Summary of “France to ban mobile phones in schools from September”

The French government is to ban students from using mobile phones in the country’s primary, junior and middle schools.
Children will be allowed to bring their phones to school, but not allowed to get them out at any time until they leave, even during breaks.
Jean-Michel Blanquer, the French education minister, said the measure would come into effect from the start of the next school year in September 2018.
At another school, Mathilde, 12, said: “It’s ridiculous. At my school, we don’t use them in class or during recess, so what’s the problem? If anyone’s caught using one in the toilets or at lunchtime, the phones are confiscated immediately and the person is given detention.”
“It’s probably a good idea when the kids are in school, but they can’t ban them bringing them to school,” said Sabine.
Blanquer has already suggested schools could install lockers for phones, though many city centre schools have little room for them.
“I’ve done a little calculation myself: 5,300 state schools with an average 500 pupils each, that makes around 3 million lockers.”
“How is the school going to stock them? And how are they going to make sure they’re given back to the owner at the end of school?” Gérard Pommier, head of the Federation of Parents in State Schools.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend: What It Has Meant to Me This Season”

The series follows Rebecca Bunch, a Harvard- and Yale-educated real-estate lawyer who rips apart her moneyed life in New York City to chase a boyfriend from her teen years, Josh Chan, to West Covina, California.
It took until season three, which takes a gimlet-eyed approach to Rebecca’s mental-health concerns, for me to realize that my chilliness toward the series wasn’t a mark of any inauthenticity I witnessed in its narrative.
In season three, several episodes reveal that Rebecca’s issues are much more knotted than the unchecked depression and anxiety she occasionally mentions.
In episode five, “I Never Want to See Josh Again,” Rebecca finds herself living with her controlling mother, stuck in a miasma of depression and bad habits, doing something I do with ritual intensity when depressed: Google the least painful ways to kill myself.
After finding out her mother has been drugging her strawberry milkshakes instead of speaking honestly with her about taking medication, Rebecca gets on a plane back to West Covina and tries to kill herself by methodically swallowing the pills she found in her mother’s room.
In Rebecca’s shifting emotions, I saw my own history: the giddy elation of a new diagnosis she believes can solve everything, the buoyant mania that often follows a suicide attempt, the careful navigation that comes when you’ve tried to set fire to your own life and still have to move forward.
Where Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’s typically keen understanding of Rebecca and her mental problems somewhat falters is in the season-two finale, when we see flashbacks of her time at a mental hospital.
In Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’s latest episode, the midseason finale, she says to her psychiatrist, “My whole life I’ve only known how to be like really good or really bad, but being human is living in that kind of in-between space.” I was struck by Rebecca’s burst of self-awareness because it reminded me of statements I had said before to psychiatrists and therapists, my mother and my friends.

The orginal article.

Summary of “2017 is the year people asked Google “how?””

The top Google searches in 2017 were quite expected topics.
Apart from those, Google notes that the world also asked more consequential questions including: how much will the wall cost, how many refugees are there in the world, how do hurricanes form, how to freeze credit, and how to help Puerto Rico.
As more people turn to Google to ask “How…?”, the accuracy of search results and Google’s algorithmic rankings have reached a pivotal point.
Google has promoted wildly inaccurate and offensive content this year, and displayed news results from malicious sources on numerous occasions, implicitly giving them authority.
As we’ve previously pointed out, Google essentially holds a monopoly on truth because it’s by far the dominant search engine on the web.
It’s more important than ever for Google to manage the integrity of its search result rankings.
Google’s Year in Search 2017 also reveals other top searches in categories including actors, Global news, and movies.
The lists were compiled based on search terms that Google said “Had a high spike in traffic in 2017 as compared to 2016.”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tony Romo on CBS NFL TV broadcast, Dallas Cowboys, more”

The first Cowboys game you called this year was obviously an emotional day given the team honored you in a pregame ceremony and your family was there.
For you, there will never be another Cowboys game like that, but as you move on in your broadcasting career and call more Dallas games, how do you anticipate your work will be on those games versus the experience this year?
The first Cowboys game for me was difficult for many reasons.
If you listened to the second game, I let it go a little more, and in the future I am pretty sure I will treat it like every other game.
If you love the game, hopefully you will enjoy learning it.
The way I think about the game, I wanted to show viewers that there is a whole bunch of things that they don’t know.
So I want to start something early in a game and it unfolds before your eyes as you are watching it.
Then it is like, Are you still going to stick with this after you have rushed for 1.0 yard per carry over nine carries? Are you going to keep going with three tight ends and running the football because that was your game plan coming in? Will people change their mindset or stick with their guns? A lot of that is really fun to see how that unfolds.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Philadelphia 76ers Joel Embiid is bringing his team to life”

Embiid didn’t speak English and had never played organized basketball, yet he knew he wanted to be like Kobe someday.
In another life- or another body- Embiid would probably be out running sand dunes like Bryant did at 4 a.m. as a way of channeling the restless id inside him.
Embiid says he’s reached out to Bryant on several occasions, drawn to Kobe’s supreme confidence.
“Bryant didn’t take all those shots because he had no conscience. He took them, Embiid says, because he knew he could make them.”He was always working on his shot, so that’s why he felt like he could.
Simmons’ game is limited by his lack of outside shooting, which collapses the space Embiid has to work inside.
For Embiid to take this team to its full potential, he has to do it with Simmons, which means they need to foster a relationship that has at times been distant.
“Having your teammates’ backs- that’s what I feel being a leader is,” Embiid says.
The kidding-not-kidding wink that masks why Embiid likes to play so close to the fire.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to tell if a CEO is worth working for”

Personally, I remember interviewing at one of my first job out of college, and I remember it being really hard to tell if a CEO is “Good” or not.
Plenty of CEOs sound like they’d be a good CEO. They’re charismatic, they’re articulate - but does sounding like a good CEO really make it true?
After almost four years of researching and observing hundreds of CEOs, I’ve learned to ask these four questions to discern whether or not a CEO is a good CEO:.#1: “When have you had to sugar-coat the truth - or avoid telling the truth - to your team?”How a CEO answers this question reveals her barometer for integrity.
3: “What does ‘success’ for the company look like to you?”This may seem like an unassuming question to ask - perhaps it’s one you’ve asked the CEO already.
If all the CEO is focused on is “Winning” and “Making money” and “Dominating the competition” in her answer, I can guarantee that’s 100% what the work environment is going to revolve around.
The answer to it demonstrates how cognizant the CEO is of how they’ve treated employees in the past, and how willing they are to admit if they’d haven’t been the ideal leader.
If you’re worried that asking these questions - particularly the last one - might offend your prospective CEO, that in itself is a sign that the CEO might not be who you’d hope for.
It gives you all the information you need to decide if they’re a CEO worth working for.

The orginal article.

Summary of “AI’s brightest minds are still figuring out how to understand their creations”

“We don’t want to accept arbitrary decisions by entities, people or AIs, that we don’t understand,” said Uber AI researcher Jason Yosinkski, co-organizer of the Interpretable AI workshop.
As these artificial neural networks are starting to be used in law enforcement, healthcare, scientific research, and determining which news you see on Facebook, researchers are saying there’s a problem with what some have called AI’s “Black box.” Previous research has shown that algorithms amplify biases in the data from which they learn, and make inadvertent connections between ideas.
“We need to understand what’s going on inside them and how they are being used.”
While he got the answer he was looking for, Wilson says that understanding the internal rules the algorithm had built to understand how light indicated the position of the particle could have opened a new avenue of research.
“In a way, a model is a theory for our observation, and we can use the model not just to make predictions but also to better understand why the predictions are good and how these natural processes are working,” Wilson said.
Does interpretability mean that AI experts know why Facebook’s algorithm is showing you a specific post, or that you understand yourself? Does a doctor using an AI-powered treatment recommendation system need to know why a specific regimen was suggested, or is that another role- like an AI overseer- that needs to be created in a hospital?
Understanding an algorithm isn’t just to fend against bias or make sure your rover won’t fall off a Martian cliff; knowing how a system fails can help AI researchers build more accurate systems.
To figure out how one of its algorithms thinks, Google is trying to sift through the millions of computations made every time the algorithm processes an image.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Read Financial News · Collaborative Fund”

The advent of financial news TV mastered the art of saying a tremendous amount of something when nothing needs to be said.
Read stuff you disagree with, written by people you respect.
An email he sent to his readers a few years ago began: “Consistent with my belief that it is more productive to read around one’s field than in one’s field, there are no investing books on this list.”
Old news is the best guide of how to treat current news.
The historian of old news teaches a few things: That forecasting markets and economies is nearly impossible; that people will never stop believing in forecasts; and that the biggest news stories in hindsight are the ones no one was talking about with foresight.
It’s an important framework to remember when reading today’s news.
Every piece of financial news you read should be filtered by asking the question, “Will I still care about this in a year? Five years? Ten years?” The goal of information should be to help you make better decisions between now and the end of your ultimate goals.
Why read something if it doesn’t lead to an actionable takeaway? I’ll tell you why: Because the person writing the article has no idea who you are, what your goals are, what your situation is, or how it will affect you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 amazing books I read this year”

Although I’m lucky that I get to meet with a lot of interesting people and visit fascinating places through my work, I still think books are the best way to explore new topics that interest you.
This year I picked up books on a bunch of diverse subjects.
Another good book I read recently is The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein.
I’ve written longer reviews about some of the best books I read this year.
If you’re looking to curl up by the fireplace with a great read this holiday season, you can’t go wrong with one of these.
If you want a good understanding of how the issues that cause poverty are intertwined, you should read this book about the eviction crisis in Milwaukee.
Most of the books I’ve read and movies I’ve seen about the Vietnam War focused on the American perspective.
It’s not the easiest book to read, but at the end you’ll feel smarter and better informed about how energy innovation alters the course of civilizations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 common-sense rules for getting the most out of meetings |”

If your goal is to have people with different opinions work through their differences to try to get closer to what is true and what to do about it, you’ll run your meeting differently than if its goal is to educate.
Debating takes times, and that time increases exponentially depending on the number of people participating in the discussion, so you have to carefully choose the right people in the right numbers to suit the decision that needs to be made.
The worst way to pick people is based on whether their conclusions align with yours.
Exploring the views of people who are still building their track record can give you valuable insights into how they might handle new responsibilities.
People’s emotions tend to heat up when there is a disagreement.
People will sometimes say, “I feel like” and proceed as though it’s a fact, when other people may interpret the same situation differently.
Watch out for assertive “Fast talkers.” Fast talkers say things faster than they can be assessed, as a way of pushing their agenda past other people’s examination or objections.
Fast talking can be especially effective when it’s used against people worried about appearing stupid – don’t be one of those people.

The orginal article.