Summary of “The Human Cost of the Ghost Economy”

The distance between the main employer, the company that hires the temp agency, and the worker who fulfills these gigs, allows for the same type of casual cruelty that is exchanged between people who meet on online dating apps.
Temp jobs began after the second world war, offering work at companies like Kelly Girl, a billion-dollar staffing company based in Michigan, on a short-term basis.
As temping has grown, the quality of jobs has deteriorated, and temps now earn 20 to 25 percent less an hour than those who work as direct hires, according to government statistics.
As temping has grown, the quality of jobs has deteriorated, and temps now earn 20 to 25 percent less an hour than those who work as direct hires.
The permanent staff worked a good city union job but they hired temp workers to fill in the gaps.
Two months prior, a worker for Remedy Intelligent Staffing, 21-year-old Lawrence Daquan “Day” Davis, was crushed to death during his first day on the job at a Bacardi Bottling Corporation facility in Florida.
An examination of wage and hour violations for the years 1980 to 2010 for subcontractors, temp agencies, and primary employers of the industries that are most predominantly temped out shows that temp agencies have a substantially higher rate of failure to pay health benefits – 34 percent of workers don’t receive them – and failure to pay at all – a whole 29 percent.
While not all temp agencies are committing wage theft, lack of contact with one’s primary employer creates a dehumanizing work environment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Will Robots Take Our Children’s Jobs?”

Any legal job that involves lots of mundane document review is vulnerable.
Then there is Wall Street, where robots are already doing their best to shove Gordon Gekko out of his corner office.
Who knows what the jobs marketplace might look like by then.
Artificial intelligence is different, said Martin Ford, the author of “Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future.” Machine learning does not just give us new machines to replace old machines, pushing human workers from one industry to another.
Since Mr. Ford’s book sent me down this rabbit hole in the first place, I reached out to him to see if he was concerned about all this for his own children: Tristan, 22, Colin, 17, and Elaine, 10.He said the most vulnerable jobs in the robot economy are those involving predictable, repetitive tasks, however much training they require.
“A lot of knowledge-based jobs are really routine – sitting in front of a computer and cranking out the same application over and over, whether it is a report or some kind of quantitative analysis,” he said.
So do jobs emphasizing empathy and interpersonal communication.
In their vision of a post-A.I. world without traditional jobs, everyone will receive a minimum weekly or monthly stipend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Jobs Report Is Overhyped. Here’s Why That’s A Problem.”

“Excellent Jobs Numbers just released – and I have only just begun,” he said.
Here’s the thing: The U.S. didn’t add 209,000 jobs in July.
“There is a lot misunderstanding around the mechanics of the jobs report,” said Matt McDonald, who is a partner at the Washington-based consulting firm Hamilton Place Strategies and writes a monthly analysis of the jobs report.
In March, The Washington Post recounted 19 examples of the president dismissing the jobs data as fake before he took office.
A little secret of the economics trade is that the jobs data is the statistical equivalent of a best guess.
According to the BLS, the actual monthly change in the number of jobs likely falls somewhere in the range of 120,000 more or 120,000 less than its estimate.
The BLS estimated that 50,000 jobs were added then, meaning that the actual change in the number of jobs could be anywhere between a gain of 170,000 and a loss of 70,000.
Since 2003, the average change between the first estimate of a month’s job gains or losses and the third and final estimate is an increase of 11,000 jobs, according to the BLS’s Current Employment Statistics program, which conducts the survey of companies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Keila Pulinario Thought Prison Was Tough. Then She Had To Find A Job.”

Not long after Keila Pulinario was released from prison, she was hit by a car while walking to work.
Pulinario had spent nearly every day of her sentence working: as a cook, a prison day care staff member, a porter, a builder in the industry program.
One friend’s boss, a professor who studies effects of mass incarceration, was at the exhibit; when that boss heard Pulinario’s idea, she told Pulinario she was hosting an event for 70 people the next week.
Pulinario entered prison in 1997, when New York City’s subways still took tokens instead of MetroCards, and before anyone had heard of Google, Facebook, or Twitter.
“Everything is overwhelming, and no one really gets that,” said Pulinario, who lived with relatives on Long Island for the first three months after prison.
After those three months, Pulinario moved to Queens to join Hour Children, a kind of halfway house for women coming out of prison, which had a six-month program to help residents learn technological skills and break into the job market.
Her friend had already recommended Pulinario to her boss, which Pulinario knew gave her an advantage.
During Pulinario’s sentence, women inmates settled a class-action lawsuit that changed pat-frisk policies in the state so that female correctional officers would perform them whenever possible over male officers, and inmates like Pulinario who had a history of sexual trauma could demand a woman every single time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Robots Will Transform Fast Food”

Visitors to Henn-na, a restaurant outside Nagasaki, Japan, are greeted by a peculiar sight: their food being prepared by a row of humanoid robots that bear a passing resemblance to the Terminator.
H.I.S., the company that runs the restaurant, as well as a nearby hotel where robots check guests into their rooms and help with their luggage, turned to automation partly out of necessity.
“Using robots makes a lot of sense in a country like Japan, where it’s hard to find employees,” CEO Hideo Sawada told me.
Chui’s latest research estimates that 54 percent of the tasks workers perform in American restaurants and hotels could be automated using currently available technologies-making it the fourth-most-automatable sector in the U.S. The robots are already here.
The companies bringing robots into the service sector are betting that we’ll be happy to trade our relationship with the chipper barista or knowledgeable front-desk clerk for greater efficiency.
Business owners insist that robots will take over work that is dirty, dangerous, or just dull, enabling humans to focus on other tasks.
Once the robots are sweating in the kitchen, human employees will be free to interact with customers in more-targeted ways, bringing them extra napkins and asking them how they’re enjoying their burgers.
A college education helps insulate workers from automation, enabling them to develop the kind of expertise, judgment, and problem-solving abilities that robots can’t match.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s College Good For?”

Every college student who does the least work required to get good grades silently endorses the theory.
Of course, college students aren’t supposed to just download facts; they’re supposed to learn how to think in real life.
College students do hone some kinds of reasoning that are specific to their major.
Today’s college students are less willing than those of previous generations to do the bare minimum of showing up for class and temporarily learning whatever’s on the test.
“Full time” college students now average 27 hours of academic work a week-including just 14 hours spent studying.
For the individual student? Would I advise an academically well-prepared 18-year-old to skip college because she won’t learn much of value? Absolutely not.
Failure rates are high, particularly for students with low high-school grades and test scores; all told, about 60 percent of full-time college students fail to finish in four years.
Simply put, the push for broader college education has steered too many students who aren’t cut out for academic success onto the college track.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tim Ferriss shares best career advice for 20-somethings”

“The 4-Hour Workweek” author and hit podcast host Tim Ferriss has made a career of collecting best practices from people at the tops of their fields.
For his new book “Tribe of Mentors,” bestselling author and star podcast host Tim Ferriss sent 11 questions to 140 people at the top of their fields.
When Tim Ferriss was an undergraduate at Princeton, he saw the majority of his classmates fiercely competing for high-paying consulting and finance jobs, regardless of their personal passions or backgrounds.
After moving to Silicon Valley and starting his own company, Ferriss took a break from it all and embarked on a journey that resulted in his becoming a self-proclaimed “Human guinea pig” who seeks out and learns from people at the top of their fields, from musicians to hedge fund managers, writers to chefs.
We recently spoke with Ferriss for Business Insider’s podcast “Success! How I Did It.” After asking him about his own career and what he learned writing his new book “Tribe of Mentors,” we asked him what he recommended for young professionals just beginning their careers.
Ferriss said that it’s worth fighting the urge to go for the job that will get you the biggest paycheck when you’re establishing yourself.
He then explained that when undertaking this early career education, it’s worth focusing on the material that will help you when you are ready to start going after high-paying, respected jobs.
Ferriss said that if your job entails something niche like placing ads on Instagram, by all means learn how to do that well, “But spend equal time developing the higher level skills like negotiation, persuasion, copywriting.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to build a startup while having a full-time job”

Starting a new startup while having other critical obligations in your life, like a full-time job or a family, is certainly challenging – but not impossible.
I started my career at a design agency teaching me the basics of being a designer and how business works.
In the evening hours two friends and I started an online design magazine named FONTANEL, basically to satisfy our creative curiosity.
Even though we didn’t earn a penny in the first couple of years we did manage to interview our heroes, experiment with the possibilities of the internet, grow our network, sharpen our design critique, and enable talented designers to find great new jobs.
I’ve found people usually do their best work if they combine the two.
My personal purpose has always been to help people become happier through work and I’ve managed to combine that with my love for digital design by co-founding recruiting platform Homerun.
Balancing my full-time job while founding my startup basically meant that after a day’s work at my job, and after our newborn baby got to sleep, I opened my laptop and started to work on my startup.
My working days were quite long but it didn’t feel like hard work because I really believed in what I was solving and I felt very passionate about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Artificial Intelligence Puts Profit Ahead of Democracy”

Facebook’s much-lauded AI was working to “Consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible,” as Facebook’s first president Sean Parker recently put it to Mike Allen.
Democracy? Not Facebook’s problem-until it was.
“AI will probably exacerbate inequalities, first with job disruptions-a few people will benefit greatly from the wealth created, [while] a large number will suffer because of job loss-and second because wealth created by AI is likely to be concentrated in a few companies and a few countries.”
Report, ‘A Future That Works’, describing a time in which fewer actually will.
According to that report, 51% of all the work done in the U.S. economy could be automated at a savings for companies-and loss in workers’ salaries-of $2.7 trillion.
While only about 5% of all occupations could be fully automated, about a third of the work in 60% of them can be taken over by machines.
As long as AI is primarily dedicated to advancing economic goals, its workings are likely to remain largely proprietary and thus unavailable for scrutiny-that’s assuming its creators even know how it works.
Our best-and maybe only-defense against this danger to our society is to educate ourselves and our children about AI and machine-learning technology so we aren’t treating AI as some sacred form of modern magic whose workings and effects we’re forced to unquestioningly accept.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Job Searching? Skip The Job Boards And Take These Five Steps Instead”

Your first instinct might be to search the job boards when you’re looking for a new job.
A single job listing can easily receive hundreds of applications within the first few hours after publishing.
One thing remains true in any job search: You first need to identify the roles and companies you want to apply to.
This is the one stage when you’ll actually want to spend time on job boards, scanning them to build up a clear picture of the skills that employers are looking for.
If you’re a digital marketer looking for an agency role, head over to one of the major job boards and run a search for your target roles and salary.
Create a list of all the hard skills and knowledge that employers are requesting, which in this case might be digital strategy, five years of agency project experience, and specific software tools.
Now you can leave the job boards behind you for good, without ever sending a single application to an opening you’ve found there.
Sending out speculative job applications definitely takes some time and effort, but it can be a great alternative to scouring anemic job boards and coming up dry-or being the 285th person to apply to a given role.

The orginal article.