Summary of “How One Tiny-Home Designer Makes a Small Space Feel 10 Times Bigger”

Matt Impola was already living in a small space when he decided he would take on a new weekend project: his first-ever tiny home.
The most striking thing about Impola’s tiny homes is that they don’t immediately look.
Clearly Impola has picked up on plenty of ways to make even the smallest spaces feel much larger, and his advice can be applied to cramped apartments or even not-so-tiny homes.
“Motor homes and travel trailers can feel so temporary, especially when they use cheaper materials like vinyl and plastic, funky wallpapers, and all that,” says Impola.
Opt for High-Quality MaterialsThose aren’t the only elevated pieces Impola swears by.
“Everything’s got to be a bit scaled down, especially sofas,” says Impola.
Kondo Your Belongings”Especially in a kitchen, you’re not going to have room for a ton of extra stuff. It’s about choosing your favorite 10 to 20 dishes,” Impola says.
Impola advocates for more unexpected choices: “I do a lot of behind-the-scenes tricks with my loft floors,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Coronavirus Pandemic Has Shattered the Myth of College in America”

At first, Barnard was everything E. needed: a beautiful campus, a sense of community, counselling services, and, through the office of disability services, the academic accommodations that E. needed.
E. went home for winter break but decided to come back early because, they told me over Zoom, their parents were being emotionally abusive.
A complicated bureaucratic procedure awaits any Barnard student who attempts to return to their dorm when school is out of session, so E. stayed with an alumna in Brooklyn until the spring semester began.
Even though E. is financing their education through loans-E.’s parents have no real relationship, financial or otherwise, with the school-e-mail messages about the end of in-person classes and the closure of campus went to all students’ parents.
“We are trying to get away from our parents unfortunately, the college system doesn’t really allow dependency overrides,” E. told me.
“If your parents make a hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year but they are not willing to help you pay for college, there isn’t a lot of sensitivity to that.” E.’s parents wanted to know why E. wasn’t coming home, and E. couldn’t really explain to them that college was supposed to be E.’s way to escape, once and for all, their parents’ homophobic comments and the constant blare of Fox News.
“I’d been trying to go to a college far enough away that they wouldn’t visit me,” E. said.
E. is applying for internships and trying to raise money to rent their own apartment; another summer option they considered was to stay with their biological father, who, E. said, is now clean and sober.

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Summary of “Preparing to shelter in place for coronavirus: A printable guide to what you need at home”

Staying home means that sick people spread the virus to fewer additional people.
In general, rethink your household habits now that you’re hopefully washing more, wiping down surfaces more, and spending more time at home – what do you need to keep up your improved habits?
You will be much less happy stuck at home without them, and as things get worse a run out to the local coffee shop may not be a good idea.
So be prepared to treat everything from home: Do you have rehydration fluids? bandages? Over-the-counter meds? Antiseptic wipes? Cold packs? Things like food poisoning or stomach flu can be safely treated at home unless you’re “Unable to keep down any fluids and have symptoms of dehydration,” Dixon-Luinenburg said.
Plan what you’ll need to keep yourself and your family entertained at home.
Hobbies: Have you been considering taking up embroidery? Knitting? Miniature furniture making? Baking? It’s a good time to dive into an activity you can do at home.
Things for working-from-home: If your job is possible to do remotely, you should prepare for being encouraged or asked to work from home for the next few months.
Getting by at home means that hospital beds can be reserved for those who need them.

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Summary of “Convincing Boomer Parents to Take the Coronavirus Seriously”

I still think of my parents as the grownups, the ones who lecture me about saving for retirement and intervene in squabbles with my little sister.
A lot of us have spent the past week pleading with our baby-boomer parents to cook at home, rip up the cruise tickets, and step away from the grandchildren.
It’s striking that the first celebrities to announce that they had contracted COVID-19 were Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson, the closest thing that Hollywood has to fun boomer parents.
One friend writes that her doctor parents have been “Overcautious” for a month, and plenty of others have rightfully hunkered down.
It’s a normal part of the life cycle for adult children to start parenting their parents.
This generational role reversal may be a prelude to the demographic shift to come, as baby boomers age out of late-late “Middle age” and are forced to relinquish their invincibility, while their children take on the burdens of caring for elderly-yes, elderly-parents.
It’s a twisted inverse of the generation gap of the sixties, when young boomers screamed across the table at their parents about Vietnam-except that now we’re telling ours not to leave their homes.
The literary agent Lucy Carson pleaded on Twitter, “Best advice for convincing a diabetic boomer parent to stop commuting into the city? Rage-sobbing into the phone isn’t helping my cause.” At Vogue, Molly Jong-Fast wrote about a similar dynamic with her “Fabulous feminist mother,” the generation-chronicling author Erica Jong.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Work from home: Technology is a blessing and a curse during coronavirus”

Like thousands of other workers in California, I’ve been doing my job at home to avoid spreading or catching the coronavirus contagion called covid-19.This isn’t my first outbreak: Seventeen years ago, I self-quarantined in my Hong Kong apartment for three weeks to avoid the epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS.My work-from-home beard is the same.
In the month of April 2003 alone, I sent and received over 1,100 emails that contained the word SARS. Going through my inbox required logging into a secure PC.This time, working from home felt pretty unremarkable at first.
Some 43 percent of Americans work from home at least some, according to a 2017 Gallup poll.
Without any boundaries between work and life, I just keep working.
Friends and colleagues who work remotely on a regular basis advise a few things no office app is going to do for you: Use a separate, dedicated work device.
Most of all, have clear remote work hours that end with a daily ritual like working out.
His was a tale of two Silicon Valleys: He’s doing on-demand work for apps, while his girlfriend, who works for a tech company, has been ordered to work from home indefinitely.
A group of tech workers and journalists working at home experimented with a form of virtual socializing on Monday: A 5 o’clock #WFHHappyHour streamed over Zoom video.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to work from home even if you don’t have coronavirus”

If you’re starting to work from home or just got a remote position, you’re probably looking forward to not spending time on a frustrating commute and staying in your pajamas until noon.
I think the most important thing to remember is to find what helps you stay focused, while keeping your work separate from your home life.
It may take a bit of trial and error to figure out what area of your home is most conducive to getting work done.
Establish a routine, including non-work hours This was the hardest part for me to adapt to when I started working from home: with devices that allow bosses and clients to reach us constantly, you can end up working 24/7. Try to start work around the same time every day if you can, and schedule breaks around the same time if possible.
Know your body I splurged on a good desk chair when I first started working from home, and you may find that’s a worthwhile expense; it’s hard to work if your back is bothering you or you’re not comfortable.
Get the tools you need You’ll get a lot of advice about investing in various work tools, such as a standing desk or a separate work computer.
If your company is requiring you to work from home, find out what tools they’ll provide and what they’ll pay for.
If you end up working from home long term, you’ll figure out what you need and what you can afford.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Work From Home Without Losing Your Mind”

If you don’t, that’s also fine; I usually work on my laptop at a kitchen counter.
The point here is to clearly define the part of your house where work happens.
Remember that when you work from home you’re always at home-but you’re also always at work.
There’s no water cooler when you work from home, no snack table, no meetings down the block.
Get the Right Set-Up. My colleague Adrienne So also works from home and wrote a great guide to videoconferencing, standing desks, and more.
Which is mostly OK-you’ll get caught up, especially in an environment when most people are working from home.
Unless you work in an office that already has CNN or CNBC or whatever on all day in the corner, no television.
Basically, if you wouldn’t do it at the office, don’t do it at home when you’re working.

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Summary of “Should I Kill Spiders in My Home? An Entomologist Explains Why Not To”

Photo by Matt Bertone, CC BY-ND. I know it may be hard to convince you, but let me try: Don’t kill the next spider you see in your home.
Some species even enjoy the great indoors, where they happily live out their lives and make more spiders.
The most common species we encountered were cobweb spiders and cellar spiders.
Cellar spiders sometimes leave their webs to hunt other spiders on their turf, mimicking prey to catch their cousins for dinner.
So killing a spider doesn’t just cost the arachnid its life, it may take an important predator out of your home.
Spiders are not out to get you and actually prefer to avoid humans; we are much more dangerous to them than vice versa.
Although there are a few medically important species like widow spiders and recluses, even their bites are uncommon and rarely cause serious issues.
If you can stomach it, it’s OK to have spiders in your home.

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Summary of “Tiny Houses Look Marvellous but Have a Dark Side”

While there is no census for these homes, they have seen a surge in popularity in the decade since the Great Recession – witness the prolific growth of tiny house manufacturers, for instance.
Originating in the US, tiny homes have also been popping up across Canada, Australia and the UK. Tiny houses are promoted as an answer to the affordable housing crisis; a desirable alternative to traditional homes and mortgages.
I have toured homes, attended tiny house festivals, stayed in a tiny house community and interviewed several dozen people who live inside them.
Photo from Luke Stackpoole/Unsplash, CC BY-SA. All the tiny-houser millenials that I interviewed wanted to own bigger houses in future; they saw tiny living as a means of owning something now and being able to save at the same time.
More broadly the legalities around tiny homes remain complicated.
In southwest England, Bristol City Council recently overruled such rules to allow several tiny homes to be built in the back garden of a terraced house in the suburbs, reckoning that it was necessary to help alleviate a local housing crisis.
Tiny Homes Tiny Consumption Tiny houses are often put forward as a more sustainable housing option.
Referred to as a “Dirty secret” by one interviewee, another explained her desire to keep items from her previous home in case she changed her mind about tiny living.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Designing a home for living alone”

The living room is her least-used space; the couch is a hand-me-down from the frat house of a local college, and the TV is mostly for watching sports or noteworthy series, usually on the rare occasion she invites someone over.
They “Named it and framed it” in 1981, Popcorn says, and in her 1991 book, The Popcorn Report, she broke down the trend into three initial sections: armored cocooning, or living in gated communities and having substantial home security; wandering cocooning, or seeking alone time in individual vehicles and solo transportation, just as Lindsey did; and socialized cocooning, or retreating to a private sphere while still interacting with family and friends.
In 2017, Pew Research Center analysis of the census found that 42 percent of Americans lived alone and 61 percent of Americans under the age of 35 lived alone.
If you’re living alone in 2019, it’s almost instinctive to find yourself in some type of socialized cocoon, and that’s changing how solo dwellers use their living spaces.
One-bedroom apartments are increasingly pricey everywhere in the U.S. But those who live alone often prize doing so despite the cost, and see their homes as spaces for the individual first, and guests second.
“When I’m designing for someone living alone, it’s almost always focused on the living space and the bedroom,” she says.
“There’s not a lot of focus on the kitchen and the dining room. It can go both ways, and a lot of people do want to be set up to entertain, but the main focus is on a living space for themselves.”
Popcorn, who has made her career by predicting future trends, pointed out that the living room will become more like a “Life space” designed to fit its dweller.

The orginal article.