Summary of “Primary care startup Parsley embraces functional medicine”

My Parsley Health experience started with a kindly bloodwork technician coming to me to draw a sample, pack it in his duffle bag, and drive away to the lab.
Parsley Health is meant to foster a close, long-term doctor-patient relationship where both parties are committed to addressing the underlying reasons of health problems.
Amid bearded, juice-slugging entrepreneurs on their laptops, I settle into the Parsley Health “Office,” located within WeWork Playa Vista, California.
In 2013, while advising several health startups, Berzin saw an industry that was ripe for her vision of what medicine could ultimately look like.
In 2015, Berzin launched Parsley Health with just one doctor: herself.
Moving forward, Parsley Health intends to open more clinics across the country, as well as beef up its online content platform.
The biggest challenge, says Berzin, is educating the public about the benefits of functional health.
With Parsley Health, membership equates to a little under $5 a day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Watch your step: why the 10,000 daily goal is built on bad science”

They concluded that the average Japanese person took between 3,500 and 5,000 steps a day, and that if these people increased their daily step count to 10,000, they could decrease their risk of coronary artery disease.
While the World Health Organization, the American Heart Foundation and the US Department of Health & Human Services have all gradually adopted 10,000 steps as a daily activity recommendation, in recent years the veracity of this number has been increasingly called into question.
Most of the scientific studies that have been conducted to try to test whether 10,000 steps a day is optimal for health are themselves relatively arbitrary.
“So, the study might find that 10,000 helps you lose more weight than 5,000 and then the media see it and report: ‘Yes, you should go with 10,000 steps,’ but that could be because the study has only tested two numbers. It didn’t test 8,000, for example, and it didn’t test 12,000.”
Scientists who have attempted to calculate an exact number of steps that equate to the public health guidelines of 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day, have found that we should perhaps aim for a minimum of 7,500 steps.
Scientists who have studied the Amish people in rural Canada, who use no motorised forms of transport, have found that they average 14,000-18,000 steps a day, while a study of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes from the mid-90s found that those who averaged about 19,000 steps a day had far better outcomes compared with those who remained largely sedentary.
Researchers are currently conducting studies to see whether people who take 10,000 steps a day merely by pottering around their house achieve the same health benefits as those who do so by brisk walking or playing sport.
“More recently, scientists have started looking at cadence, which is the idea of step rate or frequency of stepping,” Tudor-Locke says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jackie MacMullan on OCD ADHD medication and marijuana in NBA mental health”

The state of mental health in the NBA Mental health in the NBA’s black community To medicate or not? A difficult decision Behind the anxiety and anger of an NBA ref The future of mental health in the NBA. Eight times.
By middle school, Larkin’s symptoms were worsening, so his mother found him a mental health professional, who recommended an antidepressant medication to help him cope.
“I’m not depressed,” Larkin said to his mother.”Am I?”. He tried the pills. They helped alleviate some of his OCD symptoms, but he says they also robbed him of his drive and his energy, qualities that separated him as a budding basketball star.”The medication flat-lined me,” Larkin says.
The stigma of mental health is one thing; that stigma increases tenfold when their peers discover they’re on “Meds.” It’s a gamble that some players don’t believe is worth taking, because it could affect their ability to be employed by a skeptical coach or general manager.”I’ve been on and off medication my whole life,” explains one NBA star, who debated identifying himself for this story but ultimately chose to remain anonymous.
“I’d like to think it doesn’t matter, but I’m not sure that’s true when free agency comes around. I’m choosing to keep my life private because I don’t need the s– on social media. It’s hard enough already.”.”DR. WILLIAM PARHAM, the Los Angeles-based psychologist who was hired by the players’ union to oversee the growing mental health crisis in the NBA, acknowledges some mental health issues may require medication.
“But too often, medication is treating the symptoms, not the real issues,” Parham says. While the population of NBA players with OCD is minuscule, the debate over medication also pertains to anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, which, according to John Lucas, the Houston Rockets assistant coach who runs a wellness and aftercare substance-abuse recovery program for athletes, is rampant in the NBA.”I have so many guys from the NBA who were put on ADHD medication, and they didn’t want to be on it,” Lucas says.
Since Sanders’ suspension, the NBA has shored up its mental health policy and sent an internal memo to all of its teams on May 31 with suggested guidelines that include: securing the player’s privacy regarding his mental health; retaining a professional with experience in clinical mental health issues; identifying a psychiatrist who will be readily available to players; and providing mental health awareness materials to the team.
“We need to create a nonjudgmental space where there is no place for the opinion that your way of thinking is better than everyone else’s. If a player is self-medicating because that’s what makes them feel better, or at least that’s what they think, we have to find a way to provide them alternatives that are collaborative and confidential.”. Lucas says it’s imperative for NBA personnel to do a better job of identifying players with mental health issues sooner and to be more proactive in convincing them to seek counseling.”The guy who’s on a road trip and isolates himself is the one suffering from depression,” Lucas says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Where a Woman Lives Can Affect Her Pregnancy”

Preterm babies are more likely to develop health problems in the future, and complications from preterm births are the leading cause of death for children under five.
“We’re talking about the impacts of racism and poverty and how our public systems do or do not mediate those impacts on people’s health status,” Captiman says.
Rose Mary Rahn, the division manager of Public Health Nursing in Fresno’s Department of Public Health, asks, “How do we tackle that the health care providers are not being culturally competent?” Cultural competence or culturally responsive care are workplace euphemisms for non-racist services that meet patients’ social, cultural, and linguistic needs.
In a survey conducted by First 5 Fresno, a public organization that invests in direct health, housing, and education services for young children and their families, researchers measured how moms felt during their perinatal period, the period of time just before, during, and after birth.
Joe Prado, the division manager of community health for the Department of Public Health in Fresno County, says that for all providers of care to become truly respectful and understanding of diversity, it would require a system-wide approach to train on competency.
A mother’s mental health is connected to how her child develops, adapts, and learns, according to Dr. Cassandra Joubert, the director of the Central California Children’s Institute.
In the ten years following the establishment of Black Infant Health’s Fresno office in 1991, the county’s black infant mortality rate decreased by two thirds, from 37 to 11 per 1,000 births.
Rosemary Rahn of the Department of Public Health says she believes that the reduction in budget for maternal and child health led to an increase in adverse birth outcomes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Obesity in America 2018: 7 charts that explain why it’s so easy to gain weight”

“The food environment is a strong predictor of how we eat,” says Scott Kahan, director of the National Center for Weight and Wellness and a faculty member at both Johns Hopkins and George Washington University.
“And in America, the unhealthiest foods are the tastiest foods, the cheapest foods, the largest-portion foods, the most available foods, the most fun foods.”
We’re told to eat nutrient-dense foods like broccoli and Brussels sprouts instead of energy-dense foods like soda and french fries, yet there aren’t enough nutrient-dense foods to go around.
7) We’re bombarded with ads for unhealthy food Sugary, oily foods are engineered to be consumed often and in big portions.
A 2006 report by the Institute of Medicine helped establish how the rise in obesity among kids corresponds to increasing marketing of unhealthy food and drinks to them.
The UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity found that in 2014, food companies spent $1.28 billion to advertise snack foods on television, in magazines, in coupons, and, increasingly, on the internet and mobile devices.
How the food environment could support healthful eating instead With the expansion of our waistlines over the past 30 years, the factors in our environment that promote obesity – some of them outlined here – have come into focus.
There’s ample evidence that many people can’t make sense of the traditional food labels on the back of food packages: they too often require math, and some knowledge of nutrition.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Women’s ‘Health-Care Gaslighting’ Went Mainstream”

In her 23 years practicing medicine, Sherif has received a lot of thank-you notes from women she’s treated-and “They don’t say ‘Thank you for saving my life’ or ‘Thank you for that great diagnosis,'” she says.
“They say, ‘Thank you for listening to me.’ Or ‘I know we couldn’t get to the bottom of it, but thank you for being there.'” So Sherif sees a common theme in the recent flurry of high-profile expressions of disappointment in women’s reproductive health care, feminist protests against President Donald Trump, and the #MeToo movement: All three, she says, result from women feeling that their complaints, concerns, and objections aren’t being listened to.
Ottey believes women’s increasing candor about their health- and health care-related frustrations can be traced back to the advent of social media.
Ottey describes her own struggle to finally get a diagnosis and a treatment plan for PCOS in 2008 as one that made her feel “Absolutely alone,” but in the years since, she says, she’s seen women with similar conditions and complaints find and support each other on platforms like Facebook and Twitter.
Ottey’s social-media strength-in-numbers theory is borne out in The Bleeding Edge, too: Women whose health deteriorated after getting the Essure birth-control device implanted eventually created an advocacy campaign after finding each other through a Facebook group launched in 2011.
Thirty-five thousand women had joined by the time The Bleeding Edge was filmed.
Angie Firmalino, the Facebook group’s founder, remembers being surprised at how many women quickly joined the group, despite it being a project she’d started just so she could warn her female friends about the device.
“We became a support group for each other,” Firmalino says, as a montage of selfie videos women have posted to the group page play onscreen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Which Water Is Best For Health? Hint: Don’t Discount The Tap”

Which Water Is Best For Health? Hint: Don’t Discount The Tap : The Salt Scientists weigh in on whether Americans really need to pay for alkalinized, mineralized, or purified water from filters or bottles.
As it turns out, scientists say that most tap water in the U.S. is just as good as the water in bottles or streaming out of a filter.
U.S. tap water is regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, which sets safety thresholds for the amount of microorganisms, chemicals and other contaminants in the water.
If you want to investigate the safety of your water further, this tool can show you if your water is in compliance with federal drinking water standards.
Say you live somewhere with safe water and want to run your tap water through a filter before drinking it.
At the end of the day, if you are trying to improve your health, help the planet, and save your wallet, filling up a reusable water bottle with tap water is a good way to start.
Faebian Bastiman, the chief technical officer of the high-tech water filter company Mitte, featured in the video mentioned above, argues that the water delivered to your house only has to legally comply with not having “Significant amounts of bad stuff in it.” He also says municipal governments don’t regulate the pipes inside your house or apartment complex.
The University of Michigan’s Batterman notes that water utilities design and operate their systems to maintain a residual level of disinfectants to be in the water at the tap that should prevent microbial growth or biofilms.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Health Insurers Are Vacuuming Up Details About You”

With little public scrutiny, the health insurance industry has joined forces with data brokers to vacuum up personal details about hundreds of millions of Americans, including, odds are, many readers of this story.
Up front, the prime real estate belonged to the big guns in health data: The booths of Optum, IBM Watson Health and LexisNexis stretched toward the ceiling, with flat screen monitors and some comfy seating.
Patient advocates are skeptical health insurers have altruistic designs on people’s personal information.
The Affordable Care Act prohibits insurers from denying people coverage based on pre-existing health conditions or charging sick people more for individual or small group plans.
The Trump administration is promoting short-term health plans, which do allow insurers to deny coverage to sick patients.
At the IBM Watson Health booth, Kevin Ruane, a senior consulting scientist, told me that the company surveys 80,000 Americans a year to assess lifestyle, attitudes and behaviors that could relate to health care.
Actuaries calculate health care risks and help set the price of premiums for insurers.
She points to a study by the analytics company SAS, which worked in 2012 with an unnamed major health insurance company to predict a person’s health care costs using 1,500 data elements, including the investments and types of cars people owned.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Entrepreneurs Who Made It Their Mission to Lower Health Care Costs”

In 2016, the U.S. spent a staggering $3.2 trillion, or almost 18% of its GDP, on health care – that’s $10,000 per person, twice as much as any other country in the industrialized world.
Innovation has the power to ratchet down U.S. costs quite dramatically over the next decade.
Forus placed its bets on the lower cost CEMOS technology which the mobile phone industry embraced.
The Stasis solution costs 15% of competitors’ prices.
Stasis brought down costs dramatically by shifting the muscle inside the machine from hardware to software.
Purpose-driven leaders understand that providing care for the poor alongside the higher paying customers does lead to lower costs and better quality for both – a win-win formula.
The U.S. must contain health care costs, yet several factors make it difficult to adopt radical delivery innovations like the ones we outline in this article: a fee-for-service reimbursement model, malpractice suits, and lack of price transparency, to name a few.
Even under the current regulatory environments, we found health care providers such as Iora Health and University of Mississippi Medical Center that engage in breakthrough health care delivery innovations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Undercooked: An Expensive Push to Save Lives and Protect”

“Millions of lives could be saved and improved,” Clinton said when the alliance’s formation was announced, adding that clean stoves could be as transformative as vaccines.
“Maybe there will be that magic stove eventually,” Smith said of the long push behind improved biomass stoves.
Cookstoves seemed like an affordable and effective answer to the “Killer in the Kitchen.” The appliances, some as small as a Crock-Pot and costing as little as $25 – gained wider currency in December 2009, when The New Yorker magazine ran an article by Burkhard Bilger subtitled “The quest for a stove that can save the world.” The article centered on “Stove Camp” – an annual retreat in Oregon at which the engineers and entrepreneurs at the heart of the burgeoning cookstove movement refined their designs.
The Alliance’s own records make clear that of the tens of millions of stoves its members sold or distributed, only 2 million were biomass stoves that met the standard it set for “Clean.” And that standard, while a great improvement over an open, unvented fire, was still akin to secondhand smoke produced by burning 40 cigarettes an hour in a home.
Patrick, the Alliance communications official, said making sure stoves are actually being “Adopted” into everyday use is hard and expensive, but that he hoped the Alliance would have numbers on how many stoves are regularly being used by 2020.
The Alliance’s goal now, he said, is to get people the best stoves possible and encourage families to use improved stoves as a substitute for old-fashioned cooking fires instead of a supplement to them.
The Alliance’s website and newsletters feature more propane stoves, which make up the vast majority of appliances that meet standards for being “Clean.” The charitable foundation of Shell Oil Corporation, a major Alliance supporter, has shifted in its own efforts to underwriting more pilot projects involving propane stoves.
Priyadarshini Karve – a noted Indian designer of low-emission stoves, including the now-abandoned stoves in the village of Nandal – said she’d focused too much on funders’ fuel-efficiency standards and not enough on what actual women cooks sought in a stove.

The orginal article.