Summary of “Why Google’s Pixel phones matter”

When the original Pixel was unveiled by Google in October 2016, many questioned why the Mountain View company was entering the business of designing, building, and selling phones.
Two years on, that sentiment still lingers, as expressed by Andreessen Horowitz analyst Benedict Evans when he asks, “What purpose do Google’s Pixel phones serve?”.
Google claims to be serious about its hardware business, but the Pixel phones are still available in only a limited number of countries and through a limited number of carriers.
Google’s fraught decision-making notwithstanding, the Pixel phones are influential far beyond the unimpressive number of people who own one.
If my illustrated love poems to the Pixel camera haven’t been enough to convince you, check out what The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times have had to say about the first two Pixel generations.
The Pixel sets the Android standard Like the Nexus line before it, Google’s Pixel represents the company’s vision for the optimal Android user experience.
Which is to say, the Pixel is built to advertise Android at its best and, increasingly, Android is designed to create the best possible Pixel.
The Pixel is the only Android phone that can rival the iPhone Other than Apple, Google is the only company that controls the design of both the hardware and operating system of its smartphone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google Pixel 3 and 3 XL review: the best camera gets a better phone”

More than anything else, that’s what I think Google focused on this year: improving the “Phone stuff.” The Pixel 3 and 3 XL are superb phones that attempt to address nearly all of the complaints people had about last year’s Pixels.
Don’t let the notch stop you from getting the XL if you want a big phone But all of these smartphone notches become kind of invisible to the naked eye when you actually use the phone for a while, and the Pixel 3 XL is no exception.
“The glass on Pixel 3 performs comparable with other premium smartphones and according to industry standards.” But I have a very difficult time believing that the scratches we got on two different Pixel 3 phones are in line with “Industry standards.” But the good news is that I’ve only seen these marks on the matte finish, not the glossy parts.
The Pixel 2 was the best phone camera for all of last year, and it seems like the Pixel 3 will be the best camera for all of this year.
Google has tuned the Pixel 3 and 3 XL to a remarkable degree.
The Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL are quite a bit like the S-year iPhones.
Where the Pixel 2 XL had a crappy screen, the Pixel 3 XL has a great one.
If you want the best Android experience and the best camera you can get on a phone today, the Pixel 3 is it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Did Uber Steal Google’s Intellectual Property?”

In 2010, employees began to hear rumors that Levandowski, on behalf of his outside companies, had met with some of Google’s competitors, including a firm that was working with Microsoft, to sell them the same navigational technology that Google was paying to use.
According to internal Google e-mails, he ordered executives to “Make Anthony rich if Chauffeur succeeds.” Two months later, Google bought 510 Systems for twenty-two million dollars.
Since 2014, California regulations have required companies to report any instance in which a self-driving vehicle is “In any manner involved in a collision originating from the operation of the autonomous vehicle on a public road that resulted in the damage of property or in bodily injury or death.” The Camry accident occurred three years before this regulation was passed; since the rule went into effect, Google has reported thirty-six additional accidents.
Lawyers later learned that, around the same time, an engineer who had left with Levandowski, Lior Ron, had conducted Internet searches for “How to secretly delete files mac” and “How to permanently delete google drive files from my computer.” Lawyers later saw a chat message that Levandowski sent to Ron several weeks after he left Google: “Make sure you delete all the messages tonight on both your PC and iPhone.” This was evidence, Google felt, that Levandowski had exploited Project Chauffeur’s secrets to jump-start Ottomotto.
When lawyers asked Google engineers to evaluate what Levandowski had taken, one of them dismissed it as “Low value” information; he told a Google attorney, in an e-mail, that “It makes me uncomfortable to think that lawyers are trying to ascribe suspicion to” the downloads.
In December, 2016, Google spun its self-driving unit into a stand-alone division called Waymo, which, employees were told, stood for “a new way forward in mobility.” That month, Waymo’s lawyers learned that a mid-level worker had accidentally been forwarded an e-mail from an outside vender, a company called Gorilla Circuits, which had been hired by Uber to manufacture circuit boards for self-driving cars.
In 2013, Google’s chief lawyer, David Drummond, wrote on the company’s blog, “We require that government agencies conducting criminal investigations use a search warrant to compel us to provide a user’s search query information and private content stored in a Google Account.” Google had even fought a government subpoena seeking data on child-pornography searches.
“The people at Google got what they wanted,” one of the lawyers who represented Uber told me.

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Summary of “The breach that killed Google+ wasn’t a breach at all”

For months, Google has been trying to stay out of the way of the growing tech backlash, but yesterday, the dam finally broke with news of a bug in the rarely used Google+ network that exposed private information for as many as 500,000 users.
The consumer version of Google+ is shutting down, German privacy regulators in Germany and the US are already looking into possible legal action, and former SEC officials are publicly speculating about what Google may have done wrong.
The bigger problem for Google isn’t the crime, but the cover-up.
The vulnerability was fixed in March, but Google didn’t come clean until seven months later when The Wall Street Journal got hold of some of the memos discussing the bug.
Part of the disconnect comes from the fact that, legally, Google is in the clear.
Google just found that data was available to developers, not that any data was actually taken.
With no clear data stolen, Google had no legal reporting requirements.
It’s too early to say whether Google will face a real backlash for this.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google Assistant’s app redesign abandons chatbots”

5 minute Read. Google Assistant is getting an overhaul on smartphones, and it’s discarding one of 2016’s biggest tech fads in the process.
When Google Assistant arrived a couple of years ago, chatbots were all the rage in products like Facebook Messenger and Microsoft’s Skype.
Google Assistant itself debuted as a feature within Google’s Allo messaging app, so you could exchange text messages with the search giant just like you would with a friend.
Not every Google Assistant device is conducive to dialog bubbles.
When Assistant arrived in 2016, Google was mainly pushing it through Allo and on its new Google Home smart speaker.
Now, Google Assistant is available in cars through Android Auto, on kitchen counters with devices like the Lenovo Smart Display, and on televisions through Chromecast and Android TV. A chat-like interface doesn’t make as much sense on those devices.
In the future, you might ask Google Assistant for flights to a certain place on a certain date, and it might provide you with its own interface for browsing all the options.
If Google Assistant can become a little more helpful now, users may trust it down the road as it gets better at handling more complex tasks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Android at 10: the world’s most dominant technology”

So it’s only natural to think about Android in the context of Google’s answer to the iPhone – and it is.
Q. And once Android came aboard and Mr. Rubin came aboard, was there a business strategy formed about what Android would be and how it worked?
In an effort to ensure that another company wouldn’t gain dominant control over the mobile market, Google and Android have wildly, unequivocally succeeded in doing just that.
Not only has Android prevented some version of Windows from taking over mobile, but it has actually eclipsed Windows as the most popular operating system, period.
I also don’t think people have really done a great job contending with the parallels between Android today and Windows in the late ’90s. No comparison is perfect, and I will gladly admit that the situation is vastly different now, in large part because Android is an open-source project that can’t be fairly compared to what Microsoft was doing back then.
If I’m being honest, I don’t really know which side of that debate I land on yet because fully comprehending just how dominant Android is and how integral it might be to the future of the web and computing is damnably hard.
The winning platform was Android because Google was competent where Microsoft were not.
No one interested in technology should forget that more people experience computers and the internet via Android than anything else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google’s Tool to Help Cities Fight Climate Change”

The company has only released estimates for five cities, including Pittsburgh, Buenos Aires, and Mountain View, California.
As part of this initiative, Google says it will also release its proprietary estimates of a city’s annual driving, biking, and transit ridership, generated from information collected by its popular mapping apps, Google Maps and Waze.
Google made the announcement earlier this month as part of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco.
The summit, organized in part by California Governor Jerry Brown, was meant to encourage states and cities that have advanced climate policy since President Donald Trump took office.
These local programs do much, but they have not replaced climate policies revoked by Trump: A recent report from Yale and a number of European think tanks found that these “Subnational” programs could make up about half of the United States’ pledged carbon cuts under the Paris Agreement.
Google has framed the new project, called the Environmental Insights Explorer, as a way for leaders to focus and improve local climate programs.
The explorer remains a better tool for getting a glancing sense of a city’s carbon emissions than it is for making meticulous policy.
Google is also hampered by the age and quality of some data: To estimate how much carbon is emitted to power a given city, it must use a six-year-old data set from the EPA. But it can still provide useful information.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Make Android as Secure as Possible”

Most of us live on our phones, with financial information, calendar appointments, family photos, and more stored on our devices.
A secure Android phone starts with a secure Google account, because that’s where all your synced data is stored-and the more Google services you use, the more crucial this step is.
Don’t forget to add your fingerprint if your phone has a scanner, too-here are a few tips to make it as accurate as possible.
Make Sure Find My Phone is On. Losing your phone is a gut-wrenching feeling, so you also want to make sure you have a way to track it and, worse case scenario, remotely reset your phone if there’s no chance of getting it back.
Google has a tracking system in place for Android phones.
It’s called Find My Phone, and it should be enabled by default on all modern Android phones.
If you ever lose your phone or it gets stolen, you can fire up the closest web browser and search Google for “Find My Phone” and remotely locate your lost device.
Keeping your phone secure isn’t difficult-take a few minutes to check and enable a few settings, and you’ll always have the peace of mind that your phone is as secure as it can be should it ever get lost or stolen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Google Fiber Is High-Speed Internet’s Most Successful Failure”

Google Fiber, as the effort was named, entered the access market intending to prove the business case for ultra-high-speed internet.
In the Big Bang Disruption model, where innovations take off suddenly when markets are ready for them, Google Fiber could be seen as a failed early market experiment in gigabit internet access.
The story of Google Fiber provides valuable lessons for future network transformations, notably the on-going global race to deploy next-generation 5G mobile networks.
As the game of gigs played out, city leaders were forced to offer the same administrative advantages to incumbents as they had to Google Fiber.
Only six years after Google’s initial announcement, according to the Fiber Broadband Association, 30% of urban residents had access to gigabit Internet service.
The Google Fiber experiment caused a reexamination of basic assumptions about competition in what was seen as a static infrastructure industry.
As the U.S. and other economies now undertake even more expensive deployment of next-generation 5G mobile network technologies, heeding the lessons of Google Fiber will distinguish the winners from the losers.
Deployment will likely follow the new city-by-city model pioneered by Google Fiber.

The orginal article.