Summary of “Chicago’s Awful Divide”

The disconnect is why Andrew Diamond, the author of Chicago on the Make, has called Chicago “a combination of Manhattan smashed against Detroit.”
There were 11,646 retail jobs in the Back of the Yards neighborhood on Chicago’s near South Side in 1970, according to a report by the Great Cities Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Around 40 percent of black 20-to-24-year-olds in Chicago are out of work and out of school today, compared with 7 percent of white 20-to-24 year-olds in Chicago.
Murders in Chicago increased by 58 percent between 2015 and 2016, and the number of nonfatal shootings grew by 43 percent, according to the University of Chicago Crime Lab.
In Chicago, unlike many global cities, the neighborhoods that struggled 30 years ago are still the neighborhoods that struggle today.
So while wealth is creeping into some poor neighborhoods in cities like New York or Los Angeles as upper-class people move back to cities, less gentrification has taken place in poor, black neighborhoods in Chicago.
In a study of Chicago published in the American Sociological Review, Sampson found that Chicago neighborhoods that were more than 40 percent black didn’t gentrify.
Dawson told me, “My mother was a big advocate of me getting out of the neighborhood.” Rather than going to his struggling neighborhood school, Dawson attended high school in the wealthy Lincoln Park neighborhood of Chicago.

The orginal article.

Summary of “They called my university a PhD factory”

As I reluctantly consider quitting academia after a year-long research fellowship, I find myself recalling a drug dealer’s line in the film Withnail and I: “If you’re hanging on to a rising balloon, you’re presented with a difficult decision – let go before it’s too late or hang on and keep getting higher, posing the question: how long can you keep a grip on the rope?” His words describe my dilemma: do I hold on to my dream of a permanent university lectureship or abandon it as illusory and hazardous to my mental health?
Her article added to an expanding genre known as quit lit, which reflects the growing disillusionment of many academics with university culture.
Perusing job ads, it strikes me that lectureship vacancies are rare, in contrast to the plethora of positions for university bureaucrats.
When I was considering whether to study for a doctorate, I heard my chosen university disparaged as a PhD factory.
I began a PhD knowing that I stood a very small chance of securing a permanent academic job at the end of it.
Publishing work online has never been easier, but to function effectively as an academic, you need the sanction of a university.
Given university marketing departments’ desperate trumpeting of the value of “Employability”, it’s surprising that taught and research postgraduate degrees seem exempt from this consideration.
Looking for a higher education job? Or perhaps you need to recruit university staff? Take a look at Guardian Jobs, the higher education specialist.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Exactly Does a Librarian Do? Everything.”

Every job in a library depends on someone else’s to function.
Libraries are buzzing hives filled with extremely busy, frazzled, overworked people.
Staff and Librarians work together to make sure that everything runs as smoothly as possible, which it NEVER, EVER DOES. Lots of different types of library work happens everywhere-new jobs crop up daily, thanks to evolving tech and shifting community needs-but there are some standard positions that remain eternal.
First of all, there’s the backbone of the library: technical services.
These are library employees who go home and drink a lot.
What I’m saying about library “Tropes” is that they apply to anyone who works in a library because you have to know how to do everyone else’s job.
Librarianship is the understanding that maintaining a library is a shared responsibility.
Libraries are community spaces for patrons as well as for library staff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Higher Education’s Push Toward Lifelong Learning”

The alliance with Infosys is a good example of this new strategy as the college works with the company to figure out how the school can help in recruiting and training 500 workers who will make a median salary of $79,000.
Workers will likely consume this lifelong learning in short spurts when they need it, rather than in lengthy blocks of time as they do now when it often takes months or years to complete certificates and degrees.
“What worries me,” Holzer said, “Is that the system today is not great at providing training to workers who need it, and the demand is only going to grow in the future with more workers, in more occupations.”
The classic image of job retraining in the U.S. remains that of laid-off blue-collar factory workers learning new skills.
Increased funds for federal job-training programs will only come when white-collar workers use the benefits in addition to laid-off blue-collar workers.
Work sharing is a program in place in more than 25 states in which employers reduce their workers’ hours and pay and the states make up some of the lost wages.
It’s typically used as an incentive in an economic slowdown to keep skilled workers employed, but it can also provide workers the flexibility to improve their skills while in a job.
Faced with a skills gap, employers are increasingly working with community colleges to provide workers with both the academic education needed to succeed in today’s workforce and the specific hands-on skills to get a job in their companies.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Understanding Speed and Velocity: Saying “NO” to the Non-Essential”

Understanding the difference between speed and velocity will change how you work.
I once worked for someone who offered me the opportunity to work on a new project nearly every day.
Over my first seven years, I’d barely leave my desk, working 12- to 16-hour days for six days a week.
Offers of work are good problems to have.
A lot of people struggle to find work, and here I was, a few weeks out of university, saying no to my boss.
I took a two-thirds pay cut to work for the government so I could work with incredibly smart people on a very narrow skill.
“Instead of asking how many tasks you can tackle given your working hours,” writes Morten Hansen in Great at Work, “Ask how many you can ditch given what you must do to excel.” I did what I needed to do to keep my job.
Think of it this way: I want to get from New York to L.A. Speed is flying circles around Manhattan, and velocity is hopping on a direct flight from JFK to LAX. “People think focus means saying yes to the thing you’ve got to focus on. But that’s not what it means at all. It means saying no to the hundred other good ideas that there are. You have to pick carefully. I’m actually as proud of the things we haven’t done as the things I have done. Innovation is saying ‘no’ to 1,000 things.”- Steve Jobs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How I Stopped Feeling Trapped in a Life I Didn’t Want”

The trapped feeling was gone, at least for a little while.
Over the years, that trapped feeling wrapped its tendrils around my chest and squeezed a number of times, but recently I realized I haven’t felt that way in quite a while.
What was it that made me feel so trapped in the past? Why haven’t I been feeling that way anymore? For me, I think it comes down to career and identity.
I spent much of my life wondering what I wanted to be when I grew up, and went from job to job, often ending up feeling like I was caged in.
Here are some steps of the steps I took to get from there to here, and that you can try, too, if you feel trapped in your life.
Focus on the bad you’re feeling, and the more you’ll feel bad. Learn to live with uncertainty.
You don’t have to feel trapped in a life you don’t want forever.
You can make changes, even tiny incremental ones, and get into a life that feels just right for you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “During the Great Recession, Groupon was the coolest place a millennial could work”

In the thick of the recession, companies like Groupon promised to offer cash-strapped consumers a way to save money and to drum up foot traffic for ailing brick-and-mortar businesses desperate for the kind of spending that the recession had made so scarce.
Like Masterson, Daniel Cox also entered the industry coming from less-than-ideal employment circumstances – or, in his words, a “Shitty temp job at a call center.” A few friends of his had recently jumped aboard the Groupon bandwagon, so he figured he’d try the same.
Like Groupon, albeit on a smaller scale, the company quickly earned local “Tech darling” status in our city.
In an arid wasteland of jobs, Groupon and its imitators were like desert oases for income-thirsty 20somethings, especially white ones.
In May 2011, a 3,000-word story in The New York Times about Groupon followed the making of a deal for horseback riding lessons as it shuffled along a conveyor belt of young people, from a 23-year-old English major writing the copy to the 25-year-old assistant theater director-turned-fact-checker to the 27-year-old Second City alum who gave it the final edit.
As the industry ballooned and bloated, companies like Groupon began to sag beneath its own weight, and working there started to lose its luster.
A Groupon deal became a last-ditch effort to survive, when in reality it was more of a funeral dirge.
People still work at Groupon, but the company and its counterparts are what Eggers categorizes as “The living dead:” zombie-like organizations that don’t see any new influx of cash and are just stumbling along.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How You Do Anything Is How You Do Everything”

Whatever you’re doing right now, chances are you’d probably rather not be doing it.
Even if you’ve got your dream job, it’s very likely that right now you could still be on a conference call you’d rather skip, scheduling some meeting you’re doing as a favor to someone else or dealing with some administrative detail you wish someone else would handle.
Because how you do anything, is how you do everything.
These men went from humble poverty to power by always doing what they were asked to do - and doing it right and with real pride.
We should never have to ask ourselves, But what am I supposed to do now? Because we know the answer: our job.
Steve Jobs cared even about the inside of his products, making sure they were beautifully designed even though the users would never see them.
In every design predicament, Jobs knew his marching orders: Respect the craft and make something beautiful.
Every part - especially the work that nobody sees, the tough things we wanted to avoid or could have skated away from - we can treat same way Jobs did: with pride and dedication.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Most Americans think AI will destroy other people’s jobs, not theirs”

AI is a problem for jobs, say the majority of Americans, but it’s someone else’s problem.
Nearly three-quarters of US adults believe artificial intelligence will “Eliminate more jobs than it creates,” according to a Gallup survey.
For respondents with only a four-year college degree or less, 28 percent were worried about AI taking their job; for people with at least a bachelor degree, that figure was 15 percent.
One survey conducted by Quartz last year found that 90 percent of respondents thought that up to half of all jobs would be lost to automation in five years, but 91 percent said there was “No risk to my job.” Another study from the Pew Research Center in 2016 found the same: 65 percent of respondents said that 50 years from now automation would take over “Much” of the work currently being done by humans, but 80 percent thought their own job would still exist in that time frame.
Studies trying to estimate job losses caused by advances in robotics and AI vary wildly.
What counts as “AI” and when is a job “Destroyed” are up for debate.
Historically it’s the cheerier scenario that’s been true: technology usually leads to a net gain in jobs, destroying some professions but creating new ones in the process.
Enough people are saying it is a problem, but not many individuals will look at their own job and think, “Yes, a computer could probably do all this.” This isn’t ignorance, either.

The orginal article.