Summary of “Facebook knew about Snap’s struggles months before the public”

This isn’t the first time Facebook has used Onavo’s app usage data to make major decisions.
The info reportedly influenced the decision to buy WhatsApp, as Facebook knew that WhatsApp’s dominance in some areas could cut it out of the loop.
To be clear, Facebook isn’t grabbing this data behind anyone’s back.
The revelation here is more about how Facebook uses that information rather than the collection itself.
Former Federal Trade Commission CTO Askhan Soltani tells the WSJ that Facebook is turning customers’ own data against them by using it to snuff out competitors.
Tech lawyer Adam Shevell is concerned that Facebook might be violating Apple’s App Store rules by collecting data that isn’t directly relevant to app use or ads.
No matter what, the news underscores just how hard it is for upstarts to challenge Facebook’s dominant position.
How do you compete with an internet giant that can counter your app’s features the moment it becomes popular? This doesn’t make Facebook immune to competition, but app makers definitely can’t assume that they’ll catch the firm off-guard.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Writing a user manual at work makes teams less anxious and more productive”

Kroghrud adopted the user manual after years of observing that despite individual dispositions and needs, employees tried to work with everyone in the same way.
The user manual aims to help people learn to adapt to one another by offering an explicit description of one’s personal values and how one works best with others.
Having worked at Bridgewater Associates, a hedge fund notorious for creating “Baseball cards” for every employee-which list each individual’s strengths, weaknesses, and personality test scores-I know how helpful it can be to have a user manual of sorts for everyone on a team.
While filling out my user manual, many responses felt run-of-the-mill: Interviews, first dates, and a life-long obsession with personality inventories have prepared me to recite how much I value honest, explicit feedback; personal relationships; and providing support for those I care about.
While somewhat uncomfortable to document, sharing these descriptions was the most relieving and rewarding aspect of writing the manual.
Fun and cathartic as our manual writing experience was, my editor and I couldn’t help but wonder how much time and stress we could’ve saved by writing and sharing these manuals seven months ago, when we began working together.
Whether you’re a manager or young employee, writing and sharing a user manual has a clear business payoff.
What’s more, if my experience is anything to draw from, sharing manuals with your colleagues will build connection, and make you feel less alone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Habits, Not Goals, Will Bring You Success”

Victor Hugo’s dramatic trick to stop procrastinating The daily habit that made Jerry Seinfeld such a success The single behavior that often separates top performers from the pack.
Where would the wanting [come] in on some of these habits that we know we need to do, but we don’t really like to do?
Most people want to have clean teeth, or want to be in shape, or want to be calm and not stressed, or want to succeed in the workplace.
For a long time, my mom wanted to be in shape, but she didn’t like working out in public, so the idea of going to a YMCA or a gym wasn’t appealing to her.
Jay: Sometimes wanting doesn’t have to be, “I want to go to Alaska on vacation.” It can also be, “Oh, I know I need to do that.”
For a long time, I would buy apples and put them in the crisper in the bottom of my fridge, and they would sit there for three weeks and go bad. I was like, “I want to eat fruit. I want to be healthy, and I’m just wasting money.” [So] I bought a larger bowl and set that on the counter.
There are a lot of ways to be average, but if you want to be extraordinary, the system is the surest way to get there.
Of course you want to keep your chain going for as long as you can, but at some point, your kid’s going to get sick, or you’re going to get sick, or you’re going to go on vacation, and you’re going to slip.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Work with Someone Who’s Always Stressed Out”

We all know people who seem to be constantly stressed out – who claim to be buried in work, overloaded with projects, and without a minute to spare.
How do you deal with coworkers who can’t handle stress? Should you address the issue directly? Or try other tactics to help them calm down and focus? And how can you protect yourself from their toxic emotions?
“Say something like, ‘I notice you were working late last night, and it wasn’t the first time. How are things going?'” Then, after your colleague recites the usual catalog of pressures, “Say, ‘That must be hard.’ It doesn’t matter if you believe it or not. That’s how this person is feeling. Acknowledging it gives you both a chance to move beyond.” At the same time, Weeks says, you mustn’t “Enable” or agitate your colleague by making comments like, “I don’t know how you can you stand it! This company is working you to death!” That’s not helpful.
“Don’t add to their sense of being overwhelmed.” You might shorten your emails to the person, split your larger requests into several smaller steps, or encourage the idea of dividing work into manageable chunks.
“When someone is toxic and draining your energy, you sometimes have to figure out how you can get distance from that person or limit your interactions with them.” Of course, this isn’t always easy – particularly if you work in the same department and are assigned to the same projects.
Think about ways to reduce the person’s cognitive load by breaking work up into more-manageable chunks.
The colleague – we’ll call her Jenny – “Was so overwhelmed and stressed out by her work that her overall performance was really beginning to suffer,” recalls Karoli.
“Everyone could see how hard she was working. But I also saw the dark circles under her eyes, her jumpy mood, and her irritability.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 ways to get rid of anger, according to neuroscience”

When experimental subjects are told of an unhappy event, but then instructed to try not to feel sad about it, they end up feeling worse than people who are informed of the event, but given no instructions about how to feel.
Bereaved people who make the most effort to avoid feeling grief, research suggests, take the longest to recover from their loss.
Your ability to experience positive feelings goes down – but not negative feelings.
Here’s what’s really interesting: when you suppress your feelings, the encounter gets worse for the angry person, too.
Sharing your feelings with others constructively is a good idea but “Getting it out” tends to snowball your anger.
Accordingly, people can rid themselves from unwanted feelings by engaging in a cognitive activity, such as doing math equations, playing a game of Tetris.
In one of Ochsner’s reappraisal experiments, participants are shown a photo of people crying outside a church, which naturally makes participants feel sad. They are then asked to imagine the scene is a wedding, that people are crying tears of joy.
As opposed to bottling up, when you tell yourself “They’re having a bad day”, angry feelings plummet and good feelings increase.

The orginal article.

Summary of “26 Favorite Books of High Achievers”

The most successful people often are serious about self-improvement, which can come in the form of a good book.
“It may not be the newest shiny object on the shelf, but it certainly remains one of the best books for teams I have ever read. You don’t have to have a creative-based business in order to appreciate the fact that Catmull just knows how to work better with people, and how to make those people thrive. It’s an inspiration to me to see the meticulous detail and passion by which he continuously achieved this, even through failure, and how humble he was in the process. It’s a must-read for every entrepreneur and leader of people and at every level of business from startup to Fortune 500.”.
“Influence explains the psychology of why people say yes, and how readers can apply this understanding to their personal and professional lives. Dr. Cialdini is a world-renowned expert in persuasion who brings 35 years of experience researching why people are moved to change behavior. The book includes six universal principles, with direction on how to use these guidelines to master the art of persuasion. I’ve used these principles to accomplish goals in my personal and professional lives, including everything from helping my employees reach their career goals to helping our global technology consulting company close new business. I recommend this book for anyone in a leadership position.”
“Today, hyper-adaptability is more important than economies of scale and corporate process efficiency. Companies need to organize in autonomous teams and align them toward the most important goals. They need to be more agile. This is the best book I have read describing this shift toward a new normal in organizations and how to build and lead them.”
“A lot of the people I meet or that I’ve worked with complain and ask why they are not getting anywhere in their career or why they’re not a director after just two years. I believe all of us need to understand that input correlates to output. This book is a fabulous read to understand that exceptional talent is a function of hard work over time. There are no shortcuts in life: 10,000 hours of practice or 10 years. This book is the starting point and a blueprint you can follow to be successful.”
“After reading hundreds of personal development and business books, this one is my all-time favorite. To succeed in business, and in life, it’s important to first establish strong fundamentals. This book provides the tools and guidance to easily understand the power of setting goals, advancing personal development, seeking knowledge, controlling finances, mastering time management, and building a winning team. Almost anyone can get value from it, regardless of the person’s age, experience, business, or stage in his or her chosen journey. The late Jim Rohn was a master teacher and business mentor. He has truly helped shape who I am today, and significantly influenced my approach to business.”
“Cognitive dissonance is one of the most powerful forces in our personal and professional lives. It helps explain why we often unnecessarily repeat mistakes and defend entrenched positions. As this book explains, our brain wants to insulate us from making mistakes, so it allows us to rationally justify contradictions in our mind. So rather than learning from our mistakes, we tend to double down and get further entrenched in our position as a defense mechanism. This book is essential for leaders of companies to read, as it can help increase self-awareness, both in ourselves and our teams. The ability to detect and act on cognitive dissonance is a competitive advantage in all aspects of our life.”
“In his latest book, Sanborn inspires others to unlock their true potential. He emphasizes that the only limitation we have is that which we place upon ourselves. This book provides a framework and insights for how to be the best version of you. Thank you, Mark Sanborn, for encouraging continuous improvement. You inspire us to embrace the journey.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Elon Musk firing his assistant story is a good career, salary lesson”

In his 2015 book, “Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future,” Ashlee Vance shares the story of how Musk stopped working with his longtime executive assistant in early 2014.
According to Vance, the assistant, Mary Beth Brown, asked Musk for a significant raise after she’d been working with him for 12 years.
In response, Musk told Brown to take two weeks off, during which he would assume her responsibilities and see whether she was critical to his success.
Musk has since tweeted that the anecdote is “Total nonsense.”*. He continued: “Mary Beth was an amazing assistant for over 10 yrs, but as company complexity grew, the role required several specialists vs one generalist.”
“MB was given 52 weeks of salary & stock in appreciation for her great contribution & left to join a small firm, once again as a generalist,” Musk said.
Above all, Taylor said, “You want to make your boss need you – not just have you on board.” So consider what makes your boss successful and how can you align yourself with that, she said.
Some people call it “Managing up” – it’s about figuring out how you can make your boss look good to their boss.
This post was updated after Elon Musk responded to the details.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Elon Musk firing his assistant story is a good career, salary lesson”

In his 2015 book, “Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future,” Ashlee Vance shares the story of how Musk stopped working with his longtime executive assistant in early 2014.
According to Vance, the assistant, Mary Beth Brown, asked Musk for a significant raise after she’d been working with him for 12 years.
In response, Musk told Brown to take two weeks off, during which he would assume her responsibilities and see whether she was critical to his success.
Musk has since tweeted that the anecdote is “Total nonsense.”*. He continued: “Mary Beth was an amazing assistant for over 10 yrs, but as company complexity grew, the role required several specialists vs one generalist.”
“MB was given 52 weeks of salary & stock in appreciation for her great contribution & left to join a small firm, once again as a generalist,” Musk said.
Above all, Taylor said, “You want to make your boss need you – not just have you on board.” So consider what makes your boss successful and how can you align yourself with that, she said.
Some people call it “Managing up” – it’s about figuring out how you can make your boss look good to their boss.
This post was updated after Elon Musk responded to the details.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kendrick Lamar on ‘Humble,’ Bono, Taylor Swift, Mandela”

Lamar, 30, is pleased with his recent commercial triumphs, but says it’s not the goal: “If I can make one person – or 10 million people – feel a certain type of euphoria in my music, that’s the whole point.”
How so?It taught me how to deal with [pauses] … emotions.
How much have you grappled with it as an adult?Well, you know, it was also just a lot of mothafuckin’ parties and a lot of humor, which sometimes blocks the fucked-up shit that I’ve seen.
That’s where the initial change will start from.
How do you deal with that?Well, that’s the challenge that keeps me going.
That’s a skill, a talent that people perfect with years of rehearsing.
How much of his theology have you embraced, and how much of it is just you playing with the ideas?Everything that I say on that record is from his perspective.
So for the suburban kid who doesn’t know how we grew up, or the history of my people, hearing them lyrics, they get to understand.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How New Managers Can Send the Right Leadership Signals”

As a new manager, how do you build an authentic and connected leadership presence that has a positive impact on your team and colleagues?
As one new manager shared recently, “My professional leadership goal is to be a genuine and emotionally intelligent manager who inspires others to excellence.”
As Ram Charan, Stephen Drotter, and James Noel describe in their book, The Leadership Pipeline, “Though this might seem like an easy, natural leadership passage, it’s often one where people tripthey make the job transition from individual contribution to manager without making a behavioral or values-based transitionThey must believe that making time for others, planning, [and] coachingare necessary tasks and their responsibility. More than that, they must view this other-directed work as mission-critical to their success.”
Leadership presence is therefore an “And/both” versus an “Either/or.” On the one hand, having an effective leadership presence includes being authentic, genuine, and clear on your guiding compass, core values and convictions.
As your new role will likely increase your interactions with people of many different styles, having an effective leadership presence includes continually building and practicing the skills of being clear and direct while finding ways of making connections and showing respect.
As author Daniel Goleman writes in his book Primal Leadership: “Quite simply, in any human group, the leader has maximal power to sway everyone’s emotionshow well leaders manage their moods affects everyone else’s moods, which becomes not just a private matter, but a factor in how well a business will do.
To help maintain and sustain a more stable and grounded presence, be sure that you are setting the right priorities for yourself, and that you have strategies for managing the workload of being a leader, as you take on this larger role and responsibility as a new manager.
Becoming a new manager is an important leadership passage in your career.

The orginal article.