Summary of “The Most Efficient Way to Keep Your Resume Up to Date”

When you get a new job save the description and requirements from the application and use it to later add the job to your resume.
In response, u/chaoticnuetral added that it’s good to have your specific job description on hand because it makes it easier to negotiate your salary if future duties are added.
You added your new job to the resume, but you’re there a year, then two.
Learning something new that makes you better at your job.
Adding new responsibilities, job titles, new people you oversee.
As a recruiter, I’d say be careful with making your resume read too much like a job description.
Things like the full dates that I worked there, actual titles I held, actual duties vs ‘resume duties’, pay rate, managers/superiors/good co-workers names and full titles, physical addresses and phone numbers, the real reason why that is no longer my job.
Now, go forth and get new jobs that you’ll be ready to leave immediately!

The orginal article.

Summary of “China’s Tech Industry Wants Youth, Not Experience”

Almost immediately, readers seized on his age: At 42, he would have already been considered too old to be an engineer in China, where three-quarters of tech workers are younger than 30, according to China’s largest jobs website, Zhaopin.com.
The idealization of youth is in the DNA of the American tech industry.
In China the discrimination begins even younger than in the U.S. The irony is that most of the country’s famous tech companies were started by men older than 30.
China has used tech advancements to propel its economy forward for decades, but President Xi Jinping’s Made in China 2025 plan kicked activity into a higher gear.
In a country of 1.4 billion people, many Chinese tech companies are able to move faster than their overseas rivals by throwing people at a problem, and younger workers cost less than their more experienced colleagues.
A recent job posting for a front-end developer at a Beijing tech startup explained that the company is willing to relax its requirements for educational attainment but not for age; a college degree isn’t strictly necessary, but if you’re older than 30, don’t bother applying.
“Working in tech is like being a professional athlete,” says Robin Chan, an entrepreneur and angel investor in companies such as Xiaomi and Twitter Inc. “You work extremely hard from 20 to 40 years old and hope you hit it big. After that, it’s time to move on to something else and let someone younger try their hand.”
He, the tech recruiter, remains hopeful that age discrimination will eventually disappear in China.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Millennials are struggling. Is it the fault of the baby boomers?”

“Intergenerational war doesn’t reflect how people feel about the issues or how they live their lives as families,” says Torsten Bell, director of the foundation.
A complex mix of reasons includes the financial crisis, austerity and reluctance by successive governments to radically tackle the challenges of housing, health, social care, employment and a woefully deregulated market at a time when people are living so much longer – but no baby-boomer banditry.
“We have people with degrees doing Mickey Mouse jobs and young people who will have no occupational pension and no house to sell to see them through old age. That’s not the fault of mum and dad. If we think that, we are tackling the wrong problems. It’s not about redistributing the crumbs from the rich man’s table but restoring fairness.”
Only a third of millennials own their own home, compared with almost two-thirds of baby boomers at the same age.
A third of millennials will, it is predicted, have a lifetime of renting with less space, poorer conditions, longer commutes and more insecurity than the baby boomers experienced.
Although precise definitions differ, broadly speaking millennials are those people born between the early 1980s and the late 1990s.
On current trends, given high rents, low wages, Brexit and, for some, the debt of university tuition fees, will millennials have sufficient funds in retirement? Under auto-enrolment, 5% of a wage by 2019 will go into a pension pot, but on a low income, will increasing numbers of millennials opt out? In several decades’ time, millions of older people may be dependent on housing benefit, living in rented accommodation, and surviving on a state pension, which currently at £7,000 a year, is already not fit for purpose.
Ed Lewis, 36, LondonLewis lives in a house-share with four other people while working fulltime for a campaigning organisation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “America is obsessed with the virtue of work. What about the virtue of rest?”

Americans love to contemplate – and legislatively promote, to whatever degree possible – the virtue of hard work.
Work requirements for Medicaid, food stamps and housing assistance represent the latest conservative effort to make sure Americans work for any benefits they receive.
In all of these proposals, much is made of the special dignity that comes through work.
In President Trump’s executive order outlining his desire that work requirements be attached to assistance programs, he called upon the federal government to elevate “Principles that are central to the American spirit – work, free enterprise, and safeguarding human and economic resources.” In his column defending Booker’s job guarantee proposal, Bloomberg News writer Noah Smith pointed out that “Jobs provide a kind of dignity that traditional welfare programs, or even innovative new ones like universal basic income, probably don’t.”
Maybe that is the case: Trump isn’t wrong, after all, in identifying work as a cardinal American virtue – and infractions against virtue are the stuff of vice.
In terms of our wider cultural context, it doesn’t appear to me that a lack of respect for work is the No. 1 threat to American dignity.
Nor is there much dignity in pouring all of one’s energy into the purposes of another – which is what it generally means to work for a boss – with little time or money spared to learn or contemplate or travel or enjoy oneself.
There’s a balance to be struck where it comes to work and rest, but in the United States, values and laws are already slanted drastically in favor of work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “High-Paying Trade Jobs Sit Empty, While High School Grads Line Up For University”

Like most other American high school students, Garret Morgan had it drummed into him constantly: Go to college.
As for his friends from high school, “They’re still in college,” he said with a wry grin.
High school graduates have been so effectively encouraged to get a bachelor’s that high-paid jobs requiring shorter and less expensive training are going unfilled.
Nationwide, three out of 10 high school grads who go to four-year public universities haven’t earned degrees within six years, according to the National Student Clearinghouse.
“The challenge is that in many cases it’s become the fallback. People are going to college without a plan, without a career in mind, because the mindset in high school is just, ‘Go to college.'”.
The proportion of high school students who earned three or more credits in occupational education – typically an indication that they’re interested in careers in the skilled trades – has fallen from 1 in 4 in 1990 to 1 in 5 now, according to the U.S. Department of Education.
These perceptions fuel the worry that, if students are urged as early as the seventh grade to consider the trades, then low-income, first-generation and ethnic and racial minority high school students will be channeled into blue-collar jobs while wealthier and white classmates are pushed by their parents to get bachelor’s degrees.
Jessica Bruce followed that path, enrolling in college after high school for one main reason: because she was recruited to play fast-pitch softball.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Many Americans Try Retirement, Then Change Their Minds”

A more recent survey, from RAND Corporation, the nonprofit research firm, published in 2017, found almost 40 percent of workers over 65 had previously, at some point, retired.
Even more people might resume working if they could find attractive options.
“We asked people over 50 who weren’t working, or looking for a job, whether they’d return if the right opportunity came along,” Dr. Mullen said.
Why go back to work? We hear endless warnings about Americans having failed to save enough, and the need for income does motivate some returning workers.
Most retirees who returned to work told researchers they had long planned to re-enter the work force.
“Their interactions with people at work could be strained or hostile.” After a restorative break, they can find work that suits them better.
“Older jobseekers look for more autonomy, control over the pace of work. They’re less concerned about benefits. They can think about broader things, like whether the work is meaningful and stimulating.”
Still, two-thirds of older workers report satisfaction in work well done, a majority that includes Sue Ellen King.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chicago’s Awful Divide”

The disconnect is why Andrew Diamond, the author of Chicago on the Make, has called Chicago “a combination of Manhattan smashed against Detroit.”
There were 11,646 retail jobs in the Back of the Yards neighborhood on Chicago’s near South Side in 1970, according to a report by the Great Cities Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Around 40 percent of black 20-to-24-year-olds in Chicago are out of work and out of school today, compared with 7 percent of white 20-to-24 year-olds in Chicago.
Murders in Chicago increased by 58 percent between 2015 and 2016, and the number of nonfatal shootings grew by 43 percent, according to the University of Chicago Crime Lab.
In Chicago, unlike many global cities, the neighborhoods that struggled 30 years ago are still the neighborhoods that struggle today.
So while wealth is creeping into some poor neighborhoods in cities like New York or Los Angeles as upper-class people move back to cities, less gentrification has taken place in poor, black neighborhoods in Chicago.
In a study of Chicago published in the American Sociological Review, Sampson found that Chicago neighborhoods that were more than 40 percent black didn’t gentrify.
Dawson told me, “My mother was a big advocate of me getting out of the neighborhood.” Rather than going to his struggling neighborhood school, Dawson attended high school in the wealthy Lincoln Park neighborhood of Chicago.

The orginal article.

Summary of “They called my university a PhD factory”

As I reluctantly consider quitting academia after a year-long research fellowship, I find myself recalling a drug dealer’s line in the film Withnail and I: “If you’re hanging on to a rising balloon, you’re presented with a difficult decision – let go before it’s too late or hang on and keep getting higher, posing the question: how long can you keep a grip on the rope?” His words describe my dilemma: do I hold on to my dream of a permanent university lectureship or abandon it as illusory and hazardous to my mental health?
Her article added to an expanding genre known as quit lit, which reflects the growing disillusionment of many academics with university culture.
Perusing job ads, it strikes me that lectureship vacancies are rare, in contrast to the plethora of positions for university bureaucrats.
When I was considering whether to study for a doctorate, I heard my chosen university disparaged as a PhD factory.
I began a PhD knowing that I stood a very small chance of securing a permanent academic job at the end of it.
Publishing work online has never been easier, but to function effectively as an academic, you need the sanction of a university.
Given university marketing departments’ desperate trumpeting of the value of “Employability”, it’s surprising that taught and research postgraduate degrees seem exempt from this consideration.
Looking for a higher education job? Or perhaps you need to recruit university staff? Take a look at Guardian Jobs, the higher education specialist.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Exactly Does a Librarian Do? Everything.”

Every job in a library depends on someone else’s to function.
Libraries are buzzing hives filled with extremely busy, frazzled, overworked people.
Staff and Librarians work together to make sure that everything runs as smoothly as possible, which it NEVER, EVER DOES. Lots of different types of library work happens everywhere-new jobs crop up daily, thanks to evolving tech and shifting community needs-but there are some standard positions that remain eternal.
First of all, there’s the backbone of the library: technical services.
These are library employees who go home and drink a lot.
What I’m saying about library “Tropes” is that they apply to anyone who works in a library because you have to know how to do everyone else’s job.
Librarianship is the understanding that maintaining a library is a shared responsibility.
Libraries are community spaces for patrons as well as for library staff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Higher Education’s Push Toward Lifelong Learning”

The alliance with Infosys is a good example of this new strategy as the college works with the company to figure out how the school can help in recruiting and training 500 workers who will make a median salary of $79,000.
Workers will likely consume this lifelong learning in short spurts when they need it, rather than in lengthy blocks of time as they do now when it often takes months or years to complete certificates and degrees.
“What worries me,” Holzer said, “Is that the system today is not great at providing training to workers who need it, and the demand is only going to grow in the future with more workers, in more occupations.”
The classic image of job retraining in the U.S. remains that of laid-off blue-collar factory workers learning new skills.
Increased funds for federal job-training programs will only come when white-collar workers use the benefits in addition to laid-off blue-collar workers.
Work sharing is a program in place in more than 25 states in which employers reduce their workers’ hours and pay and the states make up some of the lost wages.
It’s typically used as an incentive in an economic slowdown to keep skilled workers employed, but it can also provide workers the flexibility to improve their skills while in a job.
Faced with a skills gap, employers are increasingly working with community colleges to provide workers with both the academic education needed to succeed in today’s workforce and the specific hands-on skills to get a job in their companies.

The orginal article.