Summary of “The Gift and the Grift: What’s Jay-Z’s NFL Deal Really About?”

The policy didn’t stick, but the NFL is still suffering from a many-faced perception problem, and partnering with Jay-Z just seems like a first-thought PR move.
Why did the show leave so much to be desired? Mainly because Jay-Z reportedly turned down the chance to appear, citing the NFL’s unfair denial of employment to Kaepernick, and basically everyone but Travis Scott followed suit.
It wasn’t so long ago that he was wearing a “Colin K” jersey during a performance on Saturday Night Live and describing the progenitor of NFL players’ movement to tackle injustice as “Iconic.” For whatever else he said during that press conference at the Roc Nation offices last week, Jay-Z also said that he thinks “We’ve moved past kneeling and I think it’s time to go into actionable items.” No one could reasonably disagree, but what about the action already being taken?
Jay-Z isn’t every other billionaire, but last Wednesday, he sure sounded like every other billionaire, like every Team Logo avatar on Twitter, like every other “Football reasons” guy: “I agree with what you’re saying. So what are we gonna do? You know what I’m saying?” he asked.
On Monday, Dolphins wide receiver Kenny Stills, who split from the coalition along with Kaepernick and Panthers safety Eric Reid when it began to look suspiciously like more league lip service in 2017, said that Jay-Z “Didn’t seem very informed” when he spoke at the Roc Nation offices.
On Tuesday, coach Brian Flores reportedly played eight Jay-Z songs in a row at practice.
How can the structural problem ever be fully acknowledged if Kaepernick isn’t involved? Kaepernick’s lawyer, Mark Geragos, told ABC News on Wednesday that Jay crossed an intellectual picket line with this deal.
What, specifically, makes it not a workaround for a league that really does need Jay-Z more than he needs them? And, with reports swirling that Jay could be in for an ownership stake in a to-be-determined NFL franchise, it’s fair to ask how much of Jay-Z, Black Activist, was a grift? Exactly how socially conscious can a billionaire be, really?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Silicon Valley’s Crisis of Conscience”

Another iconic image of Esalen is a fictional one: the final scene of “Mad Men.” Don Draper sits, cross-legged and ill at ease, on the Esalen lawn.
Esalen is just outside Silicon Valley, so the executives who visit it have come from the likes of Intel and Xerox PARC-and, more recently, from Apple and Google and Twitter.
“There’s a dawning consciousness emerging in Silicon Valley as people recognize that their conventional success isn’t necessarily making the world a better place,” he told the Times.
“The C.E.O.s, inside they’re hurting. They can’t sleep at night.” If the tech tycoons were already going to Esalen for ethical and spiritual guidance, then perhaps Esalen could guide them toward a less rapacious business model.
For a long time, the prevailing posture of the Silicon Valley élite was smugness bordering on hubris.
For all the talk of Esalen becoming a beacon of moral guidance for the tech élite, the institute’s public schedule looks much as it did in the seventies.
After the piece about Esalen ran in the Times, a new C.E.O. was installed in Tauber’s place, and Esalen’s leadership tried to reassure its Aquarian customer base that their beloved sanctuary would not be overrun by tech bros.
“Esalen played its own part in the collapse of Soviet Communism,” Jeffrey Kripal, a professor at Rice University, wrote in his 2007 book, “Esalen: America and the Religion of No Religion.” If hot-tub diplomacy could help thaw the Cold War, surely it can help diminish human downgrading.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Accept The Awkwardness: How To Make Friends”

Accept The Awkwardness: How To Make Friends Friendship is hard, but the best way to tackle it is to talk about it.
In this episode, you’ll learn from the experts about how to make new friends and deepen your existing relationships.
What does being a friend mean in a world where hackers are trying to be your “Friend” on Facebook?
Accept the awkwardness and assume that other people need new friends, too.
You have to accept that awkwardness and the vulnerability it stems from, because guess what? You can’t have friends without getting vulnerable.
Ask anyone about how to make friends and they will most likely tell you to try a new hobby.
Having friends is one of the most nourishing parts of being alive, so it’s not weird or bad or wrong to prioritize it.
Journalist Rachel Wilkerson Miller gives great advice about being honest when people ask how you’re doing, plus a detailed guide to how to show up for people in small and large ways.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 Ways Leaders Delegate Successfully”

A 2015 Gallup study of the entrepreneurial talents of 143 CEOs on the Inc. 500 list showed that companies run by executives who effectively delegate authority grow faster, generate more revenue, and create more jobs.
According to John C. Maxwell, author of Developing the Leaders Around You, “If you want to do a few small things right, do them yourself. If you want to do great things and make a big impact, learn to delegate.”
Senior leaders often struggle with knowing what they can delegate that would actually feel helpful to them, or how to delegate responsibility and not just tasks, or what responsibilities could serve as a learning and growth opportunity for others below them.
Senior executives may not have had role models along the way to show them how to delegate successfully.
In his book, The Art of Being Unreasonable, author, philanthropist, and billionaire CEO Eli Broad writes, “The inability to delegate is one of the biggest problems I see with managers at all levels.”
Before leaders can successfully and effectively delegate, they need to understand their own resistance.
A senior sales leader might want to delegate follow-up calls to big customers to his sales team, but realizes that he hasn’t updated his notes in the CRM database, or he might simply be in the habit of making the follow-up calls himself before members of the team can get to them.
Delegating well helps leaders maximize their resources, ensuring that they’re focusing on their highest priorities, developing their team members, and creating a culture where delegation isn’t just expected – it’s embedded in the culture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Get closer to the people in your life by being the best mess possible |”

It’s time to give up on chasing perfection and embrace our uniquely individual quirks and imperfections, says author Chidera Eggerue.
We humans are pretty excellent at telling other people what to do – but not so excellent at following our own advice.
Case in point: When friends and family confide they’re anxious about what to say or do at a party, most of us tell them, “Just be yourself! People will love you.”
Recent research shows everything we stand to gain from adopting this attitude.
Inspired by Brené Brown’s work on vulnerability, a study from psychology researchers at the University of Mannheim, Germany, examined the “Beautiful mess effect.” In a set of studies, they presented subjects with hypothetical fraught situations, which included confessing romantic feelings to a friend, admitting a mistake at work, and being the first to apologize after arguing with one’s partner.
After reading detailed depictions, participants assessed how they’d feel if they saw another person reveal their vulnerability in these scenarios – and how they’d feel if they were the ones revealing vulnerability.
The results: “Even when such examples of showing vulnerability might sometimes feel more like weakness from the inside, our findings indicate that, to others, these acts might look more like courage from the outside,” the researchers wrote.
By being our best possible messes, not only can we quit pursuing perfection, we can also build greater trust and closeness in our personal and professional relationships.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Be a Leader That Inspires People to Change”

No matter how old you are or what type of role you have in life, there are times you’re a follower, and there are times you’re a leader.
You see, when people talk and write about leadership, we often assume that you need a title to be a leader.
Look, being a leader has nothing to do with your job.
How do you lead? How do you get people to follow you? How do you get people to listen to your ideas?
“My team is small but has very strong, opinionated people. I find myself playing mediator on a daily basis. It takes up a lot of my time, but I believe in making time for the people side of work. However, it can really be mentally exhausting.”
“But I’m not the leader or manager.” That’s what people often hide behind.
So you might technically not be the leader at your work, family, or group of friends; you can still set the right example.
These are the lessons I’ve learned from studying leaders from all walks of life: From business leaders to spiritual leaders.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Great Mentors Focus on the Whole Person, Not Just Their Career”

What’s more, most of the people currently acting as mentors aren’t having as dramatic an impact as they could because they’re too narrowly focused on career advancement.
There was remarkably little analysis or advice on how to mentor the whole person, extending beyond the career to include discussions about behavior, values, relationships, parenting, finances, and even spiritual life.
Mentoring the whole person takes more effort, more time, and more thought.
If you don’t do this early on in your mentoring conversations, it is like sailing a ship without the ultimate destination in mind and you’ll find that it is possible to give a mentee good career advice that is poor life advice.
Which could, for the junior, be more important than career and financial success.
Many mentors don’t realize that their lasting imprint on a mentee is often how they conduct their life, whether at work, home, or other settings.
One teammate describes how he “Inspired me every day we were together with his demeanor and how he handled life.” I’ll always remember the time when we were about to play two opponents known for making bad line calls.
By mentoring the whole person and not limiting your conversations to career matters, you will have even greater impact and will be felt by your mentees – and everyone they influence – for years to come.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Fall in Love With Your Partner Again? Science Says to Ask Them These 36 Questions”

The person we often crave to feel most known by is our partner.
Name three things you and your partner appear to have in common.
Take four minutes and tell your partner your life story in as much detail as possible.
Alternate sharing something you consider a positive characteristic of your partner.
Share with your partner an embarrassing moment in your life.
Tell your partner something that you like about them already.
Share a personal problem and ask your partner’s advice on how he or she might handle it.
Ask your partner to reflect back to you how you seem to be feeling about the problem you have chosen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Towards Chinatown”

Two days after I learn that my mother has cancer, after my sister tearfully tells me over the phone, “This might be mom’s last Christmas,” I go to San Francisco Chinatown.
At home, my mother sings Cantonese songs from her childhood to me.
In Chinatown, my mother got her hair cut by a woman called Pony.
In the aftermath of the 1906 earthquake and fire, Chinatown merchants hired white architects to rebuild their buildings with pagodas, dragon motifs, and eaves curling skyward, a stage-set Chinatown to attract tourists and to protect the neighborhood against city leaders who had planned to seize its land.
I don’t know that in a Chinatown alley stands a modest building with my mother’s family name on it, home to our family association.
Am I imagining the yearning of my mother, left behind by her parents as a child as they headed towards America one by one? She was raised by a grandmother in a one-room apartment shared with an uncle who smoked indoors.
What do you pack when your mother has cancer and you don’t know how long you’ll stay? An acquaintance suggests sweats, but I only pack one pair.
I’m surprised – at how I mourn the loss of my mother tongue, but my mother does not.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ta-Nehisi Coates Talks to Jesmyn Ward About Writing Fiction, Reparations, and the Legacy of Slavery”

One of the things Coates must now do is figure out how to balance the two: how to write nonfiction and fiction, how to juggle his renown with his calling.
A few weeks after our meeting, Coates is called to testify before members of Congress for H.R. 40, a proposed bit of legislation that would study the issue of reparations.
Coates has been so persuasive in his writing about the issue that even those on the other side of the political divide, like conservative New York Times columnist David Brooks, agree with him.
Invested because Coates is one of the first to testify, directly after Senator Cory Booker.
Coates immediately does this brilliant thing where he insists our very conception of ourselves as a nation and a democratic republic is based on embracing our legacy, embracing the more honorable figures and aspects of our past.
“If I agree to pay taxes, if I agree to fealty to a government, and you give me a different level of resources out of that tax pool, if you give me a different level of protection, you have effectively stolen from me. If you deny my ability to vote, and to participate in the political process, to decide how those resources are used, you have effectively stolen from me.” Coates goes on to establish the wealth gap that Julianne Malveaux, an economist on the panel, attributes to that theft that spans almost 350 years, from 1619 to 1968-“Conservatively.” Then Coates finishes with steady assurance.
I believe The Water Dancer will not be the last novel you read by Ta-Nehisi Coates.
“I could write slavery fiction all day,” he says.

The orginal article.