Summary of “Why Millennials Should Lead the Next Labor Movement”

After years of studying our bathroom’s stack of union publications, I grew enthralled with the existence of union negotiator guys who looked just like my dad, dressed in the Midwestern anti-fashion of workboots and fleeces to guard against our seemingly eternal winters.
Belonging to a union is a form of education that the current national political regime opposes and that states have been working to weaken so that we are unable to be fairly compensated for our work.
The dangers of not being able to receive information about wages, hours and working conditions or the bargaining power that unions provide are legion.
As just one example, back in my native state of Wisconsin, after Gov. Scott Walker passed an anti-collective-bargaining law that sharply curtailed unions’ right to fight on behalf of their workers, he was able to pass another law a few months later that eliminated Wisconsin factory and retail workers’ right to weekends off.
At a time when the government wants to disembowel public and private health care and when wages are on the decline, our best recourse to these threats is to join existing unions or unionize ourselves.
The last big boom for American unions came during a period that resembles the present one: The Great Depression, like the ’08 recession, left workers deeply unsatisfied with wages and working conditions.
Thanks to the New Deal’s favorable collective bargaining legislation, Americans felt free to organize unions and petition their employers for labor rights; there were 12 million labor union members by the end of World War II. People like me, who have mental museums filled with memories of the stability that came with our parents’ union jobs, could be the perfect leaders of the next labor union renaissance.
The union newsletters my father kept in our bathroom magazine rack may have faded, but their message – about the value of jobs that provide a fair wage, reasonable conditions and the ability to care for a family – is as timely now as it ever was.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do When Your Heart Isn’t in Your Work Anymore”

What if they’re not? What if you’re stuck in a job or a career that you once loved, but your heart isn’t in it anymore?
According to a 2017 Gallup survey, only one-third of U.S. employees feel engaged at work; that is, only one of three workers brings a consistently high level of initiative, commitment, passion, and productivity to their job.
You might question the ultimate meaning of the work you’re doing.
According to research by Yale professor Amy Wrzesniewski, people tend to fall into one of three categories: Some see their work as a career; others see it as just a job; and still others see it as a calling.
Even if you don’t find your true calling, you will at least increase the odds of finding a meaningful work experience.
What novel tweaks can you make to redesign your job, even slightly? Sometimes even the smallest adjustments can lead to qualitatively meaningful changes in your work experience.
Having an outlet for your passion outside of work can counterbalance the monotony of nine-to-five daily work.
These inspirational endeavors can even have unintended positive spillover effects at work, giving you energy and inspiration to craft your job or reengage with parts of work you actually like.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How I learned to code in my 30s”

A few weeks passed, we began to hear stories about grads still looking for jobs, and a palpable sense of herd anxiety set in - were we actually going to become software engineers after quitting our jobs and investing $10,000? I left before I had to pay for the second semester.
I did learn a lot, there were some good instructors, and a number of my classmates went on to great careers as web engineers, but it didn’t seem obvious at the time.
Just as my optimism was up, a few months passed with unsteady work, and doubt set in.
I was confused and frustrated when all the job postings seemed to indicate otherwise.
Every junior web engineer posting seemed to require: “a degree in computer science or two years of professional experience”.
How do you get two years of professional experience without a degree, if a degree is required? How do self-taught engineers get jobs?
I wasn’t on track to meet the requirements for any jobs I wanted, and I doubted I would pass the interview if I did.
I told friends and family I had made an impulsive and expensive mistake, and I found a job that was a better fit based on my prior career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A New Kind of Tech Job Emphasizes Skills, Not a College Degree”

On Wednesday, the approach received a strong corporate endorsement from Microsoft, which announced a grant of more than $25 million to help Skillful, a program to foster skills-oriented hiring, training and education.
These jobs have taken off in tech for two main reasons.
TechHire provides grants and expertise to train workers around the country and link them to jobs by nurturing local networks of job seekers, trainers and companies.
In just two years, TechHire’s network has grown to 72 communities, 237 training organizations and 1,300 employers.
The program offered six months of training in software programming that included working with a company while being paid $400 a week.
The TechHire program, she said, could be “a doorway to a good-paying job, which is everything here.”
In Colorado, Skillful is working to improve the flow of useful information among job seekers, employers, educators, governments and local training groups.
The organization focuses on jobs in tech, health care and advanced manufacturing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My life as an airport security guard”

He went to work for his father after high school and, apart from a brief stint in the US Air Force Reserves, he worked in his father’s business for almost his entire life.
Which is all a way to say that maybe, if I worked a grinding airport job for a while, I thought I might come to understand my father better, and resent him less, before it was too late.
Thanks to a specialisation in film studies, I had spent a good deal of time examining images on screen, searching for unusual, hidden, crucial details – fine practice for working the x-ray machine.
How could I perform pat-downs in such a way that they would foster both security and compassion? I remembered Newjack, Ted Conover’s book about the year he worked as a corrections officer in the notorious maximum-security prison Sing Sing.
Later in the shift, while we were working the bag-search position, a young woman lost the backing to her earring.
The job and the way airport work is done seem likely to keep changing drastically as Trump continues to make appointments and sign executive orders.
Working as a TSO-in-training was as challenging as any other work I’ve done, including writing and teaching.
Would my soul shrink, or expand? Would I come home from work most days feeling powerful, or powerless? Could my work at the checkpoint be just as significant to me as my work on the page, or in the classroom?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Men Don’t Want to Be Nurses. Their Wives Agree.”

In theory, nursing should appeal to men because it pays fairly good wages and is seen as a profession with a defined skill set.
Just 10 percent of nurses are men, despite “Are You Man Enough to Be a Nurse?” posters and other efforts to enlist men.
The hope is to focus on millennials who may be less bound by notions of traditional masculinity, said Brent MacWilliams, president of the American Assembly for Men in Nursing and a former commercial fisherman who is now an associate professor of nursing at Wisconsin-Oshkosh.
He has seen more men apply to nursing schools, but he acknowledges his group will fall short of its goal of 20 percent male nurses by 2020.Nursing and teaching, another growing field dominated by women, may require levels of education or training that can be daunting for those men who were less successful in school but made a good living in manufacturing.
Just 20 percent of the students are men, although that represents an increase from 10 percent 15 years ago.
Men who become home health care aides are more often minorities, according to Janette S. Dill, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Akron who has studied gender and the health care industry.
“I sometimes wonder if health organizations don’t want men to come into these jobs because they’ll demand higher wages,” Professor Dill said.
“We need to reinvent pink-collar jobs so men will take them and won’t be unhappy – or women, either.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Future of Coal Country”

Once an untouched landscape of white oak and shagbark hickory, it now belonged to Consol Energy and served as the refuse area for the Bailey Mine Complex, the largest underground coal mine in the United States.
Her fight against coal mining often puts her in opposition not only to energy companies but also to miners concerned about their jobs, and he fears that someone will run her Nissan Versa off a rural road one night.
Below ground, the practice of “Long-wall” mining, which removes an entire coal seam, can crack buildings’ foundations and damage springs and wells, destroying water supplies.
When Clinton said, at a speech in Ohio, “We’re going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business,” it didn’t matter that she was laying out an economic plan for life beyond coal, or that she immediately added, “We don’t want to forget those people.” Trump, for his part, denounced “Job-killing” regulations.
During the two world wars, coal miners were often exempt from service, because their jobs were essential to the war effort, and miners retain the sense that they are risking danger to benefit their country.
Bob Murray, who owns the United States’ largest independent coal company, argued in a speech that if the mines closed “The lights will go out in this country, and people will freeze in the dark.”
Zimmerman, who worked in coal for forty years, told me, “I’ll always support miners.” But the environmental cost of coal was clear to him.
Trump complained, in his speech about the Paris accord, that under the agreement “China will be allowed to build hundreds of additional coal plants.” But China, responding to dismal air quality, has promised to close a thousand coal mines and has increased its use of renewable fuels.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What jobs will still be around in 20 years? Read this to prepare your future”

In 2013, a highly cited study by Oxford University academics called The Future of Employment examined 702 common occupations and found that some jobs – telemarketers, tax preparers and sports referees – are at more risk than others including recreational psychologists, dentists and physicians.
In the past, reports of the death of human jobs have often been greatly exaggerated, and technology has created a lot more jobs than it has wiped out.
Martin Ford, futurist and author of Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future, explains the jobs that are most at risk are those which “Are on some level routine, repetitive and predictable”.
According to a recent report by Deloitte, more than 100,000 jobs in the legal sector have a high chance of being automated in the next 20 years.
You can see these parameters at play in the jobs The Future of Employment identifies as least at risk of automation, which include recreational therapists, first-line supervisors of mechanics, installers, repairers, occupational therapists and healthcare social workers.
While being in a creative or people-focused industry may keep your job safe for the next 10 years or so, it’s very hard to predict what will happen 20 years into the future.
While the clergy only has a 0.81% probability of automation, according to data from The Future of Jobs, Susskind believes even algorithms might one day replace the ordained.
In the future, she says, we’ll all have seven or eight jobs, with the average adult working for a number of companies simultaneously rather than working for one big corporation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The key to jobs in the future is not college but compassion”

To fill the sophisticated jobs of tomorrow, the authors argued, the ‘reskilling and upskilling of today’s workers will be critical’.
‘[W]e have to make sure all our kids are equipped for the jobs of the future, which means not just being able to work with computers but developing the analytical and coding skills to power our innovation economy,’ he said.
Today, the rapid shrinking of the industrial sector means that most of us have jobs requiring emotional skills, whether working directly with customers or collaborating with our corporate ‘team’ on a project.
In 2015, the education economist David Deming at Harvard University found that almost all jobs growth in the United States between 1980 and 2012 was in work requiring relatively high degrees of social skills, while Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer at the jobs site CareerBuilder, told Bloomberg BNA in January that corporate hiring this year would prize these skills to a greater degree than in previous economic recoveries.
With the very toughest, very worst-paid jobs, like working with the dying and incontinent, that might be because those of us who don’t have to do the work would rather not think about how crucial and difficult it really is.
Granted, anyone working with older people with disabilities, or with small children, might benefit from studying research on the particular needs of these groups; and widely accessible college education is a good idea for reasons that go far beyond vocational training.
As a society, we could choose to put more resources into providing better staffing, higher pay and more time off for care workers who perform the most emotionally demanding work for the smallest wages.
Applying the metric of efficiency to the expanding field of emotional labour misses a key promise offered by technological progress – that, with routine physical and cognitive work out of the way, the jobs of the future could be opportunities for people to genuinely care for each other.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Handle Underperformers on a Team You Inherit”

Instead of building relationships with one or two coworkers, now you have to think about how you relate to the whole team.
Your job is not to compete for the “Most popular manager” award or to make things easy for your team.
Principle number two is that your success depends on the success of your team members.
You have to prioritize the team achieving its goals and everyone performing at the required level.
In order to do this, you have to set your team members up for success.
So not dealing with poor performers can be worse for morale and overall team performance than confronting the issue directly.
So what should the new manager do? First, she needs to make her expectations about high performance clear to everyone on the team.
Creating the expectation for high performance and doing what’s necessary to help your team be successful is a critical skill for anyone managing others.

The orginal article.