Summary of “The Untold Story of the Vegetable Peeler That Changed the World”

Created by Smart Design, in conjunction with OXO International’s launch in 1990, it raised the bar for accessible consumer products, and changed the way kitchen tools were designed forever.
Nearly three decades after its release, it maintains 4.8 stars out of 5 on Amazon yet still costs under $10. How many consumer products are truly that lasting? It’s why the peeler won our inaugural Timeless Design award as part of Innovation by Design 2018.
Over the years, abridged versions of the peeler’s origin story have been shared in design museums and even business schools.
We couldn’t design something for people just with special needs, because it would have to be in a special catalog, and no one is able to have access to those products.
We had to design a handle that would work for various uses.
Manufacturing the Peeler The design was on the right track, but it was extremely difficult to be made.
We’ve been living this for so long-but the OXO line was universal design, or inclusive design, long before either had a name.
We put the endorsement onto the package, but we took that off later because we realized, one of the things that’s really important for inclusive design is that the product isn’t stigmatizing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A history of the oxo good grips peeler”

One of the most important moments in the history of industrial design occurred in 1990, when the kitchen brand OXO defied the traditional, knuckle-bleeding tools of culinary tradition, and released its Good Grips line.
To this day, these tools are the best articulation of the potential of inclusive design: Developed for people with arthritis, Good Grips had thick rubbery handles that were also better tools for everyone to use.
Created by Smart Design, in conjunction with OXO International’s launch in 1990, it raised the bar for accessible consumer products, and changed the way kitchen tools were designed forever.
Nearly three decades after its release, it maintains 4.8 stars out of 5 on Amazon yet still costs under $10. How many consumer products are truly that lasting? It’s why the peeler won our inaugural Timeless Design award as part of Innovation by Design 2018.
Over the years, abridged versions of the peeler’s origin story have been shared in design museums and even business schools.
We couldn’t design something for people just with special needs, because it would have to be in a special catalog, and no one is able to have access to those products.
We had to design a handle that would work for various uses.
We’ve been living this for so long-but the OXO line was universal design, or inclusive design, long before either had a name.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is Why You Can’t Unlock A Car Door If Someone Is Trying To Open It At The Same Time”

The person inside the car is attempting to open the door lock at the same time you’re pulling the handle to open the door.
Why can’t you pull the door handle while the door is being unlocked? Why would such a fundamental mechanism of a car have such a frustrating flaw? Well, the answer is simple mechanics.
The most basic explanation possible is that pulling on the handle engages a little mechanical piece inside the door, a piece that bumps into another mechanical piece triggered by someone else trying to unlock the door.
As for why you can’t open the door from the inside when it’s locked: When you lock the car from the inside or outside, the bracket goes down and rotates the lock link into a certain position.
So there you go: On the Beetle, opening the car door at the same time that someone’s trying to unlock the car simply won’t work because of that nipple/finger interaction and the lock link/handle link interaction.
The reason why you can’t open and unlock the door simultaneously is quite simple: As soon as you’ve pulled the door handle on a locked car, you’ve put Link C where Link D needs to be in order to unlock the car.
On the Oldsmobile, the problem is that pulling the handle to open the door moves linkages to a spot where the latch release mechanism is trying to move to unlock the car.
It’s incredibly complicated considering most people hardly spend much time thinking about automotive latches, but we had to get to the bottom of why so many have “Dorked” their cars trying to open the door while someone was locking it.

The orginal article.