Summary of “What You Need to Stand Out in a Noisy World”

For years, I’ve been grappling with the question of how professionals in an increasingly noisy and frenetic world can ensure their expertise is recognized.
These are social proof, which gives people a reason to listen to you; content creation, which allows them to evaluate the quality of your ideas; and your network, which allows your ideas to spread. Without at least two of these, though ideally you have all three, it’s structurally almost impossible for your message to break through.
You can leverage the power of social proof to ensure your ideas are taken more seriously – immediately – by making an effort to align yourself with people and institutions that are known and respected within your industry.
Social proof enables others to “Relax” about you; they don’t need to be so vigilant in evaluating your credentials because you’ve already been vetted by others.
Content Creation You can’t become recognized for your ideas if you don’t share them.
The first is that access to a diverse group of people exposes you to different perspectives that can spark new ideas and enables you to refine your ideas by receiving thoughtful and relevant feedback.
The second is that a wide network enables your ideas to spread faster, because you’re starting with a larger base of people who are motivated to speak, tweet, blog, and write about your ideas with their own audiences.
At a foundational level, you need to be viewed as credible, you need to share your ideas publicly so others can see your expertise for themselves, and you need to have a network that’s eager to spread the word.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Busier You Are, the More You Need Quiet Time”

Author JK Rowling, biographer Walter Isaacson, and psychiatrist Carl Jung have all had disciplined practices for managing the information flow and cultivating periods of deep silence.
Recent studies are showing that taking time for silence restores the nervous system, helps sustain energy, and conditions our minds to be more adaptive and responsive to the complex environments in which so many of us now live, work, and lead. Duke Medical School’s Imke Kirste recently found that silence is associated with the development of new cells in the hippocampus, the key brain region associated with learning and memory.
Physician Luciano Bernardi found that two-minutes of silence inserted between musical pieces proved more stabilizing to cardiovascular and respiratory systems than even the music categorized as “Relaxing.” And a 2013 study in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, based on a survey of 43,000 workers, concluded that the disadvantages of noise and distraction associated with open office plans outweighed anticipated, but still unproven, benefits like increasing morale and productivity boosts from unplanned interactions.
Cultivating silence isn’t just about getting respite from the distractions of office chatter or tweets.
Real sustained silence, the kind that facilitates clear and creative thinking, quiets inner chatter as well as outer.
Cultivating silence, as Hal Gregersen writes in a recent HBR article, “Increase[s] your chances of encountering novel ideas and information and discerning weak signals.” When we’re constantly fixated on the verbal agenda-what to say next, what to write next, what to tweet next-it’s tough to make room for truly different perspectives or radically new ideas.
Even incredibly busy people can cultivate periods of sustained quiet time.
Silence is still accessible-it just takes commitment and creativity to cultivate it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Scientific American Blog Network”

In first generation languages like FORTRAN and C, the burden was on programmers to translate high-level concepts into code.
With modern programming languages-I’ll use Python as an example-we use functions, objects, modules, and libraries to extend the language, and that doesn’t just make programs better, it changes what programming is.
Programming used to be about translation: expressing ideas in natural language, working with them in math notation, then writing flowcharts and pseudocode, and finally writing a program.
Natural language is expressive and readable, pseudocode is more precise, math notation is concise, and code is executable.
The power of modern programming languages is that they are expressive, readable, concise, precise, and executable.
The authors designed this language to be more concise and readable than most programming languages at the time, which was 1989.
Running programs is the whole point of programming, of course, but there is more to it.
Modern programming languages are qualitatively different from their predecessors, but we are only beginning to realize the implications of that difference.

The orginal article.