Summary of “Are the super-rich ruining Burning Man?”

For many, Burning Man conjures up images of dust-covered attendees, known as “Burners”, dancing in the desert cut off from society.
Some see these camps as fundamentally opposed to the basic tenets of Burning Man.
Burning Man CEO Marian Goodell has taken the unprecedented step of withdrawing invitations to one turnkey camp – “Humano the Tribe” – and warning dozens of others.
In a blog post, Ms Goodell wrote that she was “Stunned” by the growing “Commodification and exploitation of Black Rock City and Burning Man culture”.
“Part of what makes Burning Man unique and powerful is that everyone has to work hard to be there.”
Greg Reynoso, 29, has been attending Burning Man for almost a decade.
Reflecting on the statement made by Burning Man CEO Marian Goodell, Greg describes his response as “Measured positivity”.
Greg says an important part of Burning Man is the level of preparation it takes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Did One Hit Lead to a 13-Year-Old’s Suicide?”

James’ buddies were there; some wore bright yellow sneakers and ties-an homage to James’ love of SpongeBob SquarePants.
The game had gotten chippy, and during one play an opposing player hit James on the side of his head. James later said the player was dirty-intentionally so.
James didn’t say anything about the hit to anyone during the game.
Before the boy could make contact, James swatted him away and hit him.
Two months before James’ death, the California legislature passed AB 2007, which required mandatory concussion protocols be followed-including, among other things, the removal of players suspected to have a concussion and that coaches or administrators complete head injury training.
Just days before James took his life, Pop Warner launched a “Concussion education campaign” and implemented safety measures-such as reducing contact in practice to 25 percent and requiring any player who suffers a suspected head injury to receive medical clearance from a concussion specialist before returning to play.
The Ransoms have not brought legal action against the Stallions, Santa Margarita Pop Warner, Pop Warner or the player who hit James.
Though James’ behavior changed following the traumatic brain injury suffered on September 12, 2015, the Ransoms will never know for sure what led to James’ mental illness, but they want to help other families by telling his story.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ashamed to work in Silicon Valley: how techies became the new bankers”

Greg is one of many people working in tech who are increasingly self-conscious about how the industry – represented by consumer-facing tech titans like Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Twitter and Uber – is perceived: as underregulated, overly powerful companies filled with wealthy tech bros and “Brilliant assholes” with little regard for the local communities they occupy.
Silicon Valley has taken over from Wall Street as the political bogeyman of choice, turning tech workers – like it or not – into public ambassadors for the 1%. “I would never say I worked at Facebook,” said one 30-year-old software engineer who left the company last year to pursue an alternative career.
“MBA jerks used to go and work for Wall Street, now wealthy white geeks go to Stanford and then waltz into a VC or tech firm.”
It’s a view echoed by one current Googler in her 20s, who is embarrassed by tech companies’ cluelessness about their reputation outside of the Silicon Valley bubble.
“Some of these folks aren’t the most socially gifted people and therefore suddenly having a culture encouraging this experience for them bleeds into everything, giving them a sense of self-importance and entitlement. It’s effectively like dealing with children all the time,” Greg said, referencing his time at Dropbox when people would “Fly around the office on these stupid scooters and skateboards”.
“Being in tech puts a badge on you. Things are going bad for a large section of the economy in this area and here’s a shiny beacon of people getting paid far too much for what they do. It’s a very easy target especially if you mark yourself as one,” he said.
All of this feeds into the perception that techies are, according to the former Facebooker, “Pod people” who aren’t part of the community.
“There’s a large and growing number of people who have negative emotions about how it is right now and really want to change it.”

The orginal article.