Summary of “My Private Oval Office Press Conference With Donald Trump”

What ensued amounted to a private press conference – featuring a series of special guest stars from the highest echelon of the Trump administration – to try to get me to change my mind.
“General Kelly’s doing a very good job,” Trump told me.
I asked Trump to explain how the White House was different with Kelly as chief of staff.
I began to ask Trump how he expected me to believe his relationship with Kelly was so good, given that fact, when he cut in.
“This is Olivia, she’s going to say very, very wonderful things about you. This is General Kelly,” Trump said.
One of the leads I was pursuing was a rumor that Trump had, at various times during Kelly’s tenure, offered the chief-of-staff job to other people in the White House, including Ayers.
I had put that specific question to several officials, citing a specific date and location for one of the meetings in which I understood the job had been discussed in late June, just before the publication of a Wall Street Journal story that named Ayers, along with the director of the Office of Management and Budget, Mick Mulvaney, as would-be Kelly replacements.
Cutting Kelly off, he said, “Bill was actually a little disappointed.” This prompted laughter around the room, but not from Kelly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 things I’m telling my kids to prepare them for the future”

It’s natural to look toward the future and wonder what change will bring.
Drawing on my time as co-chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Education, Gender and Work, I’ve tried to distill some of the Council’s most important research into advice for my children as they gradually age their way into the workforce.
First, past technological revolutions, from the automobile to the ATM, have ended up creating more jobs than they destroyed.
Plus, in an era of fast-paced technological and scientific breakthroughs, the more we discover, the more we have to learn new skills.
The vast majority of high schools and colleges aren’t adapting quickly enough to the change, leaving their students increasingly unprepared for the jobs market.
“Some studies suggest,” according to the WEF, “That 65 percent of children entering primary school today will have jobs that do not yet exist and for which their education will fail to prepare them.” And the WEF report “Realizing Human Potential in the Fourth Industrial Revolution” predicts that approximately 35% of the skills demanded for jobs across industries will change by 2020.
Sure, hard skills like programming, data analysis, engineering, and math are important; however, the WEF’s “Future of Jobs” report finds that technical know-how won’t be enough in the future.
“Overall, social skills-such as persuasion, emotional intelligence and teaching others-will be in higher demand across industries than narrow technical skills,” says the WEF. “In essence, technical skills will need to be supplemented with strong social and collaboration skills.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 things I’m telling my kids to prepare them for the future”

It’s natural to look toward the future and wonder what change will bring.
Drawing on my time as co-chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Education, Gender and Work, I’ve tried to distill some of the Council’s most important research into advice for my children as they gradually age their way into the workforce.
First, past technological revolutions, from the automobile to the ATM, have ended up creating more jobs than they destroyed.
Plus, in an era of fast-paced technological and scientific breakthroughs, the more we discover, the more we have to learn new skills.
The vast majority of high schools and colleges aren’t adapting quickly enough to the change, leaving their students increasingly unprepared for the jobs market.
“Some studies suggest,” according to the WEF, “That 65 percent of children entering primary school today will have jobs that do not yet exist and for which their education will fail to prepare them.” And the WEF report “Realizing Human Potential in the Fourth Industrial Revolution” predicts that approximately 35% of the skills demanded for jobs across industries will change by 2020.
Sure, hard skills like programming, data analysis, engineering, and math are important; however, the WEF’s “Future of Jobs” report finds that technical know-how won’t be enough in the future.
“Overall, social skills-such as persuasion, emotional intelligence and teaching others-will be in higher demand across industries than narrow technical skills,” says the WEF. “In essence, technical skills will need to be supplemented with strong social and collaboration skills.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Program Your Job”

“What used to take the last guy like a month, now takes maybe 10 minutes.” The job was full-time, with benefits, and allowed Etherable to work from home.
The program produced near-perfect results; for all management knew, their employee simply did flawless work.
At a moment when the specter of mass automation haunts workers, rogue programmers demonstrate how the threat can become a godsend when taken into coders’ hands, with or without their employers’ knowledge.
His boss was upset that he was quitting, Gary says-until he handed over the disk, showed him how the program worked, and told him to call him if there was ever any problem.
In most fields, workers rarely have any formal input over whether their job is automated, or how and when automation could be implemented.
“You use various tools and forms of automation anyway; anyone who works with a computer is automating work.” He says if any of these coders had sat in front of the computer, manually inputting the data day after day, they’d never be reprimanded.
They’re a sort of test case for how automation could deliver a higher quality of life to the average worker, albeit an imperfect one.
In 1932, Bertrand Russell wrote that “a great deal of harm is being done in the modern world by the belief in the virtuousness of work, and that the road to happiness and prosperity lies in an organized diminution of work.” In 2018, that might mean self-automators reclaiming parts of their work day; tomorrow, it could mean working to secure automated gains for the masses.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s How Millennials’ Lives Were Changed By Recession 10 Years Ago”

Many survived the foreclosure of homes, parents losing jobs, and years of fruitless job hunting after graduating school.
I’d say it’s impacted our lives in two ways: One, no matter how many times I took jobs that were outwardly vertical moves or increases in responsibility, my salary stayed pretty stagnant.
“Entry level” around here requires at minimum an associate’s degree and a couple years of experience – and that’s for jobs that literally anyone can do: office jobs, school support staffing, etc.
When the Great Recession hit 10 years ago, my clients were losing their jobs, homes, cars, etc.
My husband had a very difficult time finding a job out of college and worked internships and low-paying seasonal positions for years.
We struggled for three years to find a job that could feed us and lived off unemployment checks.
Once my dad had found a suitable job, it took us four years to get where we are today.
We have spent years working really low-wage jobs, sometimes multiple jobs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Do When You Have a Bad Boss”

Some studies show that it may take up to 22 months to recover physically and emotionally from a toxic boss.
While the idea of quitting may seem scary, the reality of staying in a job with a toxic boss can be even scarier.
If quitting is not an immediate option, there are some practical things you can do to mitigate the potential damage of working for a toxic boss.
There might be ways to escape your toxic boss without having to leave your company.
Let them know about the issues you’re having with your boss and what you’ve done to try to rectify the situation.
If you dread going to work every day, if you feel physically or mentally unsafe at work, if you spend more time thinking about your boss than your work, if stress from work permeates the rest of your life, if your self-esteem has plummeted, it’s time to go.
If your boss is truly toxic, he or she could dismiss you the minute you give notice.
Resist the urge to bad mouth your boss during potential job interviews or even after you land a new job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How I Learned to Embrace Power as a Woman in Washington”

Throughout my career, I’d been called “Tough.” It was a compliment that was regularly paid to women in Washington who demanded excellent work, but of course, it always sounded less begrudging when it was said of a man.
The question of how women use their power is far more complicated, more difficult and more urgent today than it is for men.
Women are often in denial about their own capabilities and search for others-groups of women or commanding men-to establish their power.
The real drawback of this dynamic is that it affects how women do their jobs.
More than anything, women have to become more accustomed to getting power.
Women need to stop thinking that “Power” is a dirty word, or that the trappings of power matter less than the work.
Women have a tremendous amount of power that comes with the roles we play in society, far more power than we ever had before.
At the same time, we have to appreciate that so many of the remaining obstacles to women’s advancement- most blatantly, perhaps, the sexual harassment in the workplace that has become an important topic of conversation-are all about power.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 resume writing tips to follow”

Having a well-crafted resume can be the key to getting your foot in the door at the company of your dreams.
Figuring out how to make your resume fully representative of your experience and also stand out is easier said than done.
Most people know the basics of how to put together a decent work history, but here are some tips you probably haven’t heard before that can help your resume stand up to the 7-second test.1.
If you’re targeting jobs in another area and you’d need to move in order to start working, it’s probably a good idea to leave your current address off your resume.
Be a name dropperIt may be poor form to drop names in everyday life, but you absolutely should do it on your resume.
Utilize your performance reviewsYou might not think to look to your annual review for resume material, but checking out the positive feedback you’ve received in years past can help you identify your most noteworthy accomplishments and best work attributes-two things that should definitely be highlighted on your resume.
Choose to share social accounts strategicallyIncluding links to social media accounts on a resume is becoming more common.
Keep an accomplishment journalKeeping a log of your work accomplishments and positive feedback as they come up can make putting together or updating your resume significantly easier.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to test your ability to do a job you’ve never done”

Most of the things you learned in college are of very limited use, the majority of future jobs do not exist today, and a large percentage of jobs within organizations remain unfilled because there aren’t enough people willing and able to do those jobs.
One of the things that will help you futureproof your career is to figure out whether you have the potential for jobs that you haven’t done in the past.
Even if you don’t have the right skills for a given job yet, being interested in that job will increase the likelihood you’ll be able to acquire them.
Being an extrovert gives you an advantage in jobs that require a great deal of interpersonal relations, such as sales, customer service, and PR jobs, but being an introvert will give you an edge when it comes to working independently, focusing on detailed tasks for extended periods of time, and listening to others.
If you find a job that is a natural fit for your style and behavioral preferences, you can turn your personality into a powerful career-building tool.
Of course, it is perfectly possible to learn and develop skills for jobs that are less naturally suited to our personality, but it will require more time, effort, and won’t always be enjoyable.
This is why so many employers are making curiosity one of the key hiring criteria, and why it’s so important to demonstrate that you’re a quick study during job interviews.
While working out whether something is interesting or not is easy, you will better understand what new jobs really require from you, how your personality differs from others, and how much you’re able to learn quickly, if you ask other people to tell you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can You Afford to Change Your Career?”

Who wouldn’t want a meaningful career and better balance between work and home? For many of us, it’s finances that keep us from making a career change.
We worry and wonder: What would a career change do to our bank accounts? To our way of life? To our family? We assume that a major reinvention would involve a gap between paychecks when we’d leave our job and break into a new field.
Like Steve, Amanda, and Brandon, we’re all drawn to career change for different reasons.
What if something unexpected happens in your new career? Or what if you can’t sell your home? Building or adding to an existing emergency fund will help ease the stress and worry of beginning a new career.
If your risk tolerance is fairly low but your proposed career change is one that will reduce your income by 75%, then you’ll probably want to rethink your choice.
Steve’s career change required different stages of setting and managing expectations with his wife, as his transition came in two phases that took place over four years.
Steve and his wife deliberated for a full year before he moved into the unpaid student phase of his career change.
The financial implications of a career change weigh heavily on the mind of anyone considering doing something different.

The orginal article.