Summary of “Six Myths About Choosing a College Major”

An English major in the 60th percentile makes $2.76 million in a lifetime, a major in psychology $2.57 million and a history major $2.64 million.
Myth 3: Choice of major matters more than choice of college.
In all, more than half of students at less selective schools major in career-focused subjects; at elite schools, less than a quarter do, according to an analysis by the website FiveThirtyEight of the 78 “Most selective schools” in Barron’s rankings, compared with 1,800 “Less selective schools.”
One tip: Complementary majors with overlapping requirements are easier to juggle, but two unrelated majors probably yield bigger gains in the job market, said Richard N. Pitt, an associate professor of sociology at Vanderbilt University who has studied the rise of the double major.
The long-held belief by parents and students that liberal arts graduates are unemployable ignores the reality of the modern economy, where jobs require a mix of skills not easily packaged in a college major, said George Anders, author of “You Can Do Anything: The Surprising Power of a ‘Useless’ Liberal Arts Education.” In his book, Mr. Anders profiles graduates with degrees in philosophy, sociology and linguistics in jobs as diverse as sales, finance and market research.
Of students who said they felt committed to their major when they arrived on campus, 20 percent had selected a new major by the end of their first year, according to a national survey by the University of California, Los Angeles.
“Students in our business meta-major get to understand the difference between finance, accounting, management and marketing so they can choose their major from an informed perspective,” Dr. Renick said.
No wonder fewer than a third of college graduates work in jobs related to their majors.

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Summary of “3 Things You Should Always Leave Out of Your Resume”

What points are necessary for a resume? originally appeared on Quora – the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.
Email address Work history: For each of your roles, include the skill-set you LIKED doing and want to continue to do.
My resume has a “Value-add” section in which I list key accomplishments in my career and certifications.
You can also include top skills such as skills from the Strength Finder or technical skills if the role you are applying for is technical.
If you are applying for a job that you are transitioning careers into, you could consider writing a skills-based resume instead of a traditional resume.
A skills-based resume lists out your skills broadly and then your jobs/roles after.
Pro tip: convert your resume into a PDF before sending.
Don’t include references until you are asked by the employer.

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Summary of “How to Apply for a Job You’re Overqualified For”

“No job applicants should call themselves overqualified. If someone else says it about you, it’s flattering. When you say it, it’s off-putting.” If the hiring manager brings it up, be humble.
Erdogan suggests saying something along the lines of, “I’d like to be in a job with more predictability and reduced travel.” Or perhaps you’re interested in the job because you’ve been searching for months and are getting desperate.
If there are still doubts about your fit for the job, Fernández-Aráoz’s advice is to take “a problem-solving point of view,” and “Be strategic” about showing how the organization could benefit from having you in the job.
You can nudge the hiring manager to think more broadly about the role by “Enthusiastically sharing your ideas for how big the job can be,” he adds.
“You will have the opportunity to shape the job and expand your role once you’re in the organization and have an understanding of how things work,” she says.
“Sometimes when overqualified people don’t get the job they applied for, they get angry and upset,” Erdogan says.
Later in the interview, Lauren shared her ideas for how big the job could be.
Case Study #2: Express enthusiasm for the job, and demonstrate how you will add value.

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Summary of “22 Years Ago, Steve Jobs Said 1 Thing Separates People Who Achieve From Those Who Only Dream”

Jobs was … well, let’s just say that Steve Jobs was demanding.
I’ve never found anybody that didn’t want to help me if I asked them for help … I called up Bill Hewlett when I was 12 years old.
“Hi, I’m Steve Jobs. I’m 12 years old. I’m a student in high school. I want to build a frequency counter, and I was wondering if you have any spare parts I could have.” He laughed, and he gave me the spare parts, and he gave me a job that summer at Hewlett-Packard … and I was in heaven.
Most people never ask, and that’s what separates, sometimes, the people who do things from the people who just dream about them.
By showing you respect and trust other people, and by giving them the latitude to freely share their expertise or knowledge, you don’t just get the help you think you want.
Plus, you make it easier for them to ask you for help when they need it.
You’ve shown it’s OK to express vulnerability, to admit a weakness, and to know when you need help.
If that’s not enough to convince you: If a guy like Steve Jobs was willing to ask for help, shouldn’t we?

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Summary of “You Will Lose Your Job to a Robot-and Sooner Than You Think – Mother Jones”

Erasers have to do with the fact that we’re all going to be out of a job in a few decades? Consider: Last October, an Uber trucking subsidiary named Otto delivered 2,000 cases of Budweiser 120 miles from Fort Collins, Colorado, to Colorado Springs-without a driver at the wheel.
No matter what job you name, robots will be able to do it.
Surowiecki also points out that job churn is low, average job tenure hasn’t changed much in decades, and wages are rising-though he admits that wage increases are “Meager by historical standards.”
In the even nearer term, the World Economic Forum predicts that the rich world will lose 5 million jobs to robots by 2020, while a group of AI experts, writing in Scientific American, figures that 40 percent of the 500 biggest companies will vanish within a decade.
The time will probably come when we actively want to do just the opposite: provide an income large enough to motivate people to leave the workforce and let robots do the job better.
As large-scale job losses from automation start to become real, we should expect the idea to spread rapidly.
A robot tax could still have value as a way of modestly slowing down job losses.
Eric Schmidt, chairman of Google’s parent company, believes that AI is coming faster than we think, and that we should provide jobs to everyone during the transition.

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Summary of “Why Nerds and Nurses Are Taking Over the U.S. Economy”

Remarkably, that’s 10 percent of the total 11.5 million jobs that the BLS expects the economy to add.
Manufacturing is the only major industry projected to decline in the next decade, and steelworkers are projected to add just 9,000 jobs in the next 10 years.
Aging explains, for example, why jobs are projected to grow 50 percent slower in the next decade than they did between 1996 and 2006.
Those five occupations-personal care aides, home health aides, registered nurses, medical assistants, and nursing assistants-account for almost one-fifth of the net new jobs to be created by 2026.
The economy has already shed 120,000 of those jobs in just the last two years.
Even though these jobs have been a bright spot in the last few years, the BLS projects that warehousing employment won’t grow much faster than the rest of the labor market in the next decade.
Jobs for people with bachelor’s degrees are projected to grow twice as fast as jobs for people with just high school degrees.
In their projections, heavy truck-driving will add 114,000 new jobs in the next decade, growing at nearly the same rate as the economy.

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Summary of “Nature News & Comment”

Over the coming decades, these technologies will transform nearly every industry – from agriculture, medicine and manufacturing to sales, finance and transportation – and reshape the nature of work.
Advances in digital technologies are likely to change work in complex and nuanced ways, creating both opportunities and risks for workers.
Their preliminary results show that these jobs do pay off for some gig workers; 68% of the survey respondents said that the work makes up an important part of their household income.
Digital platforms provided jobs to a variety of people – including women who were primary caregivers and migrants without work permits – who said that their employment opportunities were otherwise limited.
13 per hour, on average – than foreign workers, who earned $11.66 per hour for comparable work.
Another large ethnographic study of gig workers is beginning to reveal more about how this work gets done.
Workers who had connections to at least one other person on the platform had higher approval rates, were more likely to gain elite ‘master’ status, and found out about a new task more quickly than unconnected workers.
As one student put it: “Because I am a woman, employers may not think that they should give me a job working in IT, so I may never fully get to use all that I have learned to do, work that I want to do.”

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Summary of “Science Says These Are the 12 Most Satisfying Jobs. They All Share 1 Key Characteristic”

Everybody wants a good job, but here’s an important question for you – what makes a job good? There are tons of surveys to consult if your metrics are the size of your paycheck or the security that comes from seeking an in-demand profession.
Most of us know a truly good job isn’t just one that pays the rent and doesn’t unduly raise your stress levels.
So where do you find a job like that? Soul-searching is no doubt required as one person’s dream job is another’s personal nightmare, but according to one huge national survey of 27,000 people, there’s one particular characteristic that’s far and away the most likely to make a gig satisfying.
According to Tom W. Smith, director of the General Social Survey at the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago and the study’s author, despite the obvious differences in the day-to-day routines of office supervisors and sculptors, ministers and salespeople, there is one characteristic that unites almost all the jobs on this list.
“The most satisfying jobs are mostly professions, especially those involving caring for, teaching, and protecting others,” he commented, according to PsyBlog.
Or to put it, even more succinctly, the happiest jobs are those that involve giving to others.
They cite studies showing “Volunteer work is associated with greater happiness and less depression,” research demonstrating “That performing five random acts of kindness one day a week can increase your happiness,” and findings showing that “If you more strongly feel that your work made a positive difference in other people’s lives, you feel more positively at bedtime,” among other research results.
So if you’re looking for a satisfying job, go ahead and weigh all the practical concerns as well as the quirks of your own personality, but don’t forget this essential truth – if you don’t feel your work is helping others in some way, chances are good it won’t make you truly happy.

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Summary of “Welcoming Our New Robot Overlords”

“Either I’ll be working at General Motors or I’ll be working at Steelcase by the end of the year,” he vowed in 1984.
As technology is making the work faster, more efficient, and more environmentally sound, the products are being created with far fewer workers.
A decade ago, industrial robots assisted workers in their tasks.
“Broadly, my research program is about making robots that can work with people on complex tasks,” Tellex told me.
In the old days, Stinson said, “It was, How much longer am I going to be able to do this? That’s kind of a question that you would always ask-how much longer can I hold up doing this, physically just holding up? Ergonomically, the difference today is huge. Huge.” Now he could work longer without burning out, and the work was easier.
“Some of them, their jobs were being eliminated because they just didn’t have enough work. And the company has to do something to survive. But it’s hard not to take it personally when you’re losing your job. You have to go home and tell your wife and kids, ‘I’m out of work.’ I remember one engineer saying, ‘I won’t be seeing you anymore, Bill, I just got RIF’d.’ It didn’t feel very good.” He paused.
When I asked how many new workers Steelcase had hired to accommodate the increase in production, he said that workers were mainly being moved between production lines, to replace workers who had retired.
In the meantime, he was enjoying the advantages of work that involved less work.

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Summary of “How School Trains Us To Fail In The Real World”

Do you want to know why I dislike school? Homework, sure, but more important than that are these four ways that school trains us to fail in “The real world.”
Schools teach knowledge, but life requires wisdom”Never mistake knowledge for wisdom. One helps you make a living; the other helps you make a life.” - Sandara CareyInstead of learning critical life skills on how to manage money, how to negotiate, or how to communicate, kids are mostly taught to memorize information.
Many people put these “Life” skills on the onus of the parents to teach their kids, but not all parents are qualified to teach these lessons, and many assume that school is “Enough learning.” The school system would be a perfect place to learn these indispensable skills.
School is an unsuitable learning environment for many jobsFor those that say school is not the place to impart wisdom to youngsters, but to prepare them for the workplace, I hear ya, but sorry.
Grades distort our perception of realityYou can get straight As in school, but nobody, no matter how successful, gets straight As in life.
Stephen King, one of the most successful authors in history, got dozens and dozens of Fs before he got his first real life A. School trains us to have the mindset that a given amount of effort will always bring a measurable, predictable, and successful result.
When students enter the real world, and are turned down for a job in favor of the secretary’s nephew, they will be mentally unprepared for it unless they learned outside of school.
The best thing about school preparing us to fail in the real world, is that while you can “Flunk out” of school, you only flunk out of life if you give up.

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