Summary of “I’m Finally Making Money, But It Doesn’t Feel Great”

It’s like now that I have all this extra money, I feel like I’ve become this whole new person I don’t recognize.
It’s a seductive world of handwoven throw pillows and tasteful ceramics, and it’s also a bottomless money pit.
You bought a purse, some clothes, paint on sale, and an environmentally-friendly car that will save you gas money over the years? Cut yourself some slack, and chalk it up to a learning experience.
Instead, you need to find a new source of the virtuous feeling that you used to get from socking money away, and that involves exploring new things to do with it.
In other words, you should spend some time rethinking your priorities now that you have more money to spend on them.
I suggest an exercise that financial adviser Manisha Thakor got me to try a few years ago: Write down everything you spend your money on, every day, for a couple of weeks.
Did those new paints bring you a lot of pleasure? Are you still excited about that shirt you bought last week? Did you come home from that nice vacation feeling closer with your husband? Or maybe none of those things were that great, in retrospect, and you wish you’d put that money toward your friend’s fundraiser or, say, a political cause instead. It may sound corny, but keeping better track of where your money goes will give you more clarity on the expenses that are meaningful to you.
I don’t mean that you should feel bad about having money.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s the Right Thing to Say When Someone Is Grieving?”

The overwhelming answer I receive comes in the form of a question: “How will I know what to say? And, if I say the wrong thing, will I make things worse?”.
If you’ve ever had friends lose someone they love-a grandparent, parent, partner, or even a child-you may have wondered the same thing.
“There is no right thing, as if it’s a programmed text, as if there’s the right thing in all times and places,” he told me during an interview on KPFA’s About Health.
We can’t just race into a conversation with someone in pain and think we can shut all that out and be good listeners.
Just like in meditation, when this happens-and it will many times-we can gently bring our focus back to the person we’re trying to help.
The fourth step is about reminding ourselves that, even though we’re there to support the grieving individual, we’re also a separate person.
Another grief expert, psychologist Dale Larson, suggests that people can easily fall into what he calls the “Helper’s pit.” When people are going through a loss, it’s normal and natural for them to fall in a pit of despair.
“If you find that you’re lost in your own reactions,” he writes, “Take a few slow breaths to help clear your mind and bring your focus back to the other person.” Even while you’re with that person, be in your own body, with your own breath.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Escape the Overthinking Trap: Stop Judging Yourself”

We are the only species that can really think “Offline” – wrapped up in things that haven’t yet happened or things that are long gone but can never be changed.
Critical thinking has undoubtedly advanced our cause and become one of the essential assets of being so brilliantly human, but introspective thinking – our near constant self-evaluation, who we are, where we fit, how we compare – is becoming one of the most destructive aspects of modern life.
We are in thrall to the rigid, judgmental thoughts we think about ourselves, prisoners of the sinewy web of cogitation that tells us we are strong, clever, important, unassertive, patriotic, hopeless, old, fat, hard done by, forgotten – when actually we may be many of these things rolled into one.
Our obsessive thinking about ourselves even informs the air of political revolt that made 2016 such a big turning point.
It embeds personal misery in an era in which we are tempted, even encouraged, to compare ourselves with other people: the teenager who feels low because of what her Instagram feed makes her think; the thwarted youngster, demoralised by the success of others; the employee who feels insecure because she thinks the boss blanked her on the stairwell; the hypochondriac who thinks he is dying of everything.
Too much of our behaviour is determined not by how things are, but how we think things are.
How to cultivate that sense of detachment from a poisonous, unhelpful or just plain wrong stream of thinking? Visual clues can help: a post-it on a computer screen or a screensaver on a phone.
Instead of ruining our short time alive by setting expectations of how we think everything should be, from our jobs to our love lives, our children to our prospects, let us accept that some things will not always go as we wish.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Top 27 Productivity Hacks of 2018”

While working in an environment where everyone can view your Google or Outlook calendar can be convenient, it can also set you up for problems if you don’t take control of your time.
Others may view empty spaces as opportunities to schedule meetings, even if you intended to use the time for other tasks.
Some people thrive under pressure, allowing them to accomplish more than they originally thought possible in the time frame.
Often, you’ll find your focus improves when you begin working and ultimately finish on time.
If you find yourself losing time to sites that aren’t essential for work, consider blacklisting them for periods using the SelfControl app.
Websites you add to the list will be automatically blocked for the selected time, ensuring you can’t distract yourself with your hunt for a perfect unicorn meme to share with your friends.
While meetings can be vital to your business, they have a nasty habit of expanding to fit the available time slot, even if those extra conversations don’t provide value.
Trying to keep up with the news is essentially impossible, allowing it to generally function as a time sink.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 10 Commandments of Emotional Intelligence”

Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify emotions, to recognize the powerful effects of those emotions, and to use that information to inform and guide behavior.
Emotional Intelligence begins by learning to ask the right questions, like “What is my current mood, and how might that influence my decisions today?” or “What are my strengths and weaknesses?”.
II. Thou shalt learn from other perspectives.
Acknowledge your mistakes and apologize when appropriate, and you’ll develop qualities like humility and authenticity, naturally drawing others to you.
VIII. Thou shalt not freeze others in time.
Refuse the temptation to judge others too quickly, without considering context and extenuating circumstances.
Emotional intelligence isn’t about achieving perfection, or reaching a certain level of “EQ.” It’s about continuous learning and growth.
Yes, it’s often when you feel you’ve “Mastered” one of these 10 commandments that you will make your greatest mistakes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The man who built a $1bn firm in his basement”

After a month of working “Crazy hours”, Mr Rodrigues had come up with his first fully formed idea – a software system that allowed the user to control his or her mobile phone from their laptop.
Naming his company Soti, sales of the system started to grow slowly, until 12 months later Mr Rodrigues got a phone call out of the blue from one of the UK’s largest supermarket groups.
“Mr Rodrigues, now 55 and Soti’s chief executive, says:”I was still in my basement when I got a call from the company, saying they would like to place an order.
Soti has never looked back; and while most people have never heard of the firm – because it sells its mobile technology software systems to companies instead of consumers – it today has annual revenues of $80m. This is despite Mr Rodrigues not needing any external investment.
Instead of still being based in Mr Rodrigues’ basement, its headquarters is split across two buildings in Mississauga, which borders Toronto in the Canadian province of Ontario.
Technology journalist Martin Veitch who has followed Mr Rodrigues’ career, says Soti has been so successful because of its specialised approach.
One problem Mr Rodrigues says the company has faced, is struggling to recruit enough good computer programmers.
While Mr Rodrigues no longer has to work from his basement, his mother-in-law still lives with him, his wife and their two sons.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mike Rowe on Efficiency versus Effectiveness”

Earlier this week, I listened to Brett McKay’s interview with Mike Rowe.
As you’ll learn if you listen to the conversation, following his stint as the host of Dirty Jobs, Rowe has become an advocate for the trades.
In this interview, as in many others, Rowe argues that skilled labor can be both satisfying and lucrative, and yet there are still somewhere around three million such jobs left unfilled in this country.
I always find Rowe’s thoughts on shifting American work cultures interesting, but there’s a phrase he often uses in these discussions that has recently begun to draw my attention: efficiency versus effectiveness.
Rowe notes that knowledge work seems obsessed with efficiency, while the skilled trades seem more concerned with effectively solving problems.
Stepping away from the immediate context of Rowe’s advocacy, I think he has touched on an important point here that highlights a little-discussed problem rotting the core of the knowledge economy.
Rowe hints at an interesting path out of this swamp: stop lionizing efficiency, and start asking the question that has guided craftsmen for millennia: what’s the most effective way for me to accomplish the things that are most important?
The concept is elegant: important and compelling works of literature delivered in a pocket size printing, roughly the size of an smartphone.

The orginal article.