Summary of “Post-Work: The Radical Idea of a World Without Jobs”

In the US, “Belief in work is crumbling among people in their 20s and 30s”, says Benjamin Hunnicutt, a leading historian of work.
The growth of productivity, or the value of what is produced per hour worked, is slowing across the rich world – despite the constant measurement of employee performance and intensification of work routines that makes more and more jobs barely tolerable.
“Either automation or the environment, or both, will force the way society thinks about work to change,” says David Frayne, a radical young Welsh academic whose 2015 book The Refusal of Work is one of the most persuasive post-work volumes.
“All cultures thought of work as a means to an end, not an end in itself.” From urban ancient Greece to agrarian societies, work was either something to be outsourced to others – often slaves – or something to be done as quickly as possible so that the rest of life could happen.
In 1979, Bernard Lefkowitz, then a well-known American journalist, published Breaktime: Living Without Work in a Nine to Five World, a book based on interviews with 100 people who had given up their jobs.
Stronge suggests a daily routine for post-work citizens that would include a provocative degree of state involvement: “You get your UBI payment from the government. Then you get a form from your local council telling you about things going on in your area: a five-a-side football tournament, say, or community activism – Big Society stuff, almost.” Other scenarios he proposes may disappoint those who dream of non-stop leisure: “I’m under no illusion that paid work is going to disappear entirely. It just may not be directed by someone else. You take as long as you want, have a long lunch, spread the work though the day.”
Tired of the never-ending task of making work better, some socialists have latched on to post-work, he argues, in the hope that exploitation can finally be ended by getting rid of work altogether.
Creating a more benign post-work world will be more difficult now than it would have been in the 70s. In today’s lower-wage economy, suggesting people do less work for less pay is a hard sell.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Write a Resume That Stands Out to Hiring Managers”

So how do you make your resume stand out among hundreds of applicants?
Hiring managers don’t have a ton of time to thoroughly look over each resume, which means you have to be judicious about what to include.
A good resume includes specifics on what you’ve actually accomplished throughout your career, says Traci Schweikert, Vice President of Human Resources at POLITICO. If you’re looking to make your resume stand out, consider these six tips from HR executives.
One of the best ways to make your resume stand out is to use the job posting as a guide.
It may sound tedious, but taking the time to customize your resume for each individual job you apply to is a surefire tactic to stand out among the pack of applicants, she says.
For starters, you never know exactly how a hiring manager will be reading your resume; they may pull it up on their phone, or go through an applicant tracking system.
Most applications are submitted online, and the volume of resumes that hiring managers must sift through can be overwhelming at times – so establishing a personal connection can help you get noticed, she says.
After your informational interview, you can reach out to that contact and ask that they glance over your resume, making sure to pose as many specific questions as possible about how you should tailor your resume to the company or specific role, Schweikert adds.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to look for a job in 2019”

Some brand new strategies and time-tested traditions dictate the way job seekers will conduct the hunt in 2019.
We asked the experts to tell us how the way we will look for jobs will change in 2019.
Tom Gimbel at LaSalle Network says that among 5,000 professionals the staffing firm surveyed, the top three ways they look for employment are online job boards, sites like LinkedIn, Indeed and Glassdoor, recruiters, and networking.
“The line between soft and hard skills is disappearing,” says Michelle Weise, chief innovation officer at Strada Institute for the Future of Work, “What matters is whether a skill is ‘human’ or can be performed by machines.” According to a new analysis of more than 100 million job postings, resumes, and social profiles by Strada Institute for the Future of Work and labor market analytics expert, Emsi, job seekers can future-proof their chances to be competitive by beefing up their soft skills.
New Indeed research reveals the fastest-growing skills in tech job searches and found that job seekers are most frequently looking for jobs that use cloud computing tools and e-commerce platforms.
Another in-demand skill that could be a game changer in the way we look for jobs in 2019 is cybersecurity.
Brenda Darden Wilkerson, president and CEO of AnitaB.org says that 2019 will see more job seekers prioritize diversity and equity when seeking new roles.
“Much like how consumers are becoming increasingly more discerning around which companies they buy from, job seekers-especially women and underrepresented groups-will be increasingly discerning about the companies they apply to work for,” she believes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Understanding Speed and Velocity: Saying “NO” to the Non-Essential”

Understanding the difference between speed and velocity will change how you work.
I once worked for someone who offered me the opportunity to work on a new project nearly every day.
Over my first seven years, I’d barely leave my desk, working 12- to 16-hour days for six days a week.
Offers of work are good problems to have.
A lot of people struggle to find work, and here I was, a few weeks out of university, saying no to my boss.
I took a two-thirds pay cut to work for the government so I could work with incredibly smart people on a very narrow skill.
“Instead of asking how many tasks you can tackle given your working hours,” writes Morten Hansen in Great at Work, “Ask how many you can ditch given what you must do to excel.” I did what I needed to do to keep my job.
Think of it this way: I want to get from New York to L.A. Speed is flying circles around Manhattan, and velocity is hopping on a direct flight from JFK to LAX.”People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve got to focus on. But that’s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I’m actually as proud of the things we haven’t done as the things I have done. Innovation is saying ‘no’ to 1,000 things.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Was A Cable Guy. I Saw The Worst Of America.”

Maybe the next job was the Great Falls, Virginia, housewife who answered the door in some black skimpy thing I never really saw because I work very hard at eye contact when faced with out-of-context nudity.
Maybe the next job that day was the guy whose work order said “Irate.” It’s not something you want to see on a work order.
Not when you’re running late and you still have to pee, because “Irate” meant that the next job wasn’t going to be a woman in lingerie; it was going to be a guy who pulled out his penis while I fixed the settings on his television.
The points: Every job’s assigned a number of points – 10 points for a “My cable’s out” call, four points to disconnect a line, 12 to install internet.
Maybe that’s why I was running late to the next job, and my dispatcher, my supervisor, another dispatcher and the dispatch supervisor called to ask my ETA. No, that job canceled.
One year the company tried a little experiment: Choose a couple of people from each team, let them take the problem calls, those jobs a couple of techs had failed to fix, and give them the time to actually fix the problem.
The rest of day, they’d throw me one problem job at a time.
With the pressure off to complete 12 jobs a day, I found I could actually have fun at work, joke with my boss about whether or not the Cheneys constituted a favor just because, hey, we’re all lesbians.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You’re Over 50, Chances Are the Decision to Leave a”

Through 2016, our analysis found that between the time older workers enter the study and when they leave paid employment, 56 percent are laid off at least once or leave jobs under such financially damaging circumstances that it’s likely they were pushed out rather than choosing to go voluntarily.
Even years afterward, the household incomes of over half of those who experience such work disruptions remain substantially below those of workers who don’t.
Finally, a further 15 percent of over-50 workers who begin with stable jobs quit or leave them after reporting that their pay, hours, work locations or treatment by supervisors have deteriorated.
He’s spent much of his career in human resources, often helping employers show workers – including many, like him, over 50 – the door.
The share of U.S. workers who’ve suffered financially damaging, employer-driven job separations after age 50 has risen steadily from just over 10 percent in 1998 to almost 30 percent in 2016, the analysis shows.
Among workers over 50 who have lost one job, a third go on to lose two or more jobs.
Layoffs are the most common way workers over 50 get pushed out of their jobs, and more than a third of those who sustain one major involuntary departure go on to experience additional ones, as the last decade of Steckel’s work life illustrates.
We found that even when we excluded all but the most consequential cases – those in which workers subsequently experienced at least six months of unemployment or a 50 percent wage decline – 15 percent of workers over 50 who’d had long-term, stable jobs quit or left their positions after their working conditions deteriorated or they felt pressured to do so.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to transition from managing yourself to managing others”

I learned a lot of things the hard way through trial and error, success and failure-but also by reading a lot: books about management, stories about teams and culture, and articles by others who went through the same transition from maker to manager as I did.
Say goodbye to your work and say hello to your team.
As a manager you need to put the company first, your team second, and your team members last.
You could easily find yourself with an amazing team, building something that doesn’t move the needle in any way for the company.
I learned how important it is to be open and honest, and to build trust in my team, and to encourage discussions.
Your job as a manager is to make the life of your team easier and to move obstacles out of their way.
The Manager’s Path by Camille FournierAwesome overview of the what roles an engineering team normally has, and what the expectations in those job might be.
The 5 Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick LencioniI would call this my favorite book when it comes to building great teams.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Shrinking Middle Class: The Current State of Affairs”

m. to bring me home, even though she gets up for work at 5:30 a.m. When I was a kid, before Hurricane Katrina, my dad worked offshore, and my mom painted houses.
I’ve got friends who haven’t been able to catch up on bills enough to save $400 to go visit family, while the people working us to death are buying third and fourth yachts.
How the hell are you going to enjoy an actor’s work, the culture that work adds to the city, and say it’s not worth 50ยข? This is necessary.
The residential work I do is largely for two demographics: those who work in finance and those who work in medicine.
My work improves the health of the human species and the planet, but people think I’m a glorified florist, an exterior decorator.
A typical day: Clean hotel rooms for hours, sleep after work from exhaustion, reawaken to work at the laundromat.
For over 10 years I have worked as a firefighter in Hamtramck, Mich. I also work as a paramedic for a mobile MRI company called National Diagnostic Services, I help out at my parent’s golf driving range, and I do handyman work for a few families around my home in Plymouth.
My wife doesn’t work because it would cost more for us to put our kids into daycare than she would make going to work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask Polly: ‘I Will Never Be Who I Want to Be'”

That’s honestly how I feel right now – like all my sneaking feelings of being an impostor, of not being smart enough or strong enough or confident enough to get what I want in life, are becoming demonstrably true, and not just in my head any longer.
I come back to feeling like I’m drowning and I just want to run away.
Every time you stare down the barrel of your heavy workload, you say to yourself, “I am bad at this job. I will fall behind.” Every time you feel tired or overwhelmed or bored, you say, “I feel these things because I’m an impostor, I’m lazy, I’m weak.” Every time you exercise, you say, “This won’t help that much, and I won’t stick with it anyway.” Every time you imagine quitting your job, you say, “I only want to quit because I’m pathetic; I’m an escapist and a quitter at heart.”
You need to notice that you don’t JUST feel guilty for not working hard, you also feel guilty for NOT WANTING to work hard when you ARE working hard.
So I often ask him, “Do you really want to spend time on that, or could you just relax instead?” I’ve been pushing both of us to define work and relaxation in clearer terms.
This is where you land when you’ve spent a solid decade or more telling yourself that the only thing that you SHOULD WANT is to be an all-powerful career-focused conquistador, and everything else you might want is BAD and A SIGN OF WEAKNESS. If you want to feel good in your own skin, if you want to feel hopeful about your abilities and your day, if you want to believe that you are strong enough and smart enough and energetic enough to do anything you set your mind to, you have to give up your current religion and honor your heart and your body instead. You have to make some room for REALITY instead of expecting too much from yourself.
Instead of daydreaming about what it would feel like to quit, you have to sit down and ask yourself “What would it really mean to quit? How could that work?”.
The ones who are happiest are the ones who honor these feelings and take them seriously instead of telling an elaborate story about how these feelings mean that they suck.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sherrod Brown Wants to Bring a Working-Class Ethos Back to the Democratic Party”

Sherrod Brown, the liberal Democratic senator from Ohio, has often seemed a politician from the radio era, with a baritone thick with particulate matter, suits whose pressed lines disintegrate as the day wears on, and curly gray hair that can swell into an accidental bouffant.
The press, the Party, its donors, the amateur strategists toying with electoral maps in their browsers-everyone discovered Sherrod Brown as a Presidential candidate at once.
“He’d gone into Youngstown and made those very specific promises.” Brown asked the President to talk with Barra, to try to keep the plant from closing, but Trump didn’t commit to it.
Brown grew up in Mansfield, Ohio, midway between Columbus and Cleveland, within the professional class.
On the bleak Election Night in 2016, watching the returns at home with a few family members, aides, and friends, Brown declared that negotiating with Trump on trade was possible.
As Sherrod Brown becomes a national figure, his trudging approach to politics is evolving into a brand, much as Bernie Sanders’s did, a few years ago.
The field of potential Democratic candidates is thick with current and former senators should he run, Brown might soon find himself being attacked by his colleagues and friends.
“Going back to Pope Francis, he admonishes parish priests early in his papacy to go out and smell like the flock,” Brown said.

The orginal article.