Summary of “Four Things You Absolutely Must Do in Your Salary Negotiation”

Let’s say you’ve worked yourself up to asking for a higher salary.
“The whole salary negotiation process is a conversation,” says Jacqueline Twillie, a negotiation expert and founder of leadership development firm ZeroGap.
The money might sound good at first blush, but when you look at benefits like healthcare, you may find the coverage is less than you anticipated; if so, you may want to negotiate a better salary.
Do Your Research on Pay Parity In states like California, pay parity laws that have gone into effect over the past few years could help women negotiate salary increases, according to Tracy Saunders, a former recruiter who started the Women’s Job Search Network.
The same is true of another law that seeks to address the gender pay gap, which prohibits employers from asking about a prospective employee’s salary history in states like Massachusetts and California.
In the event that a recruiter does ask for your current salary, try to shift the conversation to your salary expectations; Saunders and Twillie also recommend talking about salary expectations early in the interview process.
“It’s really important that in the first phone screen, when they bring up the money, you talk about the market rate and not your current salary-especially if your first salary is less than the market [rate],” Twillie says.
“People think they’ll be provided with the tools,” Twillie says, “But if you don’t ask for those things, you’re not going to get them.” Asking for what you need during the negotiation process, she argues, can prove more effective.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Spiritual Crisis of the Modern Economy”

In a society focused on meritocratic, materialistic success, many well-off Americans from across the political spectrum scorn the white working class in particular for holding onto religious superstitions and politically incorrect views, and pity them for working lousy jobs at dollar stores and fast-food restaurants that the better-off rarely set foot in.
As research has shown, well-educated white-collar workers also sink into despair if they cannot find a new job, but among the working class, the shame of low status afflicts not just the unemployed, but also the underemployed.
Rather, the economy requires-as a white former factory worker I talked to described it-“Throwing on a goofy hat,” dealing with surly customers who are themselves just scraping by, and enduring a precarious working life of arbitrary rules and dead-end prospects.
The white working class that emerged in the 19th century-stitched together from long-combative European ethnic groups-strived to set themselves apart from African Americans, Chinese, and other vilified “Indispensable enemies,” and build, by contrast, a sense of workingman pride.
In today’s labor market, it is no longer enough to work hard, another worker, who was black, told me: “It used to be you come up and say, ‘Okay, I’ve got a strong back,’ and all that,” but nowadays a “Strong back don’t mean shit. You gotta have dedication and you’ve gotta have some kind of smartness, or something.”
The rules of meritocracy that these blue-collar workers say they admire barely apply to the very top levels of the economy.
Where do people turn when left to the dictates of an economic system like this? One white worker in Madison Heights, Michigan, described himself as a conservative, but added that he didn’t care about party labels when choosing whom to vote for.
From gripes about the backwardness and boredom of small-town America to jokes about “Rednecks” and “White trash” that are still acceptable to say in polite company, it’s no wonder that the white working class believes that others look down on them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are You Developing Skills That Won’t Be Automated?”

A recent study from Forrester estimated that 10% of U.S. jobs would be automated this year, and another from McKinsey estimates that close to half of all U.S. jobs may be automated in the next decade.
The jobs that are likely to be automated are repetitive and routine.
While much has been written about the sorts of jobs that are likely to be eliminated, another perspective that has not been examined in as much detail is to ask not which jobs will be eliminated but rather which aspects of surviving jobs will be replaced by machines.
Consider the job of being a physician: It is clear that diagnosing illnesses will soon be accomplished better by machines than humans.
Like the physician, we can easily parse this job into two components: the repetitive and routine one and the more interactive, unpredictable one that involves listening to and talking with customers.
The functioning of emotion has proven challenging to understand scientifically, and is difficult to build into an automated system.
These are the very skills that employers across industries consistently report seeking in job candidates.
This is a new approach to characterizing the underlying nature of “Soft skills,” which are probably misnamed: These are the skills that are hardest to understand and systematize, and the skills that give – and will continue to give -humans an edge over robots.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Find Your Dream Job”

In a job market transformed by turmoil and rebirth, there are suddenly all kinds of opportunities for adventurous souls.
Now: How can you monetize that skill? “You want to identify the place where your passion meets other people’s needs,” says economist Adam Davidson, cofounder of NPR’s Planet Money, who is writing a book on how to thrive in the 21st-century economy.
With a bit of smart research and creative thinking, it’s even possible to parlay your leisure interests into a dream job.
If your financial situation won’t allow you to go back to school or take a low-paying post, look for opportunities at your current job to broaden your skills.
One common pitfall of job seekers is to spend all their time trolling umbrella job sites like Craigslist and CareerBuilder.
Spend extra time on the summary section-“It should be deep,” says Sreenivasan-and update everything, especially the recommendations, even when you’re not actively pursuing a new job.
“The first job I applied for out of grad school, I got an interview but didn’t land the job,” says Sanjayan.
“The second job I applied for, with the Nature Conservancy, I didn’t even make the interview cut.” But he kept in touch with the organization and was eventually brought on as a lead scientist.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Should Universal Basic Income Look Like?”

As you know if you’ve ever heard his name, Yang supports a universal basic income, $1,000 a month paid by the government to every American citizen, from part-time baristas to millionaire bond traders.
Yang’s campaign is doing an effective job of introducing the idea of universal basic income to millions of people, but it’s not showing how transformative a guaranteed stipend can really be.
“A wave of automation and job loss is no longer a dystopian vision of the future-it’s well under way,” Yang writes in The War on Normal People.
The notion of universal basic income has a long history.
In the United States, in the 1960s, a guaranteed basic income or negative income tax-essentially topping off the earnings of anyone whose pay fell below a certain threshold-was a mainstream concept embraced by free-market lovers such as Milton Friedman and Richard Nixon; Martin Luther King, Jr. was a fan, too.
Today, the idea attracts appeal across the political spectrum: libertarians like Matt Zwolinski, a philosopher at the University of San Diego, argue for replacing existing public welfare programs with an income guarantee to reduce bureaucracy and loosen the government’s control over people reliant on social services.
In Finland, a pilot program gave a randomly selected group of unemployed people a basic income of $632 a month between 2017 and 2019.
Universal basic income still isn’t particularly popular among Americans, even with a high-profile advocate in Yang.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Worry About Job Burn-Out. Worry About Job Boredom.”

Lifshitz had the vision to create lifestyle products that were inspired by polo.
“A leader has the vision and conviction that a dream can be achieved. He inspires the power and energy to get it done.”
A vision is not something like: “On February 15, 2023, I will have a business empire.” That kind of statement sounds delusional.
What do you want your life, business, or career to look like? That’s the difference between a goal and a vision.
My vision for my career and business is to stay independent – financially and creatively.
For my blog, my vision is to help all my readers to live a purposeful life.
Create a vision and remind yourself of it every day.
If you change along the way, change your vision.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Work and Meaning Part Ways”

The American work ethic is built on a promise: Work hard, and you’ll earn more than just money.
There are only two problems with the work ethic today: Work doesn’t reliably deliver the social, moral, and spiritual goods it promises, and artificial intelligence is about to render the work ethic moot.
The very meaning of work is in jeopardy right now, and a big reason is that we expect too much meaning from work.
Many office workers repeatedly perform a narrow range of mental, physical, and emotional actions on the job, and when they’re done for the day, they may change out of a work suit, but they can’t change out of their work self.
So what should we do? Repair the whole rickety heap of our work ideology? Redesign work so that it delivers the dignity, character, and purpose it’s supposed to? Pass laws that limit employers’ control over workers’ bodies and public behavior? Push for transparency regarding the actions workers perform, and establish norms that they specialize less narrowly and have rotating duties? Set humane limits on service work and eliminate the pointless tasks most professionals do during the workday? It wouldn’t hurt to try.
In an important respect, the robot revolution at work would solve all the problems with work’s failure to deliver on the work ethic’s promise.
Our work subjects us to corporate tyranny-yet 80 percent of us say we’re “Hardworking” and not lazy.20 Our work warps us and burns us out-yet we report the highest employee engagement in the wealthy, industrialized world.
Will the idea that time is valuable make sense in a society without jobs, once people are no longer paid for their time? Will universal education make sense, once schools are no longer educating everyone for the work force? Will old age make sense as a well-earned rest after a lifetime of labor? How long will it take marital and child-rearing norms to respond to the reality that there is no such thing as a “Breadwinner”? The end of work calls everything into question.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Signs You Need to Rethink Your Career”

Even people who love their jobs may find themselves bored or feeling dissatisfied from time to time.
Boredom is the top reason that people leave their jobs, according to a 2018 survey by Korn Ferry.
Roughly one-third said that they were looking for a new job to find a new challenge.
The data analysis and visualization company Flowing Data analyzed data from the 2015 American Community Survey to find jobs with the highest rates of divorce.
The analysis found that those people with low-paying jobs and jobs in materials movement and transportation had among the highest divorce rates.
Of course, the site notes, correlation is not causation, but it’s not a surprise that low-pay, high-stress jobs may have an affect on other areas of life.2.
A May 2018 study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health found that ostracism, incivility, harassment, and bullying have direct negative effects on job productivity.
Another study from the University of Manchester found that being in a job you hate is worse for your health than being unemployed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Should You Quit Your Job? When To Leave And When To Stick It Out”

You impatiently wait until it’s an acceptable time to leave the office, where you’ll probably go to happy hour and complain about your job to your friends.
If you hate your job but love the company you’re working for, you might be able to switch departments or start volunteering for projects outside of your job description.
Aaron Michel, CEO and founder of career solution app Path Source, previously wrote for Fast Company, “Remember that job descriptions don’t need to be rigid. Of course you’ll still need to fulfill your responsibilities, but you don’t necessarily need to feel limited by them. It’s up to you to take the initiative and expand them.”
Of course, gaining a promotion requires you to be good at your job and have decent relationships with your manager and coworkers, so if you’ve been slacking off lately, you might want to dial it up a notch before making the big ask.
Reason Two: Your Job Doesn’t Align With Your Life’s Priorities And Values No matter how hard you try, it’s seems really difficult to make your job work for you.
Reason Three: Your Job Is the Biggest Source Of Stress And Anxiety When Sunday comes around, the blues are bad. The thought of going to the office fills you with dread. You feel like you can’t do anything right anymore, despite your best efforts.
Having a plan is even better, though job-quitters seem to be divided on whether it’s sensible to quit a job without something else lined up.
Or despite your stellar performance, they never seem to show their appreciation for a job well done but will never hesitate to point out when you’ve made a mistake.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do When You Feel Like You Don’t Fit In at Work”

Hiring managers are looking for employees who not only have the right credentials, but also who have the right culture fit.
“Fit is important, especially when it relates to whether there is alignment between a company’s and employee’s values and beliefs,” says Stella Odogwu, founder of Intelle Coaching Solutions.
Try these strategies to adjust your fit in the workplace.
Ask yourself if you need to adjust your own self-esteem, or if you are truly experiencing a problem of not being the right fit for the team.
Examine the evidence objectively, and remember, you don’t need to be the most popular person at the office to be able to fit in, but if you are truly struggling with a lack of respect and connection and it’s affecting your ability to do your job, then you will need to take steps to fit in.
Seek One-On-One Connections Fitting in at the workplace is more about your ability to build strong, meaningful relationships than whether everyone laughs at your jokes and asks you out for happy hour.
Put Yourself Out There Ask yourself if you are really making enough of an attempt to fit in.
Decide if It’s Time to Move On If the company culture is not in alignment with your own beliefs and values, you may be fighting an uphill battle to fit in and may consider whether it’s time to move on.

The orginal article.