Summary of “The New York Review of Books”

It is no wonder that the planet’s carbon emissions, which had seemed to plateau in mid-decade, are again on the rise: preliminary figures indicate that a new record will be set in 2018.This is the backdrop against which the IPCC report arrives, written by ninety-one scientists from forty countries.
The burden of climate change falls first and heaviest on the poorest nations, who of course have done the least to cause the crisis.
The report provides few truly new insights for those who have been paying attention to the issue.
As the new report concedes, there is “No documented historical precedent” for change at the speed that the science requires.
Since the last IPCC report, a series of newspaper exposés has made it clear that the big oil companies knew all about climate change even before it became a public issue in the late 1980s, and that, instead of owning up to that knowledge, they sponsored an enormously expensive campaign to obfuscate the science.
The next Democratic primary season might allow a real climate champion to emerge who would back what the rising progressive star Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called a “Green New Deal”; in turn a revitalized America could theoretically help lead the planet back to sanity.
In October, the attorney general for New York State filed suit against ExxonMobil, claiming the company defrauded shareholders by downplaying the risks of climate change.
If we keep doing that, climate change will no longer be a problem, because calling something a problem implies there’s still a solution.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Overwhelmed by climate change? Here’s what you can do”

The challenge of avoiding catastrophic climate breakdown requires “Rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society”, according to a new IPCC report.
Bill McKibben, a leading climate campaigner and founder of 350.org, argues that the most important thing people can do is come together to form movements – or join existing groups – that can “Push for changes big enough to matter”, from city-wide renewable energy programmes to large-scale divestment from fossil fuels.
Relatively simple measures such as insulating lofts and draft-proofing doors and windows on a large scale would see a big drop in energy consumption.
The UK government substantially cut the amount that energy companies are forced to spend on helping households with energy efficiency measures.
Demand a low carbon option in everything you consume, from clothes to food to energy.
The IPCC is clear that the real challenge from its report is to politicians, political systems and corporations rather than individuals.
Jim Skea, a co-chair of the IPCC working group on mitigation said the report had presented governments “With pretty hard choices”.
“We have pointed out the enormous benefits of keeping to 1.5C, and also the unprecedented shift in energy systems and transport that would be needed to achieve that,” Skea said.

The orginal article.