Summary of “Lincoln Riley’s Oklahoma Success Has the NFL Watching”

What’s separated Riley is the way he systemically and aggressively stresses defenses at every level, marries his passing game to his running game, and makes something that is simple enough to allow players to play at breakneck speed at the same time so complicated for opponents.
“I’d say in all the years at Texas Tech, all the years at East Carolina and the first couple years here, I had a true football discussion with maybe one NFL team. The interest in people reaching out to do that has changed a lot. And that’s probably due to some of the players we had, and how much they were studied.”
“In the past when you had damn near unlimited hours with these guys from an NFL perspective, your play sheets, the amount of stuff you put in, you’d have all the time in the world to do it.”
“The two teams in the NFL that look the most like us, or several other college teams, were the two teams playing in the Super Bowl,” Riley said, “So when people are having success with it, that’s not going to slow down.” Riley credits coaches like Pats coordinator Josh McDaniels and Eagles coach Doug Pederson for adapting certain run-action and RPO looks to the pros.
“We’ve just really drafted well over the last 10 years,” Jones said, “And when that happens, your young players that you draft, you keep them so they can push old players off. That’s what’s happened here. We feel very confident, comfortable that we have players on our roster, young players that are ready to step up and do the job. If you don’t ever give them opportunity, you won’t ever see what you have.”
Deandre Baker, DB, Georgia: Size is an issue, but he’s played a lot of football at a blueblood program, starting the last two years and emerging in 2017 as an All-SEC player.
If you’re ever wondering how much goes into a single NFL play, or whether that was more than just luck, you should check out the video on the CBS Denver site.
I’m glad tipping players being selected to play in professional sports leagues ahead of a broadcast was seen as a crime against humanity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stephen Malkmus and Tim Heidecker in Conversation”

“College, senior year of high school, Crooked Rain was really the record,” Heidecker said drolly to Malkmus earlier this month.
They are icons of their chosen fields, we figured, plus reciprocal fans-maybe we’d get Malkmus to dissect Heidecker’s work, or Heidecker to talk about how he found inspiration in Malkmus’s famously wry lyrical sensibility.
Heidecker: Wait, David Bowie is on “Life’s Been Good to Me”? Malkmus: Yeah, he sings on there, I’m almost positive, unless I’m totally tripping.
Heidecker: You do all the guitar stuff for U2 now, right? ‘Cause the Edge won’t play on the records?
Heidecker: No. Malkmus: That seems like it’s hard to do.
Heidecker: We were sitting around the other day and were like, let’s just randomly play some Frank Zappa songs, just go through his library.
Heidecker: Thanks, dad. Malkmus: Yeah, I’m 50, so I know what it’s like.
I’ve been through those low 40s. Heidecker: Well I’m glad you’re still out there making records.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chris Bosh’s search for that feeling he once had as an NBA star”

For nearly two years, when Chris Bosh glanced at a snippet of his old life – an NBA highlight of a winning 3, a gala with his ex-teammates gliding down the red carpet, resplendent in their invincibility – he’d quickly turn away, wincing from the torment of an old wound ripped open again.
“He’s still figuring out how to climb his way out. It has been almost a year since the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association ruled that Bosh’s clotting issues were career-ending, and it has been two years since he played professional basketball. Yet he continues to discuss the possibility of a return next season, provided he can find a willing partner to employ him. Bosh says”a few guys” have reached out to him about playing, but would not name them.
Bosh’s medical records with the Heat are sealed; even though other NBA teams have not had access to them, many have already reached their conclusion.
“ESPN contacted four general managers to gauge their interest in Bosh. All four said if Bosh was given a clean bill of health, there would be a clamor to sign him. But as one GM explains,”If he was healthy, he’d be playing for the Miami Heat right now.
Chris Bosh is a thoughtful, intelligent man, and he knows the odds are stacked against him.
In 2007, Bosh launched his own company, Max Deal Technologies, and rescued 800 domain names of his fellow NBA players from a cyber squatter.
Bosh, who turns 34 on March 24, says he trains regularly and still has plenty to offer an NBA team.
“I would love,” Bosh says,”to experience that feeling one more time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Super Bowl LII: The Eagles’ Culture Shift That Changed Everything”

Timmy Jernigan had been a member of the Eagles for about two hours when an unknown number lit up his phone.
Even after starting quarterback Carson Wentz went down with a torn left ACL in December, the Eagles rode their loaded roster all the way to Super Bowl LII. And with the talent lining the depth chart and the ethos that’s permeated the locker room, this run may only be the beginning.
In addition to ensuring that the Eagles’ core of young stars would remain intact for the foreseeable future, Roseman’s flurry of signings was designed to deliver a message to the locker room.
Kelly had committed the same cardinal sins that the Eagles had made four years prior, giving his team a mercenary feel in the process.
Pederson came to Philly with a decade and a half of pro football memories, and that wealth of experience was the first trait that many of his new players noticed when the Eagles hired him in January 2016.
When the Eagles signed Jeffery to a one-year deal, added Smith, and eventually traded for Jernigan and Darby, the players in house saw the moves as one final, massive swing to create a Super Bowl-caliber roster.
Eagles players say they found someone with a totally different vibe.
As the Eagles basked in the glow of the victory that sent them to the Super Bowl, Jenkins couldn’t help but think of the conversation he’d had with Robinson last spring.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why is pop culture obsessed with battles between good and evil?”

Virtually all our mass-culture narratives based on folklore have the same structure: good guys battle bad guys for the moral future of society.
Stories from an oral tradition never have anything like a modern good guy or bad guy in them, despite their reputation for being moralising.
The teams don’t represent the clash of two sets of values in the same way that modern good guys and bad guys do.
Once the idea of national values entered our storytelling, the peculiar moral physics underlying the phenomenon of good guys versus bad guys has been remarkably consistent.
Another peculiarity in the moral physics of good guys versus bad is that bad guys have no loyalty and routinely punish their own; whether it’s the Sheriff of Nottingham starving his own people or Darth Vader killing his subordinates, bad guys are cavalier with human life, and they rebuke their allies for petty transgressions.
Good guys work with rogues, oddballs and ex-bad guys, plus their battles often hinge on someone who was treated badly by the bad guys crossing over and becoming a good guy.
Stories about good guys and bad guys that are implicitly moral – in the sense that they invest an individual’s entire social identity in him not changing his mind about a moral issue – perversely end up discouraging any moral deliberation.
Watching Wonder Woman at the end of the 2017 movie give a speech about preemptively forgiving ‘humanity’ for all the inevitable offences of the Second World War, I was reminded yet again that stories of good guys and bad guys actively make a virtue of letting the home team in a conflict get away with any expedient atrocity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NBA International: Oral history of basketball’s global growth”

I saw Kyrie coming out to warm up, and that was a guy I was playing with on NBA 2K. So I saw him, and I was like, “Oh, there’s Kyrie.”
Most of the players coming here have done the research on the internet.
So when an player comes [to the NBA], we’ll be with the players through the draft, and the minute they go to their team, we work with the teams.
Everybody wants these players to succeed, it’s just a matter of doing it the right way.
Watching all those players in the NBA, I never thought about playing.
Probably it just bother him that a guy like me come from overseas, just trying to play hard, and did not care about the NBA stats that he had. I was just trying to be competitive.
We play so many games, sometimes I didn’t know what room I was in.
Because OK, a lot of players earn so much in this league, but everybody wants to play, everybody wants to win.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Good Place Season 2: Manny Jacinto Interview”

Ahead of The Good Place mid-season premiere, we spoke with Manny Jacinto on developing Jason’s voice, his love triangle with Janet and Tahani, and the grossest gag that Ted Danson has pulled on set.
For the actual audition, I was given sides as Jason Mendoza, so you can imagine that they weren’t the most intelligent.
I’ve had my fair share of those, so I guess you just have to go through the ranks before you get to be Jason Mendoza.
I remember one of our executive producer’s assistants was like, “Hey Manny, how much are you paying the writers to write all of this stuff about you?” Because it was always complimenting Jason as the hot guy or the attractive guy.
If you want to be incredibly specific, you rarely see the Asian guy kissing the Caucasian girl or even dynamics between Janet and Jason, where the female’s a bit taller.
Maybe Jason Mendoza would say, “I’m just happy to be pounding it out.” I don’t know.
Better Luck Tomorrow was about bad Asians, which is what Jason is.
Do you think Jason deserves to be in the Bad Place?Umm, no.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kylo Ren Is the Greatest Star Wars Villain of All Time”

If fans are unhappy with Star Wars: The Last Jedi, maybe it’s because Star Wars isn’t what it used to be.
The Last Jedi goes further: Luke Skywalker, our original Star Wars hero, is now a gloomy hermit who wishes the Jedi to end, while the saga’s latest villain Kylo Ren is a sympathetic antagonist whose actions seem almost rational.
Those same prequels attempted to rationalize Darth Vader by showing how innocent young Anakin Skywalker became a homicidal cyborg, but Lucas-far from the visionary he’d been when he first created Star Wars in 1977-bungled the transformation.
Kylo Ren, who started life in The Force Awakens as an emo Vader clone but has been made infinitely more complex by Rian Johnson’s latest installment, isn’t simply evil-he’s someone who’s driven to do evil by a disturbed mental state.
The key to Kylo is in the writing: Born Ben Solo to one of cinema’s most famous heroes, Kylo Ren is a great Star Wars villain-perhaps the greatest-because of how believably complicated he’s been drawn.
Kylo Ren, unlike those previous Star Wars villains who were tempted to a mysterious “Dark side” by an intangible power we as viewers find difficult to comprehend, is understandably-even relatably-bad. Darth Vader will always be more iconic: He’s a black knight with the unearthly baritone of James Earl Jones, the intimidating stature of David Prowse, and the sartorial style of a post-punk samurai.
That great Star Wars villain, so effective in the context of another time, wouldn’t ring as true were he introduced today.
Kylo Ren, on the other hand, is the perfect antagonist for our complex world-a world in which one person’s villain is another’s warped hero, in which we view morality on a spectrum, and in which we’re all too familiar with the concept of cause and effect, and how the “Good guys” sometimes inadvertently help to create their own enemies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Imminent Death-and Amazing Life-of the Funny Highlight Guy”

I speak of Brown’s old idol - the Funny Highlight Guy.
Where the network announcer was forced to adopt a stiff, impartial tone, the Funny Highlight Guy could be an unabashed fan.
For a time, Funny Highlight Guys seemed like guardians of a style of sports talk that still reigns today.
If local sports guys were vaguely “Wacky,” Funny Highlight Guys took the conceit a step further.
Funny Highlight Guys didn’t suddenly get less funny.
Where the Funny Highlight Guy was once sorta dangerous, he is now curiously above the fray.
The freedom the Funny Highlight Guy was once granted because he was doing sports has become somewhat confining.
As a comic archetype, the Funny Highlight Guy may be an endangered species.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Skinny Love: Why Players Across the NBA Are Slimming Down”

As the NBA shifts more and more toward speed and shooting over size and back-to-the-basket post-ups, players are changing their bodies to keep pace.
Abunassar, who has worked with the likes of Kevin Garnett, Kristaps Porzingis, and Kyle Lowry at his Las Vegas-based training facility, has seen more and more players willing to prioritize lean muscle and strength over bulk and size.
At NBA media days across the league, veteran NBA players showed up sporting slimmed-down physiques.
When they do cut weight, more often than not NBA players are showing it off on their popular social media streams.
With defenses switching more and more on screens, thus forcing players to match up with a wider range of positions and sizes, power forwards and centers are starting to slim-fit their offseason regimens.
That’s because you can find more and more NBA players doing nontraditional exercise classes such as yoga and cycling, or stepping into a squared ring.
Along with photos of Chris Paul and LeBron James putting in work in the weight room, a scroll through NBA Instagram also turns up Rudy Gobert and Shabazz Napier in the boxing ring or players at a pilates or yoga class.
Every offseason, Lang Whitaker and his high school friend Matt Colwell noticed the same reports in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution of basketball players getting more muscular.

The orginal article.