Summary of “Stop Doing Low-Value Work”

In the past, time management experts would recommend that you divide up your work into A tasks, B tasks, and C tasks.
Although the jobs went away, much of the work didn’t.
No matter the job, everyone ended up with a lot more work.
It’s actually a matter of professional life or death to get rid of your low-value work – tasks that mean little or nothing to customers or colleagues.
Ask for help reducing your low-value work from your company’s productivity unit or information technology gurus.
Every week, block off the same time for yourself at work.
Use the time to figure out how to get rid of your low-value work.
It may take a while before people learn not to interrupt you during that time, but if you are politely persistent, it will work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stay Confident During Your Job Search by Focusing on the Process, Not the Outcome”

There are several reasons you want to avoid appearing – at networking events or in job interviews – as if you need the job too much.
The more worried you are that your job search is dragging on, the less likely you are to project the sense that you will handle whatever the job requires.
Process goals are particularly valuable during an arduous job search.
First, you are likely to be less frustrated about the job search when you are paying attention to the specific actions you need to take.
You may not succeed at getting a job on any particular day, but you may have succeeded at applying for new positions, meeting new people, or learning new things.
Second, many of the things you need to do to get a job are things you need to do after you get hired as well.
If you develop habits to read and learn skills, you’ll retain the benefits of those activities even after you start a new job.
Instead of getting desperate that you’ll never get a job – and scaring off potential employees – focus on the job search process, not just the outcome.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you should say yes to job interviews”

What happens when you’re called in for an interview for a job you realize you don’t actually want?
There are plenty of good reasons to attend a job interview, even if you don’t intend to take the job.
Attending job interviews can be nerve-wracking, so the more experience you have under your belt, the more confidence you’re apt to gain.
Candidates are often advised to do trial runs before attending actual interviews, so if you’re invited to meet with a company you don’t think you’ll end up working for, you can use that interview as a test run of sorts in order to do better in the future.
It’s not always easy to convey the entire scope of a role in a single job description, so if you’re willing to take the time to attend an interview, you might find that the job in question is more appealing than you thought.
A better job at the same company might become available later on.
If you go into an interview for a job you’re convinced you don’t want, there’s a good chance that you’ll walk away from that interview feeling the same way.
Of course, if there’s absolutely nothing redeeming about a given interview you’re asked to attend-say, the job is a dud and the company’s future seems bleak-then by all means, politely decline.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Impressive Questions to Ask in an Interview 2018”

As someone who has interviewed probably thousands of job candidates in my career, I’ve long been surprised by how many people don’t ask good questions when their interviewer gives them the opportunity.
A surprising number of candidates don’t have many questions at all, or simply use the time to try to further pitch themselves for the job.
So here are the ten best questions to ask in an interview when it’s your turn to ask the questions – to both impress your potential employer and help you get useful insights into whether or not this is the right job for you.
Initially, you might think that the job description already laid this out, but it’s not uncommon for a job description to be the same one an employer has been using for the last ten years, despite the job having changed significantly during that time.
You might find out that while the job posting listed 12 different responsibilities, your success really just hinges on 2 of them, or that the posting dramatically understated the importance of 1 of them, or that the hiring manager is battling with her own boss about expectations for the role, or even that the manager has no idea what success would look like in the job.
A job candidate asked me this question years ago, and it might be the strongest question I’ve ever been asked in an interview.
Sometimes people use their turn to ask questions in an interview solely as an additional chance to try to impress their interviewer – asking questions designed to reflect well on them rather than questions designed to help them figure out if the job is even right for them in the first place.
If you’re just focused on getting the job and not on whether it’s the right job for you, you’re in danger of ending up in a job where you’re struggling or miserable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research: When Getting Fired Is Good for Your Career”

We conducted additional research on 360 executives, analyzing their careers in depth.
While all of them experienced a variety of setbacks, 18% of executives in this dataset faced what many view as the very worst-case scenario: getting fired or laid off.
The good news: 68% of executives who had been let go landed in a new job within six months.
Even better? 91% of executives who had been fired took a job of similar or even greater levels of seniority.
In our study, when the interview process included expert third-party assessors engaged by employers to prevent hiring mistakes, 33% of executives who had been previously fired were recommended for hire – compared to 27% of candidates who had never been fired.
Each executive assessment includes detailed career and educational histories; performance appraisals; and information on patterns of behavior, decisions, and business results.
Taking ownership without shame enabled these executives to show themselves as likeable and confident in the interview process for the next role – qualities proven to increase chances of getting the job.
The most important advice both for those looking to rebound and to prevent getting fired in the first place: Pick jobs in the “Bull’s eye” of your skills and motivations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tech Company Brings Jobs And Optimism To Colorado Coal Country”

Tech Company Brings Jobs And Optimism To Colorado Coal Country : Shots – Health News For the first time in years, Delta County in western Colorado is experiencing population growth, one indicator that rural Americans are increasingly feeling optimistic about their economic future.
Like a lot of his family and old high school buddies, Olivas used to be a coal miner at one of the mines in the mountains of western Colorado that once employed thousands of workers with full benefits.
Olivas is one of about 800 coal miners in the North Fork Valley who found themselves unemployed over a period between 2014 to 2016.
Folks now refer to it as “The shock.” Two of the county’s three coal mines shut down, and the valley’s tight knit little towns with folksy names – Cedaredge, Paonia, Hotchkiss – faced the prospect of shuttered businesses and consolidating schools.
Maybe the jobs from the new fiber-optic boom don’t pay as well as the old coal jobs.
“It’s the ‘moving on’ and being successful – not because the coal mines closed, but in spite of them closing.”
People have known for some time that coal is probably not coming back to Delta County.
She’d had to move there to keep a job, working in human resources for a coal company.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Private Oval Office Press Conference With Donald Trump”

What ensued amounted to a private press conference – featuring a series of special guest stars from the highest echelon of the Trump administration – to try to get me to change my mind.
“General Kelly’s doing a very good job,” Trump told me.
I asked Trump to explain how the White House was different with Kelly as chief of staff.
I began to ask Trump how he expected me to believe his relationship with Kelly was so good, given that fact, when he cut in.
“This is Olivia, she’s going to say very, very wonderful things about you. This is General Kelly,” Trump said.
One of the leads I was pursuing was a rumor that Trump had, at various times during Kelly’s tenure, offered the chief-of-staff job to other people in the White House, including Ayers.
I had put that specific question to several officials, citing a specific date and location for one of the meetings in which I understood the job had been discussed in late June, just before the publication of a Wall Street Journal story that named Ayers, along with the director of the Office of Management and Budget, Mick Mulvaney, as would-be Kelly replacements.
Cutting Kelly off, he said, “Bill was actually a little disappointed.” This prompted laughter around the room, but not from Kelly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 things I’m telling my kids to prepare them for the future”

It’s natural to look toward the future and wonder what change will bring.
Drawing on my time as co-chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Education, Gender and Work, I’ve tried to distill some of the Council’s most important research into advice for my children as they gradually age their way into the workforce.
First, past technological revolutions, from the automobile to the ATM, have ended up creating more jobs than they destroyed.
Plus, in an era of fast-paced technological and scientific breakthroughs, the more we discover, the more we have to learn new skills.
The vast majority of high schools and colleges aren’t adapting quickly enough to the change, leaving their students increasingly unprepared for the jobs market.
“Some studies suggest,” according to the WEF, “That 65 percent of children entering primary school today will have jobs that do not yet exist and for which their education will fail to prepare them.” And the WEF report “Realizing Human Potential in the Fourth Industrial Revolution” predicts that approximately 35% of the skills demanded for jobs across industries will change by 2020.
Sure, hard skills like programming, data analysis, engineering, and math are important; however, the WEF’s “Future of Jobs” report finds that technical know-how won’t be enough in the future.
“Overall, social skills-such as persuasion, emotional intelligence and teaching others-will be in higher demand across industries than narrow technical skills,” says the WEF. “In essence, technical skills will need to be supplemented with strong social and collaboration skills.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 things I’m telling my kids to prepare them for the future”

It’s natural to look toward the future and wonder what change will bring.
Drawing on my time as co-chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Education, Gender and Work, I’ve tried to distill some of the Council’s most important research into advice for my children as they gradually age their way into the workforce.
First, past technological revolutions, from the automobile to the ATM, have ended up creating more jobs than they destroyed.
Plus, in an era of fast-paced technological and scientific breakthroughs, the more we discover, the more we have to learn new skills.
The vast majority of high schools and colleges aren’t adapting quickly enough to the change, leaving their students increasingly unprepared for the jobs market.
“Some studies suggest,” according to the WEF, “That 65 percent of children entering primary school today will have jobs that do not yet exist and for which their education will fail to prepare them.” And the WEF report “Realizing Human Potential in the Fourth Industrial Revolution” predicts that approximately 35% of the skills demanded for jobs across industries will change by 2020.
Sure, hard skills like programming, data analysis, engineering, and math are important; however, the WEF’s “Future of Jobs” report finds that technical know-how won’t be enough in the future.
“Overall, social skills-such as persuasion, emotional intelligence and teaching others-will be in higher demand across industries than narrow technical skills,” says the WEF. “In essence, technical skills will need to be supplemented with strong social and collaboration skills.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Program Your Job”

“What used to take the last guy like a month, now takes maybe 10 minutes.” The job was full-time, with benefits, and allowed Etherable to work from home.
The program produced near-perfect results; for all management knew, their employee simply did flawless work.
At a moment when the specter of mass automation haunts workers, rogue programmers demonstrate how the threat can become a godsend when taken into coders’ hands, with or without their employers’ knowledge.
His boss was upset that he was quitting, Gary says-until he handed over the disk, showed him how the program worked, and told him to call him if there was ever any problem.
In most fields, workers rarely have any formal input over whether their job is automated, or how and when automation could be implemented.
“You use various tools and forms of automation anyway; anyone who works with a computer is automating work.” He says if any of these coders had sat in front of the computer, manually inputting the data day after day, they’d never be reprimanded.
They’re a sort of test case for how automation could deliver a higher quality of life to the average worker, albeit an imperfect one.
In 1932, Bertrand Russell wrote that “a great deal of harm is being done in the modern world by the belief in the virtuousness of work, and that the road to happiness and prosperity lies in an organized diminution of work.” In 2018, that might mean self-automators reclaiming parts of their work day; tomorrow, it could mean working to secure automated gains for the masses.

The orginal article.