Summary of “Why We Can’t Get Enough Celebrity Mom Cookbooks”

The formula is well-established: a hybrid of cookbook, memoir, and coffee-table book stuffed with recipes and reminiscences, tips and tricks, and spiritual uplift.
There are two books by former TV stars Tiffani Thiessen and Kristin Cavallari, and two that are less focused on recipes for eating and more on recipes for living, written by TV dancer Jenna Dewan and country star Jessie James Decker.
How about Magnolia Table: Recipes for Gathering by Joanna Gaines? Or Cravings: Recipes for All the Food You Want to Eat by Chrissy Teigen? Or Pretty Happy: Healthy Ways to Love Your Body or Pretty Fun: Creating and Celebrating a Lifetime of Tradition by Kate Hudson? Lessons: My Path to a Meaningful Life by Gisele Bündchen? I have not read Lessons, and, until recently, I would have guessed the Venn diagram of people searching for meaning and people wanting to buy a book by Gisele Bündchen resembled two side-by-side circles with a thigh gap in between.
In her book’s intro, Paltrow talks about how life is messy, how we’re all juggling too much, how “There’s just so much that’s outside our control.” In response, she offers a fantasy of complete control.
Tiffani Thiessen’s book, Pull Up a Chair, is a more straightforward cookbook offering “Recipes from my family to yours.” This exchange presupposes a cozy familiarity, and Thiessen gamely plays the harried regular mom – she’s not an aesthete, nor an ascetic; she’s just a down-to-earth girl whose dad worked two jobs.
Then there’s Jessie James Decker, a country singer, wife, and mother whose “Amazing fans” asked her “How she does it all” so frequently that she decided to finally put the question to rest by writing a whole book detailing how.
Celebrity lifestyle books feel less like self-improvement manuals than social media profiles on semi-gloss paper.
Sure, celebrity lifestyle books might, like glossy magazines before them, serve as an aspirational template for the middle class.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the World of Guide Dog Dropouts”

Bryan’s family has raised guide dogs ever since she was a kid, when her sister begged her parents for a puppy and they countered with the idea of raising a guide puppy every year.
Like many guide dogs, Eddie, now 6, was born into the system through a breeding program at Leader Dogs for the Blind.
While dog owners can attempt to independently train their own service animals, most are bred by guide schools that identify breeds large enough to pull people out of traffic yet small enough to ride public transportation – Labs and retrievers mostly, with the occasional German Shepherd or boxer.
Dogs live on campus with dog roommates, go on field trips to New York City to ride the subway and attend picnics to get acquainted with their new teachers and classmates.
“Less than 5 percent of dogs are cut out for service-dog work, and many ‘wash out’ during training,” says Nicole Ellis, a certified dog trainer and pet expert with Rover.com.
The political correctness comes from a place of respect toward people who depend on guide dogs, as well as the amount of work and resources devoted to raising and training them, which can cost up to $60,000 per dog.
“A lot of the dogs Early Alert Canines. gets from Guide Dogs for the Blind. are dropped for seemingly silly reasons,” explains Burke, who now works for Early Alert.
Burke’s colleague, Jason Guthrie, has an alert dog named Eli, a 12-year-old yellow Lab who was originally born into a guide dog breeding program.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Secrets of Ivy League Tour Guides”

Over lunch a few days later, Sybil-who, like all the other tour guides quoted in this article, agreed to be included on the condition that her real name not be used-lists several more pieces of exaggerated information she shares during her tours.
When they are accepted into the Orange Key program, tour guides receive a ninety-five-page Guide for Guides, detailing the program’s philosophy, tour protocol, routes and content, with the expectation that they not deviate from these standards.
The standard tour route begins on the white marble steps of Clio Hall, the admissions building, then proceeds to the constantly bustling student center, which tour guides proudly boast as the building featured in the opening credits of the television show House.
Orange Key tour guides get paid $15 for each forty-five-minute tour, including the informal question-and-answer session afterwards.
The intention of having tour guides “Sell Princeton” is not something that Orange Key denies.
The Guide for Guides humorously refers to “Selling the best university in the world” as “The easiest job ever.” In the “Philosophy” section of the Guide, Orange Key identifies its overarching goal: “To build a guide corps that makes fellow Princetonians proud each time they walk by a tour.” The manual adds: “We are also committed to having guides present factually informative yet personalized tours that allow visitors to come away from the University with a general knowledge base as well as an understanding of the individual nature of the Princeton experience.”
Alumni on tour with their children have been known to call attention to a fibbing tour guide with pointed questions such as, “Do all of the clubs really let everyone in? Don’t some of them have their own reputations?”.
At the end of the tour, visitors are welcome to ask tour guides questions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Healing Power of Nature”

River guides might know that nature is transformative for the human body and psyche; but the mechanism behind such profound change is less universally agreed upon and understood.
Research from China found that those walking in nature had reduced blood levels of inflammatory cytokines, a risk factor for immune illness, and research from Japan’s Hokkaido University School of Medicine found that shinrin-yoku lowered blood glucose levels associated with obesity and diabetes.
We do know that we don’t need endemic nature – ornamental nature or designed nature or even engineered nature can be effective.
What drives our search for nature immersion? Susan Karle, a California-based certified forest therapy guide and long-time licensed marriage and family therapist, says: ‘Nature was important to me growing up, and I returned to it because of the seriousness of the issues in my work with victims of trauma and abuse.
‘A few years ago, I took my first guided nature walk and found it so powerful that two weeks later I signed up for the five-day training to be a certified forest therapy guide in shinrin-yoku-style walks.
That sense of nature as outside of us prevails mostly in the West; Eastern-based mindfulness practices and meditative traditions align more closely with human oneness with nature.
Even in cities, we can intervene: when endemic nature isn’t available, ornamental and designed nature is quite effective.
Colorado River guides know that nature enhances our physical and mental lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Disaster in the Alps”

At 6:30 a.m. on Sunday, April 29, 2018, a group of ten skiers set out from a secluded mountain hut more than 9,000 feet up in the Swiss Alps.
The guide leading the group had an impressive mountain résumé as well.
How could such an experienced group, with such an experienced guide, have gotten into such trouble? Because so many of the group died, including the guide himself, some of the answers will never be known.
Under normal circumstances, guides tend to take their phones out only periodically to check their group’s progress on a route and then put it away in a warm pocket, because cold temperatures degrade battery life.
The group did not rope up, but Piccioli said Castiglioni did tie a rope around his waist and let the end of it drag in the snow behind him so the skiers would have a track to follow, even if they couldn’t see him.
In addition to obtaining that weather information, it would have been common, although not required, for a guide to call ahead if a group was planning to divert from its planned itinerary to make sure there was room for the group at the alternate destination.
At the same time, it’s perplexing that a group of experienced skiers never questioned those decisions and kept following their guide blindly into the storm.
One of the reasons Piccioli says his group didn’t question the decisions that day was because they didn’t have any idea what the plan was or where their route was going to take them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Smashing Guiding’s Glass Ceiling”

Dawa Yangzum, whose formal education ended at age 11, wanted to climb Everest too.
In the winter of 2010, Dawa Yangzum enrolled in a free ten-day course in Phortse at the Khumbu Climbing Center, a vocational nonprofit started by Jenni Lowe-Anker and her husband, Conrad Anker.
“Dawa definitely had that. She was confident and poised, talented, and knew what she wanted.” The following year, Dawa Yangzum returned to the KCC to teach, working with students who were typically men older than she was.
Dawa Yangzum thought working Everest was tough-she’d spent weeks hauling anywhere from 15 to 40 pounds of gear between Camp I and IV, thousands of vertical feet apart-but climbing it? That was easy.
In the summer of 2014, Dawa Yangzum and her climbing partners, Pasang Lhamu Sherpa Akita and guide Maya Sherpa, aimed to be the first all-female team from Nepal to reach the summit.
After more than 14 hours of climbing, Dawa Yangzum and her partners arrived atop K2 at 2:30 p.m., elated and emotional.
Dawa Yangzum needed to complete a route graded 5.10a, which is relatively easy for an experienced climber in grippy rubber rock shoes.
A month later, in April, Dawa Yangzum and her K2 climbing partners, Pasang Lhamu and Maya, made an attempt on Nepal’s Kangchenjunga-the world’s third-highest peak.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 2017 kottke.org Holiday Gift Guide”

The 2017 Engineering Gift Guide from the engineering department at Purdue University is the only guide I’ve found that lists the research papers used when preparing the list.
It’s always worth paying attention to what the gadget-loving weirdos at Boing Boing put in their gift guide.
Quick hitters: The Millions has a gift guide for readers and writers that aren’t books.
Books! There are tons of gift ideas in my best books of 2017 post.
On her gift guide Erika Hall recommends Behave, which she’s been evangelizing all year.
For the 2017 Good Gift Games list on The Morning News, Matthew Baldwin picks some recent board games that make good gifts, like The Fox in the Forest and game-of-the-year winner Kingdomino.
In The Ultimate Gift Guide for True TV Fanatics, they offer gift suggestions based on your favorite TV shows.
The unofficial Goldman Sachs holiday gift guide for 2017 includes a complete Triceratops skull fossil, a $3.5 million Ferrari, and a $1 million global safari to visit some of the most endangered species on the planet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ars Technica’s ultimate board game buyer’s guide”

The holiday gift-buying season is upon us, and that can mean only one thing: it’s time to buy way too many board games.
For this year’s board game buyer’s guide, we went big-close to 10,000 words big.
We split the guide into categories for easy reading, with around five solid choices for each type of gamer.
We couldn’t include all of our favorite recommendations, of course, but we love all the games on this list.
Whether your giftee is a new gamer, a grizzled veteran, or someone who doesn’t know the first thing about board games, we’ve got you covered.
Maybe you’re in the market for a new game or two for yourself-let us be your guide.
Be sure to tell us your go-to or off-the-beaten-path recommendations in the comments.

The orginal article.