Summary of “How to Make Work More Meaningful for Your Team”

Money may lure people into jobs, but purpose, meaning, and the prospect of interesting and valuable work determines both their tenure and how hard they will work while they are on the job.
Research consistently shows that people experiencing meaningful work report better health, wellbeing, teamwork and engagement; they bounce back faster from setbacks and are more likely to view mistakes as learning opportunities rather than failures.
In other words, people at work are more likely to thrive and grow when they experience their job as meaningful.
Curious leaders help people find meaning at work by exploring, asking questions, and engaging people in ideas about the future.
In a way, curious leaders help employees find something meaningful by providing a wider range of possibilities for how work gets done, as opposed to being very prescriptive and micromanage people.
Curious leaders are also more likely to get bored and detest monotony, so they will always be looking for people to come up with new ideas to make their own experience of work more interesting.
As a result employees feel a sense of progress, reinvention, and growth, which in turn results in a more meaningful and positive work experience.
In stark contrast, leaders who know how to trust people are more likely to give them room to experiment and grow.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Restaurants Are the New Factories”

Restaurants > Health Care.In some metros, restaurants are powering the entire economy.
More than a third of Cleveland’s new jobs since 2015 are in restaurants, according to EMSI data.
The same is true for New Orleans, but since 2010.Unlike mining or manufacturing, which tends to cluster in a handful of regions, the restaurant boom is spread across the country.
New fine-dining restaurants, which tend to require more waitstaff, are blooming in all the predictable places-San Francisco, Nashville, and Austin.
Restaurants are dominating local economies in a diverse range of places, from poor metros like Little Rock, to rich places like Washington, D.C., and military hubs like Virginia Beach.
For the past three decades, restaurants have steadily grown, as part of the most fundamental shift in American work-from making things to serving people.
At current rates of growth, more people will work at restaurants than in manufacturing in 2020.
What’s more, although it might feel like a golden age of restaurants in America, the truth is that the United States might have too many restaurants, particularly “Family-casual” chains like Applebee’s, which have struggled to keep up with rising labor costs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Driverless cars and trucks don’t mean mass unemployment-they mean new kinds of jobs”

These jobs are consequential both for their sheer numbers-there are roughly 4 million drivers in the US, and that’s excluding those who drive for ride-hailing services-and for what they represent to some of our economically transitional communities.
Where might that income go, and what jobs might accompany it? As demographic trends collide with new types of mobility, we could easily imagine that aging Baby Boomers will need aides to travel with them to medical appointments and run errands-even if “Driving” is not part of their job description.
The combination of mobility and smart cities can also provide broader benefits, like increased access to healthcare, efficient energy, and different jobs.
Even the much-anticipated emergence of driverless trucks could prove a boon for today’s drivers.
It also means appreciating that new, potentially higher-value jobs are also likely to emerge, and that there can be society-wide benefits to these changes.
The question is will these new jobs be in sufficient numbers to make tomorrow’s workers contributing members of our society?
Just think how factory automation has reduced the back-breaking parts of many jobs and shifted the emphasis toward higher-skilled machine operating.
We already have a skills gap; we need to figure out how to digitize and skill those workers to match them with the demand for available jobs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Rich People Love Endurance Sports?”

Participating in endurance sports requires two main things: lots of time and money.
Money because, well, our sports are not cheap: According to the New York Times, the total cost of running a marathon-arguably the least gear-intensive and costly of all endurance sports-can easily be north of $1,600.
“The cost of equipment, race entry fees, and travel to events works to exclude lower socioeconomic status individuals,” he says, adding that those in a higher socioeconomic bracket tend to have nine-to-five jobs that provide some freedom to, for example, train before or after work or even at at lunch.
One hypothesis is that endurance sports offer something that most modern-day knowledge economy jobs do not: the chance to pursue a clear and measurable goal with a direct line back to the work they have put in.
Another reason white-collar workers are flocking to endurance sports has to do with the sheer physicality involved.
For a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research this past February, researchers from the Cardiff Business School in Wales set out to understand why people with desk jobs are attracted to grueling athletic events.
“When leaving marks and wounds, pain helps consumers create the story of a fulfilled life. In a context of decreased physicality, play a major role in selling pain to the saturated selves of knowledge workers, who use pain as a way to simultaneously escape reflexivity and craft their life narrative.” The pursuit of pain has become so common among well-to-do endurance athletes that scientific articles have been written about what researchers are calling “White-collar rhabdomyolysis,” referring to a condition in which extreme exercise causes kidney damage.
Endurance sports provide a necessary outlet, offering concrete measures of a job well done and the chance to deal with physical suffering-albeit in a voluntary, defined, and immediately escapable environment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “but Thinks Other Age Groups Are in It for the Money”

“Millennials don’t understand the meaning of work – they want rewards without having to do the work to earn them.”
In order to find out if there were generational differences in definitions of meaningful work, my colleague and I started our investigation the old-fashioned way: by asking people.
We interviewed five employees from each generation, inquiring about how important meaningful work was for them, what they find meaningful in the job they currently do, what their ideal job would be, and whether they saw any generational differences in definitions of meaningful work.
Millennials: “I would rather make nothing and love going to work every day than make a ton of money and hate going to work every day.”
The traditionalists we interviewed said that meaning comes from challenging work that allows people to grow, and also from work that helps other people.
Although Generation X also thought accomplishing career goals was a key component of meaningful work, they focused much more than older generations on work-life balance.
Meaningful work happens when “You feel that your work is not all-consuming or that you feel that you can strike a good balance,” said one.
One of the most striking findings was that every generation perceived that the other generations are only in it for the money, don’t work as hard, and do not care about meaning.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Switching Careers Doesn’t Have to Be Hard: Charting Jobs That Are Similar to Yours”

For some whose jobs have disappeared – particularly those without college degrees who worked in jobs requiring routine, physical labor – it can be nearly impossible to find a stable, well-paying new one.
These jobs are more isolated, in terms of skills, from the rest of the labor market.
Extensive research has shown that there are fewer middle-skill jobs, and that some displaced workers never recover, especially if they live in communities that no longer have jobs similar to their old ones or they don’t have higher education.
Others have trouble thinking of themselves as doing other kinds of jobs – which Lawrence Katz, a Harvard labor economist, says is an identity mismatch, not a skill mismatch.
People procrastinate, inaccurately assess their own abilities and are unaware of what other jobs entail, according to behavioral economists.
Laurel Yoder’s career is an example of how jobs can overlap in unexpected ways.
These could include job counseling; cash grants for taking time off to take classes; wage insurance to make up the difference for taking a lower-paying job; and relocation grants to move to areas of the country with more jobs.
O*Net scores hundreds of jobs on dozens of characteristics.

The orginal article.

Summary of “20 Years Ago, Steve Jobs Demonstrated the Perfect Way to Respond to an Insult”

In 1997, Steve Jobs had just returned to Apple, the company he had been ousted from over a decade before.
“Mr. Jobs, you’re a bright and influential man,” he begins.
In what seems like an eternity to the audience, Jobs takes a sip of water and reflects on both the criticism and the question.
Jobs goes on to outline his role at Apple: It’s not to know the ins and outs of every piece of software.
Jobs not only explains his vision, he uses his own learnings to help establish his credibility.
“There are a whole lot of people working super, super hard right now at Apple,” Jobs exclaims.
“They’re doing their best,” says Jobs.
“Some mistakes will be made, by the way. Some mistakes will be made along the way. And that’s good. Because at least some decisions are being made along the way. And we’ll find the mistakes, and we’ll fix them,” Jobs says to applause.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 practically painless ways to expand your social network |”

The danger of this behavior is they’re at risk of leaving the university with close ties to just a few people who are similar to them, squandering their chances to build a diverse network.
My students are open-minded people, and they’ve come to business school in part to develop great networks.
According to research conducted by sociologist Mark Granovetter, people appear to find their jobs more frequently through their weak ties, or acquaintances, than through their strong ties, which are their partner or close friends.
Your weak ties, which include people you just met once in passing, are your ticket to a whole new social world.
People often tell me they’re hoping to find a new job or project by networking.
Besides talking to people you’d typically avoid, are there any places or activities where you can get injections of diversity or unpredictable people? For example, some students of mine play pickup basketball games, which attract different people every week.
I also got tons of advice from people, and the advice I disliked more than any other was “You’ve got to go out and network with everyone.” When your psychological world has broken down, I can tell you the hardest thing to do is to reach out and build your social and professional worlds.
How can we overcome this? Go down your lists of Facebook friends and LinkedIn friends, and most likely you’ll see people who are in your network but who may not automatically come to your mind when you’re feeling threatened or down.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How work changed to make us all passionate quitters”

In doing so for work, they developed a metaphor – that every person should think of herself as a business, the CEO of Me, Inc. The metaphor took off, and has had profound implications for how workplaces are run, how people understand their jobs, and how they plan careers, which increasingly revolve around quitting.
Like employment, loyalty is a two-way street – making jobs short-term, commitment-free enterprises leads to workers who view temporary work contracts as also desirable.
So how does work change when everyone is trying to become a quitter? First of all, in the society of perpetual job searches, different criteria make a job good or not.
She takes each new member of her team out to lunch in the week they start: ‘So I always say things like: “You don’t work for me, I work for you My job is to make sure you can do your job well. And one day, you are going to leave this job our careers are long, and we will have many jobs along the way. When you want to leave this job, I hope to be here to help you move on to this next job.”‘ From the outset, managers say that they will help those who work under them become job-quitters – to find the next best stepping stone in their career.
In the US especially, there is a strong cultural consensus that people should feel passion for their work, and work hard.
One hiring manager explained to me that he always chose people who seemed passionate about their work over someone who seemed to have the most experience.
In the quitting economy, you have to work for passion, and working for passion means focusing on the task, not the company.
She would tell an executive she was trying to recruit that if they no longer felt any passion for their work, then they were harming all their colleagues at work, who now had to work with someone who no longer enjoyed work to its utmost.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Mystery of Why Japanese People Are Having So Few Babies”

The blame has long been put on Japan’s young people, who are accused of not having enough sex, and on women, who, the narrative goes, put their careers before thoughts of getting married and having a family.
Now, according to Jeff Kingston, a professor at Temple University’s Japan campus and the author of several books about Japan, around 40 percent of the Japanese workforce is “Irregular,” meaning they don’t work for companies where they have stable jobs for their whole careers, and instead piece together temporary and part-time jobs with low salaries and no benefits.
Irregular workers in Japan are sometimes referred to as “Freeters,” which is a combination of the word freelance and the German word arbeiter, which means “Worker.” According to Kingston, the rise of irregular workers in Japan began in the 1990s, when the government revised labor laws to enable the wider use of temporary and contract workers hired by intermediary firms.
The surge in irregular jobs doesn’t just create problems for the people working those jobs.
People who hold them may earn enough money to support families, but they often don’t have much time to date, or to do anything but work, sleep, and eat.
Of course, Japan is not unique in having workers who say they feel abused and overworked by their employers.
People who complain about working long hours may not find much sympathy from friends and family members, let alone the government.
A government labor-reform panel has proposed capping the number of overtime hours that companies could legally require people to work at 100 per month.

The orginal article.