Summary of “The Secret Files of the Master of Modern Republican Gerrymandering”

Hofeller’s files include dozens of intensely detailed studies of North Carolina college students, broken down by race and cross-referenced against the state driver’s-license files to determine whether these students likely possessed the proper I.D. to vote.
The files mostly pertain to Hofeller’s work in North Carolina, where he drew-and defended in court-the state’s legislative and congressional maps multiple times, after judges ruled them to be either unconstitutionally partisan or racial gerrymanders.
Hofeller’s files show that he created giant databases that detailed the racial makeup, voting patterns, and residence halls of more than a thousand North Carolina A&T students.
As Hofeller sought to create two reliably Republican congressional districts, his computer contained information on the precise voting tendencies of one of the largest concentrations of black voters in the area.
Two files on Hofeller’s computer -“NC Juducial [sic] 2017 – stats” and “NC Judicial 2017 – Map”-break down the state’s eleven judiciary districts with race data.
In February, 2014, Hofeller wrote to a Republican attorney about an effort to match North Carolina’s master voter-registration file against the driver’s-license base to see which voters might be affected by the I.D. law.
“After the addresses are standardized and geo-coded for all three files, the next step will be a determination of the distance from each voter address to both the nearest DMV office and nearest in-county early voter center,” Hofeller wrote, on February 4, 2014, according to the letter from his files.
Hofeller invoiced the Republican attorney and others, including national Republican organizations, for tens of thousands of dollars between 2011 and 2017.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Father, a Daughter, and the Attempt to Change the Census”

She mentioned a recent column in the Raleigh News & Observer, in which the journalist David Daley, who has written extensively about gerrymandering, was quoted as saying, “It wouldn’t surprise me at all if on a hard drive somewhere in Raleigh Tom Hofeller has another set of gifts for legislators.” In fact, Hofeller told Pinsky, she had multiple hard drives that had belonged to her father.
In May, with the Supreme Court’s decision pending, attorneys at Common Cause were going through Hofeller’s files when they found evidence that seemed to confirm what many had suspected: that adding a citizenship question to the census was a way to drive down immigrant participation-thus weakening their representation when subsequent congressional districts were drawn-and had nothing to do with enforcing the Voting Rights Act.
Common Cause also found e-mail exchanges on the hard drives between Hofeller and Christa Jones, a longtime census employee who is now chief of staff to the deputy director of the U.S. Census Bureau.
Jones e-mailed Hofeller about the census in 2010, and again in 2015, when she pointed out that the bureau was soliciting public comments, and noted, “This can also be an opportunity to mention citizenship as well.”
In the deposition, a lawyer for the defendants said, of Stephanie Hofeller, “Even a cursory review of publicly available information shows that the respondent’s relationship with her father was strained.” Hofeller remarked to me in an e-mail, “Right, nothing better than a cursory review of publicly available information to unravel the complicated dynamics of familial relationships!”.
The shelter, Moore said, then released the photographs to Hofeller’s father, and they ended up “In the hands of the sheriff’s office.” Hofeller and Moore maintain that Thomas Hofeller suggested to his daughter that, if she “Did not coƶperate with the investigation into Peter,” as Moore put it, “He would use the photographs to incriminate her on the grounds of child neglect and then use the photos to challenge Stephanie’s custodial rights in family court. Stephanie did not comply, and everything that Tom threatened came true, except for Peter was never convicted.”
“The one thing my ex-husband and my father had in common was an obsession with putting me in submission, having control over me,” Hofeller said.
A few hours later, the Justice Department sent a letter to the district-court judges in Maryland and New York who have adjudicated the census case, informing them that they planned to “Discuss appropriate next steps in these proceedings.” A lawyer for the New York Immigration Coalition, one of the groups that sued the Commerce Department over the matter, said that the group will file a motion seeking sanctions against the government for their false testimony in the case, citing the evidence on Hofeller’s hard drives.

The orginal article.