Summary of “Want to minimize jet lag? Here’s what the doctors order.”

Caldwell explains that while our bodies are able to adjust to about one time zone change per day, jet lag sets in when we cross three or more of them, because it wreaks havoc on our circadian rhythms.
Work to align your sleep schedule with your destination: Because your body can naturally adjust to about only one time-zone change per day, you’ll want to manually adjust your schedule, and that means changing your bedtime to be better mesh with the destination to which you’re traveling.
To be ready to hit the ground running when she arrives, she starts adjusting her bedtime two to five days in advance to match the local time at her destination.
Caldwell creates a timetable so that, at a glance, he can see what time it is at home and at his destination and plan accordingly.
“Similarly, bright light exposure after waking up also will help advance our biological clock to suit the new time zone.” When traveling westward, he adds, the biological clock is ahead of the latest time zone.
It provides a brief plan to avoid jet lag, sharing the ideal time to get to sleep and the ideal time for light exposure.
“Taking a very small dose helps to recalibrate its release so that it is in sync with the time zone of your destination,” says Kern Singh, a spine surgeon in Chicago with Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush.
Turn your wine into water: Having a glass of wine or two on the plane may sound tempting, but it could negatively impact your sleep, which could worsen jet lag, says Quay Snyder, president and CEO of Aviation Medicine Advisory Service of Centennial, Colo., who advises pilots on staying in top condition while in the air.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Women Can Get What They Want in a Negotiation”

How common is Tara’s situation? Research suggests that 20% of women never negotiate at all.
If women see negotiation as a chore, they either don’t negotiate or do so in ways that can hurt the outcome.
Based on a growing body of research on gender in negotiations, combined with burgeoning research on positivity and mindfulness, we offer five strategies that can help women both choose to engage and perform more effectively in negotiations.
Prior to a negotiation, women can use positive priming to increase positive emotions, resulting in greater creativity, openness, and willingness to collaborate, all of which are essential to successful negotiation.
This can increase the likelihood that women choose to enter a negotiation to begin with.
A greater awareness of the emotions of others during a negotiation can help women better understand their needs and interests, which can make it easier to find integrative solutions.
The ability to reframe the negotiation – even one with the goal of increasing one’s total compensation – into one where the other party also benefits is particularly important for women.
In the case of salary negotiation, women would help themselves by looking at the total compensation package, which might include paid time off, the hiring of an assistant, or a commuting allowance – all of which have monetary value – as opposed to salary alone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Help Your Spouse Cope with Work Stress”

How can you help your partner cope? What’s the best thing to say when your partner starts complaining – and what should you not say? Is there a way to help them see things differently? And how can you set boundaries so that home can be a haven again?
What’s more, she adds, helping your partner learn to cope with stress helps you cope with it better, too.
“When your partner starts complaining, don’t say, ‘Oh, you think your day was bad, listen to what I had to deal with!’ It doesn’t help anything.” Stress endurance is not a competition.
“So if you get a sense that your partner is misreading a situation at work or heading in the wrong direction, you need to say something.” He suggests “Asking good questions that will broaden” your significant other’s perspective.
To wit, you need to “Notice your partner’s attitude, mood, and patterns,” and help them reflect on their career and professional path.
“There need to be times of day where you both put down your mobile phones; you need to draw a distinction of when a work device can be used at home.” He also suggests helping your partner “Develop a good end-of-work habit.” It could be encouraging them to listen to an audiobook or music or just take a walk at the end of the workday.
Expect to be the sole repository for your spouse’s work stress.
Jessica McClain, a public auditor based in Washington, D.C., helps her husband manage his work stress – and vice versa.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Email Someone You Haven’t Talked to in Forever”

At some point in our careers, we find ourselves in need of help from others – whether it’s to make a direct connection to a hiring manager, to gather information on a prospective client company, or to get help in learning about a new industry quickly.
As if reaching out to ask for help wasn’t hard enough, what do you do when the person whose help you need is someone you haven’t spoken to in over a decade?
When it would help you to ask for help from someone you’ve lost touch with, you don’t need to feel awkward.
The last thing any of us want is to be seen as the person who reaches out to someone only when we need something from them.
By viewing your request in the context of a larger, reciprocal relationship and asking how you can be helpful to the other person, you help to build the relationship.
By saying something like, “Please let me know how I can be helpful to you, either now or in the future,” you open the door for them to reach out for help when they need it.
Regardless of whether your contact is able to help you, letting him or her know in a short note that you appreciate their reply and are glad to be back in touch can leave both parties feeling good about the interaction.
Reaching out to those that we’ve lost touch with doesn’t have to be a huge hurdle to asking for help when we need it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are you a leader or a manager? Here’s the difference”

If you have a management title, you may think of yourself as a leader.
There are some stark differences between how leaders and managers motivate people toward common goals.
Halelly Azulay, founder and CEO of TalentGrow LLC and author of Employee Development on a Shoestring, says the main difference between leaders and managers is that leaders attract a following who believe in their vision, while managers have people who do work for them without necessarily any intrinsic buy-in to a particular vision.
“The primary distinction between a manager and a leader is that you don’t have to hold a management job title to be a leader, and a leader doesn’t have to have formal power over direct reports,” says Perkins.
While not all managers are leaders, both argue managers will be more successful if they develop their leadership skills.
These small steps can help you hone your emotional intelligence and help you become a better leader.
Being an effective leader requires listening to feedback.
Instead of telling people what to do, leaders ask for input from their team and create an engaged workforce who feel that their input makes a difference.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon, Airbnb, and Asos are all investing in this one simple design i”

Service design has been one of the greatest disruptive forces in our lives over the past 20 years.
I have worked in service design for roughly half of its life as an industry, and I’ve seen every kind of service.
As the home for all of the U.K. central government services, Gov.uk has to deal with millions of users trying to do complex tasks for the first time, so they recently changed the architecture of the site to enable users to find the task they were trying to complete, and navigate the various forms and guidance that are required to complete that service in a simple step-by-step guide-like learning to drive.
The service must clearly explain what is needed from the user in order to complete the service and what they can expect from the service provider in return.
The service must work in a way that does not unnecessarily expose a user to the internal structures of the organization providing the service.
If there’s an established custom for your service that benefits a user, your service should conform to that custom.
A service should not use language that assumes any prior knowledge of the service from the user.
Lou Downe is a designer, writer, and director of design and service standards for the U.K. Government.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Many poor kids who get into college don’t enroll. Here’s why.”

Every spring, millions of students graduate high school with every intention of attending college.
Research by Benjamin Castleman and Lindsay Page shows that among students from a lower socioeconomic background, about one in five who planned to attend college don’t actually enroll.
Much of the gap between poor and affluent students comes from the type of college they choose to attend.
This intervention had a pretty drastic impact on keeping poor students on the path to college.
We can also smooth the path once disadvantaged students get to college This summer melt intervention is yet another example of the small nudges that can help disadvantaged students get on an even playing field with everyone else.
In another experiment, Stanford researcher Greg Walton and his colleague Geoff Cohen theorized that disadvantaged students were concerned about belonging in their college environment – and this social concern was threatening to the point of hurting their academic performance.
Northwestern University’s Nicole Stephens found that first-generation college students – much like black students – struggle to keep up academically with students who have college-educated parents.
So before the semester, she had students sit in on a session about the importance of their class backgrounds and how it will shape their college experience, which she calls “Difference education.” The idea was that this would help them contextualize why they may be experiencing college differently.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Better Sleep is a Luxury Good That Will Cost You”

The outlook has found acolytes in the thousands of Equinox members who have each laid out $495 for six sessions since the gym launched its sleep training program this past May. After funding a University of California, Los Angeles, study, Equinox rolled out a test: one comprehensive fitness training program that included sleep coaching and one without.
“If you were going to see a psychiatrist or a psychologist, right? People would say that that was a luxury. And yet people find the money to do it. I think for people to see the deleterious effects of ongoing sleep deprivation to their health as being a drag on their health and something that they can control-to take 12 sessions with a sleep coach-[it’s] not that big a stretch.”
Dr. Dieter Riemann, editor in chief of the Journal of Sleep Research, spun his answer similarly to why we snooze: “Maybe the question might be wrongI mean, this is a philosophical question.” Answering why we sleep is like answering why we breathe: because it helps us live.
Read blog posts on ThriveGlobal.com, like the one written by an Israeli politician titled “Sleepless Countries Count Their Enemies, It’s time to Sleep and Count Our Allies.” in which he argues that sleep could help solve the Middle East crisis because when “Nations don’t sleep, they look at each other through the lens of a gun.” Quickly, the gospel of relaxation became big business.
“We’re just one slice of the massive sleep ecosystem. We’re at the top of the 2nd inning of a sleep industry boom!” he said.
“Aromatherapy meets audio therapy in the groundbreaking new sleep aid,” the press release read. There are countless more potential physical products in the pipeline, said Acton Smith: duvets, curtains and again maybe a hotel especially configured for sleep.
“Like if you haven’t fixed your sleep hygiene. Because then, it probably won’t be successful. And you’re going to be mad at your device. And it’s probably not your device’s fault-it’s probably just your sleep hygiene.” Go to bed at normal times.
Because they so desperately wanted to perfect their sleep data, they couldn’t get to sleep.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Summer melt: why so many poor kids get into college but don’t enroll”

Every spring, millions of students graduate high school with every intention of attending college.
Research by Benjamin Castleman and Lindsay Page shows that among students from a lower socioeconomic background, about one in five who planned to attend college don’t actually enroll.
Much of the gap between poor and affluent students comes from the type of college they choose to attend.
In one experiment, Page and Castleman had counselors proactively reach out to college-bound students during the summer.
This intervention had a pretty drastic impact on keeping poor students on the path to college.
We can also smooth the path once disadvantaged students get to college This summer melt intervention is yet another example of the small nudges that can help disadvantaged students get on an even playing field with everyone else.
Northwestern University’s Nicole Stephens found that first-generation college students – much like black students – struggle to keep up academically with students who have college-educated parents.
So before the semester, she had students sit in on a session about the importance of their class backgrounds and how it will shape their college experience, which she calls “Difference education.” The idea was that this would help them contextualize why they may be experiencing college differently.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Elena Ferrante: ‘I used to devour news. Now, the uninterrupted rain of it feels like chaos'”

It seemed to me that until then I’d lived in a state of distraction, and I was afraid I’d go through life without even being aware of the disasters, the horrors around me.
It seems to me more difficult today than in the past to try to understand how the world is going, in order not to have to discover, in the end, that in our distraction we have been complicit with the dregs of the human race.
The uninterrupted rain of news doesn’t help, books don’t help, the constantly new sociological terms that brilliantly simplify reality don’t help.
Rather, I have the impression that today’s network of information, in both its print and digital manifestations, forces citizens into a sort of chaos, a condition in which the more informed you are, the more confused you are.
For me, the problem is not to stay well informed but to track within the mass of pointlessly amplified news that which will help me to distinguish, over time, the true and the false, the best and the worst: this is an extremely difficult task.
I’ve always had great admiration for those who, in the chaos that generally characterises the present, sensed from the start the enormous dangers of Nazi-fascism and courageously denounced it.
Sometimes I think I understand why we women increasingly read novels.
The information marketplace, battling for an audience, tends, more and more, to transform intolerable truths into novelistic, riveting, enjoyable lies.

The orginal article.