Summary of “Why quitting your job without a backup plan can help your career”

“Sometimes you need time to detox and heal from abusive situations so that you don’t jump into something just as bad to get away from your current job,” says Rhonda Ansted, career coach and Founder of Be the Change Career Consulting.
Leaving your job without any savings in the bank is likely to lead to you feeling forced to take any job out of financial necessity.
If you can’t job search while working your current job.
Looking for a new job while employed means you can never truly give your all to your search, and you may not have the time to explore all of the opportunities available, never mind booking time off to go to interviews.
“It didn’t feel fair to the company I was working for, and it would have limited the time I was able to spend charting my next move,” says First, who quit her job without having another one lined up, freeing up her time to do a thorough job search.
Quitting your job without a backup plan has the same effect on your nervous system as walking into the desert without any water.
Assess the toll your unhappiness in your current job is having on your health.
Quitting your job with no plan in place allows you to be open to new opportunities that you may never have considered if you simply took the next opportunity that fell in your lap.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A record number of folks age 85 and older are working. Here’s what they’re doing.”

Seventy may be the new 60, and 80 may be the new 70, but 85 is still pretty old to work in America.
Overall, 255,000 Americans 85 years old or older were working over the past 12 months.
Labor Department figures show that at every year of age above 55, U.S. residents are working or looking for work at the highest rates on record.
Workers age 30 and younger are staying on the sidelines at rates not seen since the 1960s and ’70s, when women weren’t yet entering the workforce at the level they are today.
People who are still working at age 85 or above are, as you might guess, unusual.
Workers age 85 and older are more common in less physical industries, such as management and sales, than they are in demanding ones such as manufacturing and construction.
Nobody questions whether older workers can make a difference.
Few people of any age get the opportunity to work as crossing guards, funeral directors or musicians.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to love your job? Read this article”

Having done all this stuff, and been unemployed on several occasions, I can safely say that the only thing worse than working is not having a job.
It’s not the job itself that gives us a sense of purpose, but the pleasure of work.
She offered him a job interview when he was unemployed, depressed, and buying a latte as consolation-not planning to ask for work.
In his recent essay, “The Case Against Work,” Danaher, a law lecturer at the National University of Ireland in Galway, contends that-love it or hate it-we’re all obsessed with work.
Danaher defines work as “The performance of an activity for economic reward or in the hope of receiving some such reward.” He believes that work is bad because many employment contracts allow employers to undermine worker freedom.
The answer isn’t escape from a “Voluntary prison,” but a new way of thinking about how we spend our working days and breaks-making today matter, both on the job and during time off.
Disrespect for your own work can lead you to disrespect the work of others, too.
Being adaptive is a critical life skill that’s practiced at work, whatever job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to know where the economy is headed? Look at Des Moines.”

Around the country, and especially in central Iowa, the low unemployment rate has slowly but surely tipped the balance of power away from employers and towards workers, who here in the Hawkeye State have been able to demand higher wages, better working conditions, more generous benefits, training programs, and myriad other perks.
Competition for workers has gone crazy, Joe McConville, who co-owns a popular chain of made-from-scratch pizza restaurants, told me.
“At almost every restaurant that I’ve worked at, you always had a stack of applications waiting,” he said.
“You’d call somebody up and half the time they’re still looking for an extra job. That’s not happening anymore.” He said he faced a “Black hole” in terms of finding more experienced twenty-something employees, and that to compete he has paid out higher wages and added vacation days.
More than that, Iowa’s tight labor market has forced employers to offer training, reach out to new populations of workers, and accept applications from workers they might not have before – expanding and up-skilling the labor pool as a whole as a result.
“Their attitude really seems to be changing,” said Soneeta Mangra-Dutcher of Central Iowa Works, a workforce-development nonprofit.
“Once I got that behind me, I still found finding employment pretty hard.” He found work washing dishes, but became unemployed again after the restaurant he was working at closed down.
“I send it over to be [combined] in a machine with fabric. That leaves the machine, and goes to the tire builders, and they build the tire.” He said the work was hot, dirty, and physically exhausting, but still that he loved the job, where he now earns $21 an hour, as well as health benefits.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is it great to be a worker in the U.S? Not compared with the rest of the developed world.”

Joblessness may be low in the United States and employers may be hungry for new hires, but it’s also strikingly easy to lose a job here.
An average of 1 in 5 employees lose or leave their jobs each year, and 23.3 percent of workers ages 15 to 64 had been in their job for a year or less in 2016 – higher than all but a handful of countries in the study.
Decade-old OECD research found an unusually large amount of job turnover in the United States is due to firing and layoffs, and Labor Department figures show the rate of layoffs and firings hasn’t changed significantly since the research was conducted.
The U.S. ranks at the bottom for employee protection even when mass layoffs are taken into consideration as well, despite the 1988 Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act’s requirement that employers give notice 60 days before major plant closings or layoffs.
Fewer than half of displaced workers find a job within a year, the researchers found.
Japan’s rate was similar to the U.S., but Finland, Australia and Denmark were well ahead. Furthermore, the report’s authors find that “Two in three families with a displaced worker fall into poverty for some time.”
The United States spends less of its economic wealth on active efforts to help people who either don’t have a job or who are at risk of becoming unemployed than almost any other country in the study.
Based on an OECD review of almost four decades of data, countries that have decentralized collective-bargaining systems, like the United States, tend to have slower job growth and, in most cases, higher unemployment than other advanced nations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘All humanity has left the area’: paying for Tesla’s Gigafactory”

One complaint is that tax credits given to Tesla – and to a lesser extent other tech companies – deplete public services, resulting in potholed roads, overcrowded schools and insufficient affordable housing.
A Tesla spokesperson said the company was investing in local education, including a high school manufacturing development programme and a $37.5m plan to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
Tesla receives credits based on jobs created, Ron Knecht, Nevada’s state controller, said in an interview.
Current Tesla projections suggest the credits are justified even if the ultimate cost is unclear, said Knecht.
In the case of Tesla it was $68.7m. Credits to Musk’s company will soak up most of a tax revenue excess Nevada was due to record this year.
Had Tesla never come there would have been nothing to tax, so the cost/benefit remains murky.
Tesla has sold $131m in tax credits to casinos thanks to transferable tax credits – the cherry on the cake used to lure Musk.
“Giving so much to Tesla was risky,” said Eloy Jara, another labour leader.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Economists worry we aren’t prepared for the fallout from automation”

Are we focusing too much on analyzing exactly how many jobs could be destroyed by the coming wave of automation, and not enough on how to actually fix the problem? That’s one conclusion in a new paper on the potential effects of robotics and AI on global labor markets from US think tank, the Center for Global Development.
The paper’s authors, Lukas Schlogl and Andy Sumner, say it’s impossible to know exactly how many jobs will be destroyed or disrupted by new technology.
They add, it’s fairly certain there are going to be significant effects – especially in developing economies, where the labor market is skewed toward work that requires the sort of routine, manual labor that’s so susceptible to automation.
As earlier studies have also suggested, Schlogl and Sumner think the effects of automation on these and other nations is not likely to be mass unemployment, but the stagnation of wages and polarization of the labor market.
One class of solution they call “Quasi-Luddite” – measures that try to stall or reverse the trend of automation.
The other class of solution they call “Coping strategies,” which tend to focus on one of two things: re-skilling workers whose jobs are threatened by automation or providing economic safety nets to those affected.
Retraining workers is expensive, and sometimes not possible Schlogl and Sumner suggest that the problem with retraining workers is that it’s not clear what new skills will be “Automation-resistant for a sufficient time” or whether it’s even worth the money to retrain someone in the middle of their working life.
“Questions like profitability, labor regulations, unionization, and corporate-social expectations will be at least as important as technical constraints in determining which jobs get automated,” they write.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Ohio Startup Rebuilds Lives One Piece of Fried Chicken at a Time”

He wanted to accomplish this goal using a somewhat unusual product: spicy fried chicken.
“Fried chicken is this great equalizer of humanity,” DeLoss said recently as we sat in the crowded mezzanine overlooking Columbus’ North Market, where his flagship restaurant is located.
Neither of them had ever fried chicken before they bought a table-top fryer.
Hot Chicken promoted him quickly, so that by the time I met him in April he was a low-level manager earning $11 an hour plus tips.
Richard Mason, the employment specialist at House of Hope, has referred roughly 25 men to jobs at Hot Chicken over the years, and about six of them work there now.
Hot Chicken focuses on helping its employees stabilize their lives.
The first client Kindway referred to Hot Chicken was Shannon Wilson, a former heroin addict who started working at the restaurant three years ago and is now the company’s executive coordinator.
DeLoss’ ultimate goal is to expand Hot Chicken into a national chain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “America’s severe trucker shortage could undermine the prosperous economy”

Nearly every item sold in the United States touches a truck at some point, which explains why the challenges facing the industry, including trucking companies rapidly raising prices as they raise wages, have special power to affect the entire economy.
At TDDS Technical Institute, an independent trucker school in Ohio where Blocksom has considered enrolling, veteran teachers say they have never seen it this bad. They say there may be closer to 100,000 truck driver openings.
“As long as you can get in and out of a truck and pass a physical, a trucking company will take a look at you now,” said Tish Sammons, the job placement coordinator at TDDS, whose desk is full of toy trucks and fliers from the companies that call her daily begging for drivers.
One of the only industries growing in the area is trucking, yet locals are hesitant to become truckers.
The owner of the shop said he had thought about becoming a trucker but decided it wasn’t feasible after he had children.
Drivers sit for hours a day in diesel trucks and pull into truck stops that typically serve greasy hot dogs and chili.
Turnover in the trucking industry has skyrocketed to 94 percent, according to the American Trucking Associations, meaning most drivers at the major trucking companies don’t spend more than a year in their jobs.
Trucking company recruiters descend daily on the United States’ truck driver training schools – roughly 500, according to the Commercial Vehicle Training Association – to fight for new graduates.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to prepare your kids for jobs that don’t exist yet”

A 2017 report from Gartner concludes that artificial intelligence will create more jobs than it kills.
The handling of artificial intelligence is where Goldfarb thinks an overwhelming number of those new jobs will be created.
These bots are still nascent, but it’s not hard to imagine a world in which nurses have to understand how to help patients set reminders or even be able to communicate with these devices remotely as a way of checking in on a patient as part of their jobs.
“The most valuable combinations of skills are going to be people who both have good training in computer science, who know how the machines work, but also understand the needs of society and the organization, and so have an understanding of humanities and social sciences,” he says.
So how does one prepare to lead these artificially intelligent machines into the new world? Oddly enough, a liberal arts education might be the best antidote to automation, says Goldfarb.
Parents should encourage kids to be good at more than one thing as a way of being flexible, he says.
By choosing interdisciplinary courses of study, kids will not only develop a variety of skills, they’ll also be knowledgable about more than one subject area, giving them some adaptability as jobs change.
Because of how cheap technology has gotten, Goldfarb says, this means that more people have more access to the kinds of technology and tools that will prepare them for the future.

The orginal article.