Summary of “Your Data is Being Manipulated”

At this moment, AI is at the center of every business conversation.
Governments, and researchers are obsessed with data.
We are currently seeing an evolution in how data is being manipulated.
If we believe that data can and should be used to inform people and fuel technology, we need to start building the infrastructure necessary to limit the corruption and abuse of that data - and grapple with how biased and problematic data might work its way into technology and, through that, into the foundations of our society.
In short, I think we need to reconsider what security looks like in a data-driven world.
Part 1: Gaming the SystemLike search engines, social media introduced a whole new target for manipulation.
This attracted all sorts of people, from social media marketers to state actors.
The economic and political incentives are obvious, but alongside these powerful actors, there are also a whole host of people with less-than-obvious intentions coordinating attacks on these systems.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sergio Ermotti Q&A: How UBS Became Home to Half the World’s Billionaires”

BLOOMBERG MARKETS Almost half the world’s billionaires bank with you.
SERGIO ERMOTTI It’s always fascinating to hear how they became so successful.
BM Is there a limit to how big UBS can grow from an assets perspective?
BM How does that affect how you manage this business?
If you look at risk management and how you run a bank nowadays, you always think about stress.
Long-term is, How do we get the organization to move toward the next 10 years? And how do we embrace those challenges and changes in a positive way? And fortunately or unfortunately, I’m paid to think not just about the positive.
If you look at how we measure people today, it’s not just if you’re the best client adviser, or banker, or trader.
You need to constantly think about how you keep yourself relevant in front of clients, how you create value for shareholders, how you attract and retain the best people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t press send The new rules for good writing in the 21st century”

I’ve been let off parking tickets by writing politely and apologetically to the council to explain the circumstances.
In London Fields, Martin Amis offered the best postcard-writing advice I’ve ever read: “The letter with the foreign postmark that tells of good weather, pleasant food and comfortable accommodation,” he warned, “Isn’t nearly as much fun to read, or to write, as the letter that tells of rotting chalets, dysentery and drizzle. Who else but Tolstoy has made happiness really swing on the page?”.
There is little that paralyses the average person more than writing a letter of condolence.
So digital writing is about getting and retaining attention.
A lot of style guides, with good reason, tell their readers to write Plain English.
Whatever you call it, the basic style for non-literary writing wants to put clarity, which usually means simplicity, first.
If you’re not writing “Little Gidding”, do it the other way.
The formally learned skills of reading and writing come from the informally learned skills of speaking and hearing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Netflix’s Ted Sarandos: Peak TV Is “An Analog Idea””

Peak TV is an “Analog idea,” Netflix’s head of content Ted Sarandos said at the Vanity Fair Summit in Beverly Hills on Tuesday.
Sarandos also pointed out that Netflix is in his opinion perfect for film too.
Sarandos said Netflix is extremely important for films like Beasts of No Nation, which didn’t do well in the theater, but was a huge streaming hit.
“With the exception of Star Wars, more people on Netflix watched Beasts of No Nation than any other movie in the world.
Sarandos’ co-panelist, Ava DuVernay, who had much success with her Netflix documentary film 13th-including an Oscar nomination-said she doesn’t feel the need for numbers feedback anyway.
“I can feel the energy rolling in. It’s not hard numbers, but it is a general idea of how things go. I don’t need numbers to know.” Of the experience of working with Netflix, she said, “It’s fantastic to be able to make something and present it in an elevated manner to an audience that’s been targeted and well marketed to,” adding that “13th was available in 190 million countries,” thanks to Netflix.
“He has earned it to come back on his terms, and his terms were to come back and produce a talk show that has some of the characteristics of a Barbara Walters special, but to inject his brand of comedy into it.” On making that choice Sarandos said, “We have a bunch of audience in that specific age demographic and whether they’re likely to be Netflix subscribers or not.some people will join Netflix to watch that. There are some people who will not quit because that show’s coming on next month.”
DuVernay perhaps expressed best how much viewing habits have changed in the past few years, and how Netflix has embraced that when she said, “Can you imagine this? You used to have to go home, sit in a chair at a certain time and sit there where it played and wait through the commercials! We did this for 50 years!”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Astronaut Scott Kelly on the devastating effects of a year in space”

It’s March 2016, and I’ve been back on Earth, after a year in space, for precisely 48 hours.
Over the past year, I’ve spent 340 days alongside Russian astronaut Mikhail “Misha” Kornienko on the International Space Station.
No one at the hospital will have seen symptoms of having been in space for a year.
Our space agencies won’t be able to push out farther into space, to a destination like Mars, until we can learn more about how to strengthen the weakest links in the chain that make space flight possible: the human body and mind.
A normal mission to the International Space Station lasts five to six months, so scientists have a good deal of data about what happens to the human body in space for that length of time.
The second large category had to do with solving problems for future space exploration: testing new life-support equipment, solving technical problems of spaceflight and studying new ways of handling the demands of the human body in space.
The effects of living in space looked a lot like the effects of ageing, which affected us all.
It’s gratifying to see how curious people are about my mission, how much children instinctively feel the excitement and wonder of space flight, and how many people think, as I do, that Mars is the next step.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Appreciation of Tom Petty, Who Died Monday, at Sixty-Six”

“There was the way out. There was the way to do it,” he told the journalist Paul Zollo, for his book “Conversations with Tom Petty.”
The band released an eponymous début, “Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers,” in 1976.
All told, Petty released thirteen records with the Heartbreakers, three as a solo artist, two with the Traveling Wilburys, and two with a reboot of Mudcrutch.
I’m fairly certain Petty knew how it felt to be us.
Petty understood how to address the liminal, not-quite-discernible feelings that a person might experience in her lifetime.
I have, at various points in my life, cited Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ “Greatest Hits” as my favorite record of all time.
So today seems like as good a time as any to light a candle-light all the candles-and put on “Free Fallin’,” which opens “Full Moon Fever,” Petty’s remarkable solo début, from 1989.
Petty liked outlaws and fuck-ups, but he didn’t romanticize much.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Eli Finkel on His Theory of the All-or-Nothing Marriage”

So argues Eli Finkel, a professor of social psychology at Northwestern University in his new book, The All-or-Nothing Marriage.
As Finkel explains, it’s no longer enough for a modern marriage to simply provide a second pair of strong hands to help tend the homestead, or even just a nice-enough person who happens to be from the same neighborhood.
Finkel: That’s obviously a white-collar variation on the theme, but I think up and down the socioeconomic hierarchy, it isn’t totally crazy these days to hear somebody say something like, “He’s a wonderful man and a loving father and I like and respect him, but I feel really stagnant in the relationship. I feel like I’m not growing and I’m not willing to stay in a marriage where I feel stagnant for the next 30 years.”
Finkel: People with college degrees are marrying more, their marriages are more satisfying, and they’re less likely to divorce.
Khazan: What is Mount Maslow? And can you try to reach the top of Mount Maslow and maintain a successful marriage?
The idea of the book is that the changing nature of our expectations of marriage have made more marriages fall short of expectations, and therefore disappoint us.
Finkel: There’s the recalibration strategy, which is fixing an imbalance, not by increasing the investment in the marriage, but by decreasing the amount that we’re asking or demanding of the marriage.
It’s saying, look, “These are things I’ve been asking of the marriage that have been a little bit disappointing to me. These are things that I’m going to be able to get from the marriage but frankly, given what I understand about my partner, myself, and the way the two of us relate, it’s just going to be a lot of work to be able to achieve those things through the marriage.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Important, Very Serious Questions Facing Each West Team”

As training camps open across the NBA, questions remain about each team ahead of the 2017-18 season-and not just about how much brainpower Michael Beasley is using.
We’re here to break down the biggest story lines facing each Western Conference team.
Dallas Mavericks Nerlens Noel is probably mad like, how mad? O’Shaughnessy: Not only did contract negotiations between the Mavs and Noel go south to the point of the latter firing his agent and taking a one-year, $4.1 million qualifying offer-$66 million less than he was once offered, according to his former agent-but now, he’s being benched.
Houston Rockets How will Chris Paul drive Mike D’Antoni crazy first? Uggetti: Everyone seems to be worried about how CP3 and James Harden will fit together, but I’m more intrigued by how D’Antoni’s system will conform to CP3’s style.
Los Angeles Clippers Will Doc Rivers and Austin Rivers finally get to know each other? Uggetti: The Clippers are in Hawaii for training camp, where Doc Rivers said the beach is a “Great place” and that he’s looking forward to doing “Water activities” with the team.
Personally, I’m really hoping that without Chris Paul in the mix this season, the Riverses can bond more often, get to know what they each like to eat, their favorite color, what kind of midrange shot they like best, and, I don’t know, maybe figure out if they like beaches?
The Boogie-Brow experiment was iffy in the latter half of last season, and though the Pelicans bring back most of that team, the franchise’s future hinges on the two big men figuring out a way to thrive together.
Phoenix Suns How will Tyson Chandler and Jared Dudley deal with staring at old age every day? Uggetti: The Suns have six players born after 1995.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mapping’s Intelligent Agents: Autonomous Cars and Beyond”

Everything from autonomous warfare to logistics to geo-targeted advertising depends on map superiority.
Beyond those tools of looking and listening, most self-driving cars also generate a real-time map of the world.
Just as we have Siri and Google and mental maps, driverless cars tap into external sources of geospatial data.
Mobileye is attempting to speed things up by compressing new map information into a “Road Segment Data” capsule, which can be pushed between the master map in the Cloud and cars in the field.
Machine Mapping for the Rest of Us. Honestly, I don’t give a leaping Lidar about self-driving cars.
As Jer Thorp of the Office for Creative Research explained, the maps were intentionally big, to allow various physical modes of interaction: “Groups of people can gather around a map to look at it from different vantage points. People can walk across the map, experiencing distance in a meaningful way.” Shifts in scale and perspective abet a new spatial awareness.
While community mapping projects are not uncommon, the Map Room was notable for its use of projected overlays and robot assistants, which plotted fixed cartographic objects like roads and landmarks, leaving the more interpretive, aesthetic, and connotative map activity to people.
We need to recognize the world’s myriad intelligent agents not only on our maps, but also in our cartographic methods.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Boston University’s CTE Breakthrough and the NFL’s Burden of Knowledge”

On the days I hate football the most, I wonder about a number: How many NFL players don’t know the full risks of CTE? How many whose job it is to rattle their brains for our entertainment know that even minor bumps can-do-add up to something terrible? Studies of the general public have found that awareness of the link between football and concussions correlates with income and education, as does parental willingness to let children play in the first place.
Who sits down athletes to tell them what they’re risking and what they might already have suffered? By the time players reach the NFL, they might be a dozen or more years into their football careers.
Is it their new team that lays the ugly truth out, an employer with every incentive to keep the player on the field? Or is it the league, which spent years denying any link between the sport and CTE? How many players saw that Bennet Omalu, the researcher who inspired the film Concussion, estimated that more than 90 percent of professional football players suffer from some level of CTE? What percentage of the NFL’s active rosters saw this summer’s American Medical Association study of the brains of 111 former NFL players that found CTE in 110 of them?
Perhaps you make the case that it’s incumbent on players to research the risks of football on their own.
After the BU study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association came out in July, a number of beat writers cased their respective locker rooms, asking player after player what they thought of the CTE risk.
“I’m not going to change my career path. I’m playing the game I love.” And in San Francisco, then-49ers tight end Vance McDonald spoke of the power of a CTE link, even as the hypothetical study he was dreaming of was the subject of the conversation: “I think honestly that the day that something is released that can connect football to [CTE], it’s going to change the game dramatically.” There is a difference between having a sense that football carries brain-injury risks and having a full accounting-percentages, specifics, diagnoses, stages of disease progression-of what those risks are and what the personal outcome is.
There are players now who know the risks of football and who choose to play regardless.
“After learning all of this,” the retiring Ferguson wrote of the clarity he gained when he began researching CTE, “I feel a bit betrayed by the people or committees put in place by the league who did not have my best interests at heart.” He should feel betrayed, as should many of his fellow players.

The orginal article.