Summary of “I’m Quantitative Futurist Amy Webb, and This Is How I Work”

Location: NYCCurrent Gig: Quantitative futurist, professor of Strategic Foresight at NYU Stern School of Business, founder of the Future Today InstituteOne word that best describes how you work: MethodicallyCurrent mobile device: Samsung S9Current computer: Mac Pro.First of all, tell us a little about your background and how you got to where you are today.
In sixth grade, I joined our middle school Future Problem Solvers of America team, and without realizing it I began my work as a futurist when I was just 11 years old.
I wanted to model and map plausible scenarios for what that future might look like, and that’s when a colleague pointed me to the work of early futurists like Robert Jungk and Alvin Toffler, and of the quantitative modeling developed by Olaf Helmer and Nicholas Rescher.
I’ve been working full-time as a quantitative futurist ever since.
Every day at work is different-sometimes I’m at the office, but often I’m on the road-so I’ll offer you two recent workdays.
The 20-minute unit system is definitely an adjustment for people who work with me.
Our team is distributed-we work out of spaces in many different cities and don’t have a central physical hub.
The How I Work series asks heroes, experts, and flat-out productive people to share their shortcuts, workspaces, routines, and more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Little mean girls: Helping your daughter swim in those choppy social waters”

The girls in my daughter’s class began to divide themselves into groups.
I figured my daughter would eventually stumble into mean-girl territory, and that subversive manipulation, social rejection and alliance-building would leave her occasionally on the curb.
According to Katie Hurley, author of “No More Mean Girls: The Secret to Raising Strong, Confident, and Compassionate Girls,” research shows that severe bullying in childhood puts adolescents at a higher risk of mental-health issues, including suicidal thoughts and behaviors, debilitating depressive symptoms, and anxiety.
The most common ways girls ages 8 to 12 bully is by mocking, teasing and calling people names, says Cosette Taillac, a child and adolescent therapist and the national strategic leader for mental health and wellness at Kaiser Permanente.
What if your daughter isn’t talking about specifics, yet you suspect something is wrong?
Encourage your daughter to turn to a trusted friend for support, Bagwell says.
“By participating in activities such as a team sport, music groups or social clubs, your daughter will develop new abilities and social skills, and learn what is appropriate and inappropriate behavior and soon learn to surround themselves with positive influences,” says Armin.
Even if your daughter hasn’t confronted a mean-girl situation, regularly talking with her can lay groundwork if a crisis arises.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leonardo Da Vinci’s To Do List”

Most people’s to-do lists are, almost by definition, pretty dull, filled with those quotidian little tasks that tend to slip out of our minds.
Da Vinci would carry around a notebook, where he would write and draw anything that moved him.
“It is useful,” Leonardo once wrote, to “Constantly observe, note, and consider.” Buried in one of these books, dating back to around the 1490s, is a to-do list.
While all of the list might not be immediately clear, remember that Da Vinci never intended for it to be read by web surfers 500 years in the future.
You can just feel Da Vinci’s voracious curiosity and intellectual restlessness.
Later to-do lists, dating around 1510, seemed to focus on Da Vinci’s growing fascination with anatomy.
You can see a page of Da Vinci’s notebook above but be warned.
Even if you are conversant in 16th century Italian, Da Vinci wrote everything in mirror script.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You’ve Got the Dreams but are You Doing the Work?”

Your dreams are as realistic as the work you’re willing to put in.
They’re asking us, “How bad do you want it? How much work will you still put in?”.
I have to give you fair warning: there is actually one thing that can stop you from doing your daily work.
If you don’t have a plan, if you don’t have realistic and actionable goals to pursue, you will not follow through with your dreams.
So how much work are you putting in? How often are you planning?
Because if you pick just one task, that’s going to be the most important task you could pick, right? Limiting your goals forces you to choose smarter, more significant goals.
If you commit to your one daily goal this week, and if you plan out that goal and check it off every day, and use that one daily goal as the foundation for a lifelong planning practice that you consistently perfect, you will get consistent, positive results.
So how much work are you putting in? How much are you planning?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Iris Murdoch on Storytelling, Why Art Is Essential for Democracy, and the Key to Good Writing – Brain Pickings”

“One of the functions of art,” Ursula K. Le Guin observed in contemplating art, storytelling, and the power of language to transform and redeem, “Is to give people the words to know their own experience Storytelling is a tool for knowing who we are and what we want.” Because self-knowledge is the most difficult of the arts of living, because understanding ourselves is a prerequisite for understanding anybody else, and because we can hardly fathom the reality of another without first plumbing our own depths, art is what makes us not only human but humane.
Literary writing is an art, an aspect of an art form.
“Art is mimesis and good art is, to use another Platonic term, anamnesis,”memory” of what we did not know we knew Art “holds the mirror up to nature.
There is always more bad art around than good art, and more people like bad art than like good art.
Good art is good for people precisely because it is not fantasy but imagination.
Beauty in art is the formal imaginative exhibition of something true, and criticism must remain free to work at a level where it can judge truth in art Training in an art is largely training in how to discover a touchstone of truth; and there is an analogous training in criticism.
A quarter century after Hannah Arendt penned her timeless treatise on how dictatorships use isolation as a weapon of oppression, Murdoch considers this singular virtue of “merciful objectivity” at the heart of art – the selfsame virtue of which totalitarian regimes bereave society by persecuting art and artists.
Complement this particular portion with Rebecca West on storytelling as a survival mechanism, Pablo Neruda’s touching account of what a childhood encounter taught him about why we make art, and Jeanette Winterson on how art redeems our inner lives, then revisit Iris Murdoch on causality, chance, and how love gives meaning to our existence and her devastatingly beautiful love letters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why your brain never runs out of problems to find”

To study how concepts change when they become less common, we brought volunteers into our laboratory and gave them a simple task – to look at a series of computer-generated faces and decide which ones seemed “Threatening”.
The faces had been carefully designed by researchers to range from very intimidating to very harmless.
When they ran out of threatening faces to find, our participants started calling faces threatening that they used to call harmless.
As we showed people fewer and fewer threatening faces over time, we found that they expanded their definition of “Threatening” to include a wider range of faces.
In other words, when they ran out of threatening faces to find, they started calling faces threatening that they used to call harmless.
Instead of carefully deciding how threatening a face is compared to all other faces, the brain analyses how threatening it is compared to other faces seen recently.
Instead of carefully deciding how threatening a face is compared to all other faces, for example, the brain analyses how threatening it is compared to other faces it has seen recently – or compares it to some average of recently seen faces, or to the most and least threatening faces it has seen.
In a sea of mild faces, even slightly threatening faces might seem scary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It Looks Like We Are Now, Officially, Over Steroid Panic”

McGwire is currently a bench coach for the San Diego Padres, a fact you probably didn’t know, because the last time Mark McGwire came across your mind was likely 2010, when he gave a high-profile interview to Bob Costas on MLB Network in which he admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs during his playing career.
This interview cemented the hostility of many who felt betrayed by McGwire, whose memories of that beautiful summer of 1998, when McGwire and Sammy Sosa raced to break Roger Maris’s 37-year-old home-run record, were now sullied by the Steroid Era.
USA Today said of all the candidates for the Cardinals’ job, McGwire “Made the most sense.” McGwire has gone from being a baseball pariah to being the guy everybody wants in charge.
There has long been an argument among those who believed much of the PED hysteria was lunacy – who claimed, as science advanced, someday we all would look back at Bonds and McGwire and mock then not for cheating, but for using such primitive performance enhancers like “The cream” and cattle steroids.
When you look back at the PED panic in the age of Trump, it looks more and more like one of those First World problems, the sort of national scandal you invent because there are no actual national scandals to deal with, or at least none that you want to.
Today, the PED panic looks more and more like the last gasp of a fading generational outrage, an emotional outburst and response to an increasingly wonkish and data-driven world: It feels more like Baby Boomers pounding their fists angry that it’s not 1961 anymore and athletes are not powered by Ovaltine the way they were told when they were 12.
Even more than its more fashionable cousin basketball and its more popular cousin football, the sport is run by data nerds from Harvard and Wall Street now, and they have no moral illusions about the game.
Perhaps more notably, the fact that the two best players of their generation, and maybe two of the best of all time, still aren’t in the Hall of Fame is increasingly being seen less as an ethical stand and more like a reason to ignore the Hall of Fame altogether.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Minimalist Ways To Declutter Your LifePick the Brain”

What Minimalism is really all about is reassessment of your priorities so that you can strip away the excess stuff – the possessions and ideas and relationships and activities – that don’t bring value to your life.
In this article, I will talk about 7 little ways you can declutter your life with a minimalistic approach.
A lot of people who are successful in the health area of their life apply this principle to their life.
The goal should be to either eliminate debt out of your life or never get in debt at all.
Minimizing time is also a way to become more of a minimalist.
It’s important to know where you’re spending your time on, try to focus on the highest value activities in your life and minimize the time you spend on low-value activities.
Try applying at least 1 of these tips to your life right now and see how you feel.
How to Get Sh*t Done will teach you how to zero in on the three areas of your life where you want to excel, and then it will show you how to off-load, outsource, or just stop giving a damn about the rest.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Spend It: the shopping list for the 1%”

The key role in this process played over decades by How to Spend It has made it an almost unique social lens, through which we can see how much the world has polarised since the egalitarian 1960s and 70s. Together, the magazine and website form “An elegant luxury environment for readers and advertisers”, as the FT’s promotional material puts it.
Today’s FT is more cosmopolitan and influential than when it produced its first How to Spend It page in 1967.
Nobody outside the FT knows exactly how much of that revenue comes from the advertisements in How to Spend It. Like other papers, the FT does not release financial results for individual supplements.
Julia Carrick, who conceived the How to Spend It magazine and was its publisher until 2015, told me: “Some of the issues were way over £1m in profit.” At its current publication rate, a conservative estimate of How to Spend It’s annual profits would be above £10m. At a recent meeting of FT executives, convened to discuss the long-term future of the paper, the current editor, Lionel Barber, reportedly declared: “What we need is another How to Spend It.” Among senior FT management, a piece of melodramatic business jargon is sometimes used to describe the importance of How to Spend It and its editor since 1998, Gillian de Bono, to the FT’s continued existence.
In an age of mass luxury – of mobbed designer concessions in department stores, of designer shops proliferating in seemingly every major city – how can the rich stand out? How to Spend It often advises its readers to buy limited-edition or hand-made goods.
How to Spend It began as a more carefree enterprise: the product of a reader’s letter and an extramarital affair.
The 1% were not as rich as they would become; nor was How to Spend It their shopping list quite yet.
If she is presented with work she considers inadequate or unsuitable, she will say: “This is not How to Spend It. It’s not how we do it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want More Energy And Bigger Results? Stop Asking “HOW” And Start Asking “WHO””

Becoming A WHO-Thinker”Your network is your net worth.” - Tim SandersMost people’s goals are based on HOW. According to Dan Sullivan, thinking about the HOW is daunting and leads to procrastination.
Instead of asking HOW, a much better question is WHO.WHO do you want to learn from?WHO is already doing what you want to be doing?WHO is where you want to be?WHO fascinates and/or inspires you?WHO do you want to collaborate with?WHO do you want to help? According to bestselling author Jeff Goins, “Success isn’t about who you know. Success is about who you help.”There is a clear transition that people make as their vision for themselves advances.
Conversely, scrappy people are far more concerned about the work.
We live in an age where people really really want to look sophisticated.
“Self-made is an illusion. There are many people who played divine roles in you having the life that you have today. Be sure to let them know how grateful you are.”In the book Give and Take, Adam Grant explained that successful people GIVE others credit while unsuccessful people TAKE the credit.
Create A List Of “Dream Mentors”When the WHY is strong enough, you’ll figure out WHO!When the WHO is exciting enough, you’ll figure out HOW!-Benjamin Hardy’s adaptation of the quote by Bill WalshIn the book, The Third Door, Alex Banayan tells the story of how he met and learned from people like Bill Gates, Lady Gaga, Steven Spielberg, and others.
Who Are Your Dream Mentors?Who are your dream mentors?Who are the people who are WHERE YOU WANT TO BE?Who are the people who fascinate and inspire you?Who are the people you want to learn from?Joe Polish, the founder of Genius Network and arguably the most connected man in business, has a list of “Rules” that he expects of those whom he interacts with.
If you have rare skills and abilities, you can use those skills abundantly to HELP the people you want to work with.

The orginal article.