Summary of “Don’t Tell The Kids, But Bedtime Is A Social Construct”

Kids need to sleep, and they generally sleep more than adults, especially when they’re really young.
The National Sleep Foundation, a nonprofit that funds research and does public outreach on sleep health, says it could be appropriate for a toddler to get as few as nine or as many as 16 hours of sleep a day.
Scientists are still trying to understand how culture and biology work together to create our sleeping lives, and they are learning that cultural variables can have a big impact on outcomes of sleep that we might be tempted to view as purely biological: how easily we fall asleep, how we feel the next day and even what it means to “Get enough.”
Biology is the biggest determinant of sleep, said Kate Bartel, who recently completed her Ph.D. under professor Michael Gradisar at his sleep science laboratory at Australia’s Flinders University.
Those same signals from the SCN tell you when to sleep by triggering the production of melatonin – a hormone that, among other things, makes humans tired – in response to darkness.
How we sleep – and how we experience the quality of the sleep we get – isn’t driven purely by biology.
A kid might start off staying up late to play video games every night and eventually be unable to sleep at a culturally accepted bedtime – even when she wants to.
Ultimately, O’Connor said, we have to be cognizant that sleep is a biological phenomenon, but how sleep is done is social and cultural.

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Summary of “Full transcript: Defense Secretary James Mattis’ interview with The Islander – The MIHS Islander”

So I think once in awhile, people understand if we want to vote people into office that say “Let’s stop this, stop working on other people’s problems.” But I think eventually, as Winston Churchill put it, once the American people exhaust all the alternatives, they’ll do the right thing.
If you want to really change it in the long term, I think it comes down to doing so through education of the young people.
The short answer is, get the political end state right and then give it the full effort and explain to the American people and the American congress what you’re doing and get the whole world behind you.
TEDDY: How can the United States create an atmosphere of trust with the Arab people, especially in Iran?
Until the Iranian people can get rid of this theocracy, these guys who think they can tell the people even which candidates they get a choice of.
For so long when Russia vetoed the United Nations so they couldn’t do anything about it, the only reason that Assad is still in power and has killed hundreds of thousands of his own people and allowed the terrorists a place to set up camp and millions, literally millions of people, forced out of their homes with nothing but what they could cram into a car or put on their back, it’s all because of Iran.
Most of the Iranian people, I’ve known enough Iranian people or talked to Americans who grew up in Iran and it’s not them, it’s the regime.
I’ve sat behind then Secretary of Defense Gates who said the American people are not going to keep paying more than you for this defense.

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Summary of “Ask Polly: I Moved for My Job, and It Was a Huge Mistake!”

What’s crazy about overachievers who take big risks but who are also neurotic is that we expect ourselves to FIND A SOLUTION using our minds instead of allowing our feelings to tell us what should come next.
Slowing down to feel your feelings doesn’t mean not exercising, which you know manages to keep you afloat moodwise.
You’ll get upset about something, but because you’re feeling it completely instead of pushing it away and bellowing GET BACK TO WORK, YOU FAILURE, you will be able to follow your instincts for a change.
Sensitive women who work their asses off and don’t feel their feelings enough tend to have a lot of trouble standing up for themselves in work situations.
So we’re always paranoid about being “Bitchy.” We ignore our own feelings and we try to ignore other people’s feelings, too, to compensate.
Knowing how you feel and being able to stand up for how you feel instead of defining yourself as a fuck-up and a judgmental bitch is pretty much essential to every woman, and it’s particularly essential if you want to enter middle age without constantly hating yourself for not having “Arrived” in some magical place by now.
No matter what you do next, you have to honor your feelings and give yourself more credit for working so hard to get to this point.
Not in a place or in a job, but in that good feeling inside your heart that says, “I am doing my best. I took a big risk and I floundered but I’m still trying so hard, and that’s a beautiful thing, maybe even more beautiful than sailing across some imaginary finish line.” There is promise in this false start.

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Summary of “IDEO’s secret to better brainstorming sessions lies in the phrase “How might we””

To avoid these pitfalls, the design firm IDEO has developed a brainstorming strategy that relies on three simple words: the phrase “How might we.”
At a recent creative leadership class at the firm’s office in New York City, put on by Adobe’s 99U conference, nearly every question was framed as a “How might we,” or HMW: How might we make our teams more engaged? How might we foster deeper relationships between employees? How might we inspire more frequent knowledge-sharing? The same approach is popular at Google and Facebook, according to the Harvard Business Review.
While the phrase “How might we” seems pretty basic, each word is intended to serve a specific purpose.
Asking “How would we do this” or “How do we do this” can give employees performance anxiety, she says: People may stay silent for fear of giving half-baked or incorrect answers.
By contrast, “The beauty of the phrase ‘How might we do this’ is that it eliminates fear, stress, and anxiety by supportively implying that there may be more than one solution, and that nothing more is needed at the moment than ideas,” says Greaves.
The phrase “How might we” signals that risky or outlandish ideas are welcome.
The question “How might we solve world peace?” Way too big.
“How might we create a more peaceful office environment?” is bound to produce some specific suggestions.

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Summary of “AI is changing how we do science. Get a glimpse”

Their field lends itself to AI and machine-learning algorithms because nearly every experiment centers on finding subtle spatial patterns in the countless, similar readouts of complex particle detectors-just the sort of thing at which AI excels.
Particle physicists strive to understand the inner workings of the universe by smashing subatomic particles together with enormous energies to blast out exotic new bits of matter.
In 2012, for example, teams working with the world’s largest proton collider, the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland, discovered the long-predicted Higgs boson, the fleeting particle that is the linchpin to physicists’ explanation of how all other fundamental particles get their mass.
At the LHC, a Higgs boson emerges from roughly one out of every 1 billion proton collisions, and within a billionth of a picosecond it decays into other particles, such as a pair of photons or a quartet of particles called muons.
Physicists still rely mainly on their understanding of the underlying physics to figure out how to search data for signs of new particles and phenomena.
Troyanskaya combined hundreds of data sets on which genes are active in specific human cells, how proteins interact, and where transcription factor binding sites and other key genome features are located.
To train the program-a deep-learning system-Zhou exposed it to data collected by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements and Roadmap Epigenomics, two projects that cataloged how tens of thousands of noncoding DNA sites affect neighboring genes.
Like master chefs who start with a vision of the finished dish and then work out how to make it, many chemists start with the final structure of a molecule they want to make, and then think about how to assemble it.

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Summary of “Why do we think poor people are poor because of their own bad choices?”

Here’s what has gone wrong: hard work and a good education used to be a sure bet for upward mobility in the US – at least among some groups of people.
JD Vance writes of seething with resentment as he worked as a teen cashier, watching people commit fraud with food stamps and talking on cellphones that he could only “Dream about” being able to afford.
When we watch others, we tend to see them as being driven by intrinsic personality traits, while in our own case we know that, for example, we acted angrily because we’d just been fired, not because we’re naturally angry people.
In other words, other poor people are poor because they make bad choices – but if I’m poor, it’s because of an unfair system.
As a result of this phenomenon, Pimpare says, poor people tend to be hardest on each other.
Biases about the nature of inequality, of course, don’t only affect poor people.
Cecilia Mo’s experience of the effects of inequality on education came during a stretch with Teach For America, a selective program that allows top university students to spend two years teaching in poor communities.
The more you engage with with people unlike you and learn about their lives and stories, the harder it is to see them as stereotypes or to dismiss their challenges as trivial.

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Summary of “How to use Instagram Stories like a pro”

While the company is nowhere near down and out, brands and individuals are increasingly shifting over to Instagram Stories for a variety of reasons.
In April, Instagram Stories usage surpassed all Snapchat activity, with Instagram Stories users surpassing 200 million, and Snapchat stories rounding up to 160 million.
Even if you’re not ready to fully move away from Snapchat, I’m here to teach you the ins and outs of Instagram Stories, and how to become a true pro on the stories platform that people are increasingly starting to explore.
WHY EVEN USE INSTAGRAM STORIES Instagram Stories generally provide a better, less perplexing user experience.
Now if you’re a brand, the list of reasons why you should use Instagram Stories are endless.
How to hack the 24 hour rule: Instagram Stories are meant for sharing of recent content, but there are several ways to post something older.
Do you feel like pro? A content creating expert? Do the features in Instagram Stories appeal to you more than Snapchat? Now it’s up to you to harness these tips and tricks and get creative with how you share your everyday life with your followers.
If you think I missed anything, I’d love to hear from you in the comments, and follow me on Instagram to see how I do stories!

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Summary of “The Golden Age of Bailing”

You just pull out your phone and bailing on a rendezvous is as easy as canceling an Uber driver.
People feel free to bail on close friends, because they will understand, and on distant friends, because they don’t matter so much, but they are less inclined to bail on medium-tier or fragile friends.
A high-status person will frequently bail on a lower-status colleague, but if an intern bails on a senior executive, it is a sign of serious disrespect.
In the information age, the highly ambitious are masters of acquaintanceship – making a zillion useful contacts, understanding the strength of weak ties and bailing on a networking prospect with a killer-eyed coldness when a better offer comes along.
I’ve been reading the online discussions to understand the ethics and etiquette of bailing.
I’m delighted half the time when people bail on me.
We could, for example, create three moral hurdles every bail must meet.
Second, did you bail well or did you bail selfishly?

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Summary of “Atlassian Boosted Its Female Technical Hires By 80%”

Atlassian took this tack, and deprogramming people from calling its hiring culture a meritocracy has shifted the company’s mentality to really scrutinize potential biases – in every candidate touchpoint, in performance evaluations, in project assignments, and throughout.
“If these people have a very similar set of perspectives and life experiences, you may be unintentionally building a culture that’s saying, ‘We only want people like us. We don’t want you here. We’re not going to support you,'” she says.
I’ve seen people post everything from what it’s like to work with mental health issues to interesting observations about what makes our culture unique,” says Blanche.
“We thought really specifically about what images we put on our website. Were we showing a diversity of employees in situations that demonstrated a multidimensional environment? Would most people coming to the site feel like they recognized not only themselves, but the type of activities, social occasions, work settings they like to work in? We didn’t want to show pictures of only happy hours or intense heads-down work,” Blanche says.
“Startups should create a broad picture of who they are and who they support. Showcase benefits that you provide for people across different backgrounds and stages of life. It’s important that people feel represented and that their needs have been thought of. If you’re emphasizing that the perks of your company are your ping pong table and the keg, then there’s a very specific set of people who are going to be interested in that kind of a culture.”
“We also choose interviewers who we think are great ambassadors of our culture and values. There’s a nomination process where Atlassians choose peers who they think best embody the company values to interview candidates for Values Fit. For instance, one of Atlassian’s values is ‘Play, as a team.’ So, a chosen interviewer might be someone who goes out of their way to help others learn, tasked with looking for that quality in prospective candidates. Atlassian then gives nominees training on structural behavioral interviewing and unconscious bias, and we make sure these people have a lot of support,” she says.
“If you want to increase your conversions, identical pitches may only end up working on a small subset of people because everyone has a different set of preferences,” says Blanche.
“A lot of people have habits with implications they don’t understand because they haven’t worked with the most diverse set of folks in the past. There’s a big learning curve for a lot of people. To be understanding and empathetic of that learning curve is also a crucial part of inclusion. We have to include people who we’re asking to develop new habits. The key will always be dedication and persistence. Always ask what perspectives you don’t have. Just carrying that question with you can create powerful change. Make your efforts public to your company.”And remember, startups are uniquely suited to this task.

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Summary of “21 Behaviors That Will Make You Brilliant At Creativity & Relationships”

Spend more time with your loved ones and away from work.
I’ve made this mistake and destroyed important relationships with people I deeply admire - people who invested lots of time and energy into me.
Research has found that experiencing awe can expand your perception of time, alter your decision making abilities, and enhance your well-being.
Awe alters your experience with time because it helps you see things more astronomically.
Think More Flexibly About “Limits” on Time”It is utterly beyond our power to measure the changes of things by time.
Time is an abstraction, which we conceive by the change of other things.
Take away: Let go of your beliefs about fixed-limits of time.
Time is a unique concept, which few of us understand.

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