Summary of “To Seem More Competent, Be More Confident”

One important reason this happens is that people are simply not great at assessing competence – a crucial trait for succeeding at work – and perceptions of competence are just as important for success as actual competence.
Because of this, people tend to evaluate competence based on other factors, meaning you have to do more than produce results to convince them of your expertise.
Lo and behold, the person’s prediction had a strong influence on how subjects perceived their competence: Observers evaluated those who made optimistic predictions as much more competent than their modest contemporaries – no matter how accurate those predictions were and how well they actually performed.
A negative forecast may lead you to be perceived as distinctly less competent – no matter how well you actually perform.
Why do people view confident others as more competent, even when their performance suggests otherwise? One explanation is that we have a tendency to believe what we are told, and to confirm our beliefs by selecting information that supports them.
To feel more authentic demonstrating confidence, you may first have to convince yourself.
Do you think they have a good sense of your competence and expertise? If not, could you be demonstrating more confidence in your tasks? This doesn’t necessarily mean praising yourself at every opportunity; rather it means projecting an optimistic attitude.
By displaying more confidence in your abilities, you set yourself up to be recognized for your competence and your contributions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A feminist’s guide to raising boys”

In the 1970s, from my child’s-eye point of view, it seemed pretty much agreed that boys and girls were essentially the same; it was just society that turned us into “Boys” and “Girls”.
No matter how much Mike pitched in, the day-to-day reality was me, at home, trying to hold back a tsunami of washing-up and laundry and mess and boys and nappies and Lego.
Looking back, there were a lot of things I should have talked more about to the boys.
At one meal, when I tried to explain to a table of men and boys why #MeToo was a necessary act of mass civil disobedience, how the ideal of a rule of law actually shielded white men and protected the status quo, how most women who are assaulted never get justice, it all fell apart.
The producers dressed little boys up in girls’ clothes and vice versa, then got unsuspecting members of the public to play with them and watched as they merrily handed robots and maths toys to the little “Boy” and cuddly toys and dolls to the “Girl”.
Why did I find this so hard to write? Because it involved admitting that I was naive, that I didn’t put nearly as much thought into the business of rearing good feminist boys as it deserved.
Hug your boys a lot and tell them, often, how much you love them.
Teach your sons that equality is just as good for boys as it is for girls.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why So Many Smart People Aren’t Happy”

What we were trying to do in that particular study is bring that focus back into people’s attention.
What people might do varies, but when there’s a reminder, what we discover is that-and these are studies conducted with Fortune 500 employees, undergraduate students-they make seemingly small, you might even call them trivial, decisions, but they add up to a happier life overall.
This simple reminder on an everyday basis is a kind of reality check, which puts things in perspective for people.
Pinsker: What do you think it is about the messages people receive about what it takes to be successful in business that runs counter to this mindset? In other words, do you think that working your way up any professional ladder requires not thinking in terms of abundance?
Raghunathan: Daniel Pink, in his book Drive, talks about how what used to be used as motivators to employees-what he calls the carrots and sticks approach-are now being replaced by what he calls “Motivation 2.0,” which is more trying to figure out what is it that people are really passionate about.
In business schools, I see that there’s a huge push towards corporate social responsibility and finding a passion, but at the same time, if you look at the kinds of people who get invited to come give keynote addresses, or what it is that we focus on to improve our Businessweek rankings, it’s things that are extrinsic.
We invite people who made a million bucks, and we look at incoming MBA students and their outgoing salaries.
Pinsker: You mentioned earlier how easily people adapt to positive changes in their lives, and I’m familiar with the research showing that lottery winners are no happier, a year later, than even people who just as recently suffered serious injuries.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to get better at estimating your time”

The confidence that led to my unrealistic estimates actually has a name-the planning fallacy-and it’s something we all occasionally suffer from when estimating how long tasks and projects will take us to complete.
If you understand the reasons why we tend to underestimate how long tasks will take, you can take steps to avoid the pitfalls of the planning fallacy and start forming more realistic estimates.
Use the app to track how long it takes you to complete different types of tasks over time, then use the app’s built-in reports to reference that data later when it’s time to estimate.
The results of these studies not only confirmed that people are prone to the pitfalls of the planning fallacy as described by Kahneman and Tversky, but they also discovered something unique: While we’re bad at estimating how long tasks will take us to complete, we’re actually pretty good at estimating how long it will take someone else to complete a task.
When research participants were asked to estimate how much time it would take someone else to complete a task, they were much more likely to refer to historical data to form a basis for their estimates.
Track how much time you actually spend completing the tasks you estimated.
If you’re having trouble figuring out how to add a percentage value to your original estimate, use this free percentage calculator to calculate your final estimate easily.
Understand the planning fallacy to get better at estimating.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Speech, Their Rules: Meet the People Who Guard the Internet”

What do you think most people don’t understand about working in trust and safety at a platform with tens or hundreds of millions of users?Rob: People are quick to dismiss our policies and decisions as a product of a bunch of college students sitting around in flip-flops and not really thinking about the impact of this stuff, which could not be further from the truth.
Martin: For the most part, the people who are lifers are caring people who just want to make their sites work.
Y.X. Yang: My sense is that a lot of people who work in trust and safety are usually not part of the dominant group, which also makes for a very interesting and kind of sad dynamic when you have people reading things like, “Oh, this company just doesn’t care about women,” or, “This company just doesn’t care about gay people” like, half this team is underrepresented, and they do care.
Adam: Creators and product people want to live in optimism, in an idealized vision of how people will use the product, not the ways that people will predictably break it.
The separation of product people and trust people worries me, because in a world where product managers and engineers and visionaries cared about this stuff, it would be baked into how things get built.
What about the working conditions and pay among people doing this work?Remy: It only makes sense that whatever negative and toxic effects ordinary people get from heavy internet use will only be multiplied in people whose job is to deal with the worst of it.
How do you explain to people what you do for a living?Martin: As a joke, I say I’m an internet janitor.
My real answer is, “I work for this website. And most people use it for good, but the people who don’t use it for good, I kick them off the website.” And it’s that simple.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 reasons you can’t seem to get your message across”

4 minute Read. How many times has your boss told you to get to the point when you’re trying to explain something-whether it’s giving a speech, or outlining the reason why you chose a particular approach over another? No matter how hard you try, you still can’t seem to do it.
To get to the point, you have to learn how to jump to a conclusion.
Just as a diver needs a springboard to launch into a dive, you need a structure to get to the point.
Having observed thousands and thousands of businesspeople talking, I noticed that the speaker who got to the point used an oral bullet point structure.
Next time you feel that pressure to jump into the conversation, begin by rephrasing what you’re trying to connect your message to, and you’ll discover how quickly you can get to your point with power and precision.
To get to the point, you need to focus on strategy-why does the audience care? You need to focus on calculating your best shot, not covering it up.
By shifting from fear to focus, you’ll be able to get to the point and increase your odds of making a difference through your message.
Guess what? Your audience doesn’t want to be dazzled by your brilliance-they want to get your point quickly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Are There So Few Services for Autistic Adults?”

Before Anthony turned 21, his school district covered the cost under federal mandate.
In September, they received a letter from their Medicaid provider indicating that Anthony needs to be recertified, meaning more paperwork.
The Solomoniks’ struggle to find a program for Anthony is mirrored in families and communities across the country.
As the number of adults with autism surges, and as the research lags about how to help them achieve meaningful lives, the availability of affordable, quality programs cannot match the demand.
The number of nonprofit programs like ELIJA that offer services tailored to people with autism, such as specialized job coaches, has recently increased.
Even the most well-intentioned programs lack research-and therefore clarity-on how to best serve a population so diverse and so deprived.
With the uncertainty over Anthony’s future continuing to prey on the Solomoniks, the tension at home can at times become unbearable.
On a scorching August afternoon, Marie was working her way through a stack of legal documents when Anthony took a seat next to his mother and turned to her with a distant gaze.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Feedback Rarely Does What It’s Meant To”

The search for ways to give and receive better feedback assumes that feedback is always useful.
Feedback is about telling people what we think of their performance and how they should do it better-whether they’re giving an effective presentation, leading a team, or creating a strategy.
If you’re in sales, how can you possibly close deals if you don’t learn the competency of “Mirroring and matching” the prospect? If you’re a teacher, how can you improve if you don’t learn and practice the steps in the latest team-teaching technique or “Flipped classroom” format? The thought is that you can’t-and that you need feedback to develop the skills you’re missing.
Another of our collective theories is that feedback contains useful information, and that this information is the magic ingredient that will accelerate someone’s learning.
Watch an NBA game, and you may think to yourself, “Yes, most of them are tall and athletic, but boy, not only does each player have a different role on the team, but even the players in the same role on the same team seem to do it differently.” Examine something as specific and as limited as the free throws awarded after fouls, and you’ll learn that not only do the top two free-throw shooters in history have utterly different styles, but one of them, Rick Barry-the best ever on the day he retired-didn’t even throw overhand.
Since excellence is idiosyncratic and cannot be learned by studying failure, we can never help another person succeed by holding her performance up against a prefabricated model of excellence, giving her feedback on where she misses the model, and telling her to plug the gaps.
If we continue to spend our time identifying failure as we see it and giving people feedback about how to avoid it, we’ll languish in the business of adequacy.
CONCLUSION How to give people feedback is one of the hottest topics in business today.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The beach nobody can touch”

About 50-60 blacktip reef sharks started visiting the bay early each morning.
The shallow waters are ideal for them and three of the female sharks chose Maya Bay to give birth to their babies.
“They are a symbol of nature, everyone gets it. Sixty sharks are worth protecting.”
So how long can this last? Authorities say they are committed to re-opening Maya Bay when they know what the true capacity of the beach is – that is how many people can sustainably visit on a daily basis.
“We have to admit that tourists who come to Krabi and Phi Phi islands all dream of going to Maya Bay or ‘The Beach’. Once they arrived and the short term closure was announced some of them cancelled the tours. They couldn’t go to the selling attraction,” said Ekawit Pinyotamanotai, president of the tourism council of Krabi.
Despite its iconic status, Maya Bay is just one small beach.
The damage to Thailand’s waters from rampant tourism is a much bigger problem.
Perhaps Maya Bay is a sign that Thailand is turning a page in its effort to preserve its natural resources.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School”

Most of us aren’t taught how to identify or deal with our own emotions, or the emotions of others.
Emotional intelligence is a shorthand that psychological researchers use to describe how well individuals can manage their own emotions and react to the emotions of others.
People who exhibit emotional intelligence have the less obvious skills necessary to get ahead in life, such as managing conflict resolution, reading and responding to the needs of others, and keeping their own emotions from overflowing and disrupting their lives.
Measuring emotional intelligence is relatively new in the field of psychology, only first being explored in the mid-80s. Several models are currently being developed, but for our purposes, we’ll examine what’s known as the “Mixed model,” developed by psychologist Daniel Goleman.
The order of these emotional competencies isn’t all that relevant, as we all learn many of these skills simultaneously as we grow.
Emotional intelligence isn’t an area that most people receive formal training in.
My struggle with depression taught me that some emotions persist long after the overflow.
Resolving conflict can be one of the best ways to learn how to apply your emotional skills.

The orginal article.