Summary of “Chevy Chase is 74, sober and ready to work. The problem? Nobody wants to work with him.”

Chevy Chase is sitting on the porch, outside his home in wooded Westchester County.
There is an entire body of work devoted to casting Chase as a nasty, bitter egomaniac who spreads bad cheer whenever he’s within winking distance of a camera.
Those books are the anecdotal tapeworms which led to Chase’s bad-boy reputation, including Gawker’s “He’s Not Chevy, He’s an Asshole: A History of Chevy Chase’s Horrific Behavior,” Uproxx’s “Chevy Chase’s 4-Step Plan for Getting Your Workplace Staff to Hate You,” and, just this past July, an essay in the London Telegraph that began with the line: “Bill Cosby is the most hated comedian in America. But if you were looking for a runner-up, Chevy Chase has to be in with a shout.”
There are times when Chase pretends he has no idea an entire oeuvre of Chevy Chase bashing exists.
Still, there were tensions even before Chase left SNL. Belushi, in particular, grew frustrated with all the attention directed at Chase.
Michaels, the book stated, was mortified by his old friend’s behavior and issued a Chevy Chase ban.
Chevy Chase with his family at the pre-premiere party for “A.I. Artificial Intelligence” at the Remi Atrium in New York City in 2001.
Chevy Chase with a guitar at his father and stepmother’s East Hampton house about 1960.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Underrated Acquisitions of the NBA Offseason”

While Howard made a significant impact on the league in his heyday - he was a three-time Defensive Player of the Year and eight-time All-NBA selection - he never annihilated opponents in the ways that Shaq could and never progressed the big-man template as the game changed.
Howard has become a player that no one wants, an antiquated offensive big man whose schticky humor annoys anyone in his orbit.
Despite being a player that everyone loves to hate, Howard is still effective.
Dwight Howard, Wizards Signed for two years, $10.9 million with a player option in the second season.
Howard isn’t the defensive force he once was, but he’s still a deterrent around the rim, using his sheer size and length to alter the competition’s shot or defend like a brick wall in the post; he ranked 14th in interior defensive rating - an advanced defensive statistic created by Stephen Shea - for players who logged at least 1,000 minutes last season.
Now he’s going to play with Wall, the best point guard he’s played with since James Harden.
If Howard does focus more on rim runs, cuts, and rolls - and a Washington Post interview with Howard and his trainer, Justin Zormelo, suggests that Howard knows it’s “Either evolve, adapt or get left behind” - then Howard and a core of Wall, Bradley Beal, and Otto Porter Jr. could actually make things interesting in the open Eastern Conference.
Parker wasn’t a hot commodity for two reasons: He has torn his ACL twice and plays defense like he doesn’t think players get paid for it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tom Hardy Talks Venom, Fonzo, and the His Future in the Acting Business for Esquire’s Cover”

We’re at the first stop on Tom Hardy’s literal tour down memory lane, and he’s already causing trouble.
Public Hardy may be an accomplished actor in the U. S., but in his home country he’s a national treasure.
“But ultimately you need to ground the character in some form of recognizable truth.” Hardy will talk your ear off about acting theory- Stanislavsky versus Adler, presentation versus representation, the use of clowning and mask work.
Through his production company, Hardy Son & Baker, he’s working on the second season of Taboo, a moody period drama set in early-1800s London that he stars on and cowrites with his father.
“He’s going to be taking care of her, so it’s important he pays attention. Sometimes, when there are other people around, that’s hard to do.” Hardy isn’t trying to swashbuckle; he’s thinking of how to best help two loved ones.
In 2003, at twenty-five, Hardy cleaned up with the help of a twelve-step program-he calls it “My first port of call”-and he’s been sober ever since.
By filtering which parts of himself become public, he’s mostly okay with the balance of Private Tom and Public Hardy.
Subscribe Now.Read this month’s Esquire UK cover story, also starring Tom Hardy, here.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Blood moon: Photos of the lunar eclipse taken by astronaut in space”

NASA/Bill Stafford, Josh Valcarcel and Norah Moran An astronaut in space captured haunting photographs of Friday’s total lunar eclipse , also called a blood moon because of its eerie orange-red color.
German astronaut Alexander Gerst, a geophysicist and spaceflight veteran, launched toward the International Space Station on June 6.
In the short time the European Space Agency astronaut has been in orbit, he’s done some stunning photography of Earth and the moon.
On Friday, Gerst watched and photographed the eclipse from his temporary home about 250 miles above the planet.
Here are a few pictures he snapped, plus some other share-worthy imagery he’s recorded over the past eight weeks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Brock Pierce: The Hippie King of Cryptocurrency – Rolling Stone”

Specifically, they are here to help Brock Pierce – a child actor turned video-game entrepreneur turned crypto titan – give away a billion dollars to charity.
Bruce Fenton, a crypto economic adviser and leading figure on the scene, describes Pierce as one of the community’s most unsung connectors: “In one way, Brock is this larger-than-life and extremely colorful character. In another way, he’s extremely quiet behind the scenes and doesn’t take a lot of credit for what he’s done. There’s hundreds of millions of revenue out there because Brock was the seed that brought people together. We’re talking about stacks and stacks of people.”
So here’s another way of thinking about what Pierce is doing: Since its inception, in 2009, when a person using the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto created and mined the first Bitcoin, cryptocurrency has spawned a $350 billion market that’s attracted millions of investors, entrepreneurs, gamblers, hackers, activists and institutions.
Anything’s possible – and that’s why Brock Pierce matters.
Pierce claims, DEN’s executive team told him to persuade Collins-Rector to settle the suit and “Make it go away.” “I convinced Marc to do that,” Pierce says.
When asked how it was possible to spend so much time around Collins-Rector and not be aware of what so many others have alleged, Pierce responds, “No one saw anything or knew anything. It was not something out in the open. I also didn’t know he was doing this to other people. I only heard Turcotte’s version of events four years ago.” Asked why he remained with Collins-Rector despite the lawsuit, Pierce says, “I’m a pariah at this point – no one else would work with me. Of course I’m going to stay with my friend and partner.”
Will O’Brien, an adviser in Blockchain Capital, who has hired Pierce as a consultant, says, “I’ve seen many interactions when Brock makes a promise to an entrepreneur, and he’s followed through every time. That’s integrity.”
The plan is to create a charity cryptocurrency token, tentatively called One, of which Pierce will buy $1 billion worth and then inspire other individuals to do something similar.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Way-Too-Early 2018 NBA Redraft”

Tjarks: In all seriousness, I wouldn’t let Smith’s struggles as a rookie affect my opinion of SGA. For one, I’m still really high on Smith, especially now that he’s playing with Doncic in Dallas.
There are a lot of big men at the next level who can be excellent roll men if they are playing in sufficient space.
He’s a decent shooter, but he doesn’t have much fluidity when it comes to putting the ball on the floor and making plays in space.
Robinson might fly across the court to block shots, but can he read pick-and-roll defense? Can he defend without carelessly fouling? Can he execute offensive sets? Williams was suspended in college for breaking team rules, was a low-effort player on the court, came into pre-draft workouts out of shape, missed his conference call with the media the morning after the draft, missed his flight to his first practice, and got red-flagged by multiple teams for his knee issue.
In 2015, would you not have drafted Karl-Anthony Towns, Jahlil Okafor, or Kristaps Porzingis just because you could get Bobby Portis, Larry Nance Jr., or Chris McCullough in the late first round? Okafor might’ve been a mistake, but if that were the mind-set you might end up with a lesser player.
He’s an eyesore on defense, despite the fact he plays hard, because his reaction time is so poor.
He’s a well-rounded player who impacts the game in a lot of different ways.
The interesting thing is that his summer league team was a lot like his college team in that he dominated the ball and didn’t really have anyone else to play off.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 customer service lessons from the best Uber driver ever”

A few months ago I hailed an Uber driven by a guy named Vishwas Aggrawal, who goes by Vish for short.
The five-minute drive home blossomed into an interview I did with Vish the following week for my podcast 3 Books with Neil Pasricha, where I discuss the three most formative books of inspiring people like Seth Godin, Judy Blume, and Gretchen Rubin.
Vish was officially the first Uber driver on the show, and he shared with me why he cares so deeply about his service quality-even though Uber has no leaderboard, ranking, or major incentives tied to it-and what he does in order to keep that service so high.1.
After Vish moves his seat up, he says, “It will take 11 minutes to get to your destination. Does this sound good to you?” The purpose of the question is to establish the service being offered and find out if the passenger is in a rush.
Despite the thousands of rides he’s given, Vish knows that “It’s always their first time with me.” He keeps wet wipes under his seat and cleans the floor mats between every ride.
As an Uber driver, Vish says, “I know I’m doing a service,” not just operating a vehicle.
After reading Schwartz’s book, Vish says, “I started working on my ‘yes man.’ That’s what I do at Uber as well.”
Vish says that Uber wants drivers to say “What is your name?” to customers before they get in the Uber.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Steve Albini Became a Poker Champion”

The stereotypical trappings of poker have never appealed to Steve Albini.
As the three-day event reached its climax, Albini said he was “Over the moon.” His friend Eric Rodawig, who won a WSOP bracelet in 2011, said he heard that “Steve was walking around the Rio like he found out that Santa Claus was real.” Matthew Ashton, a buddy with more than $2.6 million in WSOP winnings, was part of a small contingent in a mostly empty room that watched Albini take down the tourney.
“I think because she wanted to play poker and there was no one to play with,” Albini said.
As a student at Northwestern University in the early 1980s, Albini played in a semiregular poker game.
“When my band is on tour and I find myself with nothing to do after a show in a strange town, I can Google the words ‘poker’ and ‘casino’ and find out if there’s a poker game nearby,” Albini said.
After he opened his Chicago studio in 1997, Albini began playing in a weekly poker game at Russ Arbuthnot’s apartment.
“When I’ve played poker with Steve he’s a lot quieter and more purposeful at the table than away from it,” Ashton said of Albini, who wears ear plugs while playing.
For years, Albini has posted about strategy on the Two Plus Two Poker Forum.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Major League Baseball’s aging cycle”

As a rookie, he has hit a ball 513 feet in batting practice, thrown a pitch 102.5 mph from the mound and reached a top sprint speed – nearly 30 feet per second – faster than three-quarters of his peers can touch.
He’s having, by most measures, the best season of his career, and he’s the easy front-runner for American League MVP. It’s an odd quirk of aging patterns that ability declines before performance does: Exit velocity declines years before home runs do; speed declines years before stolen bases do.
The 26-year-old runner is a few steps off third base as the pitch is delivered, and the batter pops it 230 feet to right field – too shallow, it seems, to get him home.
A year ago, he was considered, more or less unanimously, the best starting pitcher in the world, with a stretch of more than 1,300 innings – the equivalent of six full seasons! – with an ERA below 2.00.
If that’s what we wanted to see, we’d let the pitcher get a running start, we’d let the hitters use aluminum bats, we’d let them all drink Deca-Durabolin and we’d only make them play one game a week.
He’s still very good, but baseball has become, for this pitcher, hard.
Not long ago, Verlander had gone years without throwing a pitch so hard.
Batters swing at the fewest pitches out of the zone in their early 30s. Batters draw the most walks in their late 20s, and pitchers issue the fewest walks at about 26.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Seven Most Interesting Restricted Free Agents of the NBA Offseason”

Some of the most high-profile players from the 2014 draft class are entering restricted free agency this summer, and the NBA still doesn’t know what to make of them.
Either the team gives up on a young talent right as he is entering his prime, or it creates a liability by locking into a long-term deal with a player who can’t live up to that contract.
Since teams can match any contract offer their players receive, offer sheets extended by opposing teams are usually above market value.
Marcus Smart, Celtics Smart is one of the only players in Boston remaining from the team that played in the 2017 Eastern Conference finals, and he was one of the keys to the Celtics’ unlikely playoff run in 2018.
Much like Capela, he’s at the mercy of what the top players on the market decide unless he can convince another team to sign him to an offer sheet.
They’re one of the few teams who are willing and can afford to let young players walk for the chance to sign a star, banking on their reputation as a desirable place to play.
His ability to put the ball on the floor, make plays on the move, switch screens, and defend players at all five positions would make him a fascinating fit as a small-ball 5 on a good team.
After trading for LaVine and Kris Dunn, and drafting Lauri Markkanen, Wendell Carter Jr., and Chandler Hutchison, Chicago now has an interesting young player at all five positions.

The orginal article.