Summary of “How to Overcome Your Fear of Failure”

Behind many fears is worry about doing something wrong, looking foolish, or not meeting expectations – in other words, fear of failure.
Let’s go back to Alex as an example of how to execute this.
In coaching Alex through this approach, I encouraged him to redefine how he would view his performance in the interview.
Was there a way he might interpret it differently from the get-go and be more open to signs of success, even if they were small? Could he, for example, redefine failure as not being able to answer any of the questions posed or receiving specific negative feedback? Could he redefine success as being able to answer each question to the best of his ability and receiving no criticisms about how he interviewed?
Goals can be classified as approach goals or avoidance goals based on whether you are motivated by wanting to achieve a positive outcome or avoid an adverse one.
Though nervous about the process, Alex’s desire to become a CEO was an approach goal because it focused on what he wanted to achieve in his career rather than what he hoped to avoid.
If Alex had instead become discouraged about the outcome of his first C-level interview and decided to actively avoid the pain of rejection by never vying for the top spot again, he would have shifted from approach to avoidance mode.
To return to Alex, he was able to recognize through the coaching process that being hyper-focused on his previous company’s flop – and overestimating his role in it – caused him to panic about the CEO interview.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Overcome Your Fear of Failure”

Behind many fears is worry about doing something wrong, looking foolish, or not meeting expectations – in other words, fear of failure.
Let’s go back to Alex as an example of how to execute this.
In coaching Alex through this approach, I encouraged him to redefine how he would view his performance in the interview.
Was there a way he might interpret it differently from the get-go and be more open to signs of success, even if they were small? Could he, for example, redefine failure as not being able to answer any of the questions posed or receiving specific negative feedback? Could he redefine success as being able to answer each question to the best of his ability and receiving no criticisms about how he interviewed?
Goals can be classified as approach goals or avoidance goals based on whether you are motivated by wanting to achieve a positive outcome or avoid an adverse one.
Though nervous about the process, Alex’s desire to become a CEO was an approach goal because it focused on what he wanted to achieve in his career rather than what he hoped to avoid.
If Alex had instead become discouraged about the outcome of his first C-level interview and decided to actively avoid the pain of rejection by never vying for the top spot again, he would have shifted from approach to avoidance mode.
To return to Alex, he was able to recognize through the coaching process that being hyper-focused on his previous company’s flop – and overestimating his role in it – caused him to panic about the CEO interview.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Ways to Respond to Ageism in a Job Interview”

Despite the negative stereotypes that older workers have less energy and are less productive, the data shows otherwise.
According to research from the Stanford Center on Longevity, older workers are healthy, have a strong work ethic, are loyal to their employers, and are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs than their younger coworkers.
Show your excitement about the opportunity and the work you do.
Instead of discussing how many years of experience you have, or how many times you’ve done a certain type of project, show your enthusiasm for the job by saying something like, “This is my sweet spot. This is the work I love to do.” Calling out all of your years of experience can have the unintended consequence of alienating or intimidating your interviewer, or making you appear to be a know-it-all.
In finding ways to connect personally with her interviewer, Lauren made sure to use current references that a younger person could relate to, like a popular show on Netflix.
Humor is another way to connect and show the other person you’d be enjoyable to work with.
Show your ability to work well with diverse groups of people.
While ageism exists, focusing on what you can control and employing the strategies above can divert attention from your age and refocus it on why you are right for the job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Answer ‘Why Are You Interested in This Position?'”

Sit down for any job interview and one of the first questions you’re likely to be asked is, “Why are you interested in this position?”.
Sometimes someone says something that makes me think, “Huh. Do they fully understand what this job is?” When that happens, it’s usually because the person has talked about how excited they are to do X, when X is only a tiny portion of the job, or not likely to be part of it at all.
If your interviewer asks why you’re interested in the job, it’s important that you actually sound interested.
If the thing that interests you most about the job is the company you’d be working for figure out a different answer.
Typically, a good answer to “Why does this job interest you?” will not only explain what appeals to you about the job, but also explain how it fits in with your career path.
While you do want to explain how the job fits with your overall career path, you don’t want to sound as if it’s just a stepping stone on your way to something else.
Sometimes this question can feel hard to answer because the reality is that you’re really not very interested in the job, but you need a paycheck.
If you want to increase your chances of being hired, you need to at least act interested in the job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Exit interviews: Why do companies do them and how should you respond?”

If you’re like most people, you might have wondered how your input would be used and worried that telling the unvarnished truth would burn a bridge.
This tends to leave people unsure of how to navigate exit interviews.
The bad news is that my exit interview will be with one of the people who have been key in making this formerly pleasant environment a miserable place to work in.
Companies do have sources of information other than exit interviews if they truly care to use them.
In particular, employers that really want this type of feedback should be asking for it before people leave! One option is to do “Stay interviews,” where management seeks input from people before they’re on their way out the door.
Most importantly, companies can invest heavily in good management, part of which is creating a work culture where people feel reasonably safe speaking up about concerns because they see people aren’t penalized for doing that-and because they see those concerns taken seriously and addressed.
If a company doesn’t have that kind of culture-if it hasn’t done the work to make people feel safe sharing candid input-exit interviews are likely to be largely unproductive anyway.
Companies also need to be more transparent about how exit interview feedback will be used and about how they’ll insulate people who give negative feedback from blowback from their managers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You’re answering these 5 job interview questions wrong”

This question is tricky because it’s easy to give an answer that has little to do with the job itself.
These are all true answers, but they’re hardly inspiring.
If you’re not prepared with a better answer, you might reply, “My weakness is that I don’t respond well to tight deadlines,” or “I don’t like situations where the team is not working well together.” These may in fact be true, but such an answer is risky.
Here, again, there’s a wrong answer, and a right one.
The wrong answer is to share anything negative that might be propelling you out of your existing role.
The answer is to simply express a 10-year goal, without attaching it to a specific individual.
There’s enough stress in job interviews without making things more difficult by having to come up with answers to these common questions on the spot.
So before you go into your next job interview, master these five answers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Show You’re Passionate in a Job Interview”

The company where he was interviewing was in the U.S. The interviewers had a blind spot: they believed that passionate candidates would speak loudly and at length about their achievements.
Alex needed to figure out how to communicate excitement and commitment in interviews without fundamentally changing his personality or culturally ingrained mannerisms.
Demonstrating passion is not the only predictor of a great job candidate, however hiring managers reference this trait repeatedly in their interview feedback.
To succeed in your next job interview, you need to figure out how to convey what matters most to you.
Most résumés and interview responses are a long list of “What” someone did without ever delving into “Why.” Instead of telling hiring managers what you’ve done, begin by explaining your motivations – why you chose that activity – and the impact of your work.
An exceptional candidate tells interviewers about when and where he went above and beyond.
After using these techniques during interviews, Alex was hired by a competitor of the company that had turned him down.
Don’t get overlooked during your next job interview because you don’t display the kind of full-throated, table-thumping behaviors companies tend to equate with passion.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Passionate, Progressive Politics of Julia Child”

The rest is the stuff of gastronomic legend: the love affair with French cuisine, and then the meandering and often tumultuous path to publishing “Mastering the Art of French Cooking”-the two-volume compendium, co-authored with Simone Beck and Louisette Berthold, that would make Julia Child the most famous French chef in the world, despite the fact that she was not a bit French, nor even a proper chef.
The public Julia Child-Julia Child the culinary titan-looms so large that she often eclipses the person who existed outside the kitchen.
In a new volume, “Julia Child: The Last Interview,” a collection of conversations with journalists from throughout her life, the Child on display is quick and insouciant, as one expects her to be, pronouncing on methods for turning mushrooms and the pleasure of making one’s own vinaigrette.
Child grew up in Pasadena, California-in one of the book’s interviews, a 1989 conversation with the journalist Polly Frost, for Interview, she describes herself as “An innocent hayseed from a middle-class, utterly nonintellectual background.” In fact, the McWilliams family was quite well off: Child’s father owned and managed a great deal of land; her mother was the heiress to a modest paper fortune.
The following year, just before Senator McCarthy began his infamous hearings, televised live to a rapt and terrified audience of millions, Child received a letter from Aloise Buckley Heath, a fellow Smith College alumna and the sister of William F. Buckley, Jr., the prominent conservative author and proponent of McCarthyism.
“The French Chef,” her first television show, ran from 1963 to 1973; while Child was urging her audience to engage with a classical, almost dreamlike version of French culture, actual France was in the midst of a tumultuous, often violent cultural recalibration, under DeGaulle’s fractious leadership.
Over the years, as Child became more comfortable with her fame, she spoke more openly about her political beliefs, especially her support for Planned Parenthood and her disgust at the Republican Party.
The Administration seemed uninterested in “Doing anything about the environment,” Child said, in the same interview with Polly Frost, adding, “These people are anti-abortion, but they’re not doing anything for the future.” She went on, “If we go on as we are, polluting everything, we may very well end up like Venus, a great ball of fire. And I don’t think we have very much time.” Two years later, an eighty-one-year-old Child told Fenzi, the journalist compiling the oral-history project, “The American Institute of Wine and Food, that’s mostly what I do now. That, and I am very much interested in Planned Parenthood, and Smith College, and the Democratic Party.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 mistakes can ruin your chances in a job interview”

4 minute Read. Making a good impression at a job interview involves a lot more than just dressing appropriately, being on time, and researching the company.
Suppose you start off with, “Here’s why I’d be great for this job. Here are my accomplishments.” You’ve just dug a hole for yourself, because you’re making the interview all about you.
If you correct the person interviewing you by saying, “Well, actually, I didn’t work for that division,” or “I’m late because I think you sent me the wrong time in my Google Calendar,” you might as well kiss the job goodbye.
Every interview flows both ways-you are evaluating the company, just as they are judging you.
There’s nothing more important than rehearsing for that interview.
The executive communications company I founded and headed for 30 years often rehearsed leaders for job interviews.
Ask, and answer, these five questions before a job interview.
You’ll kill the interview, rather than getting killed by it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Joe Rogan’s podcast is an essential platform for freethinkers who hate the left.”

“Spoke with Joe Rogan Podcast coming soon,” West wrote on Twitter.
From its unambitious beginnings as a venue for Joe Rogan to shoot the shit with his comedian buddies, The Joe Rogan Experience has become one of the internet’s foremost vectors for anti-wokeness.
It’s a fine motto for the show that The Joe Rogan Experience would eventually become.
Jones had come on the podcast to bury the hatchet with Rogan, with whom he had been feuding over Jones’ previous assertions that the 2012 Sandy Hook school shooting may not have actually happened-that conspiracy theory is the rare one that Rogan will not abide.
In January, for example, Rogan and Mike Tyson shared a loopy conversation in which the former heavyweight champion explained how he came to purchase a tiger and praised a drug he referred to as “The toad.” In September, Rogan hosted the entrepreneur Elon Musk for a 2½-hour conversation during which the two men smoked weed, played with a flamethrower, and discoursed on the nature of reality.
Here is the quandary: Rogan appeals to listeners who are aware enough to recognize that media consolidation is a bad thing yet naïve enough to mistake The Joe Rogan Experience for something other than a promotional tour stop for slicksters on the make.
Joe Rogan is fully invested in the idea that people-progressive liberals, mostly-are too quick to take offense at things that do not offend Joe Rogan.
For 3½ hours, Rogan and Tim Pool pressed Dorsey and Twitter exec Vijaya Gadde on their reasons for banning Yiannopoulos, Alex Jones, Gavin McInnes, Jacob Wohl, and Chuck Johnson, among others; on the importance of allowing conservatives to misgender people online; and on the injustice of perma-banning the right-wing trolls and anti-intellectual intellectuals to whom Rogan is indebted for his late-career success.

The orginal article.