Summary of “21st-Century Propaganda: A Guide to Interpreting and Confronting the Dark Arts of Persuasion”

Complacent, technocratic elites who spoke self-assuredly of growth and progress while failing to notice how many people saw little of either.
In recent years we’ve learned much about the human mind that contradicts the view of people as rationally self-interested decision-makers.
Lakoff, who is best known for his work on how the metaphors we use influence our beliefs, argues that people tend to vote in line with their values, not rational beliefs.
If you’re a conservative going into politics, there’s a good chance you’ll study cognitive science, that is, how people really think and how to market things by advertising.
Whether it’s Breitbart for the alt-right or RT for the Kremlin, it’s now possible to create large, well-financed operations that pump out news with a strong agenda and can reach people across the world.
If you have a fiercely loyal base of supporters or can pay them you can mobilize vast groups of people to troll opponents and flood the digital airwaves with your desired message, amplifying it and making it hard to tell how much support it really has.
In an only slightly less controversial study the company showed that it could change people’s likelihood of voting.
Companies such as Cambridge Analytica claim to be able to sway voters’ preferences en masse, using publicly available data skimmed from people’s social-media accounts to build detailed psychological profiles and crafted messages for each person.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When “easy mode” isn’t enough: An analysis of unclear lessons in video games”

This week, a gaming and pop-culture critique channel on YouTube looked at the existential question of “Video game access” from a wholly different perspective: a year-long analysis of an adult trying video games for the first time in her life.
Instead of calling the video “I made my wife suffer through video games for her first time ever,” Razbuten opted for a title that speaks to the inherent learning curve for anyone new to the hobby.
“What Games Are Like For Someone Who Doesn’t Play Games” came as a result of a full year of the host’s wife testing nine video games she’d never played before: Super Mario Bros., Celeste, Shovel Knight, Portal, Doom, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, The Last of Us, Uncharted 2, and Dark Souls.
While we’ve seen essays and thinkpieces about the obfuscating “Language” of video games and how that can be a barrier for those who didn’t grow up with the hobby, Razbuten’s video shines because it collects and presents clear video proof of his concerns.
The tester unsurprisingly got lost in 3D games for various reasons, most commonly due to information overload and unclear onscreen markers.
Still, the video does an interesting job of selling the tester’s familiarity with computers, phones, and technology but not necessarily with the dense, underlying language of how traditional video games work.
What’s an “L3” button? Do all games have “Run” or “Sprint” options built in? If something in the game world looks destructible, why can’t it be destroyed?
The resulting perspective is an interesting mix of rigid and wide open, and it speaks to how even seemingly “Accessible” games can stand to make a little more room for brand-new eyes, especially as services like Apple Arcade, Google Stadia, and Microsoft Project xCloud loom as gaming entry points for people who have otherwise never owned a console.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It takes psychological flexibility to thrive with chronic illness”

Generally, living as rich and meaningful a life as possible when you are struggling with a chronic illness requires a great deal of psychological flexibility.
Below are some approaches that you can use to help you increase your psychological flexibility and, I hope, help you live a more meaningful life, even if you have a chronic illness.
If you’re dealing with a chronic illness, you might be plagued by thoughts of being burdensome to your family or loved ones.
Be the thinker, not the thought simply means increasing your awareness of the thoughts you are having, being more observant of your own thought processes, putting some distance between the thought and reality, and then making some better decisions about whether or not to engage with them.
If you think that it is time for your medication or that your family loves you and takes good care of you, then of course engage with those thoughts.
Know what matters: there are few things that will clarify your priorities and values like a chronic illness.
Chronic illness might have robbed you of much of your abilities.
With chronic illness, you can easily spend all day cataloguing what you can no longer do, but to what end? Does this move you towards your values? Maybe you can’t engage with your friends and family exactly the way you like; but if you can engage with them somehow, no matter how small, that is meaningful.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What makes dogs so special and successful? Love.”

From the point of view of those of us that are in the science of studying dogs, the idea that it’s affection and not intelligence that’s the secret ingredient that makes dogs successful is quite a radical idea.
I’m just saying there’s enough similarity between how dogs form strong emotional bonds and how people form strong emotional bonds that it’s fair enough to use the love word.
Q: You write about many studies that show dogs behaving as though they love us.
Pretty much all dogs look very, very upset, and what appears to be happening is that all the dogs are disturbed, but only about one-third can figure out what needs to be done.
We got DNA samples from those dogs and wolves, and we identified three genes that show the mutation in those genes [is] responsible for a big difference between dogs and wolves in their gregariousness.
A: It’s not the case that dogs have special genes or special capacities to form relationship with humans.
So a nearby farmer who had dogs guarding his free-range chickens suggested putting dogs out on the islands to guard the penguins.
The dogs were put with penguins when they were puppies, so now the dogs form warm, strong emotional bonds with penguins and follow the penguins around and keep the foxes away.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Focus Better: Manage Your Attention”

How many minutes of undisturbed work do you get done on an average day?
We’re all so connected that it becomes impossible to find time to focus on yourself and your work.
So no wonder that many of us ask: “How do I focus better?” When new subscribers join my newsletter, I always ask them about their challenges.
The majority who answers, mentions something that’s related to focus.
When I did a survey on my newsletter last year, 28% said that their biggest challenge is related to focus and time management.
“My biggest challenge is: how can we define what to really focus on?”.
It has nothing to do with your smartphone or YouTube, online shopping, Instagram, or any other thing you want to blame for your lack of focus.
Remember: Focus determines the quality of your life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “DMX on New Music, Rejoining Def Jam, and Kanye’s Sunday Service”

Do you put yourself in the “Lyricists” category?I don’t put myself in any category.
How did your cameo at Kanye’s Sunday Service come about?He reached out.
I don’t know what she thought I was doing, but I don’t know if she thought I was trying to sabotage her or whatever.
I think a lot of people struggle with forgiving their parents.
I personally struggle with forgiving my parents.
Until you learn how to forgive others, you can’t forgive yourself.
You can’t forgive yourself if you don’t know how to forgive.
Just being onstage, period, and knowing that there’s so much love out there.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Breakthrough’s” James Allison is having fun and curing cancer”

He’s been described in the press as a “Carousing Texan.” He’s also a Nobel laureate, a man whose unwavering faith in and curiosity about the human immune system led to one of the most revolutionary developments in cancer research in over a century.
Advertisement: There have been plenty more encouraging successes like mine over the past several years, thanks to clinical trials and FDA approvals for innovative, immune system-based approaches to cancer.
Dr. Allison is now the subject of a new documentary from director Bill Haney, narrated by Lone Star State native Woody Harrelson and carrying the appropriately simple name, “Breakthrough.” It’s a deep dive into the fascinating science of immunotherapy, and a portrait of an iconoclast who always believed there was another way to treat cancer beyond the traditional – and unreliable – trifecta of chemo, radiation and surgery.
Let’s step back, since we are not doing anything whatsoever to directly engage the cancer but rather manipulate the immune system.
It’s melanoma, non-small-cell, small cell lung cancer, kidney cancer, bladder cancer, Hodgkins lymphoma, head and neck cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma.
I certainly as a patient didn’t understand immunotherapy, because the common parlance of cancer previously was, “Everybody does chemo, everybody does radiation.” Do you think that that is changing? Do you think that patients are becoming more sophisticated?
We are beginning to learn how to go from a 30% to 40% response, like we’re seeing in kidney cancer now.
In the movie, the question was “Will this work?” Now the question is how do we get in to work in more kinds of cancer at higher frequencies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jenny Odell on why we need to learn to do nothing: ‘It’s a reminder that you’re alive'”

Nearly two years ago, the artist and academic Jenny Odell gave a keynote address on “How to do nothing”.
Odell writes of feeling compelled to seek refuge in her local rose garden in the days after Donald Trump became president, “Like a deer going to a salt lick”: “It really did feel necessary, like a survival tactic.”
“What we are left with,” Odell writes, with no small sadness, “[are] 24 potentially monetizeable hours that we can no longer justify spending on ‘nothing’.
Odell herself finds this state of mind most easily accessed in nature, losing herself in the study of a single leaf or patch of earth, or going on meandering hikes.
A keen birdwatcher, Odell recalls in great detail specific experiences in nature – happening upon a clearing full of sage plants and its “Amazing smell”, or seeing a “Really amazing warbler”.
Finding solace in nature is not a new idea, but its sense of escape is increasingly necessary for our survival, says Odell.
Odell has said How To Do Nothing is not a self-help book promising simple steps to a lasting new way of life : “You have to know that you’re going to keep getting sucked back in, and be realistic about that.”
I catch myself asking Odell what she sees as the benefit or the outcome of doing nothing – is it increased creativity? Greater empathy, improved mental health?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Go From Procrastinate Hero To Procrastinate Zero”

In this guide, I will give you an example of how you can improve every single step of the Procrastinate Zero framework.
How do you keep an activity log? Watch this video to learn how I do it.
Track your movements and diet Do you know how many calories you eat during your work-week? How many calories do you burn? How many calories does your body need? Use apps like Myfitnesspal or step counters to measure yourself.
Once you start using these apps, you will get a clear picture of how much you walk and how much you eat on an average day.4.
If we want to get anywhere in life, we have to understand the basics of how to communicate with people.
One of the best books about this subject is How To Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie.
No matter how many times you read Influence by Robert Cialdini, if you’re an idiot, you will remain an idiot.
At the same time understand how you should get your product, yourself, or services out there.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How We Judge Others is How We Judge Ourselves”

Why We Judge Others Months ago, I wrote an article about the ways that we choose to measure the value of our own lives.
The way you measure yourself is how you measure others, and how you assume others measure you.
If you measure your life by your family relationships, then you will measure others by the same standard – how close their family is to them.
If you measure your life by how much fun and partying you can have, then you will measure others by the same standard – how much fun and partying they have.
If you measure your life by how much you’ve traveled and experienced, then you will measure other people by the same standard – how worldly they’ve become.
If we measure ourselves by our intellect and use of reason, then we will judge others through the same lens.
It’s why people who think they’re ugly look for all of the ways people around them are ugly and why people who are lazy and slack off look for all of the ways others cut corners and slack off as well.
A big part of our development is to recognize our own fixation, to recognize how we measure ourselves and consciously choose our metric for ourselves.

The orginal article.