Summary of “Rocket woman: How to cook curry and get a spacecraft into Mars orbit”

Can you guide a spacecraft into orbit around Mars and cook for eight people morning and night? Yes, if you get up at 5am, and your name is BP Dakshayani.
Four years ago, the picture of a group of women in saris celebrating as an Indian spacecraft successfully entered Mars orbit shone a light on the role played by women in the country’s space programme – among them BP Dakshayani.
A year after she began working at Isro, her parents arranged her marriage to orthopaedic surgeon Dr Manjunath Basavalingappa – which meant that she suddenly had a household to run.
Her voice is full of enthusiasm as she talks about how she juggled home and work life, how much she enjoyed her work and how solving problems gave her happiness.
As she brings out tea and delicious snacks, the couple talk about the decades they’ve spent together, about how they have supported each other in tough times and how their relationship and respect for each other has grown over the years.
“Sometimes I would go to work on Saturdays and he thought maybe that was because I was not doing my work properly,” she says.
Today, Dr Basavalingappa says he is incredibly proud of his wife and what she has achieved by her hard work – the Mars mission, for example, and the “Space recovery project” where Dakshayani calculated how to ensure that a space capsule returning to Earth would not burn up on re-entry to the Earth’s atmosphere, and could be safely recovered at sea.
Dr Basavalingappa explains that as a doctor, his working day often stretches up to 18 hours, while his wife mostly worked office hours.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Spending So Much Time In Your Head”

I bet you spend A LOT of time in your head. You know, thinking, worrying, stressing, freaking out – call it whatever you want.
“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”
Before I learned that skill, I would spend hours and hours inside my head. Just think about how much you think.
Put your brain to use and think about how you can solve problems.
If you’re constantly thinking, it’s because you haven’t’ trained your mind yet.
You’re probably thinking so much that you’re missing out of life.
If your answer is no, you definitely need to get out of your head. Stop thinking and start feeling.
Now, you might think: “How do I train myself to stop thinking useless thoughts?” Awareness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is ‘They’ Singular or Plural?”

The proper user of English is to either use he to refer to both genders, to toggle self-consciously between he and she, or, in writing, to use little monstrosities like he/she.
Adjusting ourselves to the supposed naturalness of these backdoor fixes, we tend to miss that English speakers have been using they in the singular since English was anything we’d recognize as English.
Back in Middle English, the Sir Amadace tale includes, “Each man in their degree.” The Bard has Antipholus of Syracuse in Comedy of Errors chirp, “There’s not a man I meet but doth salute me / As I were their well-acquainted friend.” Thackeray has Rosalind toss off in Vanity Fair, “A person can’t help their birth.” Whence the idea that all of these people were butchering the language?
It was the schoolteacher and writer Anne Fisher whose English primer of 1745 began the notion that it’s somehow bad to use they in the plural and that he stands for both men and women.
The simple fact is that they in English has always operated differently from they in Latin, and trying the narrow the gap between the two makes no more sense than deciding that English’s definite articles need to operate like the ones in Arabic or Hebrew.
If the past is any guide, many will insist on making the effort not to use the relatively novel form of the singular they-at least in print, and maybe even in speech-despite how naturally other uses of the singular they tends to fall out of our mouths, just as it fell out of the mouths of medievals, Elizabethans, and Victorians.
One problem is that languages differ massively in how they sort out subjects and objects, and we don’t have to go far afield to see ones that operate like English.
Why is it wrong in English to say Billy and me went to the store?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Put your phone in Do Not Disturb mode forever”

Apple’s next operating system, iOS 12, which will likely be released next month, is an admission of guilt: Notifications come grouped by app so they don’t overwhelm people, and time limit controls are built-in to allow users to keep track of how many hours they’ve spent stalking their ex’s sister’s new boyfriend on Facebook.
With new time-spent tools from Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube, you can spend more time on the apps, seeing how much time you spend on the apps.
Yes, Do Not Disturb mode, that underused feature on your Android or Apple device that silences all notifications and vibrations and was ostensibly designed to help you sleep better.
How many notifications do you have? How many notifications have you received over the last 24 hours? As I’m typing this there are 37 glaring at me from my lockscreen: 20 from Twitter, eight emails, seven texts, and two Google Calendar notifications.
The notifications are all there on my screen waiting for me if I really feel the need to know what’s going on, but that decision now happens on my terms.
My phone never buzzes or beeps – unless someone calls me more than twice in a row, which is a setting I turned on in case of emergency – and the screen never flashes some distracting reminder of all the other nonsense I could be giving my attention.
It’s fantastically relaxing and comes with the added bonus of giving your friends and loved ones the impression you’re doing something interesting or fulfilling with your life, rather than just scrolling through Twitter and not continually responding to the pressure of push notifications.
Unlike the more nuclear option of doing away with push notifications entirely, long-term use of Do Not Disturb mode doesn’t leave me stuck bouncing from app to app in order to gauge what I missed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Fast Food Worth Making at Home”

I have three children and, like all other American kids, they harbor a deep and abiding love of fast food.
I could spend all day preparing a lovely dinner of braised short ribs, scalloped potatoes, and six different kinds of perfectly roasted vegetable, and yet these kids would gladly dump all that food in the toilet if I gave them the option of heading to a Five Guys instead. Fast food is their ideal.
You walk up to a counter, plunk down a few dollars, and are rewarded instantly with fattiest, saltiest, sweetest possible food imaginable.
The idea is that I can make “Fast food” healthier for my kids if I make it myself, since I’m in charge of the ingredients and the preparation.
How do you make one? Blend together some vanilla ice cream, milk, green food coloring, one single drop of peppermint extract and literally no more than that unless you want to feel like you just drank a cup of Flouride.
The reason fast food shakes are so good is because those places have industrial strength blenders that can turn a live horse into lumpless gravy in six seconds flat.
Should you make it? Yes, because pizza is an unassailable family meal AND it’s one of the foods that kids genuinely love to help prepare.
I loved making homemade pizza with my mom when I was a kid, and my kids do likewise with me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “100 Things I Learned Reading The Same Book 100 Times Over 10 Years”

I would also become what Stephen Marche has referred to as a “Centireader,” reading Marcus Aurelius well over 100 times across multiple editions and copies.
In Book Four, Marcus reminds himself to think about all the doctors who “Died, after furrowing their brows over how many deathbeds, how many astrologers, after pompous forecasts about other’s ends.” In black pen - somewhat recently it looks like - I added “Or plotters, schemers and strategists, outsmarted, outmaneuvered and destroyed.” I suppose that was a dig at myself and other smart people.
Marcus writes “Mastery of reading and writing requires a master. Still, more so life.” I wrote “Tucker, R.G” in the margins next to that passage.
Marcus reminded himself: “Don’t await the perfection of Plato’s Republic.” He wasn’t expecting the world to be exactly the way he wanted it to be, but Marcus knew instinctively, as the Catholic philosopher Josef Pieper would later write, that “He alone can do good who knows what things are like and what their situation is.”
One of the most practical things I’ve learned from the Stoics is an exercise I’ve come to call “Contemptuous expressions.” I love how Marcus would take fancy things and describe them in almost cynical, dismissive language - roasted meat is a dead animal and vintage wine is old, fermented grapes.
In his excellent book The Inner Citadel about Marcus Aurelius and Stoicism, Hadot did original translations for the passages he quotes - but sadly he died without publishing a full translation of Marcus for wider consumption.
Years later, one of my readers created and sent me two 3D printed busts of both Marcus and Seneca which sit in my library.
In Book Six we find one of the strongest encouragements that Marcus gives himself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Know If You’ll Be Successful”

I started seeing how many objectives I could complete in a single day, and how many days I could compete challenges in a row.2.
How could you ever become an Olympic Athlete if you didn’t at some point see it and believe it in your mind?
Carry A Notepad Everywhere”I take notes like some people take drugs. There is an eight-foot stretch of shelves in my house containing nothing but full notebooks. I trust the weakest pen more than the strongest memory, and note taking is - in my experience - one of the most important skills for converting excessive information into precise action and follow-up.” - Tim Ferriss, in the blogpost, How to Take Notes Like an Alpha-GeekYour mind can be like a well.
Face Your Pain, Or It Will Be Buried And Stunt Your Growth”If you don’t know how to control your emotional reactions and there’s a refractory period, and you let that emotional reaction linger for hours or days, it turns into a mood. So you say to someone, ‘What’s wrong with you?’ The person says, ‘I’m in a mood.’ Then you say, ‘Why are you in a mood?’ They say, ‘Well, this thing happened to me five days ago and I’m having one long emotional reaction.’ If you keep that refractory period going for weeks and months, you’ve developed a temperament. If you keep that same refractory period going on for years, it’s called a personality trait.” - Dr.
I know people who had rough experiences as teenagers who are still subconsciously playing out the same emotional experiences from that episode.
See How Much You Can Do In A Single Day”Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” - T. S. EliotEzra Taft Benson was a religious leader who simultaneously served as the 15th United States Secretary of Agriculture during both presidential terms of Dwight D. Eisenhower.
See How Much You Can Give In Your Relationships”You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help other people get what they want.” - Zig ZiglarWhen you’re driven to give and to serve, you become more empathetic and relevant.
In order to keep yourself sharp, you need to never stop pushing your boundaries, not matter how good you become.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Men Fight?: An Interview with Thomas Page McBee”

In his new book Amateur: A True Story About What Makes a Man, journalist and memoirist Thomas Page McBee trains for a charity fight.
In his first book, the Lambda Award-winning Man Alive: A True Story of Violence, Forgiveness, and Becoming a Man, McBee writes about surviving being mugged by a man who had killed other men in similar attacks, making the decision to transition, and facing off with the stepfather who had sexually abused him as a child.
As a trans man who has also reckoned with violence at the hands of other men and who struggles to create for myself a path toward a feminist expression of masculinity, I was eager to catch up with McBee to discuss these issues and how we as trans men might be uniquely poised to witness masculinity for not only its flaws but also for its potential for positive change.
Yeah, though I think, again, that nobody is really off the hook as long as white men enjoy the status we do in culture.
I think early stories I’d heard from trans men compounded that fear for me, too.
Do you think there’s a way in which the concept of beginner’s mind might be at odds with the aims of memoir as a form? In other words, do you think the genre of memoir pressures us as writers “To know” or to arrive at a conclusion that one may not have yet, or to ignore that the questions are perhaps more important than answers?
I think being a man can be a lonely thing, especially when men choose to remain hemmed in by the societal status quo.
I think about boxing every day, but I haven’t been back in the ring since the fight.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere”

Beer, Drinking Water And Fish: Tiny Plastic Is Everywhere : The Salt Plastic trash less than 5 millimeters long is in the things we eat and drink, and the air we breathe.
She studies how plastic works its way into the food chain, from tiny plankton to fish larvae to fish, including fish we eat.
“Are there things that transfer to the tissue? Does the plastic itself transfer to the tissue? Do the chemicals associated with the plastic transfer to the tissue?”.
The plastic particles go into beakers of water containing fish larvae from fathead minnows, the test-animals of choice in marine toxicology.
Plastic can also get into fish tissue, particularly plastic fibers from clothing such as fleece.
She found plastic in Indonesian fish guts, but no fibers, suggesting that fish bodies tell a story about what kind of plastic resides in local waters.
Plastic also attracts other chemicals in the water that latch onto it, including toxic industrial compounds like polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs. Plastic becomes a chemical Trojan horse.
“There’s tons.” Plastic comes in many forms, with a wide variety of chemical additives depending on how the plastic is used.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Crying in H-Mart”

The “H” stands for han ah reum, a Korean phrase that roughly translates to “One arm full of groceries.” H Mart is where parachute kids go to get the exact brand of instant noodles that reminds them of home.
Growing up mixed-race in America, with a Caucasian father and a Korean mother, my mom was my access point for our Korean heritage.
I can hardly speak Korean, but in H Mart I feel like I’m fluent.
I’ll wonder what my Mom would have looked like in her seventies-if she would have the same perm that every Korean grandma gets as though it were a part of our race’s evolution.
There’s a stall for Korean street food, which serves up Korean ramen; giant steamed dumplings full of pork and glass noodles, housed in a thick, cake-like dough; and tteokbokki, chewy, bite-sized cylindrical rice cakes boiled in a stock with fishcakes, red pepper, and gochujang, a sweet-and-spicy paste that’s one of the three mother sauces used in pretty much all Korean dishes.
I wonder how many people at H Mart miss their families.
At another table, there are three generations of Korean women eating three different types of stews: daughter, mom, and grandmother dipping their spoons into each other’s dolsots, reaching over one another’s trays, arms in one another’s faces, pinching at their different banchan with chopsticks.
Woman, let me eat in peace! But, most days, I knew it was the ultimate display of a Korean woman’s tenderness, and I cherished that love.

The orginal article.