Summary of “Revenge of the clothes moths: as numbers boom, can they be stopped?”

In houses up and down the country, there is a war being waged against clothes moths.
Unlike the many moths that are in decline, these moths – the webbing clothes moth and the case-bearing clothes moth – are believed to be increasing in numbers.
Moth traps used by English Heritage at its properties and storage sites found a 216% increase in the number of webbing clothes moths caught between 2012 and 2016.
“Wool insulation is great environmentally, but if you stick wool up in your attic you’re going to get moths in it. Even worse, I know one house where they blew wool in cavity walls. They can’t get it out and they’ve got moths – they’re going to have to live with moths the whole time they live in that house.”
Moths will happily breed in warm, centrally heated homes throughout the year, says Pinniger, “But there is a peak of adult emergence usually in April and May, and often another one in late August/early September when you get another generation through. Some of the museums I work with, there are moths all year round because the temperatures are constant, and we’re getting at least three generations a year. Each female can lay 100 eggs. That’s a pretty big potential increase.”
Clothes moths can’t fly very far, so it is unlikely that they come into homes through open windows, although this is possible in urban areas.
“In some cases where we need to go beyond that, we use a commercial product called Constrain, which has a residual effect for a number of months. We use that to treat nooks and crannies where moths might like to hide away.” The National Trust has done a trial using tiny parasitic wasps, which seek out moths’ eggs and lay their own inside, hatching new wasps.
“They’re busy living on your clothes, slowly breaking it down. So, even when you don’t have moths, the idea that your clothes last for ever is an illusion. You’ve also got your skin bacteria that wait for you to put clothing on and then they metabolise your sweat. With that motley crew, the clothes moth is the most charismatic of the bunch.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Going against the decluttering craze: the book hoarders who defy Marie Kondo”

Of course, there was a backlash to the backlash, with the expected explanation from Kondo that not all books gotta go.
On the coffee table at the moment are coffee table books: The History of Rap, the book Author: The Portraits of Beowulf Sheehan, which I’m thankfully featured in.
I’m still trying to figure out how she wrote a book that spans 25 years in only 25,000 words.
For 35 years, there was a bright pink bookstore in my town called Remarkable Book Shop.
I’m now able to get rid of books much more easily knowing they’re going to a good home.
If I’m writing about dinosaurs, I’ll have every single book about dinosaurs already in the same section – children’s books, history books, comic books.
It’s a book from a chef in Spain, from the 1890s.
What 30 books does Ms Kondo keep? Are they the same books or does she rotate them? I’d be fascinated to know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The California Sunday Magazine”

“Did fire come to Paradise or did Paradise go to the fire?” I asked.
On his director’s watch, the big fires began to erupt: the Oakland-Berkeley Hills Fire in 1991 that killed 25 people, injured 150 others, and destroyed 3,000 houses; the Old Topanga Fire two years later that scorched 18,000 acres, destroyed 359 houses, left three people dead, and would have burned down Pepperdine University, if not for the response of his firefighters.
The most the fire agency could muster was that locals “Should” include a consideration of fire danger when approving growth.
Each battle required air tankers, helicopters, bulldozers, all-terrain fire engines, thousands of firefighters and inmate conservation workers, hundreds of fire stations, and a statewide communications system.
Cal Fire manned fire stations throughout the wildland-urban interface.
During my first visit to Paradise, Joan Degischer remembered getting a phone call from PG&E on November 7, the evening before the fire.
“The drought did not start the fire. Global warming did not start the fire. PG&E started it. What do we do? Does the judge just turn a blind eye and say, ‘PG&E, continue your business as usual. Kill more people by starting more fires’?”.
During the same period, Southern California Edison caused 344 fires, with seven greater than 300 acres.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Visiting open houses”

On weekends, we’d drive out to houses on the market, either already-built homes in nearby towns or model homes in the under-construction new developments that, at the time, seemed to be springing up all over our part of New Jersey.
It’s a popular hobby in Sweden, where one in three Swedes visit open houses without any intention of buying property.
Open houses are designed to spark buyers’ imaginations in this way.
Sellers are told to remove personal objects so a buyer can imagine her own possessions there, and model spaces in new-built houses are often staged for a “Type.” For the developer or homeowner hoping to close a sale, these are tactics.
For the prospective buyer, the decor in an open house or model unit can be aspirational.
For me, a kid who never quite felt she understood how to be like other people, the open houses offered something else-a way in.
When I visited open houses as a child and teenager-and then once I not-so-surprisingly became a real estate reporter in my 20s-I would imagine the lives of those strangers.
Homes like the one with two dishwashers were opportunities: Why, my family would wonder, would someone want or need two dishwashers? In the granularity of the question, the people who lived in these homes came alive to us as individuals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The First Responders”

Born in 1949 at Atlanta’s Grady Memorial Hospital, Moon lived the first eight years of his life just south of Georgia’s capital city with his parents, Clinton and Elzora, and his younger sister, June.
Freedom House handled staffing for the fledgling ambulance service and recruited the first class of paramedics, including Vietnam veterans and men with criminal records.
In its first year, Freedom House responded to nearly 6,000 calls and was credited with saving more than 200 people from heart attacks, gunshot wounds, stabbings, and overdoses.
Twelve hours after donning the uniform, Moon was speeding through Pittsburgh’s streets in the front seat of a Freedom House ambulance as a voice on the dispatch radio sounded in his ear, firing off details about a man who’d overdosed on heroin and was lying unconscious in the street.
Behind the ambulance’s wheel was George McCary, who’d joined Freedom House in its earliest days-back in 1968, when his grandmother had threatened to kick him out of the house if he didn’t get a job.
Caroline’s first encounter with Freedom House was painful, too, laden with bias and suspicion.
“Twenty-five grand?” Moon spat the first time he heard that one.
“No one imagined the impact Freedom House would have. Generations of paramedics have carried on what we started. That’s our legacy,” Moon said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What it’s like to be on House Hunters and House Hunters International.”

So I’m going to tell you all about my experience with House Hunters International, on which we appeared in 2017, and House Hunters, which we filmed last winter.
The first thing you need to know is that in neither episode of House Hunters were Jeff and I actually house hunting.
House Hunters International is always looking for people who have moved abroad to feature on the show.
The show is intended to resemble a real-life house hunt, but exaggerated for TV. So you take your real-world wants, and in each house you visit, you ham that up.
In House Hunters International I mentioned that I wanted a bathtub, something that is nearly impossible to find in the Netherlands.
In our House Hunters International episode, Jeff is portrayed as wanting a small house that is close to work no matter what.
So when we moved back to the United States, we got in contact with the House Hunters production company, which is different than the House Hunters International production company.
We haven’t seen the episode yet, but I already know it turns on Jeff not being satisfied with any house and all the little home-repair problems he finds when house hunting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “the new affordable houses?”

In parts of the United States, a lack of affordable housing means garage conversions are taking off, particularly in the United States.
They’re built on the city’s extensive grid of very small side streets that snake their way between the houses.
The city says in the last 10 years, over 4,000 new laneway permits have been issued, and it hopes to add another 4,000 in the next 10 years.
The city says in the last 10 years, over 4,000 new laneway houses have been built, and it hopes to add another 4,000 in the next 10 years.
“Even though we’ve been doing laneway houses for a decade, there’s been a pretty marked upswing,” says Graham Anderson, community planner at the city of Vancouver.
As the demand for affordable housing has become bigger than ever – a 2018 survey found that 90% of 200 cities polled were considered unaffordable – these cities have eased up the relevant planning laws.
It’s why places outside of North America, like New Zealand, have recently begun examining the potential of ADUs in their cities.
Instead, people can park their cars on their driveways, and turn their garages – houses for their cars – into houses for people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are Big Houses Making Americans Unhappy?”

To be clear, having more space does generally lead to people saying they’re more pleased with their home.
The problem is that the satisfaction often doesn’t last if even bigger homes pop up nearby.
In neighborhoods where the biggest houses are more modest, Bellet told me, expanding the size of one’s house can be 10 times as satisfying as undertaking such an expansion in a neighborhood where the biggest homes are palatial.
Bellet sketches out an unfulfilling cycle of one-upmanship, in which the owners of the biggest homes are most satisfied if their home remains among the biggest, and those who rank right below them grow less satisfied as their dwelling looks ever more measly by comparison.
To reach these conclusions, Bellet scraped data on millions of American homes from the real-estate website Zillow, and grafted it onto data from the American Housing Survey, which has been conducted by the Census Bureau since 1973 and records, among other things, how big new homes are and how satisfied homeowners are with their houses.
The merging of these two sources allowed Bellet to examine how envy might play out on the level of the neighborhood block, and to study whether being close to an enormous new house makes one less satisfied with one’s own home.
Of course, expansive homes could be unfulfilling in other ways.
“The big house represents the atomizing of the American family,” a historian of landscape development told NPR for a story on gargantuan American homes back in 2006.

The orginal article.

Summary of “14 Millennials Got Honest About How They Afforded Homeownership”

According to the study, there are multiple, intersecting reasons for this, all of which will likely sound familiar to millennials shut out of the market: We’re getting married and having kids later; we have far more student debt; and many of us are drawn to urban areas with “Inelastic housing supplies,” where both home prices and rental costs have skyrocketed.
If you’re putting your extra money toward child care, or loans, or medical bills – how do you come up with that down payment? And how do you find a home you can actually afford?
While 39.5% of white millennials own homes, the black homeownership rate is just 13.4%, the Asian ownership rate is 27.2%, and the Hispanic ownership rate 24.6%. “Left unchecked,” the Urban Institute study declares, “Current trends will result in even greater wealth disparities among white, black, and Hispanic millennials.”
Many people received money from family for a down payment; they chose to buy in an area of the country where homes are markedly cheaper; their parents were homeowners or felt very strongly about homeownership as a mark of adulthood; others are ambivalent about their own homeownership and the way it excludes so many others their age.
My dad knew how badly we wanted a home so he decided to give us his inheritance from my uncle’s estate, about $50K. We had $10K in our own home savings, which we’d use for closing and moving costs.
People don’t really think about how having grown up in a home that their parents owned set them up for success in a lot of ways.
My mom in particular has a strong aversion to people who live in mobile/manufactured/trailer homes despite having lived in a trailer home with my father until she was in her mid-twenties.
Now, as custom homes builders/small business owners, my parents have what seems to me to be bougier-than-usual taste in homes and home design.

The orginal article.

Summary of “House Un-American”

Past the threshold, the house seems to open on hinges like a multi-level jewelry box.
The house itself is five long rooms in one long flow.
My grandparents, Hyman and Esther Engelberg, worked closely with Harrison on the plans for the house.
As we approached the top of the driveway, the breeze carried the scent of licorice, a wild licorice that grew full and weedy in front of my grandmother’s house.
The House Un-American Activities Committee, or HUAC as it was known, called more than 100 witnesses, asking actors, writers, directors, and others to answer to whether they were members of the Communist Party, and to provide lists of names – anyone in show business with “Red” sympathies.
My mother had sold her West Los Angeles apartment and lived part time in Manhattan herself, but she was at that time staying with her former mother-in-law – Esther – in the St. Ives house.
Esther, on the other hand, had no college education, had been raised on a farm, tended house and garden, raised three boys, stood appealingly on the arms of both her husbands, helping them to achieve success.
It seemed wrong, disloyal for the house to exist without its original occupants, a betrayal of the dramas that had ensued there, as if those dramas were somehow formative for the house itself.

The orginal article.