Summary of “Has the Mystery of Skyjacker D.B. Cooper Finally Been Solved?”

Tom Colbert’s journey to track down Cooper led him to an elaborate theory of collusion involving the FBI and CIA. For several days in May 2013, the Hollywood sting operation surveilled the grandfather at the condominium he sometimes shared with his ex-wife in the tony San Diego district of Bankers Hill.
Colbert entered the Coopersphere in 2011, when a source tipped him off that some cash discovered near an Oregon riverbank in 1980 was planted there in a scheme by the skyjacker to mislead authorities.
Rackstraw spent the next several decades living a quiet life, although Colbert claims his inquiry found that, privately, he would brag to family members and friends that he was Cooper.
In July 2016, three years after he ambushed Rackstraw, Colbert had amassed what he describes as 95 pieces of “Physical, forensic, direct, testimonial, foundational, hearsay and documentary evidence.” Unable to get his own documentary off the ground without Rackstraw’s commitment, Colbert agreed to appear on a History Channel special about the Cooper phenomenon called D.B. Cooper: Case Closed? which followed former assistant FBI director Tom Fuentes as he sorted through a number of suspects who’d gained traction over the decades.
The agent directly overseeing the Cooper case, Curtis Eng, explained that he’d reviewed the evidence independently amassed by Colbert and that “It didn’t prove that his suspect was Dan Cooper.” Late in the program, a stewardess who’d dealt most directly with the skyjacker was shown old photos and video of Rackstraw.
Colbert’s linked goals – proving that Rackstraw was Cooper and profiting from it by selling his project about the pursuit – had been foiled by the History Channel fiasco.
According to Sherwood’s cryptography, the results of which Colbert publicized, one decoded letter included the phrasing IF CATCH I AM CIA. Colbert contends he’s established evidence that Rackstraw was a longtime CIA asset and now believes that collusion explains why the FBI stopped looking into him back in the 1970s as well as why, after the charade of keeping up an investigation for decades, it closed the case when his team grew too hot on its tail.
Then he contacted Colbert with the results of his inquiry: “I’m poor as dirt,” the man wrote Colbert of his obsession with the hunt for Cooper.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Talented Mr. Khater”

Where was Youssef? Late one night, sitting at the Lucite desk in her loft apartment, BerrĂ­os stumbled upon an article online about how Youssef Khater had organized a 24-hour race outside Copenhagen in 2009.
The following day, half an hour turned into three as Youssef led him on a circuitous path around Santiago and eventually to the outskirts, where they hiked to a ritzy hilltop suburb where Youssef said the lawyer worked.
After dropping behind to tie his shoe, Youssef suddenly charged Rayner, swinging his stick savagely at the Brit’s head. The blow missed by mere inches.
Startled, Rayner rushed headlong into Youssef, yelling; as the two men tumbled into each other, Rayner cracked his head against a rock.
A photographer who had initially introduced Youssef to Medina and Krauss, he was furious at Youssef for besmirching the reputation of the Palestinian people.
“I saw the real Youssef Khater for the first time.”
Youssef’s attorney a lawyer named Roberto Kong, hoped to win him a suspended sentence, on account of Youssef’s being a first-time offender in Chile, allowing him to walk free.
There were some peculiarities-like the time he remarked that he could kill her in the jungle and nobody would find her, or the time he pressed a pillow to her face in bed until she gasped for air, or the time she noticed that the name on his passport was Youssef, not Joseph-but when Taylor asked questions, Youssef countered that she had no sense of humor.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Book of Prince”

On January 29, 2016, Prince summoned me to his home, Paisley Park, to tell me about a book he wanted to write.
A member of Prince’s team later told me that, over the years, Prince had paid for enough rooms there to have bought the place four times over.
Prince’s team sent us an assignment: we were to submit personal statements to Prince about our relationship to his music and why we thought we could do the job.
In the early eighties, Prince and Matthews had fallen in love, and Prince had tapped her to front the group Vanity 6.
After his mother remarried, in 1967 or 1968, Prince went to live with his father, a day he described as the happiest of his life.
Prince wanted to reserve the right to pull the book from shelves, permanently, at any time in the future, should he ever feel that it no longer reflected who he was.
Prince had me scoot in beside him and cupped my ear.
One of the people closest to Prince told detectives that, after Prince’s first show in Atlanta, he’d said that he “Enjoyed sleeping more these days,” and that maybe it meant he’d done all he was supposed to do on Earth; waking life was “Incredibly boring.” I found those words wrenching when I read them, a disavowal of everything we’d talked about.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Matthew Cox: The True-Crime Writer in the Prison Yard”

Updated on July 19, 2019 at 5:05 p.m. ET.Last April, I received an odd email from a man named Matthew Cox.
It called Cox and Hauck “The Bonnie and Clyde of mortgage fraud,” deemed Cox “a master con artist,” and detailed his and Hauck’s “Six-state crime spree.” As he read on, the story grew uglier.
The self-published book, Once a Gun Runner, has been the subject of protracted legal battles among all three men, with Cox suing Diveroli and Reback, Reback and Diveroli suing Cox, and all of them suing Warner Bros.
Once word got out that there was a writer in cellblock B4, other guys would sidle up to Cox in the yard, urging him to tell their story, or their buddy’s story.
They’d meet in the library, or in the prison yard, or over tater tots in the chow hall, and Cox would ask probing questions, taking notes in his own ersatz version of a reporter’s notebook: a sheaf of loose-leaf paper stapled to a rectangle of cardboard.
Cox could conduct phone interviews only in the 15-minute increments the prison system allowed, and then only if the person accepted his collect call.
At the 2013 sentence-reduction hearing, Cox’s public defender said that Cox had “Done more, given more information to the government, than any case that I have ever had in 20 years.” He’d cooperated with the FBI; given newspaper interviews about his dealings with a corrupt member of the Tampa city council; and contributed to a fraud course that was used to help mortgage brokers and loan officers spot criminal activity.
“There’s all these girls on YouTube that have done literally 45-minute videos on their favorite podcasts about true crime,” Cox told me, his eyes widening.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Atavist Magazine”

Of Taylor’s three sons, only Josh maintained a strong connection with his dad. Taylor found work as a laborer, doing construction and installing home security systems.
Taylor could barely get his truck and trailer off the road. “Everything reeked of failure,” Taylor later wrote in a letter.
According to Taylor, Knight told him that the gun had been used in a murder; Taylor wasn’t sure if that was the truth or just a scare tactic.
Knight then gestured toward Blondie, Taylor’s diesel pickup, demanding that Taylor give him one of the truck’s two batteries, as payback or a peace offering.
Taylor later said that Knight pulled the mini revolver out of his right back pocket and announced that he was going to kill Taylor.
After berating Taylor for several minutes, Knight started to walk away from the trailer, still in possession of Taylor’s phone.
Bryson handcuffed Taylor, then Tague went over to look at Knight, who was dead. Taylor seemed eager to talk, chattering about how Knight had been threatening him for days, explaining that he’d been calling 911 but nobody ever came.
Taylor had admitted to the shooting, and thanks to the security cameras, Irish had video of Taylor shooting Knight in the back.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Nugrybauti”

Do-or-Die Dan took place in the immediate post-war years, so there was still a risk he’d get into the war.
A bunch of the guys on the night shift, like the man he’d learn to call Do-or-Die Dan, were also veterans.
Eventually the foreman summoned Dan to his office with a final warning: Miss another Friday shift and Dan was gone.
“I’ll take you in my car.” He walked Dan out to the parking lot, then left him there a moment while he went back to the hangar for his wallet.
Benny had seen Dan scalding his hand in the bathroom that night.
Dan came back to work with a story.
Joe, the new custodian, asked Dan how he’d had the nerve to bust his own hand like that.
“What would Do-or-Die Dan do if he couldn’t find his way out of the woods?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Heart Still Stands”

Fallis threw some clothes in a bag and left within the hour.
Fallis slipped a necklace of Yellow Wood’s over Young’s head. “She’s not here, so I’m here. I’m here to stand beside you,” Young recalled Fallis saying.
One day, Fallis was put in plastic handcuffs and charged with disorderly conduct.
In a girlish, exuberant voice, Fallis announced, “Auntie, I’m in love.”
The man who’d tackled her, Thadius Schmit, a cop from South Dakota, said that he’d arrested Fallis for “Being an instigator and acting disorderly.” Although no one was hurt when the gun went off, the state’s criminal complaint against Fallis alleged that she’d been trying to kill an officer.
Supporters began referring to Fallis as a new Leonard Peltier, referencing the AIM activist sentenced in 1977 to two consecutive life terms for shooting federal agents on the Pine Ridge reservation, where Fallis was born.
Police officers present at her arrest wrote in reports that, after the gun went off, Fallis laughed and said things like “All pigs deserve to die” and “If I wanted to kill you, I would have shot you in the head.” Fallis described these accusations as “Totally false.” If it sounded like she was laughing, it was only because she was gasping for air after her gas mask was yanked off.
“He’s brought me so much kindness and unconditional love,” Fallis told me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Mind of a Hurricane Chaser”

Outside, Hurricane Maria churns over Humacao, Puerto Rico, nearly a Category 5 storm, winds moving at the speed of a jet at takeoff.
Still, a series of absolutely catastrophic hurricane seasons for the U.S. have changed how we think about these storms-and perhaps about the kind of person who would spend their life chasing them.
In 1976, Hurricane Belle swept over the Long Island house where six-year-old Morgerman was sleeping.
“It’s a ‘new era’ of hurricanes,” CNN reported after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans: “Hurricanes aren’t behaving like many of us are used to them behaving. They’re bigger and meaner, and more numerous than many people have seen.”
Max Mayfield, then-director of the National Hurricane Center, testified before a Senate subcommittee in October 2005 that these destructive new storms were the result of “Natural fluctuations,” and “Not enhanced substantially by global warming.” Another NHC meteorologist assured the senators that the effect of climate change on hurricanes would be “Minimal for the foreseeable future.”
In the past, he’d occasionally tried to deliberately place himself in the path of a hurricane.
The first time was in 1991, when he was still in college; he’d taken a train to Rhode Island in hopes of catching up to Hurricane Bob.
A 2018 report in the Los Angeles Times detailed how the data Morgerman recorded during Hurricane Odile ended up disqualifying Mexico from a desperately needed insurance-bond payout.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How an Olympic Hopeful Robbed 26 Banks on His Bike”

Nobody in town was surprised when Tom was selected to attend the Olympic training camp in Colorado Springs in 1987.
Tom received massages, soaked in hot tubs, had his bike fine-tuned by mechanics, and was subjected to a battery of testing to measure everything from body fat to oxygen efficiency.
Every morning at the YMCA, Tom worked through the Olympic strength-training regimen to build muscle mass.
On March 24, Tom robbed two banks: the Southwest Community Bank in Encinitas and the U.S. Bank in Carlsbad. “D-d-do you want the s-s-second drawer, too?” the 20-year-old blond U.S. Bank teller had nervously stuttered.
In the summer of 2001, Tom joined a club cycling team run by Higher Gear, a bike shop in Wilmette, not far from the LaSalle Bank in Highland Park, one of the nine suburban Chicago banks he had robbed at this point.
One day, the bike shop’s manager mentioned to Tom that a local rider was selling a used Steelman, a 12-speed road bike built in 1996.
“Uh, yeah, so your bike was stolen from me,” Tom said cryptically.
Ever since he’d traveled to Colorado for the Olympic training camp, Tom kept thinking that his life should be momentous enough to carry him far away from Libertyville.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Atavist Magazine”

In a report dated July 18, 1994, the test’s administrator wrote, “I advised Mr. Woodworth that he had lied to me and was responsible for shooting the Robertsons. I told him it wasn’t a question of who any longer, but rather a question of why.” Mark nodded, but when asked directly why he’d committed the crime, he answered, “I didn’t.” The administrator pressed him, reminding Mark that “If he was a cold-blooded murderer and found guilty of capital murder, he could be taken and executed for the killing, but if the shooting and death were accidental, that was another situation altogether.”
Deister consented to a deposition and, according to the paralegal’s notes, said he “Had done nothing wrong” and “Never had a doubt that Mark Woodworth was guilty.” Deister continued, “Mark should have just quit after the first trial. He would probably already be out by now.”
The records had never been produced at Mark’s trials to contradict Rochelle’s testimony about Brandon and call her credibility as a witness into question.
“I’m going to show you what’s been marked as Exhibit 13,” Ramsey said, sliding over the portion of Rochelle’s interrogation from shortly after the murder in which she’d conceded that Brandon had been violent with her.
“Sure, there were a couple of fights, but they got along-they just disagreed about Brandon.” The sisters said the notion that Rochelle might have been involved in the shooting, which Mark’s lawsuit explicitly suggested, was baseless.
Caleb’s sister, Casey, had dated Brandon around the time of Mark’s second trial.
If, as Ramsey has argued, Calvert, Deister, Lyndel, and others framed Mark, what was their motive? A frank if misguided desire to finish the case and bring closure to the Robertsons? A financial agreement benefiting certain individuals at Mark’s existential expense, and that of his family, too? Something more sinister, like a cover-up to protect the real killer?
Brandon, Ramsey, accusations, and court hearings didn’t seem to be on Mark’s mind as he walked through his home’s unfinished rooms.

The orginal article.