Summary of “10 resume writing tips to follow”

Having a well-crafted resume can be the key to getting your foot in the door at the company of your dreams.
Figuring out how to make your resume fully representative of your experience and also stand out is easier said than done.
Most people know the basics of how to put together a decent work history, but here are some tips you probably haven’t heard before that can help your resume stand up to the 7-second test.1.
If you’re targeting jobs in another area and you’d need to move in order to start working, it’s probably a good idea to leave your current address off your resume.
Be a name dropperIt may be poor form to drop names in everyday life, but you absolutely should do it on your resume.
Utilize your performance reviewsYou might not think to look to your annual review for resume material, but checking out the positive feedback you’ve received in years past can help you identify your most noteworthy accomplishments and best work attributes-two things that should definitely be highlighted on your resume.
Choose to share social accounts strategicallyIncluding links to social media accounts on a resume is becoming more common.
Keep an accomplishment journalKeeping a log of your work accomplishments and positive feedback as they come up can make putting together or updating your resume significantly easier.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to test your ability to do a job you’ve never done”

Most of the things you learned in college are of very limited use, the majority of future jobs do not exist today, and a large percentage of jobs within organizations remain unfilled because there aren’t enough people willing and able to do those jobs.
One of the things that will help you futureproof your career is to figure out whether you have the potential for jobs that you haven’t done in the past.
Even if you don’t have the right skills for a given job yet, being interested in that job will increase the likelihood you’ll be able to acquire them.
Being an extrovert gives you an advantage in jobs that require a great deal of interpersonal relations, such as sales, customer service, and PR jobs, but being an introvert will give you an edge when it comes to working independently, focusing on detailed tasks for extended periods of time, and listening to others.
If you find a job that is a natural fit for your style and behavioral preferences, you can turn your personality into a powerful career-building tool.
Of course, it is perfectly possible to learn and develop skills for jobs that are less naturally suited to our personality, but it will require more time, effort, and won’t always be enjoyable.
This is why so many employers are making curiosity one of the key hiring criteria, and why it’s so important to demonstrate that you’re a quick study during job interviews.
While working out whether something is interesting or not is easy, you will better understand what new jobs really require from you, how your personality differs from others, and how much you’re able to learn quickly, if you ask other people to tell you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can You Afford to Change Your Career?”

Who wouldn’t want a meaningful career and better balance between work and home? For many of us, it’s finances that keep us from making a career change.
We worry and wonder: What would a career change do to our bank accounts? To our way of life? To our family? We assume that a major reinvention would involve a gap between paychecks when we’d leave our job and break into a new field.
Like Steve, Amanda, and Brandon, we’re all drawn to career change for different reasons.
What if something unexpected happens in your new career? Or what if you can’t sell your home? Building or adding to an existing emergency fund will help ease the stress and worry of beginning a new career.
If your risk tolerance is fairly low but your proposed career change is one that will reduce your income by 75%, then you’ll probably want to rethink your choice.
Steve’s career change required different stages of setting and managing expectations with his wife, as his transition came in two phases that took place over four years.
Steve and his wife deliberated for a full year before he moved into the unpaid student phase of his career change.
The financial implications of a career change weigh heavily on the mind of anyone considering doing something different.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Universal Basic Income and the Future of Pointless Work”

Graeber attempts to quantify just how much-and after some back-of-the envelope calculations, he wagers that 37 to 40 percent of all office jobs are “Bullshit.” He further contends that about 50 percent of the work done in a nonpointless workplace is also bullshit, since even useful jobs contain elements of nonsense: the pretending to be busy, the arbitrary hours, the not being able to leave before five.
Work backward: How much activity on social media takes place during work hours? How many doctor’s appointments, errands, and online purchases occur between nine and five? In other words, how many of us could stand to work half as much as we currently do without any significant consequences? And yet we insist over and over that we are terribly, endlessly busy.
Workers in essential, nonbullshit jobs are constantly told by moralizing politicians that their work is noble and that they ought to be grateful for the often low pay they receive.
A UBI would “Unlatch work from livelihood entirely”: If, guaranteed enough money to live on, people could choose between bullshit or nothing, he wagers that they’d choose nothing and do something more useful and interesting with their time instead. In Give People Money, Annie Lowrey is less concerned with dissatisfied professionals than with some of the world’s poorest, who in addition to already being overworked and underpaid-if they are employed at all-will likely face the harshest economic consequences if or when menial tasks are automated.
Lowrey appreciates the extent to which people identify with their work-even if it’s bullshit or shit work.
It might not be the healthiest approach-she dislikes moralizing around the virtue of work almost as much as Graeber does-but she realizes it’s something we have to build in to our short- and medium-term expectations because “The American faith in hard work and the American cult of self-reliance exist and persist, seen in our veneration of everyone from Franklin to Frederick Douglass to Oprah Winfrey.”
That often gives the impression that anyone who does want to work for work’s sake must be a bit of a sucker and that the compulsion to work is a manifestation of false consciousness or, worse, stupidity.
Such measures represent only a fraction of the socioeconomic overhaul that will be needed to deal-if not now, then for future generations-with this twin utopia-dystopia: a world with less work and less money.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask Polly: ‘Should I Quit My Day Job to Write a Book?'”

I’m terrified of becoming one of those people who never succeed with their art, so all they’re left with is the day job they hate.
Writing a first book tends to be a letdown for most people: It’s just very hard to feel it, particularly if you’re a little panicked or too much is riding on it or you hate your day job or you haven’t learned to connect with the work while you’re writing it.
That’s not to mention how extensively people with “Just a day job” tend to talk about how much they loathe their day jobs.
The other problem with the day job is that people tend to pick one that pays reasonably well immediately – it’s just a day job, after all – but has no growth potential.
Never take a job for the pay alone if you know you’ll hate yourself for having that job a decade from now.
You can write and also pursue a version of your career that feels less like a day job.
Your first job is to ENJOY YOUR DAY. Enjoying your day means feeling good about how you spend your time.
So that’s your to-do list: Upgrade the day job and upgrade the dream and speed up the publication schedule.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Some People Turn to Acupuncture for Drug Addiction”

Most of the dozens of lower-income Baltimoreans I interviewed liked their doctors, though most had also felt mistreated from time to time.
Last year, I accompanied Coriless Jones, a black woman in her late 50s, to her primary-care doctor appointment.
The appointment took almost an hour and included a long lecture from the doctor about the importance of quitting smoking and drinking more water.
The doctor “Was more attentive to my needs and more talkative today than she’s ever been,” she said.
She had been thinking of switching doctors because “She wasn’t showing empathy or compassion in my case By her knowing that someone was with me, she did a better job this time.”
“You are more likely with no degrees in any field to get a job before I am.” It’s true: Blacks who have attended college are less likely to have jobs than white high-school dropouts.
Inconveniently, the site said, “Methadone can cause a certain amount of tooth decay, but no more than any other opiate.”
Here I was, wasting his time, implying that salvation could be found in a product made by corporations and endorsed by doctors, groups he’s all too aware have abused people just like him.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Beat Mid-Career Malaise”

If you find yourself dwelling on what holds you back, Johnson recommends “Reframing the constraints.” When you’re young and you can live and work anywhere in the world, plotting your career path is incredibly daunting – “Almost paralyzing,” she says.
One possible remedy, Petriglieri says, is to consider what kinds of small “Changes you can make to bring yourself more fully to your work.” Even if you cannot change your circumstances, “You might be able to change the microenvironment in which you operate.” For instance, you could seek out an exciting and immersive project, hire employees with different backgrounds, or join an internal committee or team that will stretch you in new and different ways.
“When you can see how your work is being used by others, it is hard not to find meaning.” Otherwise it’s easy to lose sight of why you do what you do; it can become “Too theoretical.”
In these cases, working with a career coach can be helpful, Petriglieri says.
“Maybe your malaise is due to the fact that you have all your eggs in one basket.” It could be that you need to seek self-worth and life satisfaction outside of work – perhaps through your family or faith, a charity you support, or a project, hobby, or sport you’re passionate about.
“A colleague of mine suggested the idea as a way to better my own career and transform how I approached my work,” he says.
In Joel’s case, his interests and abilities centered on connecting people and ensuring that the people on his team and others work well together.
James readily admits that his new role is hard work – and the pay is paltry.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why quitting your job without a backup plan can help your career”

“Sometimes you need time to detox and heal from abusive situations so that you don’t jump into something just as bad to get away from your current job,” says Rhonda Ansted, career coach and Founder of Be the Change Career Consulting.
Leaving your job without any savings in the bank is likely to lead to you feeling forced to take any job out of financial necessity.
If you can’t job search while working your current job.
Looking for a new job while employed means you can never truly give your all to your search, and you may not have the time to explore all of the opportunities available, never mind booking time off to go to interviews.
“It didn’t feel fair to the company I was working for, and it would have limited the time I was able to spend charting my next move,” says First, who quit her job without having another one lined up, freeing up her time to do a thorough job search.
Quitting your job without a backup plan has the same effect on your nervous system as walking into the desert without any water.
Assess the toll your unhappiness in your current job is having on your health.
Quitting your job with no plan in place allows you to be open to new opportunities that you may never have considered if you simply took the next opportunity that fell in your lap.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A record number of folks age 85 and older are working. Here’s what they’re doing.”

Seventy may be the new 60, and 80 may be the new 70, but 85 is still pretty old to work in America.
Overall, 255,000 Americans 85 years old or older were working over the past 12 months.
Labor Department figures show that at every year of age above 55, U.S. residents are working or looking for work at the highest rates on record.
Workers age 30 and younger are staying on the sidelines at rates not seen since the 1960s and ’70s, when women weren’t yet entering the workforce at the level they are today.
People who are still working at age 85 or above are, as you might guess, unusual.
Workers age 85 and older are more common in less physical industries, such as management and sales, than they are in demanding ones such as manufacturing and construction.
Nobody questions whether older workers can make a difference.
Few people of any age get the opportunity to work as crossing guards, funeral directors or musicians.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to love your job? Read this article”

Having done all this stuff, and been unemployed on several occasions, I can safely say that the only thing worse than working is not having a job.
It’s not the job itself that gives us a sense of purpose, but the pleasure of work.
She offered him a job interview when he was unemployed, depressed, and buying a latte as consolation-not planning to ask for work.
In his recent essay, “The Case Against Work,” Danaher, a law lecturer at the National University of Ireland in Galway, contends that-love it or hate it-we’re all obsessed with work.
Danaher defines work as “The performance of an activity for economic reward or in the hope of receiving some such reward.” He believes that work is bad because many employment contracts allow employers to undermine worker freedom.
The answer isn’t escape from a “Voluntary prison,” but a new way of thinking about how we spend our working days and breaks-making today matter, both on the job and during time off.
Disrespect for your own work can lead you to disrespect the work of others, too.
Being adaptive is a critical life skill that’s practiced at work, whatever job.

The orginal article.