Summary of “Chernobyl: The end of a three-decade experiment”

BBC News Our World: In the Shadow of Chernobyl – Watch Victoria Gill’s full report from the exclusion zone on Saturday and Sunday, 16 and 17 February, at 2130 GMT on the BBC News Channel, and afterwards on BBC iPlayer.
“Gennady, an environmental scientist with the Ukrainian HydroMeteorological Institute, started work in the zone just three months after the evacuation.”We used to fly in by helicopter every day from Kiev,” he explains, “to collect water and soil samples.
In a forgotten, outer portion of the exclusion zone, people were quietly allowed to return home a few months after the disaster.
There is one group of animals that has made the zone its home and that – strictly speaking- should not really be here.
Some people still live here – deep in the 30km zone.
An estimated 60,000 people visited the exclusion zone last year, keen to witness the dramatic decay.
Gennady’s 33 years working in the exclusion zone might have been leading up to one meeting at the end of this week.
As a scientist who has spent years scrutinising the truth about the contamination in the zone, Gennady admits that he did not expect the people of Narodichi to be afraid of radiation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Were there more than Three Kings?”

Fresh out of his farm clothes, Habib the mayor now sits at his table in a crisply ironed shirt.
Sometimes Habib fashions a triangle, sometimes a circle, sometimes he adorns the shapes with a dot, indicating a vowel.
In Aramaic this means the Mount of the Servants of God.How many Kings / Magi / Wise men?The Biblical source of the story of the wise men is the gospel of Matthew – Matthew doesn’t say how many there were, he just says they brought three gifts: gold, frankincense and myrrh.
Michael the Syrian names 11 kings: Dahdandur, son of Artaban; Shuf, son of Gudfar; Arshak, son of Mahduq; Zarwand, son of Warwadud; Aryo, son of Kasro; Artahshasht, son of Hamit; Ashtanbuzan, son of Shishron; Mahduq, son of Hoham; Ahshiresh, son of Sahban; Sardanh, son of Baldan; Marduk, son of Bel.
Habib’s village of Hah, where he’s mayor, or Anitli as it is known in Turkish.
Habib’s family have survived by holding out in their fortress-like farmhouse that still stands above the village.
Habib says his family, the Beth Henno, have been here since records began.
“As we walk back in to the courtyard, I hear the village children reciting, Aramaic in class. I ask Habib, what the future is for the Syriac community here in Tur Abdin, the Mount of the worshipers of God.”We won’t give up,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The remote UK community living off-grid”

“I have been here 23 years. I don’t think it is very remote really in the sense that people think about remoteness – but its inaccessibility, which I think is appealing.”
“As the children get older we want them to have the independence to build their own dwellings here.”
“I have now been here for five years. I came here as a couple, with our son, but we have now split up but still both live here.”
“My wife, Gill, and I came up here for a holiday and we got hooked on the idea of living here.”
“For one thing, I’d always wanted to build my own house and Gill liked the idea as there was a good primary school here for our three children.”
“I like living here because I like to know where everything comes from, to know myself what the situation is with my electricity and what to do when it goes wrong and the same goes for the water too.”
“Everybody expects washing machines now here and everybody has one apart from me. I’m the last person washing by hand here.”
“There is a proper sense of community here, which I think is lacking in other parts of the country.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The City I Love is Destroying Itself”

Historian David Dorado Romo is one of several “Paso Del Sur” figureheads who have been fighting the City of El Paso, for over a decade, to preserve the spaces Romo has long been writing about.
At the time of our interview the neighborhood was in a state of limbo with a section punched out of each of five buildings by orders issued by the City; giving the distinct anthropomorphic appearance of a body disemboweled and left for dead. The day after the 2018 midterms, while awaiting edits on this piece, I got word that the City of El Paso had increased their police presence in the neighborhood and resumed fencing in properties to speed up an archaeological study, with plans to resume displacement and demolition within the next week.
Then 12 years later, the City of El Paso sends bulldozers to Duranguito and we were very conscious historically about Chavez Ravine and even though they fought so hard for 10 years, in the end, they were still bulldozed.
Our attorneys were trying to get a court injunction to prevent the City and landlords from demolishing the historic Duranguito buildings that day and we successfully got an injunction that denied the City the right to raze anything until all the pending court cases at the state level were decided.
If it’s not technically City owned then the City attorneys can try to get around it.
So the City tried to circumvent the Texas Antiquities law with contract stipulations where the City promised to give the land speculators $140,000 immediately when you start creating the first dents in your building.
What do they care if the city slaps a $2,000 fine on them, because the city will still pay them $11 million plus the $140,000 that they’ve already promised?
A few weeks later, one of the staff people that had had supposedly told someone that the court was pissed off with the City officials, was fired.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Beth Moore: The Evangelical Superstar Taking on Trump”

For the moment most evangelical women look like Beth Moore’s traditional fan base: white and middle-aged.
The event was billed as an “Intimate” gathering, but 5,000 women sitting in a church auditorium is intimate only by contrast with the arena-size crowds Moore hosted in the past.
On her way to the stage, Moore worked the room in stiletto boots, greeting strangers like old friends.
“Some of you are here to see if I’m as big a fruitcake as they say that I am, and”-here Moore emitted a theatrical little gasp-laugh, like helium escaping a balloon-“You probably already have your answer.”
Debbie, 54, my seatmate, had been to eight Beth Moore events.
Moore walked slowly among them as if in a trance, pausing to rub a back or whisper a prayer.
Above all, what women seem to want from Moore is to be seen.
This article appears in the October 2018 print edition with the headline “Will Beth Moore Lose Her Flock?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Laura van den Berg on Writing ‘The Third Hotel'”

I’m not sure Williams is exactly trying to answer the question Why are we here? the same way her characters are in “The Country.” I do think of her as being a very theologically engaged writer, one whose work is focused on diving into those most central and recurring questions of the fact of our existence.
In my mind, this story demonstrates how wrestling with that question of why we are here is really an impossible pursuit.
“We are here to prepare for not being here,” he says.
“Then you’re in the other here, where the funny thing is no one realizes you’ve arrived.”
I love the koan-like, contradictory logic of that phrase: We are here to prepare for not being here.
The beautiful thing about “The Country,” though it’s a story reckoning with the anxiety of mortality, is that Williams doesn’t really let us know if we’re here or there, whether the characters are alive, or in a place beyond life, or somehow straddling the line.
That’s so much more Williams’s project than drawing any sort of clear conclusion about why we’re here, or where we go when we die.
What do you do with that, the fact we can be here, and then not here? At one point, she remembers a line from Tolstoy’s The Death of Ivan Ilyich that sums this feeling up so neatly: “I was here, and now I’m going there! Where?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The last Blockbuster: ‘I’m proud that we’ve survived'”

Standing unpretentiously in the car park of a petrol station at a busy intersection in Oregon, this Blockbuster is the last one still open in the US. Over 10 years ago, the Blockbuster chain, known for short-term rentals of films on video cassette and DVD, numbered 9,000 stores around the world.
The store in Bend, Oregon, is a franchise and became the last one after two independent locations in Alaska shut down in July.
The best stories are about the parents who bring their kids and are like: “This is what we used to do, we used to grab a movie and take it around.” Or the ones talking about how they had their first dates going to Blockbuster.
We have a beautiful grass in front of our store and three weeks ago there wasn’t a path to the Blockbuster sign like there’s now – yellow, worn out grass from everybody taking their pictures.
It doesn’t matter what colour of skin, religion or political affiliation, everybody in the world has a happy feeling when they think about Blockbuster and it brings us all together.
A woman who had managed a Blockbuster store in California came with her family and it was like we were long-lost friends.
All the media hype has actually reminded people that we’re here and we’ve had more customers coming in saying “Hey, we want to support you, we want to keep our last Blockbuster in Bend.” That’s been really wonderful.
The elements of a traditional Blockbuster have all been kept: yellow walls, candy machines, even the computer system with its blue screen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The last Blockbuster: ‘I’m proud that we’ve survived'”

Standing unpretentiously in the car park of a petrol station at a busy intersection in Oregon, this Blockbuster is the last one still open in the US. Over 10 years ago, the Blockbuster chain, known for short-term rentals of films on video cassette and DVD, numbered 9,000 stores around the world.
The store in Bend, Oregon, is a franchise and became the last one after two independent locations in Alaska shut down in July.
The best stories are about the parents who bring their kids and are like: “This is what we used to do, we used to grab a movie and take it around.” Or the ones talking about how they had their first dates going to Blockbuster.
We have a beautiful grass in front of our store and three weeks ago there wasn’t a path to the Blockbuster sign like there’s now – yellow, worn out grass from everybody taking their pictures.
It doesn’t matter what colour of skin, religion or political affiliation, everybody in the world has a happy feeling when they think about Blockbuster and it brings us all together.
A woman who had managed a Blockbuster store in California came with her family and it was like we were long-lost friends.
All the media hype has actually reminded people that we’re here and we’ve had more customers coming in saying “Hey, we want to support you, we want to keep our last Blockbuster in Bend.” That’s been really wonderful.
The elements of a traditional Blockbuster have all been kept: yellow walls, candy machines, even the computer system with its blue screen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Study the Competition. Study Winners in Other Industries.”

When top-earning entrepreneurs need more creative inspiration, or we need to accelerate the growth of our businesses, here’s what we do instead: We study winners and losers in other industries.
I’ll explain why in a moment, but I need to fully debunk this myth that it’s smart to study the competition.
That’s why high-performing CEOs and entrepreneurs keep their thoughts completely focused on success, whether that means studying successful businesses in other industries or envisioning the success of their own businesses.
Studying winners in other industries makes you innovative.
The key to faster innovation is to study innovative leaders in other industries so you can borrow their strategies and be the first to implement them in your own industry.
The point is that Subway was the first fast food place to position itself as “Healthy” and because of that it became the fastest growing, most recognized sandwich company on the planet, all because it copied the winners in a different industry.
That’s because it’s just as important to study failures in other industries as it is to study successes.
Studying losers in other industries keeps you sharp.

The orginal article.

Summary of “24 Cognitive Biases You Need To Stop Making”

Cognitive bias occurs when we make subjective assumptions about people or situations based on our own perception of reality.
This can lead to irrational decisions and judgement calls that affect those around us.
They can alter the way you see everything without you even realising it.
Identifying the problem is the first step towards rational thinking.
Here are 24 distinct biases that you need to be aware of – from “Declinism” to “Fundamental attribution error”.
The “Know Thyself” infographic was put together by the talented Jesse Richardson.
It breaks down 24 world view-altering biases with brief explanations.
There are also a few tips on how to avoid falling into these logic traps yourself.

The orginal article.