Summary of “Baby Boomers’ retirement savings are running dry”

West Allis, just outside Milwaukee, was once the headquarters of the Allis-Chalmers Co., which manufactured industrial machinery, employed 31,000 unionized workers in Wisconsin and elsewhere, supported a solid standard of living for its workers for nearly eight decades, and paid them pensions when they retired.
Only about one-quarter of employed Americans work continuously through their 50s and their early 60s in jobs with benefits, according to a study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.
“If older workers can’t work in high-contact areas,” said Teresa Ghilarducci, who studies aging and employment issues at the New School University in New York, “Employers will have to make accommodations for them.” That’s an expense.
That’s what befell Gregory Bates – and he’s only 61.Bates went to work for the local utility company in Milwaukee – now called WE Energies – when he was 18, as a file clerk, and, after four years in the Air Force, eventually worked his way up to budget analyst.
Just 40 percent of working Americans aged 55-64 participate in a job-related retirement plan, according to a Stanford University study.
With 401(k)s and other individual savings accounts, which collectively are more expensive to manage than a pension plan, each worker has to provide for an unknowable number of years in retirement.
Her son, who works for a company that makes environmentally friendly doors, works from home now and has had his hours cut back.
“The hardest part,” said his wife Tammy, 57, who is unable to work full-time because of a back injury she sustained while working in a dry cleaner’s, “Has been when you’re fighting the big medical bills, even though you have insurance – okay? – and it’s hard to find money for anything else. And now that he’s retired it’s going to be even harder.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Advice Do You Wish You’d Gotten When You Graduated From College? 25 Ted Speakers Answer”

“If you don’t know what you want to do with the rest of your life, you’re not a failure. Give yourself time and get yourself experience to figure things out.” – Angela Duckworth.
“It’s okay to quit your first job – even if it was really hard to get it, it paid well, and everyone seemed to admire you for getting it. If you hate your job, you’ll be wasting your life acquiring skills, contacts and a reputation that you don’t want to use. The sooner you find something you love, the better.” – Tim Harford.
“The advice that I wish I’d gotten when I graduated from college is: Pay attention to the difference between the quick hits of excitement that come from that first kiss of a new relationship or job and those feelings you get when you think about your strong connections with family or friends. Don’t get fooled by shiny things – that shine fades over time, while the gold of strong relationships never tarnishes. Remember the differences between these feelings to help you make decisions as you go forward.” – Judson Brewer.
“Never stop learning. When we graduate college and start our careers, we often understand that we have a lot to learn, so we approach our jobs with a learning orientation. We ask questions; we observe others; we know we may be wrong; and we realize we’re works in progress. But once we gain competence in our jobs, too many of us stop learning and growing. The most successful people – in work and in life – never stop deliberately continuing to learn and improve.” – Eduardo BriceƱo.
“Give yourself more time. So many college graduates immediately start wanting to make all their dreams come true at once – this can go wrong in many ways. The first is the frustration that you’re not ‘there’ yet. It’s going to take time to find your dream career. The second is burnout. If you find your career early, you can find yourself setting all sorts of unrealistic goals with arbitrary deadlines and chase them until you drop from fatigue. You can have it all – but not all at once.” – David Burkus.
“Whenever possible, get as uncomfortable as possible. Challenge yourself to get outside of your comfort zone regularly – spend time with people you deeply disagree with, read books about experiences you will never have, travel to places where you don’t speak the language, and take jobs in industries you’ve never worked in before. And if you feel yourself resisting, try again. Those experiences will help you build deep empathy, and we could all use more of that.” – Anjali Kumar.
“You don’t have to pursue what you studied. I followed my heart, and now I’m happier and more satisfied with life than I could have ever envisioned. We kill ourselves looking for jobs in our fields of study, while there are a million other things we are able to do. I also wish somebody had told me money doesn’t equate to happiness. When you get a job and start working, don’t forget to live.” – Kasiva Mutua.
“When you finish college and begin your first job or internship, you’ll be keen to learn all you can and impress your employer so you can start on the path to promotions and raises. But the important thing that you might not see amidst all this excitement is the great idea that could someday become a great business or entrepreneurial venture. I’ve found the most interesting employment that life offers is often something of your own creation that you do full time or in addition to your main job. So, after you graduate from college, take the time to identify a venture that you’d like to do by yourself or with friends, and start building it. One day, you’ll be glad you started early.” – Washington Wachira.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I clung to the middle class as I aged. The pandemic pulled me under.”

Several days of work at an international conference? The organizers decided not to take the risk.
Even if work dries up, that $2,800-a-month health insurance bill still comes due on the first of the month.
In the first two decades of this century, wages declined for working men over 55 with bachelor’s degrees.
In a downturn, older men do hold on to their jobs more regularly than younger ones, but when they lose work it takes them considerably longer to find their next position.
A study from the New School estimates that 8.5 million older workers over 55 would fall into poverty or near-poverty if they retired at 62 and began taking Social Security payments.
I had long tenures with “PBS NewsHour” and NPR. When I read warnings that workers could face sudden and catastrophic losses of income in their final years of employment, I was empathetic but concluded it could never happen to me.
I am years away from what I had thought of as the age when I could transition to part-time work.
It’s unclear at the moment just what federal and state government emergency programs will do for millions of self-employed and gig economy workers, many already hustling in the best of times, who’ve been watching their work dry up and disappear.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Smiling When You Don’t Feel Like It Has Harmful Psychological Consequences”

The pressure to smile no matter how we really feel can be crushing, especially when it’s mandated by a “Service with a smile” work policy.
Projecting a different emotion than the one you actually feel is sometimes referred to by psychologists as “Surface acting.” The study, published in March of 2019, suggests that putting up that front day after day takes a serious toll.
Using survey data collected from 1,592 people, the authors showed that surface acting during work was “Robustly correlated” with heavy drinking outside of work.
Her work suggests that controlling our emotions is like flexing a muscle, a theory she calls the “Self-control framework.” When we force ourselves to smile, that muscle performs “Emotional labor” that wears the muscle down.
In Grandey’s analysis, people who reported more impulsive tendencies were more likely to drink heavily if they engaged in surface acting at work.
People who worked service relationship-based jobs didn’t report high drinking levels, even if they were impulsive.
“In the work context, one is expected to put on that smile for the entire shift, regardless of how they feel or how others treat them – and that is a different experience,” she says.
Surface acting predicted drinking after work only for employees with low self-control jobs or traits; this effect was exacerbated for those with service encounters and buffered for those with service relationships.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Life as an NFL scout: 3,000 nights in hotels, chain restaurants and lots of video”

On the road, Sears has accumulated 3,233 nights – and counting – at Marriott hotels, with the next stop coming this week in Indianapolis at the NFL scouting combine.
Sears, 44, has spent one-fifth of his life – 8.8 years – at Marriott hotels as part of his continued search for the next potential NFL star.
Sears has a photographic memory and has been scouting since former NFL general manager Charley Casserly hired him out of Springfield College as an intern in Washington in January 1997.
Sears is away from his Morrisville, North Carolina, home for more than 85% of nights from August until Thanksgiving.
Sears figures he’s legitimately missed half her life.
“He paints a picture,” said Larry Bryan, a veteran scout Sears worked with in Washington and Houston.
Sears has learned over the years that the job is to look for athletic ability and “Figure out if the guy can do it physically” at the NFL level along with small parts of technique.
The basis of any good scout is the base of knowledge, so Sears will sometimes go back and review all his successes and failures in the basement.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Robots aren’t taking our jobs”

The robots are here, they’re working in management, and they’re grinding workers into the ground.
There are robots of the ostensibly job-stealing variety in Amazon warehouses, but they’re not the kind that worry most workers.
The robots were so efficient that more humans were needed in other roles to keep up, Amazon built more facilities, and the company now employs almost three times the number of full-time warehouse workers it did when the robots came online.
The robots did change the nature of the work: rather than walking around the warehouse, workers stood in cages removing items from the shelves the robots brought them.
Why get too worked up over conditions for warehouse workers, taxi drivers, content moderators, or call center representatives when everyone says those roles will be replaced by robots in a few years? Their policy proposals are as abstract as their diagnosis, basically amounting to giving people money once the robots come for them.
Angela, the worker struggling with Voci, worried that as AI is used to counteract the effects of dehumanizing work conditions, her work will become more dehumanizing still.
Asked why such intense monitoring was necessary, he said remote work was the future and will give workers greater flexibility, but that employers will need a way to hold workers accountable.
Couldn’t you imagine a future where you have the freedom to choose between starving or taking a job in a warehouse, the worker said, and you sign a contract agreeing to wear something like that, and it zaps you when you work too slowly, and it’s all in the name of making you more efficient? “I think that’s a direction it can head, if more people aren’t more conscious, and there isn’t more organization around what’s actually happening to us as workers, and how society is being transformed by this technology,” he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Quit Your Job Before Asking Yourself These Questions”

Most people wait until they feel they must leave their job or organization, and that puts them at a disadvantage.
It might have been a great job for you last year, but is it still? A great job is one that helps you grow and learn.
It’s one in which the people recognize you for the job you are doing, and a lot of what you’re working on is exciting and rewarding.
As soon as you start thinking that the political part of your job is more important than the work you are doing, take a closer look at your position.
If your organization is a great one, and your job isn’t working for you, look to find another position in another part of your company.
Your personal assets will help balance the liabilities of your current job or employer.
Is the organization you work for the source of your concern? Then, you might look for a similar job with another employer.
Is the job the problem? Then, you should consider making a move within your company before you decide to leave.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Were Fired, Don’t Lie About It in a Job Interview. Do This Instead.”

Either way, it can be a difficult thing to explain at a future job interview.
Getting fired doesn’t make you a bad person, nor does it mean you won’t be an all-star in a new role, or at a new company.
I was once fired from an ice cream scooping job because I bit my fingernails too much and apparently the sight of my chewed-up digits bothered the customers.
What if you haven’t made the same peace with a firing? And what if a prospective employer asks why you left your last job? Just saying, “I was fired,” without explanation, isn’t great, and most of us know that lying is worse.
Step One: Don’t Lie According to Green, covering up your firing is setting yourself up for disaster.
Step Two: Keep It Brief There’s no need for a longwinded explanation.
“Saying too much will make it a bigger deal than it needs to be, and generally you’ll come across as pretty defensive,” writes Green.
Step Three: Follow the Script The key to successfully answering questions about why you were fired is focusing on what you learned, and how you plan to improve going forward.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Subtlety Is Overrated”

As a workplace advice columnist and someone who coaches managers, I hear from a lot of managers who are frustrated with an employee over some aspect of their work performance or behavior.
Over the years, I’ve learned to ask these frustrated managers, “Exactly what have you said to the person about this?” More often than not, it turns out that the manager has only hinted at the problem rather than being direct about it.
I’m a relatively new manager of a small team, and while I do have a lot of strengths as a manager, I’ve also discovered that I have no idea how to communicate directly.
A couple of times those issues ended up developing into a situation where I couldn’t let them slide anymore, and of course failing to address things earlier only made the conversation even more awkward.
The reason managers do this, of course, is that they want to be kind, and they feel unkind telling someone directly that they’re doing something wrong and need to change it.
You end up prioritizing your own comfort over the employee’s ability to clearly hear where they’re going wrong and what they need to change.
Managers need to consider clear, direct communication to be a fundamental, non-negotiable part of the job, even when it’s awkward and even when it’s hard.
There’s no way to manage effectively without getting comfortable with phrases like “I need you to change X” and “Y is a serious problem that could affect your ability to stay in your job.” Employees who aren’t meeting expectations deserve the opportunity to hear that message clearly and explicitly, so they don’t have to pick up on hints or read through layers of sugarcoating to figure out how to succeed in their jobs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Practically Painless Ways to Expand Your Network”

The danger of this behavior is they’re at risk of leaving the university with close ties to just a few people who are similar to them, squandering their chances to build a diverse network.
My students are open-minded people, and they’ve come to business school in part to develop great networks.
According to research conducted by sociologist Mark Granovetter, people appear to find their jobs more frequently through their weak ties, or acquaintances, than through their strong ties, which are their partner or close friends.
Your weak ties, which include people you just met once in passing, are your ticket to a whole new social world.
People often tell me they’re hoping to find a new job or project by networking.
You’ve worked out an efficient way of living your life, but you end up seeing the same people because they’re also following their own routines.
Besides talking to people you’d typically avoid, are there any places or activities where you can get injections of diversity or unpredictable people? For example, some students of mine play pickup basketball games, which attract different people every week.
How can we overcome this? Go down your lists of Facebook friends and LinkedIn friends, and most likely you’ll see people who are in your network but who may not automatically come to your mind when you’re feeling threatened or down.

The orginal article.