Summary of “How to Read a Map”

Being able to read a good old-fashioned paper map is one of the most fundamental outdoor skills.
Topo maps are the only map you should use if you’re trying to navigate outdoors and will be the subject of most of this article.
Photo by USGS.Any good map will tell you how to read itself.
From left to right, it gives you information on where and when the map data was compiled, the area’s magnetic declination, the scale, the location of the shown area in relation to the state it’s in, and a key to the symbols used to represent roads.
The key is another essential, spelling out what the symbols on the map represent.
Take a minute to absorb the legend before trying to read the map itself.
Pick out two distinct terrain features that you can see both in the real world and on the map.
Rotate the map until its orienting lines align with those of the compass bezel.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Torching the Modern-Day Library of Alexandria”

Books still in print you’d have to pay for, but everything else-a collection slated to grow larger than the holdings at the Library of Congress, Harvard, the University of Michigan, at any of the great national libraries of Europe-would have been available for free at terminals that were going to be placed in every local library that wanted one.
On March 22 of that year the legal agreement that would have unlocked a century’s worth of books and peppered the country with access terminals to a universal library was rejected under Rule 23(e)(2) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure by the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.
Way back in 1996, the student project that eventually became Google-a “Crawler” that would ingest documents and rank them for relevance against a user’s query-was actually conceived as part of an effort “To develop the enabling technologies for a single, integrated and universal digital library.” The idea was that in the future, once all books were digitized, you’d be able to map the citations among them, see which books got cited the most, and use that data to give better search results to library patrons.
Brin put Google’s lust for library books this way: “You have thousands of years of human knowledge, and probably the highest-quality knowledge is captured in books.” What if you could feed all the knowledge that’s locked up on paper to a search engine?
In just over a decade, after making deals with Michigan, Harvard, Stanford, Oxford, the New York Public Library, and dozens of other library systems, the company, outpacing Page’s prediction, had scanned about 25 million books.
So a settlement of the Authors Guild case could theoretically bind just about every author and publisher with a book in an American library.
“While the digitization of books and the creation of a universal digital library would benefit many,” Chin wrote in his decision, “The ASA would simply go too far.”
He’s been working on another project to scan library books; the scanning has been limited to books in the public domain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Switch Phones Without Losing Anything”

Bought a new phone? Here’s how to ensure you don’t leave any personal information behind during the upgrade.
Start by going through the apps on your phone and thinking about where each program stores its data-and how seamlessly you can transfer it to your new device.
One of your biggest problems will be third-party apps, especially if you’re going from Apple phones to Google-powered ones.
Subscription Accounts Even once you’ve figured out how you’ll move your data from one phone to another, you’re not quite ready to roll.
You may well use your phone as part of the two-step authentication process, where a code gets sent to your phone whenever someone tries to log on to your accounts on a new device.
While two-step authentication improves your security, it also adds to the hassle of switching phones.
If your accounts authenticate with an authenticator app, you’ll need to carefully navigate the switch from one phone to another.
Still, we’d recommend keeping both phones close to hand until you’ve securely logged into all your accounts on the new device.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tech Tricks to Help You Organize Your Digital Photo Library”

Smartphones’ ever-improving cameras encourage us to snap an ever-increasing pile of digital photos.
On top of that, they also come with some lesser-known tools to organize your photo library-and thanks to the rapidly advancing AI underpinning both apps, they do most of the hard work for you.
In addition to the folders you curate yourself, both Google Photos and Apple Photos will create albums for you automatically.
Experiment with the feature by searching for different descriptors, and if you vaguely remember a photo from years ago, try digging it up with a search term-chances are these apps will be able to find it.
In Google Photos, tap the search box, and the app will show you a row of faces that show up in your photo library.
In Apple Photos, find a photo that includes a person you want to identify and swipe up.
In Google Photos, you can also search for a specific date using the YYYY-MM-DD format or look for context-sensitive queries such as “Last week” or “Last April” work in Google Photos too.
Google Photos will automatically save anything you make to your library.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside Google’s Civil War”

Even as activists inside Google are relying on traditional labor organizing tactics, their demands are not just the typical wage or benefits ask.
“Who decides what is the soul of Google and what Google is?” asks Lokman Tsui, formerly Google’s go-to executive on issues of free expression and censorship in Asia and the Pacific.
Google became a subcontractor to the Department of Defense for Maven in 2017, but most people inside the company didn’t learn about it until the following year, when an employee wrote an unsanctioned post about the clandestine project on Google’s internal social media platform.
July 2017 February 2018 June 2018 August 2018 October 2018 DAMORE MEMO: Google engineer James Damore posts an internal memo arguing against the value of diversity in tech; Google ultimately fires him.
Where Google management has increasingly used confidentiality as a tool to maintain control of decision-making, some of Google’s activist employees have gone in the opposite direction-turning to the media to amplify their concerns.
The Google organizers have taken to calling themselves the “Entitled vocal majority,” after one employee publicly referred to them as the “Entitled vocal minority.” No matter its size, there’s no denying the group has been impactful, playing a role in Google’s decision to not renew its contract for Project Maven.
“Congress¬≠people take meetings with Google workers that they didn’t take with Chipotle workers,” says Vicki Tardif, an ontologist at Google, who has been with the company for eight years.
In April, the conflict inside the company reached a new level when Whittaker and Claire Stapleton, two women instrumental in planning the walkout, published an open letter accusing Google of retaliating against them for their organizing activities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One year later, restaurants are still confused by Google Duplex”

Twenty minutes earlier, I’d asked the bartender at Sweet Afton, an Irish pub in Astoria, New York, if she’d ever heard of Google Duplex, an AI that calls restaurants on a person’s behalf and uses realistic human speech to make reservations.
When the fourth call rang – as my Google Assistant frantically tells me it’s still trying to reach Sweet Afton – Myriah finally picks up.
The Duplex calling feature only kicks in for restaurants that aren’t on those platforms and have opted into receiving calls from Google Assistant on their Google business page.
Though Google opts businesses in by default, that still likely amounts to a fairly small percentage of businesses that have to regularly deal with Duplex calls, especially as the tech is still relatively new.
Thanaraksalakul, a waitress who works at my parents’ Thai restaurant in Queens, New York, hadn’t seen that the caller ID said Google Assistant on it when she picked up, and she doesn’t remember if the caller said she was being recorded.
Server Shawn Watford of Birmingham, Alabama, said that while he hasn’t gotten customer calls from Duplex at his job, he has tried it on himself just to get a feel for what the AI sounded like.
As the US continues to deal with an onslaught of spammy robocalls, it seems that many restaurant employees are inadvertently shielding themselves from Duplex by ignoring incoming calls that do not display a person’s name.
Although Google does not personally call businesses to convince them to buy ads, it stands to reason why many restaurant employees would shy away from answering calls that list the company in its caller ID in the first place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook almost missed the mobile revolution. It can’t afford to miss the next big thing.”

As the dust settled on F8 and Facebook executives started to look ahead to what was next, the company’s problem was suddenly obvious: While Facebook had been heads-down for nine months building and preparing for its big conference, the rest of the world was rapidly moving toward smartphones and mobile devices.
If Facebook wanted to survive, it would have to do so by riding that mobile wave.
Mobile devices are still far and away the most popular way people use Facebook services, but after two years of privacy debacles, misinformation campaigns, and political polarization, how they interact with those services is starting to change.
Facebook employees still use Microsoft Outlook for email and Quip for document sharing, instead of Gmail and the suite of Google document services the company used to use until around 2012 because, former employees say, Facebook executives never trusted Google.
What Facebook ultimately launched was a drastically scaled-down version of the original phone plan: a software program called Facebook Home that brought Facebook pictures and status updates directly to the phone’s home screen on Android phones.
“I think the reality is Facebook needs to be investing before it is a big thing in order to build some of the muscles to be competitive.”
If private messaging is indeed the next big wave of communication – and who’s to say it won’t be? – Zuckerberg laid the groundwork for that four years ago when he acquired WhatsApp and spun out Facebook Messenger into its own standalone product, a signal that it was important enough to exist outside of the core app.
Even if Zuckerberg has identified the next big wave, having a plan is different from executing a plan – and Facebook has two major obstacles working against it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Big Tech Built the Iron Cage”

Shoshana Zuboff, a professor emerita at Harvard Business School, mentions the citizens of Broughton more than once in her book “The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power”-a reckoning with the stranglehold that Google, Facebook, Amazon, and other Big Tech companies exert over our lives and minds.
Neoliberal economics enabled the rise of the tech giants, as Zuboff makes clear at the outset.
After the tech crash of 2000, Google, under pressure from investors, looked for ways to increase revenue.
Close scrutiny of a patent that Google filed at the end of 2003-“Generating User Information for Use in Targeted Advertising”-allows Zuboff to establish that user profiles were “Deduced” or “Extracted” from personal data that users may have wished to keep hidden.
Machine intelligence, Zuboff explains, “Reaches its full potential for quality only as it approximates totality.” For this reason, the tendency toward all-devouring monopolies in the tech world is the inevitable outcome of the underlying algorithmic logic.
One of the saddest aspects of life under Big Tech is our habit of equating entire sectors of human activity with particular corporations.
Zuboff’s decision to begin her account with Google in 2000 means that she neglects the earlier history of radical indifference on the Internet-notably, Napster’s normalization of copyright violation, in 1999.
As Zuboff points out, the very idea of privacy is antithetical to the viability of a corporation like Google or Facebook.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Smart talking: are our devices threatening our privacy?”

Collins’ death triggered a broad debate about privacy in the voice-computing era, a discussion that makes the big tech companies squirm.
As the writer Adam Clark Estes put it: “By buying a smart speaker, you’re effectively paying money to let a huge tech company surveil you.”
Saying the phrase “OK, Google” wakes up that company’s devices.
Designers at Microsoft and Google and other companies also receive reports detailing the most popular user queries so they know what content to add.
In the offices of one conversational-computing company I visited, employees showed me how they received daily emails listing recent interchanges between people and one of the company’s chat apps.
Isabelle Olsson, a designer, got the job of announcing the new Google Home Mini, a bagel-size device that is the company’s answer to the Amazon Echo Dot.
If a company the calibre of Google can make such a blunder, then other companies might easily make similar mistakes as voice interfaces proliferate.
If in doubt – especially with applications made by companies whose privacy policies can’t be easily understood – pull the plug.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Hottest Chat App for Teens Is Google Docs”

Neta Guey March 1, 2019Teens told me they use Google Docs to chat just about any time they need to put their phone away but know their friends will be on computers.
What the media thinks teens like: sextingwhat teens actually like: google docs.
Oh wow tell her to follow me and then chat on google docs.
If that’s ur man why is he in my google docs chat bar .
Ab January 3, 2019Like the paper notes of yore, most Google Docs chat is banal.
In a blog post, Bark, an app that parents can use to monitor their child’s phone use, cautioned parents about kids ganging up on other children in Google Docs: “They work in tandem to write mean or hurtful things in a shared Google Doc. In other cases, kids create private, digital ‘burn books’ and invite others to contribute while leaving out the teased child,” the post read. But teens said this type of use is rare.
If you don’t flirt with your girl over the chat feature on Google Docs for her paper you’re editing together, somebody else will.
Blake Commanchee January 22, 2019While Google Docs chat may be the hottest communication tool for middle and high schoolers, most teenagers abandon it once they get to college.

The orginal article.