girls drop by for the summerFor the summer.
I like girls that wear Abercrombie & FitchI’d take her if I had one wishBut she’s been gone since that summerSince that summer.
“Summer Girls” never intended to exclude anyone: You were invited to this party no matter how old you were, no matter how few references you got, no matter how you felt about boy bands or white rappers, and, crucially, no matter what you were wearing.
For Young’s part, he concedes now that if he’d known how big “Summer Girls” would get, he’d have spent more time on the mix, and in all likelihood made it worse.
If you continue listening to 1999’s LFO past the one-two punch of “Summer Girls” and “Girl on TV,” you will find a talented and charismatic group caught between boilerplate teen-pop anthemia and something shrewder and ever-so-slightly lewder.
A history of turn-of-the-century pop music filtered through LFO’s “Summer Girls” does involve entering a universe where the most important album of 1999 is not The Slim Shady LP or Enema of the State or Californication but, instead, Sugar Ray’s 14:59, whose very title winks at Andy Warhol’s possibly apocryphal quote about everyone in the future getting 15 minutes of fame.
“Back then we didn’t really think about that. It was just, like, so normal. Everything was very sexualized, you know what I mean? You had to be a boy band, you had to take off your shirt onstage. You had to make the girls scream. It was just very normal, some of the songs on the radio.”

The orginal article.