Summary of “How Tech Companies Can Help Upskill the U.S. Workforce”

In 2015, there were 7 million jobs that required some level of coding skills, and programming jobs are growing 12% faster than market average.
Three key initiatives can help: Supplementing K-12 with vocational training programs, increasing access to job retraining for adults, and empowering lower-skilled workers to continuously “Upskill” on the job.
Vocational Technical training programs for high school students are key to helping them specialize in in-demand technology-related fields, and be ready for the job market.
Increasing access to job retraining programs for adults.
We are currently experiencing intra-generational job disruption, where the job you trained for at age 20 may not exist at age 40.
As a start, we should support job-retraining programs to help transition low-income, lower-skilled workers into well-paying technology jobs.
We need similar programs to serve workers without a post-secondary degree, who are seeking middle-skill jobs.
Empowering lower-skilled workers to continuously upskill on the job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tech companies should stop pretending AI won’t destroy jobs”

First, China has a huge army of young people coming into AI. Over the past decade, the number of AI publications by Chinese authors has doubled.
In China, shared bicycles generate 30 terabytes of sensor data in their 50 million paid rides per day-that’s roughly 300 times the data being generated in the US. Third, Chinese AI companies have passed the copycat phase.
The rise of China as an AI superpower isn’t a big deal just for China.
The competition between the US and China has sparked intense advances in AI that will be impossible to stop anywhere.
As my Uber driver in Cambridge has already intuited, AI will displace a large number of jobs, which will cause social discontent.
Some people argue that it will take longer than we think before jobs disappear, since many jobs will be only partially replaced, and companies will try to redeploy those displaced internally.
“Take the extra money made by AI and distribute it to the people who lost their jobs,” they say.
We need to find the jobs that AI can’t do and train people to do them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “American Giant’s Hoodie Can’t Save US Manufacturing By Itself”

Donald Trump tried to make the deal he struck to save factory jobs at the Carrier HVAC plant in Indiana a synecdoche for his professed concern over the welfare of the American worker.
You might want to want to read a story about American manufacturing; you might say, “Hmm, yes, American manufacturing, very important” and nod if asked about it in a social setting, but the reality of it – how cotton is grown and yarn is made and fabric is dyed and finished, how factory workers do their jobs to maximize efficiency and how plants and mills adapt to innovation and how companies are structured to make the margins possible – is complex and, frankly, boring.
So why is this the unsexy, complicated message that Bayard Winthrop wants to tell me, and for me to tell you, this story about American manufacturing? Why does he want you to read a story about how cotton is grown and how factory workers work and how yarn is made, when he could tell me an easy-to-digest, consumer-centric story about the greatest hoodie ever made?
Winthrop’s goal is to be able to price American Giant’s clothing so that, as he says, the “Gap between virtue and action is nonexistent.” If a customer is shopping for virtue, he or she is probably able to afford these mall brands, which don’t have the made-in-America pedigree American Giant has.
According to Winthrop, the cost of the addition isn’t passed on to American Giant nor the American Giant customer.
As soon as I have the chance, I ask: So, what’s the media missing about the story of American manufacturing, in Bayard Winthrop’s opinion? His answer is about the nature of the apparel industry.
One of the often-told narratives about American Giant is that Winthrop is spearheading an American manufacturing revolution.
American Giant’s real secret in many ways isn’t the well-made sweatshirt or the PR-friendly American supply chain or the loyal customers – it’s the luxury not to be run like other businesses.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 Habits of People Who Are Always Learning New Skills”

Working in online learning, I’ve found that every year around this time there’s a burst of sign-ups from workers seeking new skills.
Having worked in HR at a large banking corporation and in strategic HR consulting, I’ve seen the effects of learning and development on career mobility – and what leads people to let it fall by the wayside.
Over time, working with users as well as learning experts, I’ve found that four crucial habits can make a tremendous difference.
With so many learning options available these days, people are often tempted to simply go to Google, type in some general search terms, and start one of the first courses that pops up.
To ensure relevance, you need to focus on learning the latest emerging skills.
As you get a sense of the most important skills to learn, ask these experts whether they can recommend specific online courses with practical value.
Researchers have found that “The sense of isolation” for some online learners “May make the difference between a successful and an unsuccessful online learning environment.” They call for more synchronous experiences.
You can run into the same issue with online learning.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Amazon Opens Warehouses”

He has tried to get a job with Stater Brothers to no avail, and says there are few other local options but at Amazon or at companies that work for Amazon.
The lack of other opportunities for people like Gabriel Alvarado illuminates the problem these communities face when deciding to offer tax breaks and incentives to compete for Amazon to build warehouses in their towns.
Many people who start out at Amazon warehouses begin as “Pickers.” These are the people who walk through the vast aisles in the Amazon warehouses where goods are stored, and, reading information from a handheld scanner, put items that have been ordered online into yellow bins, called totes.
Another man, a former carpenter who works in the stow department in Moreno Valley who didn’t want his name used because he still works for Amazon, said that without warning, Amazon changed the amount of time workers had to stow an item from six minutes to four minutes and 12 seconds.
At one Kentucky facility, according to Lindsey, the Amazon spokeswoman, there are more than 100 employees who have been with Amazon for more than 15 years.
A report from the Institute for Local Self-Reliance found that Amazon paid 11 percent less than the average warehouse in the Inland Empire; a similar analysis by The Economist found that workers earn about 10 percent less in areas where Amazon operates than similar workers employed elsewhere.
There is potential for Amazon to be the shining knight that city officials hope it will be when it opens in their cities.
Fresno, another economically depressed city in California, offered Amazon $15.3 million in property tax rebates and $750,000 in sales tax rebates to locate a facility there, an offer Amazon was happy to take up.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ten Job Search Hacks Everybody Needs To Know”

If you job hunt in 2018 the way you did in 2005, your job search will last a long time.
You have to adopt a new job search strategy and tactics now!
If you’re not working right now, you can announce your job search status right in your LinkedIn profile.
If a recruiter asks you “How much are you earning now?” answer this way: “In this job search I’m focusing on jobs in the $50K range. Is this job in that range?”.
How To Un-Blind A Blind Job Ad. When you see a “Blind” job ad that doesn’t include the employer name, look for any non-boilerplate language that might identify the firm.
If you find a non-standard phrase used to describe the company or the role anywhere in the job ad, like “One of the midwest’s premier stick dynamite makers,” grab that entire phrase and plug it into a Google search with quotation marks before and after it.
Before you go after any particular job, look up the jobs you are interested in on Salary and Paysa to see what these jobs pay.
Don’t walk into a job interview hoping to make the best of it and answer the interviewer’s questions to the interviewer’s satisfaction.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to know when to quit your job, according to former Netflix exec”

Patty McCord is a former chief talent officer at Netflix.
McCord’s new book is “Powerful: Building a Culture of Freedom and Responsibility.” She devised an algorithm for figuring out if your job is a good fit: You’re doing what you love to do, what you’re good at, and what the company needs.
McCord was the chief talent officer at Netflix, and she now runs her own consulting business.
Toward the end of the book, McCord presents an algorithm that managers can use to determine whether an employee is a good fit at the company.
Individual employees can use the same algorithm to figure out if or when it’s time to move on.
The tricky part of using this decision-making tool is that “The circumstances around making the algorithm true change constantly,” McCord said.
On the flip side, McCord said, if the company moves into a different business or its objectives evolve, the work you’re doing may no longer be crucial.
The algorithm McCord devised won’t necessarily spit out a yes/no answer – at least not immediately.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to know when to quit your job, according to former Netflix exec”

Patty McCord is a former chief talent officer at Netflix.
McCord’s new book is “Powerful: Building a Culture of Freedom and Responsibility.” She devised an algorithm for figuring out if your job is a good fit: You’re doing what you love to do, what you’re good at, and what the company needs.
McCord was the chief talent officer at Netflix, and she now runs her own consulting business.
Toward the end of the book, McCord presents an algorithm that managers can use to determine whether an employee is a good fit at the company.
Individual employees can use the same algorithm to figure out if or when it’s time to move on.
The tricky part of using this decision-making tool is that “The circumstances around making the algorithm true change constantly,” McCord said.
On the flip side, McCord said, if the company moves into a different business or its objectives evolve, the work you’re doing may no longer be crucial.
The algorithm McCord devised won’t necessarily spit out a yes/no answer – at least not immediately.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why American men are getting less marriageable”

Somewhere between 1979 and 2008, Americans decided it was much less worth it to get hitched: the share of 25 to 39-year-old women who were currently married fell 10 percent among those with college degrees, 15 percent for those with some college, and a full 20 percent for women with a high school education or less.
These blue collar gigs were and are special: they pay more than comparable jobs at that education level in the service sector, and they deliver way more than just a paycheck.
Spouses tend to be less happy, more likely to think the marriage is in trouble, and more likely to discuss separation if the wife outearns her husband, as well.
“Either men don’t like their female partners earning more than they do,” Dorn says, or women feel like “If the man doesn’t bring in more money, then he’s an underachiever.”
As manufacturing jobs are lost, there are also increases to mortality in men aged 18 to 39, Dorn says, with more deaths from liver disease, indicative of alcohol abuse; more deaths from diabetes, related to obesity; and lung cancer, related to smoking-not to mention drug overdoses.
The precarious situation that American men face has a lot to do with the nature of the jobs they’re doing.
“The lack of good jobs for these men is making them less and less attractive to women in the marriage market, and women, with their greater earnings, can do fine remaining single,” says Bertrand, the Chicago economist.
Eventually, she adds, gender norms “Will adjust to the new realities” that are already present in the economy: women are getting better educations and are more employable, and the work opportunities that are growing are-for now-thought to be feminine.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Research Shows the Best Resumes and Cover Letters Use These Words and Phrases”

While your resume won’t get you the job you really want, if you’re following a standard hiring process, a good cover letter and resume is necessary to get you to the next stage, the interview.
Researchers at the University of Michigan undertook a study “Systematically examining the impression management content of actual resumes and cover letters and empirically testing the effect on applicant evaluation.”
“1.”Male applicants engage in more frequent self-promotion and use more intense self-promotion tactics than female applicants.
“Job postings that contain more IM-inducing content will elicit more frequent use of IM-relevant words in resumes and cover letters than postings with less IM-inducing content.”
In short, the more frequently an organization uses words like “Excellent,” “Outstanding,” and “Superior” in job postings, the more likely it is to get cover letters and resumes that include those words.
“The less intense self-promotion condition will result in more positive evaluations of job fit and organizational fit compared to the more intense self-promotion and no self-promotion conditions.”
If the job posting is light on superlatives, go light – otherwise your “More intense” self-promotion will be seen as manipulative.
All of which means you can’t create boilerplate cover letter and resume to use for every opening; not only do you need to tailor your skills and qualifications to the particular opening, you also need to tailor your self-promotional language to that of each job posting.

The orginal article.